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Before Alyssa Milano, #MeToo began with activist Tarana Burke 10 years ago

Before Alyssa Milano, #MeToo began with activist Tarana Burke 10 years ago

In wake of mounting sexual harassment and assault allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein, Alyssa Milano tweeted a call to victims to share their stories.  “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet,” the actress wrote on Sunday. The hashtag spread far and wide, but Milano isn’t the originator of using the phrase to bring attention to these stories. That credit belongs to Tarana Burke, a New York-based sexual assault, abuse and exploitation activist. >> Read more trending news “It's not about a viral campaign for me,” Burke told CNN Tuesday. “It’s about a movement.” CNN reported that Burke began the movement -- the genesis of which happened in 1996 -- when she was a youth camp director and heard a young girl’s story of abuse. “For the next several minutes this child ... struggled to tell me about her ‘stepdaddy’ or rather her mother’s boyfriend who was doing all sorts of monstrous things to her developing body…” Burke wrote on the Just Be youth organization website. “I was horrified by her words, the emotions welling inside of me ran the gamut, and I listened until I literally could not take it anymore…which turned out to be less than 5 minutes. Then, right in the middle of her sharing her pain with me, I cut her off and immediately directed her to another female counselor who could ‘help her better...’ “I could not muster the energy to tell her that I understood, that I connected, that I could feel her pain,” she wrote, later adding, “I watched her put her mask back on and go back into the world like she was all alone and I couldn’t even bring myself to whisper…me too.” Burke told CNN she began the movement to help young women of color who survived sexual exploitation, abuse and assault.  “It started with young people and I quickly realized adults needed it too,” she said. “When you experience trauma and meet other people that have a similar experience, and you show empathy for each other, it creates a bond.” As of Wednesday, #MeToo continues to be tweeted and shared on other social media spaces, including Facebook and Instagram.  “Somebody asked me, does this (campaign) amplify your work? And it does in a certain way, but also when this hashtag dies down, and people thinking about it, I'll still be doing the work,” Burke told the Los Angeles Times on Monday.  “I think the viral moment is great but the amplification of that -- I worry about disclosing their status as survivors en masse on social media and not having space to process,” she told CNN. “I worry about survivors coming on to social media and being bombarded with messages of ‘me too.” By Monday, Milano tweeted that she was made aware of the origin of the movement. “(T)he origin story is equal parts heartbreaking and inspiring,” she wrote with a link to the Just Be website. Before then, some were critical, Ebony magazine reported. To a number of women of color on Twitter, Milano’s elevation of #MeToo and the day-long Twitter boycott following Rose McGowan’s temporary account deactivation ignored the fact that black women and other women of color are excluded from conversations.  “Where was the boycott when actress and comedian Leslie Jones was harassed by trolls to the point of deleting her account for months?” writer Ashley C. Ford wrote in a Refinery29 essay. “I think that women of color use social media to make our voices heard with or without the amplification of White women,” Burke told Ebony. “I also think that many times when White women want our support, they use an umbrella of ‘women supporting women’ and forget that they didn’t lend the same kind of support.” “I don’t think it was intentional but somehow sisters still managed to get diminished or erased in these situations,” she added. “A slew of people raised their voices so that that didn’t happen.”

Boy, 11, dies in St. Cloud mobile home fire

Boy, 11, dies in St. Cloud mobile home fire

An 11-year-old boy died Wednesday morning when a mobile home caught fire, St. Cloud Fire Rescue said. The fire was reported at about 7 a.m. on Lime Drive in the Golden Grove mobile home park near Orange Avenue and East Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway, firefighters said. Firefighters said two people, including the boy's mother, escaped the burning home, but she was taken to Orlando Regional Medical Center to be treated for burns. Photos: Fatal St. Cloud mobile home fire St. Cloud FD, PD & city fire marshal on scene of mobile home fire. 1 person confirmed dead. pic.twitter.com/FsS6iEGqGu — Johny Fernandez (@jfernandezwftv) October 18, 2017 Read: Police: Masked man at large after robbing St. Cloud convenience store at gunpoint A good Samaritan who was helping rescue residents was taken to a hospital to be treated for smoke inhalation, officials said. It took more than 30 firefighters to extinguish the blaze, the cause of which remains under investigation. Crews arrived at the home quickly because they were extinguishing an unrelated car fire nearby, officials said. No other details were given. Read: 9 Investigates: Osceola County bus driver shortage makes students late Firefighters visibly upset and consoling each other after structure fire in St. Cloud. Waiting on details from PIO. @WFTV pic.twitter.com/eNoF0WISG9 — Dave Ater (@daveotter) October 18, 2017 Watch video below of investigators at the fire:

Person of interest sought in attempted kidnapping at Aquatica

Person of interest sought in attempted kidnapping at Aquatica

Orange County deputies need help identifying a man suspected of involvement in an kidnapping at Aquatica. Deputies released a composite sketch Wednesday of a man who they said is a person of interest in the incident, which they said happened Oct. 12. No other details were released about the incident. Anyone with information is asked to call Crimeline at 800-423-8477.

Get the latest information on what storms are churning in the Atlantic, and the Gulf. 
Get the latest information on what storms are churning in the Atlantic, and the Gulf. 
Get the latest information on what storms are churning in the Atlantic, and the Gulf. 
Get the latest information on what storms are churning in the Atlantic, and the Gulf. 
President Trump leaves both parties confused on Senate health care deal

A day after seemingly endorsing a legislative effort in Congress to formally approve money for insurance companies that would pay for health insurance subsidies for certain consumers, President Donald Trump indicated on Wednesday that while he backed the idea of bipartisan negotiations related to the Obama health law, he did not support a deal on “Cost Sharing Reduction” payments, which he moved to cut off last Thursday.

“If something can happen that’s fine,” Mr. Trump told reporters at a White House photo op about a plan worked out by Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA).

“I won’t do anything [More]