ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
66°
Partly Cloudy
H 72° L 44°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    66°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 72° L 44°
  • cloudy-day
    68°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 72° L 44°
  • clear-night
    62°
    Evening
    Clear. H 72° L 44°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Three Big Things
 you need to know
1
2
3
St. Louis police officer killed in accidental shooting, authorities say

St. Louis police officer killed in accidental shooting, authorities say

A St. Louis police officer was killed early Thursday in an accidental shooting, authorities said. According to KMOV-TV, an off-duty St. Louis Metropolitan police officer, identified as a 24-year-old woman, stopped by an on-duty officer’s Carondelet home about 1 a.m. CST. There, she suffered an accidental gunshot wound to the chest, police Chief John Hayden said. The woman, who joined the department more than two years ago, was pronounced dead at the hospital, KSDK reported. >> Read more trending news  “We are deeply saddened to announce that the officer transported to the hospital has succumbed to her injuries,” the department tweeted just before 3 a.m. CST Thursday. “We ask that you keep the officer’s family and the entire SLMPD in your thoughts and prayers as we mourn the loss of our officer and friend.” >> See the tweet here Authorities have not revealed the officers’ names or who fired the gun. Read more here or here.

Teen threatens to blow up middle school, shoot any survivors, police say

Teen threatens to blow up middle school, shoot any survivors, police say

A Georgia teen has been arrested after police said he threatened to blow up a Cobb County middle school and shoot anyone who survived. >> Watch the news report here WSB-TV's Chris Jose was in Mableton, where police say the man emailed the threat to officials at Floyd Middle School on Thursday.  Andrew Brady, 18, was arrested and charged with making terroristic threats. He's being held with no bond.  Police searched Brady's apartment but did not find explosives.  >> Man made social media threat to shoot 3rd-graders for talking about his mom, deputies say Jose said the suspect's family called him and said this is a misunderstanding.  Jose spoke to Ida Swan, Brady's neighbor, who described the huge police presence outside her apartment on Creekside Circle on Friday. 'I was nosy,' Swan said. 'I opened my door and the police were standing right outside there. They were standing right out here by my car, and they were standing there with their hands up.' Jose went to Brady's apartment, where someone partially opened the door but denied police had been to the home.  Police said when they tracked down Brady, they were concerned about electrical wires coming from his car. They didn't find explosives in the vehicle either.  Jose talked to some parents, who said they were upset that they were not notified of the plot.  >> Read more news stories  Helene Howard-Everett has a sixth-grader at the school. She had no idea Brady threatened to harm people. 'You just don't feel safe, like your child is safe anywhere,' Howard-Everett said.  The Cobb County School District said officials did notify parents and sent out this statement:  'If any of our parents did not receive notification, we'd urge them to update their contact information with their local school or at the district office.' They also sent Jose a statement about the incident.  >> Read it here

Senate finally ready to take first votes on ending government shutdown

Senate finally ready to take first votes on ending government shutdown

As the U.S. Senate prepared to cast votes for the first time on Thursday to end the partial government shutdown which began before Christmas, the two parties remained defiantly at odds in Congress over how best to resolve the impasse over the President’s call to fund a wall along the Mexican border, as lawmakers predicted the two plans being voted on in the Senate would both fail to get the necessary 60 votes to advance. “Open up the government, and then let’s talk,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, summing up the main hurdle between the two parties after almost five weeks, as Democrats won’t negotiate until the government is fully funded, while Republicans refuse to fund shuttered agencies until they get a deal on border security. “It’s just pure politics,” said brand new Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL), who accused Democratic leaders of being in favor of doing nothing on border security. Meanwhile, back home, the stories were piling up of federal workers who were in financial difficulty, along with businesses who were feeling the pinch of the shutdown. Hey @realDonaldTrump, we are an American-owned company and we want to distribute a new beer, but the shutdown includes the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau… so we currently can't move forward. Please help. The people want the beer. #beer2020 — Prairie Artisan Ales (@prairieales) January 7, 2019 The first vote the Senate will take Thursday is on a bill which would fund all operations of the federal government, and include the immigration changes proposed on Saturday by President Donald Trump. “I think the President’s plan is a reasonable one,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH). “And that’s why I plan to support it.” “You don’t have to agree on everything in it – but he did put something new on the table,” said Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK), as Republicans decried another round of votes in the House on plans from Democrats to fund the government. “It’s one more pointless exercise,” Cole said – the House will vote Thursday on one more plan to fund the government, this time through February 28; that will make 10 funding bills sent to the Senate. “Ten times now the House of Representatives has done our job and voted, without preconditions, to end the shutdown and reopen the government,” said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA). The latest vote came as hundreds of federal workers who have been furloughed from their jobs rallied in Senate office buildings on Wednesday, as they homemade signs written on paper plates. “Feed my family,” read one. “ENOUGH,” said another. “Do your job,” was one more. The one wildcard on Thursday is on the second vote which Senators will take, on a Democratic plan which combines money for disaster aid with funding for the government through February 8 – some Democrats hoped that a number of GOP Senators would vote for that plan, possibly seeing it as a way to end the deadlock, and pay federal employees who haven’t seen a check since late December. “We always hold out hope,” said Rep. Val Demings (D-FL), as the House and Senate seemed ready to go home on Thursday afternoon without any resolution to the border funding impasse, likely sending it into a sixth week, by far the longest shutdown ever for the federal government. If that does happen, 800,000 federal workers would miss a second paycheck on Friday, as the Senate is not expected to get 60 votes for either of the two plans being voted on Thursday afternoon.

Senate finally ready to take first votes on ending government shutdown

As the U.S. Senate prepared to cast votes for the first time on Thursday to end the partial government shutdown which began before Christmas, the two parties remained defiantly at odds in Congress over how best to resolve the impasse over the President’s call to fund a wall along the Mexican border, as lawmakers predicted the two plans being voted on in the Senate would both fail to get the necessary 60 votes to advance.

“Open up the government, and then let’s talk,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, summing up the main hurdle between the two parties after almost five [More]