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Large flightless bird with dagger-like talons up for auction in Florida after killing owner

Large flightless bird with dagger-like talons up for auction in Florida after killing owner

A large flightless bird with dagger-like talons that was blamed for fatally attacking its owner at a Florida farm earlier this month is heading to the auction block Saturday along with dozens of other exotic animals. >> Read more trending news  The animals are part of the estate of Marvin Hajos, who was killed when he fell in between the pens of his cassowaries, a colorful, emu-like bird native to Australia and Southeast Asia that can weigh up to 130 pounds. Other animals on Hajos’ farm include lemurs, macaws, and Kookaburras. The animals will be auctioned off by Gulf Coast Livestock Auction, according to The New York Times. A friend of Hajos told the Times the group organized Saturday’s auction because Hajos wanted the animals sold after his death.  Original story: A dagger-clawed, large, flightless bird fatally attacked its fallen owner Friday at a Florida farm. Marvin Hajos, 75, was killed by a cassowary after apparently falling, Alachua County Fire Rescue told the Gainesville Sun.  “It looks like it was accidental,” Deputy Chief Jeff Taylor told the Sun. “My understanding is that (Hajos) was in the vicinity of the bird and at some point fell. When he fell, he was attacked.” Cassowaries, like emus are about 6 feet tall. The endangered bird is native to Australia and New Guinea. It is believed their population is about 4,000, according to the Australian government.  It is considered one of the most dangerous birds on the planet. “The cassowary can slice open any predator or potential threat with a single swift kick,” the San Diego Zoo said in its description of the animal. “Powerful legs help the cassowary run up to 31 mph through the dense forest underbrush.”  The man was breeding cassowaries at his Florida farm, state wildlife officials said. The bird was taken to a private location after the incident. It is unclear what will ultimately happen to it.  Florida state wildlife officials say the cassowary can “pose a danger to people.” To obtain a mandatory permit, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission requires cassowary owners to have “substantial experience” and meet specific cage requirements, spokeswoman Karen Parker told the Sun.  The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Child on bike killed by semi-truck in Orange County

Child on bike killed by semi-truck in Orange County

A child has died after being hit by a truck in south Orange County, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Troopers said the incident happened near East Wetherbee Road and Landstar Boulevard around 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. The child was taken to Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando for treatment where he died. FHP also said that it is not clear if the semi-truck driver knew whether it hit the child or not. This incident is not being reported as a hit-and-run at this time. They are still still searching for the involved semi-truck.

A giant potato prop in Idaho is now an Airbnb rental at $200 a night

A giant potato prop in Idaho is now an Airbnb rental at $200 a night

Idaho is known for its consistently high-quality potatoes, and now visitors can sleep in a giant fake one if they can afford $200 a night. As pointed out by the Detroit Free Press, a potato “hotel” the size of a small house is now a place people can stay.  It’s located in a field southeast of capital Boise.  Interested travels can check out its official Airbnb rental page: The actual prop is 28-feet long and made from steel, plaster and concrete.  It was made to celebrate the Idaho Potato Commission’s 75th anniversary, according to the Free Press, and has been on the road for the last seven years until owner Kristie Wolfe decided to let people stay inside. Here’s a video documenting its construction: (Video)

President Trump: 'We're fighting all the subpoenas' Aggravated by the efforts of House Democrats to continue to ask questions about the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump on Wednesday said his administration would not cooperate with those hearings in Congress, as Mr. Trump said a subpoena for testimony by his former White House Counsel was 'ridiculous,' calling on Democrats to move past Russia and on to domestic issues. 'We're fighting all the subpoenas,' the President said, casting the investigative efforts in Congress about Russia and the Mueller Report as nothing more than a political gambit by Democrats to damage his re-election chances. 'Look, these aren't impartial people,' he told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House. 'The Democrats are trying to win 2020.' Before leaving for events in Atlanta, the President again complained that Democrats were still focusing on the Russia probe, even after the release of a redacted version of the Mueller Report. 'I thought after two years, we would be finished with it,' Mr. Trump added, again declaring that the Mueller investigation found nothing. 'No collusion, no obstruction,' he said. Mr. Trump's comments came after a blitz of posts on Twitter Tuesday morning in which he denounced efforts by Democrats to further investigate Russian interference in the 2016 elections, again arguing that only Democrats deserved scrutiny. The President's Wednesday comments echoed remarks he made in an interview with the Washington Post on Tuesday night, in which he said his administration won't help Democrats with what he charged were 'partisan' hearings. On Tuesday, a former White House official defied a subpoena from a House committee to testify about security clearances granted to the President's son-in-law and other officials - despite red flags in their background checks. Tuesday also brought a second missed deadline to turn over seven years of Mr. Trump's tax returns, as the Secretary of Treasury said a final decision on the request would be made by May 6. “The president just made it clear that he is trying to stifle our investigation into his prior conduct,” said Rep. Diana DeGette (D-CO). Several hours after President Trump said he would be fighting 'all the subpoenas,' more evidence of that surfaced, as Democrats said a top Justice Department official had been ordered not to show up for a scheduled bipartisan deposition on Thursday before a House panel. “Both President Trump and Attorney General Barr are now openly ordering federal employees to ignore congressional subpoenas and simply not show up,” said Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), the head of the House Oversight Committee. In this case, Principal Deputy Attorney General John Gore was slated to come in for questions concerning the controversy over adding a citizenship question to the 2020 Census - an issue which has nothing to do with the Russia investigation. “The subpoena that was issued to Mr. Gore was adopted by our Committee on a bipartisan basis,” Cummings said in a written statement.  “Neither the White House nor the Department of Justice has asserted any privilege that would relieve Mr. Gore of his legal duty to comply.” Republicans argued Democrats were making something out of nothing. “Chairman Cummings is trying to insert the Committee into ongoing litigation,” said a GOP spokesman for the Oversight Committee, noting Gore had already appeared twice before the panel.  Still, it would be the second time this week that a Trump Administration official had ignored a subpoena - on Tuesday, a former White House security official who now works at the Pentagon, refused to honor a subpoena for testimony on questions about security clearance approvals for senior White House officials.