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Bodies of hikers found 30 years after going missing in Himalayas

Bodies of hikers found 30 years after going missing in Himalayas

Two Icelandic mountain climbers missing for 30 years in the Himalayan mountains are now home after an American hiker found their remains last month.  Kristinn Rúnarsson and Thorsteinn Gudjonsson, both 27, were last seen alive Oct. 18, 1988, at a height of 21,650 feet on Pumori, a mountain about 5 miles from Mount Everest on the Nepal-Tibet border. Rúnarsson’s father, Rúnar Guðbjartsson, told the Iceland Monitor last month that the discovery of his son’s body brings the family some closure.  “When people were hugging me and giving their condolences I said, ‘Congratulate me instead, he’s been found,’” Guðbjartsson told the newspaper.  >> Read more trending news Guðbjartsson described his son and Gudjonsson as childhood friends who lived for mountain climbing. They had climbed South America’s highest peak, as well as several North American mountains, before heading to Nepal to tackle Pumori.  The long-grieving father remembers the day his oldest son flagged him down as he drove by and told him word had come that the pair was lost on the mountain.  “It's impossible to describe. It was so painful,” Guðbjartsson told the Monitor.  Rúnarsson’s girlfriend was pregnant when he vanished. “Five months after he was declared deceased, we sort of got him back; he's the spitting image of his father,' Guðbjartsson said of his grandson, Kristinn Steinar. Steve Aisthorpe, a Scottish climber who was part of Rúnarsson and Gudjonsson’s expedition, searched for his friends for weeks before abandoning hope of finding them alive.  Aisthorpe, now a 55-year-old mission development worker for the Church of Scotland, said in a story on the church’s website that the positioning of ropes where the bodies were found suggests his friends either had reached or had almost reached the ridge atop Pumori’s face when they fell into a crevasse. Pumori is one of the more challenging of Mount Everest’s neighboring peaks in the Himalayan range.  The pair ventured up the mountain alone when, 12 days into their expedition, Aisthorpe and a fourth member of their crew, Jon Geirsson, both fell ill, Aisthorpe said. Geirsson cancelled the remainder of his trip and went home, while Aisthorpe descended to a nearby village to see a doctor.  He sent a message back to the expedition’s base camp, set up on the upper Changri Shar glacier, telling Rúnarsson and Gudjonsson to “feel free” while he recovered to make an attempt to summit the mountain without him.  He never saw them alive again.  “I’ve never felt as alone as the day I arrived back at our high camp,” Aisthorpe recalled.  He said he climbed back up to the camp, hoping desperately to find his friends safe there. When he called out to them, his voice was met only by echoes as it bounced on the ice and rocks.  “Even as I finally reached and then unzipped the tent, I still nurtured a hope that the boys would be lying there, comatose, sleeping off the climb of their lives,” Aisthorpe said. “But it was empty and I scanned our route up the steep face above, but nothing moved.  “It was then that my guts started to twist and a cold sweat began.” Aisthorpe called for help, which consisted in part of a helicopter search launched five days after Rúnarsson and Gudjonsson were last seen. He said helicopters in Nepal were few in 1988 and they could not conduct the types of searches that take place in the Himalayas today.  “Looking down into the deep crevasse that guarded the base of the west face, I expected to see a flash of red or yellow Goretex but there was nothing,” Aisthorpe said. “A couple of weeks later, I left the area, convinced that Kristinn and Torsteinn must have fallen somewhere high on the face and their remains swallowed by the cavernous crevasse below. “This was what I explained to their families and friends on a visit to Reykjavík shortly after my return from Nepal.” The Monitor reported that at least one person who saw the pair on Pumori saw them reach the summit before they disappeared. Guðbjartsson told the newspaper that his son told him, in his last postcard, that he could see the peak of the mountain.  Guðbjartsson said last month that he was unsure if the bodies would be able to be recovered, but that it didn’t matter. His grandson, Steinar, agreed.  “He told me that Kristinn and Thorsteinn had told people that if something happened to them, the mountain could keep them,” Guðbjartsson told the Monitor. “They didn’t want to put people in danger to save them. The mountain would take what it was going to take.” Conditions on the mountain have since allowed the pair’s bodies to be recovered. According to Aisthorpe, a group of local climbers brought their remains to Kathmandu, where they were cremated.  Relatives were able to bring their ashes home to Iceland.  Aisthorpe said the discovery of his long-ago friends’ bodies has brought many emotions to the surface. He said he hopes that, with time, it will also bring those who loved them peace.  “My diary of the expedition reminds me of how, as someone who had only recently embraced the Christian faith, I found comfort and guidance as I turned to God in prayer,” Aisthorpe said. “In the midst of the desperate tasks of searching and then leaving the mountain alone, the words of a Psalm were a personal reality -- ‘God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble.’ “I plan to go to Reykjavík in Iceland to meet their families soon and pay my respects.”

VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

Demanding that Democrats accept his call for $5 billion in funding for a wall along the border with Mexico, President Donald Trump sparred with top Democrats in Congress in an extraordinary scene played out before television cameras in the Oval Office on Tuesday, as the President said he would be happy to see a partial government lapse over border security. “I am proud to shut down the government for border security, Chuck,” the President said in what became a bitter back and forth between the President, Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. “If we don’t have border security, we’ll shut down the government,” the President made clear at several points in the photo op, which left reporters stunned as they left the Oval Office. CLIP: Exchange between President Trump, @NancyPelosi & @SenSchumer on border security and government shutdown. Watch full video here: https://t.co/5Y6NEITjCe pic.twitter.com/kVmcJKkEbx — CSPAN (@cspan) December 11, 2018 Several times, Pelosi tried to turn the discussion away from the differences between the two parties, urging all sides to debate in private. But that didn’t work, as the President jabbed at the likely next Speaker of the House. “It’s not easy for her to talk right now,” Mr. Trump said, apparently alluding to Pelosi’s efforts to nail down the final votes from fellow Democrats to make her Speaker. “Nancy, we gained in the Senate,” the President said at one point, interrupting Pelosi multiple times. “Excuse me, did we win the Senate?” Here is the full photo op: One thing left unsaid by the President is that it’s not clear if GOP leaders have enough votes in the House to approve the $5 billion in wall funding. Five of the 12 funding bills for the federal government have already been approved – so any funding lapse on December 21 would impact some – but not all – of the federal government. The military, Congress, the VA, military construction, energy and water programs, health, education and labor agencies have all been funded – but many like NASA, the Department of Justice, Homeland Security, Interior and others have not.

Mueller investigation: Michael Flynn's attorneys to make sentencing recommendation

Mueller investigation: Michael Flynn's attorneys to make sentencing recommendation

Attorneys for President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn are expected to make a sentencing recommendation Tuesday in a case brought by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office. >> Read more trending news Prosecutors with Mueller’s team said last week in court filings that Flynn has been cooperative since he pleaded guilty last year to making false statements to the FBI. In light of his assistance, prosecutors asked that Flynn receive little to no jail time for his crime, an argument Flynn’s attorneys are expected to echo, according to The Associated Press. >> Mueller investigation: Report recommends little to no jail time for Michael Flynn Flynn resigned from his post in the Trump administration in February 2017 after serving just 24 days in office. He pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian officials and agreed to fully cooperate with Mueller’s team.  Flynn is scheduled to be sentenced next week by U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan, according to court records.

VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

Demanding that Democrats accept his call for $5 billion in funding for a wall along the border with Mexico, President Donald Trump sparred with top Democrats in Congress in an extraordinary scene played out before television cameras in the Oval Office on Tuesday, as the President said he would be happy to see a partial government funding lapse later this month unless gets his way on money for to build a wall along the border with Mexico.

“I am proud to shut down the government for border security, Chuck,” the President said in what quickly escalated into a bitter back and [More]