CORONAVIRUS:

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Coronavirus live updates: Total US cases surpass 216,000 as death toll tops 5,000

Coronavirus live updates: Total US cases surpass 216,000 as death toll tops 5,000

Nearly 942,000 people worldwide -- including more than 216,000 people in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. Officials are attempting to contain the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. as hospitals brace for unprecedented patient surges. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here.  Live updates for Thursday, April 2, continue below:  Spain’s coronavirus death toll tops 10K after highest single-day increase Update 6:56 a.m. EDT April 2: At least 10,003 people have died after testing positive for the novel coronavirus in Spain, the country’s health ministry announced Thursday. The latest figures include 950 fatalities recorded in the past 24 hours alone, representing the European nation’s largest single-day increase since the pandemic began. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, Spain has reported a total of 110,238 infections and trails only Italy in terms of virus-related fatalities where 13,155 people have died. New unemployment claims could hit 3.1 million Update 6:44 a.m. EDT April 2: Economists anticipate an additional 3.1 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the novel coronavirus pandemic continues to force business closures, layoffs and financial uncertainty. According to The Wall Street Journal, a record 3.3 million people sought jobless benefits two weeks ago, and the 3.1 million surveyed economists believe filed last week comprise more claims than those which have been processed in the past six months. British docs receive guidance on parsing out ‘scarce lifesaving resources’ amid coronavirus Update 5:49 a.m. EDT April 2: The British Medical Association has issued new ethics guidelines dictating which patients should be saved if the United Kingdom’s health system becomes overwhelmed by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Per the new guidelines, ventilators could be removed from treatment protocols for older patients with a low survival probability if the machines mean healthier patients might survive. 'As such, some of the most unwell patients may be denied access to treatment such as intensive care or artificial ventilation,' the BMA’s ethics guidance note states, adding, “This will inevitably be indirectly discriminatory against both the elderly and those with long-term health conditions, with the latter being denied access to life-saving treatment as a result of their pre-existing health problems.' The guidance note was updated April 1. ‘Unruly’ coronavirus quarantine violators could be shot, Philippine president says Update 3:16 a.m. EDT April 2: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte warned during a Wednesday address that citizens who disregard the nationwide novel coronavirus quarantine and become unruly could be shot by authorities. Duterte’s remarks came during a televised address, covered by CNN Philippines. “My orders to the police, the military and the barangays: If they become unruly and they fight you and your lives are endangered, shoot them dead!” Duterte said. Israel’s health minister tests positive for coronavirus Update 2:52 a.m. EDT April 2: Israeli Health Minister Yaakov Litzman, 71, has been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus. The health ministry confirmed Litzman’s illness in a statement issued Thursday. Litzman has held the position for nearly a decade. To date, Israel has confirmed 6,092 coronavirus cases, resulting in 26 deaths. Coronavirus pandemic fueling gun sale background check surge, FBI says Update 2:39 a.m. EDT April 2: The FBI reported a record-setting number of gun purchase background checks during the month of March as the novel coronavirus pandemic continues to sweep across the globe. According to data released by the bureau, the 3.7 million checks conducted in March represent a 41 percent month-over-month surge and the most processed during a one-month period since the FBI began tracking the information in 1998. Illinois led the nation in March with more than half a million federal firearm background checks conducted, followed by Texas, Kentucky, Florida and California, CNN reported. Click here to see the FBI data. Boeing preps to offer buyouts, early retirement amid coronavirus cash crunch Update 2:10 a.m. EDT April 2: Aerospace giant Boeing could soon begin offering early retirement and buyout packages to employees as the novel coronavirus pandemic continues pummeling the aviation industry, The Wall Street Journal reported. Read more here. Biden says Democratic National Convention likely to be postponed amid coronavirus crisis Update 1:28 a.m. EDT April 2: The Democratic National Convention will likely be shelved for several months due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, presidential candidate and former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden said during a Wednesday night webcam interview on “The Tonight Show.”The “I doubt whether the Democratic convention is going to be able to be held in mid-July, early July,” Biden said, adding, “I think it’s going to have to move into August.” The convention is currently slated for July 13-16 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Jazz icon Ellis Marsalis Jr., 85, dies from coronavirus complications Update 1:12 a.m. EDT April 2: Jazz legend and patriarch of a musical dynasty Ellis Marsalis Jr. died on Wednesday from complications associated with the novel coronavirus. He was 85. 'Ellis Marsalis was a legend. He was the prototype of what we mean when we talk about New Orleans jazz,” New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell said in a statement, adding, “He was a teacher, a father, and an icon — and words aren’t sufficient to describe the art, the joy and the wonder he showed the world.”  US coronavirus deaths hit 5,119, total cases top 216K Update 12:20 a.m. EDT April 2: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States surpassed 216,000 early Thursday morning across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, there are at least 216,515 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 5,119 deaths. U.S. cases now outnumber those in any other nation by wide margins, including more than twice the 110,574 reported in Italy and the 104,118 confirmed in Spain. Of the confirmed U.S. deaths, 1,941 – or roughly 40 percent of the nationwide total – have occurred in New York, 355 in New Jersey and 337 in Michigan.  In terms of diagnosed cases, New York remains the hardest hit with at least 83,712 confirmed cases – or more than three times the next-closest state – followed by New Jersey with 22,255 and Michigan with 9,334. Five other states have now confirmed at least 6,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 8,155, including 171 deaths • Massachusetts: 7,738, including 122 deaths • Florida: 7,495, including 100 deaths • Illinois: 6,980, including 141 deaths • Louisiana: 6,424, including 273 deaths Meanwhile, Washington and Pennsylvania each has confirmed at least 5,000 novel coronavirus infections, trailed only slightly by Georgia with 4,748 cases; Texas, Connecticut and Colorado each has confirmed at least 3,000 cases; and Tennessee, Indiana and Ohio each has confirmed at least 2,000 cases. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.

Coronavirus: DJ Jazzy Jeff recovering from pneumonia, fears he may have COVID-19

Coronavirus: DJ Jazzy Jeff recovering from pneumonia, fears he may have COVID-19

DJ Jazzy Jeff may have contracted the novel coronavirus and is recovering from pneumonia, the hip-hop star said in social media posts. According to Billboard, the 55-year-old DJ and record producer, whose real name is Jeffrey Allen Townes, revealed his illness in an Instagram Stories post this week. “I’m recovering from pneumonia in both my lungs ... I lost my sense of smell and taste which is a main sign of the virus,” he wrote, referring to possible COVID-19 symptoms. Jazzy Jeff, best known for his work with rapper and actor Will Smith, also encouraged his followers to take the pandemic seriously. “It does not care who you are ... what you do or what your plans are,” he continued. “Stay safe.” >> See the posts here On Wednesday, Jazzy Jeff echoed the sentiment in a tweet. “I’m good ... lil scruffy but GOOD,” he added. >> See the tweet here It was not immediately known whether he had been tested for the virus. According to the Philly Voice, the updates came more than three weeks after he tweeted: “I’ll be happy when I’m home and I can cough freely ... LOL.” >> Read the tweet here Read more here or here.

Coronavirus: Man accused of spitting on Pennsylvania supermarket employee's face

Coronavirus: Man accused of spitting on Pennsylvania supermarket employee's face

Police in Pennsylvania are searching for a man accused of spitting on a Giant Eagle employee’s face. Aisha Mariner, a manager at the store in Swissvale, told WPXI-TV that she was trying to help a customer who was arguing with a clerk over a transaction. Mariner said she tried to calm the customer down numerous times, but he was irate and wouldn’t stop yelling and cursing. According to investigators, the man – who has not yet been identified – then crawled under the Plexiglas barrier and spat on the woman’s face. Mariner is worried, especially for her family, because her husband and mother are diabetic. “I have to wait and wonder if I’m hurting my family,” the employee said. Police are investigating the incident, and Giant Eagle issued a statement: 'We thank our Edgewood Giant Eagle Team Member, and all Giant Eagle, Market District and GetGo Team Members, for continuing to put their communities first during this unprecedented and uncertain time. How this Edgewood guest acted is wholly unacceptable, and his actions do not reflect the calm, positive and appreciative attitude of so many of those shopping in our stores. “We support the efforts of local law enforcement to take every action to ensure that this individual answers for his careless and disrespectful behavior, and are working closely with our affected Team Member to provide the care she needs and deserves.”

Trump considers airline restrictions between U.S. virus hotspots Looking for ways to stop the further spread in the United States of the Coronavirus, President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that he was considering a plan to limit flights between certain cities which have been virus hotspots, but shrugging off the broader idea of halting all travel in the U.S. by air or rail. 'I am looking at hotspots,' the President said at his daily Coronavirus briefing at the White House. 'I am looking where flights are going into hotspots.' But pressed by reporters about a broader ban on travel - whether airlines or trains - the President indicated that did not seem to be one of his likely choices.  'Closing up every single flight on every single airline, that's a very, very rough decision,' Mr. Trump added. 'We have trains going back and forth, and people don't think of trains,' the President noted. 'It's a very big decision to do that (close them down).' The issue of restrictions on airline travel comes at a time when the U.S. airline industry is seeing record low traffic, as airlines have grounded passenger jets and reduced flights. Data released by the Transportation Security Administration shows a gigantic drop in the number of air travelers going through security at America's airports since the virus outbreak began, as many flights are operating with just a few passengers on board. 'When you start closing up entire transportation systems, and then opening them up, that's a very tough thing to do,' the President said. As for when he would make a decision, the President indicated he would not wait too long. 'We will let you know fairly soon,' Mr. Trump said Wednesday evening.
Trump's contradictory views on China shift as crisis grows
Trump's contradictory views on China shift as crisis grows
Infrastructure often embraced by both parties, to no avail
Infrastructure often embraced by both parties, to no avail
Report: US hostage families seek better government support
Report: US hostage families seek better government support
States largely have authority over when to shut down, reopen
States largely have authority over when to shut down, reopen
Trump considers limits on domestic travel to virus hot spots
Trump considers limits on domestic travel to virus hot spots
Trump warns Iran against attacking US troops in Iraq
Trump warns Iran against attacking US troops in Iraq
Georgia Sen. Loeffler gets renewed scrutiny over stock moves
Georgia Sen. Loeffler gets renewed scrutiny over stock moves
Democrats proposing commission to study US pandemic response
Democrats proposing commission to study US pandemic response
Biden: A normal convention 'hard to imagine' as scheduled
Biden: A normal convention 'hard to imagine' as scheduled
Apply here: How to spend $2.2 trillion — and rescue economy
Apply here: How to spend $2.2 trillion — and rescue economy