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Martin's family disputes Zimmerman medical report

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Trayvon Martin’s family is questioning a newly obtained medical report that shows George Zimmerman was treated for a fractured nose, cuts and a black eye one day after he allegedly killed Martin.

ABC News broke details of Zimmerman's medical report on Tuesday.

Court records show Zimmerman had a pair of black eyes, a nose fracture and two cuts to the back of his head after the fatal shooting of the 17-year-old Martin.

“It goes along with Zimmerman's story that he acted in self-defense, because he was getting beaten up by Trayvon Martin," said WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer.

ABC News reported the medical records were part of evidence released that prosecutors have in the second-degree murder case against Zimmerman. He has entered a plea of not guilty and claims self-defense in the Feb. 26 shooting.

The injuries the doctor lists correspond to Zimmerman's account of what happened before Zimmerman opened fire on Martin. However, the report did not say that Zimmerman had been concussed.

Martin’s parents are disputing Zimmerman’s medical report, saying he was not beaten as badly as he claims he was.

 “The testimony is that Trayvon Martin beat his head against the pavement repeatedly for over a minute,” said Martin’s family attorney, Benjamin Crump. “And so, you'd logically conclude that somebody would be concussed.”

The Mayo Clinic said most concussions don't cause unconsciousness and "some people have concussions and don't realize it.”

 But the new medical records also show the doctor wrote that Zimmerman "had a weapon as he is authorized to carry a firearm, and he fired at the attacker, killing him."

Sheaffer said that unrelated statement about the gun could raise questions about the report, which otherwise helps Zimmerman.

“This is going to make what the paramedics, the first responders, observed all the more important,” said Sheaffer. “If their observations are consistent with this doctor's report, then it's going to bolster this report.”

WFTV also learned that Martin had broken skin on his knuckles when he was shot and killed. That could play into Zimmerman's story that Martin punched him in the nose and then slammed his head on the sidewalk.    

However, Crump said Martin had cuts to knuckles, saying, Martin got those injuries fighting for his life.

"It could be consistent with Trayvon either trying to get away or defend himself," Sheaffer said.

Zimmerman shot and killed the unarmed teenager almost three months ago after calling 911 to report that Martin was acting suspiciously.

Zimmerman said Martin threw the first punch and that he opened fire in self-defense after his screams for help went unanswered.

The FBI was not able to determine whether it was Zimmerman or Martin who could be heard crying out for help in 911 calls.

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