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Heads up: I-4 Kirkman Road exit shifts again

Heads up: I-4 Kirkman Road exit shifts again

The ramp on Interstate 4 to get off at Kirkman Road has switched sides again.  The exit used to be on the right, but as of Thursday morning, it is on the left and it comes up a little sooner.  “We are going to have people who are lost, confused probably driving kind of crazy because they don't know where they are going,” said resident Eric Frommer. Special Section: I-4 Ultimate Project Frommer has seen it before. He works at a hotel just off the exit. He said his customers and other drivers get confused when it happens.   If you just got used to the exit on the right on I-4 Eastbound to Kirkman Rd (North), it’s moving again...back to the left. @I4Ultimate will make the change Thursday morning (October 18th) @WFTV pic.twitter.com/ySfxtZbs4j — Racquel Asa (@RAsaWFTV) October 17, 2018   I-4 Ultimate Project spokesperson David Parks said they had to make the two shifts because there just isn't enough space in the area for all the work being done and the lanes need to be open during construction.  Special Section: I-4 Ultimate Project “That allows us time to build three new ramps in a location where one ramp is,” said Parks.  Until then, Frommer knows it's something drivers will have to get used to. “I can't imagine this is going to be good for anyone,' he said.  Photos: I-4 Ultimate project renderings Eventually, some express lanes for the I-4 Ultimate Project will be added.  The shift is expected to last until next summer. 

Acute flaccid myelitis: CDC sees rise in cases, seasonal pattern to polio-like illness

Acute flaccid myelitis: CDC sees rise in cases, seasonal pattern to polio-like illness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting an increase in cases of a rare polio-like illness affecting kids. >> Watch the news report here So far this year, the CDC has confirmed 62 cases acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, in 22 states, and has received reports of 127 patients who are under investigation. >> Read more trending news  The CDC started detecting the increases in 2014. Since, then there have been 386 cases of the mysterious illness, including one death in 2017. Despite the increase in cases, the disease remains rare, with fewer than an estimated one in a million people getting AFM each year, the CDC said. However, it’s not mandatory for health providers to report AFM, so it’s possible there could be more cases. According to Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, most AFM cases occur in late summer and fall. The Associated Press reported that 'similar waves of the same illness occurred in 2014 and 2016,' appearing to follow 'every-other-year pattern.' “As far as we know, it has only been detected in the United States. In terms of clustering in the United States, many states in the U.S. have been impacted by this disease, so we are not seeing geographic clustering in 2018, nor have we seen it in 2016 or 2014,” Messonnier said. >> On ActionNewsJax.com: Florida toddler fighting polio-like disease in ICU, mom says In Jacksonville, Florida, doctors believe Aamira Faircloth, 3, has AFM. She is in fair condition at Wolfson Children’s Hospital. Aamira's mother, Reba, told ActionNewsJax on Tuesday that her daughter suddenly couldn’t walk. “It was just like how a baby learns to walk, and she collapsed and fell to the ground,” Reba said. Dr. Mobeen Rathore, chief of infectious diseases at Wolfson Children’s Hospital, said this isn’t cause for panic, but parents should be aware. “The good news is we know it’s not polio, but unfortunately it’s still happening, it almost looks like every other year, and still affecting children,” he said. Rathore said the most frustrating thing about the illness is 'not knowing what causes it and not knowing how to treat it.' ActionNewsJax's Facebook post about the illness received hundreds of comments, including one from Christina Strickland, who wrote that in 2012 she woke up one morning to find her son “crying laying on the floor screaming in pain that he couldn’t walk.” >> On ActionNewsJax.com: Jacksonville sees first case of polio-like illness affecting children in Florida Other parents on the thread blamed vaccinations – a claim that Rathore disputed. “Absolutely not. There is no evidence. There’s absolutely no evidence that vaccines have anything to do with this,” Rathore said. According to Rathore, there’s also no evidence that AFM is caused by the flu shot.  He said there is something parents can do right now. “Good hand hygiene, good cough etiquette, stay away from people who are sick,” Rathore said.

Missing boy last seen 2 years ago in Massachusetts found safe in Florida

Missing boy last seen 2 years ago in Massachusetts found safe in Florida

A 5-year-old boy last seen in Massachusetts about two years ago was found 1,500 miles away in Orlando, Florida. >> Watch the news report here An anonymous tip sent to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children on Tuesday helped Florida sheriffs locate the boy. Police in Webster, Massachusetts, said Matthew Hale was kidnapped by his mother, Christina Hale, in 2016, first going from New York to her mother's home in Webster.  The child's father showed up in Webster in January 2017 and asked police for help. 'He was from New York. He had paperwork stating he had full custody of his child, and he wanted officers to go with him to keep the peace,' Master Deputy Ingrid Tejada-Monforte said.  When they arrived on Emil Street, they came up empty-handed. 'When they went there, Christina and Matthew were not there,' Tejada-Monforte said. 'They learned she had left a few weeks prior.' Police filed a missing person's report, with posters featuring Matthew and his mother's pictures going up across the area. >> On Boston25News.com: Investigators following trail of trash to help identify newborn baby found dead Seven months later in July, the mother's car was found in Maine. That trail went cold, as the two eventually made their way to Florida to stay with a cousin, authorities said. The anonymous tip led the Florida sheriffs to the home, where an arrest was made. 'She was located down in Florida with a relative, I assume, because it’s the same last name [Warren Hale], and she was taken into custody,' Tejada-Monforte said. 'Matthew was taken into custody of the Department of Children and Families, and they’re working on reuniting him with his father.”  >> Read more trending news  The mother will face a charge of parental kidnapping in Webster, while Matthew's father gets a weight lifted off his shoulders. “For the father, this is a good relief for him to know that his child is OK and is in good health,' Tejada-Monforte said.

In a surprise, Trump to ask for 2020 cuts in defense, domestic spending

After two years of added spending for the Pentagon, President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that he would send Congress a budget plan for 2020 which reduces spending for the military by just over two percent, while asking all other agencies to cut their budgets by a minimum of five percent.

“It will probably be $700 billion,” the President said of the military budget, which Congress raised to $700 billion for this year, and $716 billion for 2019.

Bringing the Pentagon back to $700 billion for 2020 would be a cut of $16 billion – just over two percent; other agencies would [More]