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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

    As a former FBI agent was sentenced to 4 years in prison Thursday in Minnesota for disclosing classified information to the news media, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions hailed the latest court moves against leakers in the federal government, saying the Trump Administration is waging what may be ‘the most aggressive campaign against leaks’ in the history of the Department of Justice. “Today’s sentence should be a warning to every would-be leaker in the federal government that if they disclose classified information, they will pay a high price,” Sessions said in a statement, making clear that government leakers will be ‘prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and punished.’ Terry Albury, the Minneapolis FBI agent arrested for leaking classified information to the Intercept, gets four years in prison. 'We are conducting perhaps the most aggressive campaign against leaks in Department history,' AG Sessions says in statement: https://t.co/QBFKUUiXy8 — Kevin Collier (@kevincollier) October 18, 2018 The Sessions statement came after a busy week on the leak front for the feds: + On Monday, a former employee of the Senate Intelligence Committee plead guilty to lying to the FBI about leaks to a reporter. + Wednesday, a Department of Treasury official was charged with leaking banking activity reports to a reporter which was linked to the Russia investigation. + Today, former FBI agent Terry Albury was sentenced to four years of jail time for leaking national security material to the Intercept. From press reports in recent days, it is obvious that more leak investigations are underway as well. + The Trump Administration has sent a subpoena to an immigration attorney, trying to find out how leaked an internal government memo from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, on how asylum applications would be handled for domestic violence victims. + The charges this week against a Treasury Department employee for leaking “Suspicious Activity Banking” reports shows another official in the same office had contacts with the news media as well. + Earlier this week, Attorney General Sessions told the Washington Times that there were 27 ongoing leak investigations at the Department of Justice. + Back in February, Sessions vowed that the Justice Department was going “aggressively” to find out who leaked information about transcripts of phone conversations involving former Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.
  • A 63-year-old man was shot and killed by police in Monroe, Georgia, Thursday after pointing what turned out to be a replica Thompson submachine gun, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said. >> Read more trending news  The incident happened about 9 a.m., when police responded to a report of a man with a gun, Monroe Public Safety Director Keith Glass said in a statement. The man was identified as Mahlon Edward Summerour, GBI spokeswoman Nelly Miles said in a statement, adding that Summerour appeared to be wearing a curtain over his clothing. “During the encounter, Summerour pointed the weapon at one of the officers,” Miles said. “One officer fired a shot at Summerour, striking him in the chest. Summerour was transported to a local hospital where he later died.” Officer-involved shootings in Georgia in 2018 are on track to surpass the 97 recorded in 2017, according to the GBI. The Monroe shooting is the 73rd such investigation the agency has opened in 2018.
  • The Georgia State Patrol says a man is dead after he managed to fire a weapon that he had hidden behind his back while he was handcuffed during a traffic stop on Interstate 75 in Georgia. >> Read more trending news The shooting happened at exit 293 in Cartersville, near the exit ramp to Highway 411 in Bartow County. Officials say a trooper pulled a couple over around 5 a.m. Thursday and the trooper found contraband in the car. The female driver was taken into custody. Authorities said the male passenger originally gave a false name and, at some point, the first trooper called for backup. When a second trooper arrived, the officers determined the man was a wanted parole violator who had been on the run for months, officials said. The troopers searched the man’s car for weapons and handcuffed his hands behind his back, according to investigators. >> Man carrying replica machine gun fatally shot by police, cops say The man was able to grab a weapon hidden behind his back in his pants and fired at the troopers. One of the officers was struck in the stomach, but protected by a bullet-proof vest.  The troopers shot back at the suspect, authorities said. The man was taken to the hospital and later died, according to officials.  The trooper was treated at the hospital and released.  Authorities continue to investigate.
  • State authorities are investigating a deadly shooting involving police in Monroe, officials said. >> Read more trending news The incident happened about 9 a.m. Thursday in the 400 block of East Marable Street in Walton County when police responded to a report of a man with a gun, Monroe Public Safety Director Keith Glass said in a statement. >> See the latest on AJC.com A 63-year-old man was shot and killed after police said he was carrying a gun that turned out to be a replica Thompson machine gun, WSBTV reported. The scene is about one block from Athens Technical College’s Walton campus. >> See the latest on WSBTV.com It was one of two officer-involved shootings in Georgia on Thursday. The second was reported in Bartow County. >> Suspect shot dead after pulling gun during traffic stop, injuring officer, Georgia State Patrol says Officer-involved shootings in Georgia this year are on track to pass the 88 recorded in 2017, according to the GBI. The Monroe shooting is the 73rd such investigation the agency has opened in 2018.
  • A South Dakota woman who works as a clinical psychologist is accused of trying to kill herself and her 6-month-old son in a car crash out of fear the baby has an attachment disorder, court documents allege.  Julia Jacquelyn Alzoubaidi, 34, of Sioux Falls, is charged with attempted premeditated first-degree murder and abuse or cruelty to a child under the age of 7, records show. The Argus Leader reported that bail has been set at $250,000.  According to the court documents, computer data from Alzoubaidi’s Mazda CX-5 indicate she accelerated from 50 mph to 70 mph just before the crash. She never hit the brakes, the arrest affidavit says.  KELO-TV in Sioux Falls said that Avera Health confirmed Alzoubaidi is a psychologist within the health care system. By Thursday morning, her profile page on the system’s website had been removed.  “Our hearts go out to the Alzoubaidi family during this incredibly difficult time, and we are holding them in our prayers,” Avera Health said in a statement obtained by The Argus Leader.  Sioux Falls police spokesman Sam Clemens said 911 dispatchers received a call around 3:30 a.m. Tuesday about a vehicle that had left Interstate 229 near Minnesota Avenue and rolled into a ditch. The scene of the crash is close to the Big Sioux River.   The court documents say that Minnesota state troopers were first on the scene.  “As they made their way to the SUV, they heard splashing and moaning near the river,” the arrest affidavit said.  One of the troopers found Alzoubaidi facedown in the river under a bridge that crossed a culvert, the document said. He pulled her to shore, where he found her unresponsive, but breathing and shivering.  The temperature at the time was 37 degrees, with a wind chill of 32 degrees, the affidavit said.  Alzoubaidi’s 6-month-old son was found on the bank of the river, wet, cold and not breathing. The affidavit says the troopers began CPR and continued performing it until Sioux Falls fire medics arrived. Both Alzoubaidi and the baby were taken to Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center for treatment. According to the arrest affidavit, the baby was rushed into the pediatric intensive care unit, where he was treated for hypothermia and aspiration pneumonia, or water in his lungs.  Meanwhile, the first responders were unsure if there were more victims in the water. Clemens told reporters the morning of the crash that the uncertainty of the situation resulted in a large response -- 15 patrol cars from the Highway Patrol and Sioux Falls Police Department, as well as two fire trucks and a rescue unit.  “I think part of it was they thought it was going to be a water rescue,” Clemens said. “Both of them had been in the water at some point in time. I think that was probably part of the response.” Initially, first responders also believed more people might have been involved in the crash, but Alzoubaidi’s husband, when reached by police, was able to confirm his wife and son were likely the only people in the vehicle, Clemens said.  See Clemens brief the media on the crash and the charges against Alzoubaidi below, courtesy of The Argus Leader. The troopers noted that all the doors on the SUV were closed, except the door next to the infant boy’s child safety seat, and they determined that Alzoubaidi and her son were not ejected into the water. A suicide note was found in the vehicle, the affidavit says. The note, the contents of which were included in the affidavit, indicated that Alzoubaidi believed her son had signs of reactive attachment disorder.  According to the Mayo Clinic, reactive attachment disorder is a rare but serious condition in which an infant or young child fails to establish healthy attachments with his parents or caregivers.  “Reactive attachment disorder may develop if the child's basic needs for comfort, affection and nurturing aren't met and loving, caring, stable attachments with others are not established,” the Mayo Clinic website says. Signs of the disorder include a failure to smile, a listless appearance, failure to seek comfort or respond when comfort is given, failure to engage in social interaction and a failure to reach out when picked up.  “The prognosis is poor and I couldn’t let him live a life of misery and pain,” Alzoubaidi wrote in her suicide note. “Most kiddos I know with the disorder are institutionalized, suicidal and homicidal and tortured souls. (Name redacted) doesn’t deserve that.” The note also indicated she blamed herself for her son’s condition and believed she’d caused her husband nothing but pain, the affidavit says. Read the affidavit seeking an arrest warrant for Julia Alzoubaidi below.  According to the document, Alzoubaidi told emergency room staff treating her that she believed her son had the disorder because he did not enjoy being held.  “When she picked the baby up, he would cry,” the affidavit reads. “The defendant told the ER staff that her solution was to kill the baby and herself.” Alzoubaidi’s husband told investigators that he did not worry when his wife was not in bed because she often woke during the night to feed their son or pump breast milk, the affidavit said. He did not realize anything was wrong until he was awakened by police officers knocking on the door around 4 a.m. He told officers he was aware that his wife was concerned about the possibility of reactive attachment disorder, but he did not know his wife intended to harm their son or herself, the document says.  >> Read more trending news Alzoubaidi reiterated her concerns when investigators interviewed her in the hospital, the affidavit says. She said the lack of bonding she felt with her son made her feel “inadequate as a mother.” “(Alzoubaidi) sought assistance and advice from her peers and colleagues,” the affidavit says. “This intervention helped for a time, and then she stated her thoughts would eventually turn to ending her life.” Alzoubaidi’s husband told detectives his wife suffered from anxiety and depression, but that she had gone off her medication during her pregnancy and while breastfeeding their son, the document said.  As of Wednesday, both Alzoubaidi and her son remained hospitalized, KELO-TV reported. 
  • President Donald Trump threatened to deploy the military to close the U.S.-Mexico border on Thursday as a group of thousands of migrants trekked toward the border from Honduras. >> Read more trending news Several thousand migrants journeyed from Honduras to Guatemala this week, headed for Mexico and on to the United States in hopes of escaping poverty and violence in Central America. As the caravan strung out from Guatemala City to the border, it was unclear whether those who made it the farthest would wait for their countrymen to arrive to attempt a mass crossing into Mexico. Trump on Thursday demanded in a series of tweets that Mexican officials “stop this onslaught” before it reaches the U.S., adding that, “if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!” The president said the issue is more pressing to him than the recently announced trade deal with Mexico and Canada that’s meant to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. “The assault on our country at our Southern Border, including the Criminal elements and DRUGS pouring in, is far more important to me, as President, than Trade or the USMCA,” the president wrote. Mexican officials say the Hondurans won’t be allowed to enter as a group, and would either have to show a passport and visa — something few apparently have — or apply individually for refugee status, a process that can mean waiting for up to 90 days for approval. Mexico’s ambassador to Guatemala, Luis Manuel Lopez Moreno, met with leaders of the caravan Wednesday and warned them that Hondurans caught without papers in Mexico would be deported.  Immigration along the southern border has sharply increased in recent months after the Trump Administration was forced to walk back a policy that separated migrant families at the border. According to The Washington Post, Border Patrol agents arrested more than 16,600 family members last month, an 80 percent increase from arrests in July. Trump’s tweets came one day before a scheduled meeting between U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, according to Reuters. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Expressing confidence in recent days about the impact of his work for GOP candidates in the 2018 mid-term elections for Congress, President Donald Trump starts a swing out west on Thursday to help Republican efforts to maintain control of the U.S. Senate, as he tries to make the issue of illegal immigration more central to the final days of the 2018 campaign, as the President threatened to use U.S. military forces to closed down the southern border with Mexico. “Republicans must make the horrendous, weak and outdated immigration laws, and the Border, a part of the Midterms!” the President tweeted on Wednesday, as he again blamed Democrats for a stalemate in Congress on immigration law changes. “Our laws are terrible,” Mr. Trump said at the White House. “They’re a laughingstock all over the world.” Hours before leaving on a campaign swing which will take him to rallies in Montana, Arizona, and Nevada over the next three days, the President amplified his comments on immigration with a series of breakfast-time tweets on the subject on Thursday morning. “All Democrats fault for weak laws!” he concluded. I am watching the Democrat Party led (because they want Open Borders and existing weak laws) assault on our country by Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, whose leaders are doing little to stop this large flow of people, INCLUDING MANY CRIMINALS, from entering Mexico to U.S….. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018 ….In addition to stopping all payments to these countries, which seem to have almost no control over their population, I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught – and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!.. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018 ….The assault on our country at our Southern Border, including the Criminal elements and DRUGS pouring in, is far more important to me, as President, than Trade or the USMCA. Hopefully Mexico will stop this onslaught at their Northern Border. All Democrats fault for weak laws! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018 Both the President and Vice President have also publicly called for efforts by the governments of Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico to stop what the Trump Administration describes as a ‘caravan’ of illegal immigrants reportedly heading for the southern U.S. border. “When you look at the border, how bad it is, that’s because the Democrats want it to be bad,” the President told reporters at the White House on Wednesday. “Back to one of his core wedge issues,” political expert Stuart Rothenberg said of the President and immigration. The President’s first stop will be a campaign rally on Thursday evening in Montana, where Republican Matt Rosendale is trying to knock off Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT), who is trying to win election to a third term in the Senate. As the Billings Gazette newspaper noted, this is the third trip to Montana for President Trump, an unusual amount of political attention for the state. . @realDonaldTrump 'apparently has taken a great deal of interest in (Montana's Senate) race. He likes Rosendale. I think he's annoyed by Tester.' #mtpol #mtal https://t.co/aOlDZXymb9 — Billings Gazette (@billingsgazette) October 17, 2018 On Friday the President will hold a rally in Mesa, Arizona, trying to boost the Senate bid of Rep. Martha McSally (R-AZ). Mr. Trump will go to Elko, Nevada for a rally on Saturday night to help Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV). Next Monday, the President will stop in Houston, Texas, where Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) is in a hotly-contested race for re-election. Most of the President’s campaign rallies since Labor Day have been in areas where he won in 2016. The latest polls seem to give Republicans a good chance to hold on to their slim majority in the Senate – or even expand it – a bit different from the House, where Democrats seem to have an edge. “I think I’m helping people,” the President told the Associated Press in an interview on Tuesday, making the case that his campaign rallies and support will turn the tide for GOP candidates in a number of states. “I don’t believe anybody’s ever had this kind of impact,” Mr. Trump added, with Election Day now 19 days away.
  • While there is no known cure for breast cancer, scientists are working on medicine that could be key for treating the disease, according to a new report. >> Read more trending news Researchers from the Mayo Clinic recently conducted a study to develop a vaccine that could eliminate cancer cells and potential disease recurrence.  The vaccine helps the body resist the return of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a protein that can cause breast cancer. It should be used with Trastuzumab, an immune-stimulating drug given to women following HER2 tumor removal surgery. If successful, the researchers believe the vaccine could prevent the cancer from returning and spreading to other parts of the body. Here’s exactly how it works: The vaccination in combination with Trastuzumab works by activating the immune system's B-cells, which attack breast tumor cells with HER2. The process then triggers other groups of cells so that they that promote resistance to the recurrence of the illness.  >> Breast cancer patients may help boost survival chances by building muscle, study says “The vaccine provides a prevention strategy to deter cancer reformation,” coauthor Keith Knutson said in a statement. “The body's T-cells and B-cells synergize with each other for a strong, durable, immune response.” The analysts found the medicine can cause mild responses like fatigue. For future research, they hope to find out how long immunity will last and whether it can be use to help target other cancerous cells. >> On AJC.com: Breast cancer treatment may trigger heart problems, study says “The standard approaches to treating cancer address the existing disease,” Knutson said. “Our goal is to develop a strategy to address recurrence. We have good drugs, like Trastuzumab, that can interfere with the recurrence of HER2 breast cancer. Our hope is that a vaccine that engages multiple aspects of the body's own immune system will build on those successes.” The researchers have received an $11 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for further exploration.
  • A Georgia teacher accused of sexually abusing a DeKalb County middle-school student was found dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound Wednesday afternoon, police said. >> Read more news stories  Zachary Meadors, 28, of Lawrenceville, was found dead in a vehicle in the 1200 block of Scenic Highway around 5:15 p.m., Gwinnett County police said in a news release. He was accused of having an inappropriate relationship with a sixth-grade male student at Freedom Middle School, according to an arrest warrant by DeKalb County police. He faced charges of child molestation, computer pornography and child exploitation, WSB-TV reported. >> On AJC.com: Teacher accused of having sex with middle-school student He was a sixth-grade English teacher at the school in Stone Mountain, and he had worked there for two years, WSB-TV reported. He was placed on unpaid administrative leave on Friday. His parents filed a missing persons report Monday with police after Meadors left letters and an iPad at his parents’ front door. He was last seen Saturday. The missing persons report said Meadors apologized for his relationship with the student and asked his parents to divide his money among family members, WSB-TV reported.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • As a former FBI agent was sentenced to 4 years in prison Thursday in Minnesota for disclosing classified information to the news media, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions hailed the latest court moves against leakers in the federal government, saying the Trump Administration is waging what may be ‘the most aggressive campaign against leaks’ in the history of the Department of Justice. “Today’s sentence should be a warning to every would-be leaker in the federal government that if they disclose classified information, they will pay a high price,” Sessions said in a statement, making clear that government leakers will be ‘prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and punished.’ Terry Albury, the Minneapolis FBI agent arrested for leaking classified information to the Intercept, gets four years in prison. 'We are conducting perhaps the most aggressive campaign against leaks in Department history,' AG Sessions says in statement: https://t.co/QBFKUUiXy8 — Kevin Collier (@kevincollier) October 18, 2018 The Sessions statement came after a busy week on the leak front for the feds: + On Monday, a former employee of the Senate Intelligence Committee plead guilty to lying to the FBI about leaks to a reporter. + Wednesday, a Department of Treasury official was charged with leaking banking activity reports to a reporter which was linked to the Russia investigation. + Today, former FBI agent Terry Albury was sentenced to four years of jail time for leaking national security material to the Intercept. From press reports in recent days, it is obvious that more leak investigations are underway as well. + The Trump Administration has sent a subpoena to an immigration attorney, trying to find out how leaked an internal government memo from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, on how asylum applications would be handled for domestic violence victims. + The charges this week against a Treasury Department employee for leaking “Suspicious Activity Banking” reports shows another official in the same office had contacts with the news media as well. + Earlier this week, Attorney General Sessions told the Washington Times that there were 27 ongoing leak investigations at the Department of Justice. + Back in February, Sessions vowed that the Justice Department was going “aggressively” to find out who leaked information about transcripts of phone conversations involving former Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.
  • A 63-year-old man was shot and killed by police in Monroe, Georgia, Thursday after pointing what turned out to be a replica Thompson submachine gun, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said. >> Read more trending news  The incident happened about 9 a.m., when police responded to a report of a man with a gun, Monroe Public Safety Director Keith Glass said in a statement. The man was identified as Mahlon Edward Summerour, GBI spokeswoman Nelly Miles said in a statement, adding that Summerour appeared to be wearing a curtain over his clothing. “During the encounter, Summerour pointed the weapon at one of the officers,” Miles said. “One officer fired a shot at Summerour, striking him in the chest. Summerour was transported to a local hospital where he later died.” Officer-involved shootings in Georgia in 2018 are on track to surpass the 97 recorded in 2017, according to the GBI. The Monroe shooting is the 73rd such investigation the agency has opened in 2018.
  • The Georgia State Patrol says a man is dead after he managed to fire a weapon that he had hidden behind his back while he was handcuffed during a traffic stop on Interstate 75 in Georgia. >> Read more trending news The shooting happened at exit 293 in Cartersville, near the exit ramp to Highway 411 in Bartow County. Officials say a trooper pulled a couple over around 5 a.m. Thursday and the trooper found contraband in the car. The female driver was taken into custody. Authorities said the male passenger originally gave a false name and, at some point, the first trooper called for backup. When a second trooper arrived, the officers determined the man was a wanted parole violator who had been on the run for months, officials said. The troopers searched the man’s car for weapons and handcuffed his hands behind his back, according to investigators. >> Man carrying replica machine gun fatally shot by police, cops say The man was able to grab a weapon hidden behind his back in his pants and fired at the troopers. One of the officers was struck in the stomach, but protected by a bullet-proof vest.  The troopers shot back at the suspect, authorities said. The man was taken to the hospital and later died, according to officials.  The trooper was treated at the hospital and released.  Authorities continue to investigate.
  • State authorities are investigating a deadly shooting involving police in Monroe, officials said. >> Read more trending news The incident happened about 9 a.m. Thursday in the 400 block of East Marable Street in Walton County when police responded to a report of a man with a gun, Monroe Public Safety Director Keith Glass said in a statement. >> See the latest on AJC.com A 63-year-old man was shot and killed after police said he was carrying a gun that turned out to be a replica Thompson machine gun, WSBTV reported. The scene is about one block from Athens Technical College’s Walton campus. >> See the latest on WSBTV.com It was one of two officer-involved shootings in Georgia on Thursday. The second was reported in Bartow County. >> Suspect shot dead after pulling gun during traffic stop, injuring officer, Georgia State Patrol says Officer-involved shootings in Georgia this year are on track to pass the 88 recorded in 2017, according to the GBI. The Monroe shooting is the 73rd such investigation the agency has opened in 2018.