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The Latest from News 96.5 WDBO

    The saying goes ‘age is just a number’ and this firecracker of a lady proves that all too well. Maggie, a Vietnam War nurse veteran, was preparing to board her airplane at Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport for her Honor Flight when she decided to have some fun. The ‘seasoned’ Vet challenged one of the TSA officers to 10 push ups. The obviously fit Maggie, who still even fit into her uniform, completed all ten without trouble, showing just how much of a bada** she still is. Mobile users see video here. Our own Joe Kelley from Orlando's Morning News is a volunteer guardian for an Honor Flight this Saturday as Joe escorts a 93-year-old World War II vet to see the WWII memorial in Washington D.C. Follow @talkradiojoe on social for a behind the scenes look!
  • U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings has died at age 68, his office announced Thursday morning. >> Read more trending news  According to WBAL, the Maryland Democrat died about 2:45 a.m. Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore 'due to complications concerning longstanding health challenges,' his office said in a statement. The news came one day after the Baltimore Sun reported that Cummings had not returned to Washington after having a recent 'medical procedure.' His office did not say what the procedure was. Cummings, who represented Maryland's 7th District for more than 23 years, was the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee. The Sun described him as 'a key figure in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.' In a statement published Thursday morning on Twitter, Trump shared condolences for Cummings' family. 'I got to see first hand the strength, passion and wisdom of this highly respected political leader,' he said. 'His work and voice on so many fronts will be very hard, if not impossible, to replace!' According to Cummings' congressional website, the Baltimore native graduated from Howard University with a bachelor's degree in political science before completing law school at the University of Maryland. He eventually was awarded 13 honorary doctorates, the website says.  Before he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, Cummings was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1983 to 1996. Cummings' website says he was 'the first African American in Maryland history to be named speaker pro tem.' Cummings is survived by his wife, Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, and three children, the Washington Post reported. After learning of his death, friends, colleagues and other public figures remembered Cummings on Twitter, calling him a 'patriot' and a 'warrior.
  • Only on Orlando’s Morning News with Joe Kelley You don’t usually have to look too far to find fun things to do around Central Florida, and we’ve got you covered by selecting the best of the best each week. Shelley talks through our top weekend picks early Friday morning on Orlando’s Morning News with Joe Kelley. icFlorida Fun 3: Taste of Nona: Diamonds and Denim The 7th Annual Taste of Nona is your chance to enjoy an evening out with a huge assortment of delectable dining options, live entertainment, and a silent auction. This year's Taste will feature more than 30 fantastic regional restaurants, dessert makers and catering services! Each vendor will bring a sampling of some of their most celebrated offerings. All of this is included in every ticket purchased for the Taste of Nona, and Boxi Park will provide cash bars for a full-sized taste of beverages offered by some of the vendors. Want the VIP Experience? VIP Ticket Holders will receive access to the event one full hour before the public: in this hour, VIPs will have the first go at all samples and beverages. Enjoy a private, luxurious VIP Zone and an exclusive cash bar to indulge in full-sized drinks and minimal lines. The VIP Zone is open throughout the event. All the proceeds from the Silent Auction will benefit Nemour's Hospital Children's Health Fund, Lake Nona.  Immerse 2019 October 18 & 19, IMMERSE yourself in an inspiring experience you can't have anywhere else in the world. Now in its seventh year, IMMERSE 2019 will be an even more spectacular display of creativity through music, dance, acrobats, murals, projection experiences, theater, and interactive installations. This global-destination experience in the streets and public spaces of Downtown Orlando bring the City Beautiful to life with hundreds of performances and installations.   Gators, Ghosts, and Goblins at Gatorland  This all-ages daytime Halloween event is taking place the last two weekends in October and Halloween day at Gatorland! Stroll through spooky areas like the “Graveyard of the Darned”, have an encounter with Skunk Ape “the Florida Bigfoot” at the Cryptozoo, then grab your Lederhosen for Frank & Stein’s Ooky Kooky Octoberfest, featuring live music from an undead polka band as well as German beer and food for purchase! And don’t miss the “Monster Movie Madness Show” starring Bubba, Cooter, and members of the audience! Plus animal meet and greets, fun shows, a variety of specialty vendors, games, giveaways and more! All this fun and excitement is included with your regular park admission! This isn’t a trick or treat event, and they won’t be giving out candy. BUT Kids can wear family-friendly costumes if they like. (Nothing scary or gory, please, Bubba and Cooter are easily spooked).   3 More Fun Things:  Gators, Ghosts, and Goblins at Gatorland  Spooky Seas at SEA LIFE Orlando  Halloween Spooktacular at SeaWorld Orlando  Stay in the know about what fun things are happening throughout Central Florida at icFlorida.com. - http://www.icflorida.com/   
  • A letter that President Donald Trump wrote to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been made public. In it, President Trump warns Erdogan to not be a ‘tough guy’ or ‘a fool.’ 'Dear Mr. President,' the Oct. 9 letter began, 'Let's work out a good deal! You don't want to be responsible for slaughtering thousands of people, and I don't want to be responsible for destroying the Turkish economy — and I will.' He continues, “History will look upon you favorably if you get this done the right and humane way. It will look upon you forever as the devil if good things don't happen.” Mobile users see the letter here.
  • The Latest on Brexit (all times local): 3:35 p.m. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker says there will be no extension to Britain's Oct. 31 departure from the European Union. In comments a half-hour after he stood alongside British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Juncker said he was 'ruling out' any new delay in Brexit. Britain's departure from the European Union was initially due on March 29 but was delayed on two occasions after Parliament rejected the previous withdrawal agreement negotiated by Johnson's predecessor, Theresa May. He said there was no longer any reason to delay further, while emphasizing his sadness about Brexit. The ultimate decision on any extension though does not rest with Juncker. It's a decision for the other 27 EU countries. Johnson faces a difficult challenge to get Parliament to back his deal after his allies from a Northern Ireland party, rejected it. ___ 3:25 p.m. Britain's Parliament has voted to hold a rare Saturday session to vote on the government's new divorce deal with the European Union. The vote Thursday was necessary to set up Parliament's first Saturday sitting since the 1982 Falklands War. Johnson's new plan is facing substantial opposition. He will be required to seek a Brexit delay if no deal is passed and legislators vote against a 'no-deal' break with the EU. Lawmakers backed a proposal to make the deal subject to amendments. ___ 3:15 p.m. The next president of the European Union's executive arm says the Brexit agreement between the EU and the British government bodes well for their future relationship. Ursula von der Leyen, who is set to replace Jean-Claude Juncker in December, said the agreement is 'good for people on both side, good for the economy on both sides,' and respects the 1998 Good Friday Agreement that brought peace to Northern Ireland. Von der Leyen, who will attend the two-day meeting in Brussels alongside EU leaders, said Brexit is not the end of something, it's a good starting point for a future relationship.' ___ 3:10 p.m. Donald Tusk, who as president of the European Council will chair the summit of European Union leaders later, has voiced his relief that a new Brexit agreement has been sealed which avoids a chaotic U.K. departure from the bloc at the end of the month. However, he said it is 'not a happy day for Europe.' Ahead of the summit, Tusk told Polish reporters that a 'deal is a much better scenario than no deal.' Tusk said it was important that the deal agreed by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the EU had received a positive response from Ireland and that he would make that his first point at the summit later. Tusk says it's up to Johnson now to sell the deal to the British Parliament which is due to vote on it on Saturday. ___ 3 p.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says U.K. lawmakers should 'get this excellent deal over the line' by voting for the proposed Brexit divorce deal in Parliament on Saturday. Speaking in Brussels alongside European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Johnson said the agreement was 'a very good deal both for the EU and for the U.K.' He said it would allow Britain to leave the bloc as scheduled on Oct.31 'whole and entire.' Johnson's key Northern Irish allies, however, don't agree, The Democratic Unionist Party says it will not support the deal because it treats Northern Ireland differently to the rest of the U.K. ___ 2:55 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron has welcomed the new Brexit deal but warned that the agreement still faces major hurdles in both the U.K. and EU parliaments. Speaking after the new deal between the European Union and the British government was announced, Macron told reporters that 'based on past experience we have to be reasonably cautious.' He noted that a deal can only be secured if both the British and European legislatures back the agreement. The president of the EU parliament is expected to signal later Thursday whether there is enough time for the assembly to give its green-light before the Brexit deadline of Oct. 31. Macron said the deal 'allows us to respond to the political and technical concerns that both we and the British share.' ___ 2:50 p.m. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker says the Brexit agreement reached with U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson means there is no need for a Brexit extension. Juncker said he was 'happy about the deal and sad about Brexit.' The two men stood together and agreed that Thursday's agreement meant there would be no need for Britain to request a new deadline to its official Oct. 31 departure from the European Union. Juncker said 'there is no need for any kind' of extension. Now European officials say it's up the British Parliament to approve the measure. ___ 2:45 p.m. The pound has given up the gains it made after the announcement of a Brexit agreement between Britain and the European Union as a small but important Northern Ireland party voiced opposition to the deal. The pound, which earlier struck a five-month high at $1.2941, was trading 0.3% lower on the day at $1.2789 after the Democratic Unionist Party confirmed it won't vote for Johnson's Brexit deal in Parliament, saying it is not 'in Northern Ireland's long term interests.' Because Johnson's Conservative Party is far short of a majority in the 650-seat chamber, he will struggle to get his deal over the line without the DUP's support. The DUP has 10 votes in the 650-seat chamber and has the potential to unlock votes from hard-line Brexiteers in the Conservative Party. ___ 2:45 p.m. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has welcomed the new Brexit deal negotiated by Britain and the European Union. Varadkar said in a tweet that the divorce agreement allows the United Kingdom to leave the EU in an 'orderly way.' He said the agreement is good for both EU member Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK, as well as protecting the EU's single market and Ireland's place in it. Varadkar's enthusiasm is in stark contrast to the reaction of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party, which says it won't vote for the deal, saying it is not 'in Northern Ireland's long term interests.' ___ 2:25 p.m. Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party has confirmed it won't vote for British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit deal in Parliament, saying it is not 'in Northern Ireland's long term interests.' The DUP says that under plans to maintain an open Irish border, Northern Ireland will be 'bound into arrangements that the rest of the United Kingdom will not' on customs and taxation — something the pro-British Unionist party can't accept. It says that because Northern Ireland's assembly has no say on whether or not the measures are imposed, the deal 'drives a coach and horses through the professed sanctity of the Belfast Agreement' — the 1998 peace treaty that ended decades of violence in Northern Ireland. The DUP is a key ally of Johnson's Conservative government, and without the votes of its 10 lawmakers he will struggle to get majority backing for the Brexit deal in Parliament. ___ 1:45 p.m. German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas has described the Brexit agreement negotiated by the British government and the European Union as 'nothing less than a diplomatic feat.' Speaking to reporters in Berlin, Maas said the agreement 'is proof that we all worked very responsibly together.' However, he cautioned that the deal still needs to be discussed by EU leaders at their summit later as well as the European Parliament. ___ 1:30 p.m. The leader of the Scottish National Party says her party will not vote for the new Brexit deal agreed between the U.K. government and the European Union. Nicola Sturgeon says the deal announced 'would take Scotland out of the European Union, out of the single market and out of the customs union against the overwhelming democratic will of the people of Scotland.' She says in a written statement that her party's lawmakers 'will not vote for Brexit in any form.' The SNP has 35 seats in the 650-seat House of Commons. Sturgeon, who has long championed a second independence referendum for Scotland, says 'it is clearer than ever that the best future for Scotland is one as an equal, independent European nation.' ___ 1 p.m. Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has urged the U.K. Parliament to reject the new tentative deal reached between the British government and the European Union. Farage said Thursday the deal is 'just not Brexit' and would bind Britain to the EU in too many ways. He said he would prefer an extension to the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline to be followed by a national election rather than a parliamentary vote in favor of the new terms. Farage said he favors a 'clean break' with Europe rather than 'another European treaty.' ___ 12:45 p.m. The leader of Britain's pro-Europe Liberal Democrats says the party is determined to halt the Brexit process despite the new deal announced by Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Europe's leaders. Jo Swinson said Thursday she is 'more determined than ever' to stop Brexit and to 'give the public the final say.' The party is in favor of holding a second referendum on the Brexit question. Its policy is also to halt the Brexit process by revoking the Article 50 letter that triggered it if Swinson becomes prime minister. Johnson says Britain has reached a 'great' new deal, but the government is expected to struggle to get it approved by Parliament. ___ 12:35 p.m. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier says that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the EU he is confident he can get a deal through the House of Commons. Johnson had a phone call with EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker Thursday morning and soon after, both sides announced the breakthrough outline deal. Barnier was in the room when the leaders called each other and said Johnson 'told President Juncker this morning that he believed he was able to get the deal approved,' adding Johnson said he was 'confident about his capacity to convince a majority.' ___ 12:25 p.m. U.K. Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn has condemned the Brexit deal brokered between Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the European Union as 'even worse' than the settlement reached by Johnson's predecessor that was repeatedly rejected by British lawmakers. Corbyn says in a statement that: 'From what we know, it seems the Prime Minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May's, which was overwhelmingly rejected.' He says the 'sell out deal won't bring the country together and should be rejected. The best way to get Brexit sorted is to give the people the final say in a public vote.' With Johnson's Northern Irish allies the Democratic Unionist Party currently rejecting the deal, the prime minister will likely need support of some pro-Brexit Labour lawmakers to get the deal through Parliament. ___ 12:20 p.m. The European Union's chief Brexit negotiator says the deal with Britain answers the uncertainty created by Brexit and added 'we have delivered, and we have delivered together.' In a first reaction, Michel Barnier said that Britain now agrees to pay its financial commitments to the EU, something which has been estimated at around 39 billion pounds. ___ 12:05 p.m. EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker says in a letter that member nations should back the Brexit deal agreed early Thursday and that the 27 member states are 'best served by an orderly and amicable withdrawal of the United Kingdom from our Union.' He adds: 'Our hand should always remain outstretched as the United Kingdom will remain a key partner.' 'I believe it is high time to complete the withdrawal process and move on as swiftly as possible to the negotiation on the European Union's future partnership with the United Kingdom,' he said in a letter to EU Council President Donald Tusk Thursday. Even if the United Kingdom leaves by the of the month, both sides will have to negotiate a new trade agreement for years to come. ___ 12 p.m. Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party says it remains opposed to the outline Brexit deal struck between the U.K. and the European Union. The party, a key ally of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, says it stands by a statement issued earlier by leader Arlene Foster and her deputy Nigel Dodds. They said the DUP 'could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues.' The party said Thursday its position had not changed. Arrangements are key to guaranteeing an open border between the U.K.'s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland, which has been the main obstacle to a Brexit deal. Without the support of the DUP's 10 lawmakers, Johnson may struggle to get his deal ratified by the U.K. Parliament. ___ 11:50 a.m. The pound has surged on news that the European Union and Britain have reached a provisional deal on Brexit. The currency, which has been volatile over the past week on conflicting reports of progress, jumped to $1.2934 from $1.2805 earlier in the morning. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker tweeted 'We have one! It's a fair and balanced agreement for the EU and the UK and it is testament to our commitment to find solutions.' British Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeted that the two sides had struck a 'great new deal' and urged U.K. lawmakers to ratify it in a special session on Saturday. ___ 11:45 a.m. European Union and British negotiators have agreed on an outline Brexit deal which still needs to be backed by EU member states and by the respective parliaments. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker tweeted 'We have one! It's a fair and balanced agreement for the EU and the UK and it is testament to our commitment to find solutions.' British Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeted that the two sides had struck a 'great new deal' and urged U.K. lawmakers to ratify it in a special session on Saturday. Juncker said he would recommend the 27 EU nations to endorse the deal during their summit later Thursday. ___ 11:15 a.m. An election for Gibraltar's 17-seat parliament is taking place under a cloud of uncertainty about what Brexit will bring for the speck of British territory on Spain's southern tip. The Rock's about 34,000 residents didn't want to leave the European Union — in the 2016 referendum, 96% voted to stay. But they are bracing to be hit hard by it. Gibraltar relies heavily on thousands of European workers who every day cross the border from Spain, which is in the EU. The international operations of online gambling companies, whose operations account for around 25% of Gibraltar's economy, need access to the EU market. The Socialist Labour Party is seeking a third consecutive term in government in Thursday's ballot. Results are expected early Friday. ___ 10:20 a.m. European Union nations are still waiting for a text of any tentative agreement between the EU and the Britain only hours before the start of a key EU summit. A senior EU official said that 'we didn't get the text of an agreement between the (European) Commission and the UK government,' making it impossible for the EU member states to assess it. The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the talks were still going on, said that the member states 'will have to consider our options in light of the situation. Maybe we will have a deal, maybe not.' --By Lorne Cook. ___ 10:10 a.m. The European Union says Brexit negotiations are plowing on after intense talks in recent days, as EU leaders converge on Brussels for a key summit aimed at sealing a new divorce agreement. European Commission spokeswoman Mina Andreeva tweeted Thursday that 'contacts between EU and U.K. teams are continuing.' She says European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has just spoken to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson as both sides strive to finalize a new divorce deal within hours. Andreeva says that 'every hour and minute counts' prior to the summit, set to start at around 1300 GMT (9 a.m. EDT), and is underlining that 'we want a deal. The U.K. is currently due to leave the EU on Oct. 31. ___ 10 a.m. A British government minister says negotiations will continue to hammer out a Brexit deal after a key ally, the Democratic Unionist Party, said it can't support the current draft. Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick told the BBC: 'We're working very intensively... to try and secure a deal.' Jenrick says the government wants to provide 'sufficient comfort for the DUP and unionists in Northern Ireland to feel that the arrangements we would put in place with this deal are sufficient to give them comfort to support it.' He says Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his team will keep negotiating 'with all parties, including with the DUP.' Johnson is scheduled to travel to Brussels later Thursday for a European Union summit at which leaders hope to approve a Brexit deal. ___ 9:30 a.m. German Chancellor Angela Merkel says that an agreement on Brexit is still possible, but that it hasn't yet been reached. Merkel said Thursday in parliament that 'we're on a better path than before, but we have not yet reached the goal.' Merkel gave a speech in Germany's Reichstag before traveling to Brussels to attend a European Union summit on Brexit. She stressed that an 'agreement is still possible,' which is, 'why we need to continue to do everything to bring the negotiations to a successful end.' ___ 8:10 a.m. The leaders of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's key Northern Ireland ally say they can't support the draft Brexit deal struck between the government and the European Union. Support from the Democratic Unionist Party is key to Johnson's plan to get an agreement approved by parliament. But DUP leader Arlen Foster and the party's parliamentary chief Nigel Dodds say they 'could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues.' Those arrangements are key to guaranteeing an open border between the U.K.'s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland — the main obstacle to a Brexit deal. Without the DUP's support, any deal is unlikely to be ratified by the U.K. Parliament. Foster and Dodds said they would continue to work with the U.K. government to get a 'sensible' deal. ___ 7:30 a.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his 27 counterparts from across the European Union are converging on Brussels for a summit they hope will finally lay to rest the acrimony and frustration of a three-year divorce fight. Yet high anxiety still reigned on Thursday morning with the last outstanding issues of the divorce papers still unclear and Johnson uncertain whether his allies at home will back the compromises he needs to make a deal. Technical negotiators again went into the night Wednesday to fine tune customs and VAT regulations that will have to regulate trade in goods between the Northern Ireland and Ireland, where the UK and the EU share their only land border. The summit starts midafternoon and is slated to end some 24 hours later.
  • Orlando’s real estate market saw another month of increased sales and higher prices in September.  That’s according to the latest housing report from the Orlando Regional Realtor Association.  Year-over-year, Orlando saw increases in both sales and median price.   Orlando realtors participated in 2,972 sales during the month of September, a 7.1% increase year-over-year compared to sales in September of 2018. The overall median sale price for September was $245,000, which is 5.2% above the median price recorded one year ago. ORRA president Jeff Fagan spoke to News 96.5 WDBO about the report and says the numbers point toward a strong real estate market. “The market, again, is healthy.  We always could use more inventory.  We did drop in inventory for a second consecutive month.  However, it’s an indication that sales remain strong, fueled mostly by the continued decrease in interest rates that we’ve seen all year,” said Fagan.  September’s sales and median home price were both lower than numbers recorded in August of this year. Read the full report by clicking HERE.
  • Several veterans charity groups in Central Florida are spreading awareness of their services following a troubling VA report on veteran suicides. Last week, the Department of Veterans Affairs released a report showing at least 60,000 veterans committed suicide between 2008 and 2017. In 2017, more than 6,100 veterans died by suicide, and increase of two percent over 2017 and six percent since 2008. K9 Partners for Patriots “When I came back from those [Iraq] deployments, something was off but I couldn’t place my hand on it,” said Ron Flaville. Ron Flaville is the new CEO of a veterans charity group called K9 Partners for Patriots which is based in Brooksville, Florida.  He spent 17 years in the military (Marine Corps and Army) and deployed to Iraq in 2004 and 2009.  He was diagnosed with PTSD while in service, but he says it got worse when he got out and moved to Central Florida with his wife. “I started isolating really bad,” Flaville said.  “I was suffering with bits of depression, anxiety and outbursts of rage.” Flaville said his wife pushed him to get a dog, and later to begin training her to be his service animal.  The two met Mary Peter who was then a dog trainer and would later go on to start K9 Partners for Patriots. Flaville said he went from a reclusive life and a troubled marriage to being a dog trainer.  He said it became the mission and challenge he needed. “Over the years I’ve developed better coping mechanisms, and having Sophia is what has allowed me to be able to do that.” Flaville said he’s noticed a “180 degree change” in the veterans who go through their program, which involves instructing veterans in how to train their dogs to become service animals.  Flaville himself went from taking 14 medications to now four. How do the dogs help?  If a veterans is having a nightmare during their sleep, their trained dog will come over to lick or paw them to wake them up, which is safer than having a person wake them up. If a veteran is having an anxiety attack or an episode of rage, the dogs try to turn the focus to them. But a service animal may not be for every veteran. Camaraderie Foundation Orlando-based veterans charity Camaraderie Foundation provides mental health counseling for veterans suffering from PTSD or TBI. “Different types of therapies that are accepted and approved by our medical-advisory council,” said CEO Nef Rodriguez.  Rodriguez said Camaraderie Foundation has an 87 percent success rate. “We got EMDR as one, accelerated resolution therapy is another, and we have cognitive behavioral therapies.” Both Rodriguez and Flaville said their programs have helped veterans get off of prescription medications that weren’t working for them. Flaville urges veterans who are struggling to not lose hope. “I know it’s easy to get caught up in the depression and thinking that nothing will ever go right.  I am here to tell you a hundred percent that it can. Do not give up.” There are many other veterans charity groups in Florida, such as 22 Project, aiming to provide alternative therapies for veterans who are suffering. (App users click here to see video) (App users click here)
  • A woman is recovering from severe smoke inhalation after she woke up to her a fire in her apartment. Orange County Fire Rescue says it happened at the Cranes Landing on Goldenrod Rd. in Winter Park this morning. In her call to 911, the 32-year-old woman is coughing and says she had no idea how the fire started. Listen to that 911 call here. Firefighters rescued her cat and five other cats from the unit above hers.  The state fire investigator found it was caused by a pot on the stove left on. App users, see video of the fire’s aftermath here on the Orange County Fire Rescue Twitter page.
  • On the picket lines at a General Motors transmission plant in Toledo, Ohio, passing cars honked and striking workers celebrated a tentative contract deal by munching on 10 pizzas dropped off by a supporter. They had carried signs for 31 days and demonstrated the muscle the United Auto Workers union still has over Detroit's three manufacturers. Details of the four-year pact weren't released, but GM's latest offer to end the monthlong strike included wage increases and lump-sum payments, top-notch health insurance at little cost to workers, promises of new products for many U.S. factories and a path to full-time work for temporary workers. That's a big difference from what GM wanted going into the talks: to slash total labor costs at its factories, which are about $13 per hour higher than at foreign automakers in the U.S. Terry Dittes, the UAW's chief bargainer with GM, said the deal offers 'major gains' for 49,000 union workers who have been walking picket lines since Sept. 16. They'll stay off work for at least a couple more days while union committees decide if they will bless the deal. Then workers will have to vote on it. The deal shows that the union, with less than one-third of the 1.5 million members it had at its peak in 1979, still has a lot of clout with GM, Ford and Fiat Chrysler. 'I think economically the UAW will do just fine in this agreement,' said Art Schwartz, a former GM negotiator who now is a labor consultant in Michigan. 'The union certainly still has power in this industry.' President Donald Trump called UAW President Gary Jones on Wednesday night, but union spokesman Brian Rothenberg said he did not know what the men discussed. The strike immediately brought GM's U.S. factories to a halt, and within a week, started to hamper production in Mexico and Canada. Analysts at KeyBanc investment services estimated the stoppage cut GM vehicle production by 250,000 to 300,000 vehicles. That's too much for the company to make up with overtime or increased assembly line speeds. Analysts say the costs to GM will hit around $2 billion. Workers, on the other hand, lost north of $3,000 each on average, the difference between their base wages and $250 per week in strike pay from the union. 'It's nice to see there's a deal, but without knowing the details I'm a little skeptical because we don't know the highlights or the lowlights,' said worker Nick Kuhlman, who was among the strikers huddled around a burn barrel on a blustery, gray Toledo afternoon. 'I just hope it gets done,' said Toledo worker Mark Nichols, who thought the strike would last only a week or two and was ready to get back to work because his savings are running low. GM apparently was able to close three of four factories that it wanted to shutter to get rid of excess capacity in slow-selling cars and components. The Detroit-Hamtramck plant will get a new electric pickup truck and stay open, but factories in Lordstown, Ohio; Warren, Michigan; and near Baltimore are to be closed. The Lordstown area will get an electric vehicle battery factory, but it won't have nearly as many workers as the assembly plant that for years made compact GM cars. The deal now will be used as a template for talks with GM's crosstown rivals, Ford and Fiat Chrysler. Normally the major provisions carry over to the other two companies and cover about 140,000 auto workers nationwide. It wasn't clear which company the union would bargain with next, or whether there would be another strike. Schwartz said depending on the contents, the GM contract could influence wages and benefits in other industries. But he said foreign automakers with U.S. factories, mainly in the South, will give modest pay raises regardless of the GM contract, and shouldn't be affected much. Clarence Trinity, a worker at GM's engine and transmission plant in the Detroit suburb of Romulus, Michigan, said the deal sounds good, 'but I have to see it in writing or hear from the leaders.' Trinity said he can't figure out why it took 31 days for the strike to end. 'I don't understand what General Motors was expecting to get out of us. Maybe they didn't expect us to strike. Maybe they didn't expect us to strike this long.' If all of the committees bless the deal, it's likely to take several days for GM to get its factories restarted. Matt Himes, a worker at the GM plant in Spring Hill, Tennessee, heard news of the deal in Ohio, where he's trying to help his wife sell their house after the Lordstown GM plant where he used to work was shuttered. He hopes good news keeps coming. If they can sell their house, his wife can finally move south with him. 'I'm proud that we stuck our ground and everybody stuck together,' Himes said of the union workers during a phone interview. 'And I'm relieved that hopefully it worked out, got us a good contract and we can move on and get back to work making cars like we should be.' Wall Street investors liked news that the strike could end. GM shares jumped 2.6% just after the news broke, but eased back to close up 1% at $36.65.  GM and the union have been negotiating at a time of troubling uncertainty for the U.S. auto industry. Driven up by the longest economic expansion in American history, auto sales appear to have peaked and are now heading in the other direction. GM and other carmakers are also struggling to make the transition to electric and autonomous vehicles. Meanwhile, President Donald Trump's trade war with China and his tariffs on imported steel and aluminum have raised costs for auto companies. A revamped North American free trade deal is stalled in Congress, raising doubts about the future of America's trade in autos and auto parts with Canada and Mexico, which last year came to $257 billion. Amid that uncertainty, GM workers have wanted to lock in as much as they can before things get ugly. They argue that they had given up pay raises and made other concessions to keep GM afloat during its 2009 trip through bankruptcy protection. Now that GM has been nursed back to health — earning $2.42 billion in its latest quarter — they wanted a bigger share. The union's bargainers have voted to recommend the deal to the UAW International Executive Board, which will vote on the agreement. Union leaders from factories nationwide will travel to Detroit for a vote on Thursday. The earliest workers could return would be after that. In past years, it's taken a minimum of three or four days and as long as several weeks for the national ratification vote. This time around — with a federal corruption investigation that has implicated the past two UAW presidents and brought convictions of five union officials — many union members don't trust the leadership. But they're also tired of striking and may return before they vote on the deal themselves. The strike had shut down 33 GM manufacturing plants in nine states across the U.S., and also took down factories in Canada and Mexico. It was the first national strike by the union since a two-day walkout in 2007, and the longest since a 54-day strike in Flint, Michigan, in 1998 that also halted most of GM's production. ____ Associated Press writers Mike Householder in Detroit, John Seewer in Toledo, Ohio, and Jonathan Mattise in Nashville, Tennessee, contributed to this report.
  • An underage Iowa man has been arrested for using a fake ID that claimed he was McLovin from the film 'Superbad.' 20-year-old Daniel Burleson was partying at Iowa City's Airliner Bar over the weekend when an officer, who thought Burleson looked a little young, asked to see his ID, police say. After handing over his real driver's license, the cop asked for the ID that got him into the bar. Although Burleson claimed he didn't have a fake ID, he 'pulled out his wallet and began shuffling through the wallet and police could see fake Hawaii ID with the name 'McLovin -- Date of Birth: 06/03/1981,' according to his arrest report. The ID is an exact copy of one used by actor Christopher Mintz-Plasse in the 2007 movie 'Superbad.'  Mobile users see clip here. Burleson admitted he bought the phony ID on Amazon, which sells them for $6.97 each. He was taken into custody and charged with many things, including possession of a fictitious license.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • The saying goes ‘age is just a number’ and this firecracker of a lady proves that all too well. Maggie, a Vietnam War nurse veteran, was preparing to board her airplane at Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport for her Honor Flight when she decided to have some fun. The ‘seasoned’ Vet challenged one of the TSA officers to 10 push ups. The obviously fit Maggie, who still even fit into her uniform, completed all ten without trouble, showing just how much of a bada** she still is. Mobile users see video here. Our own Joe Kelley from Orlando's Morning News is a volunteer guardian for an Honor Flight this Saturday as Joe escorts a 93-year-old World War II vet to see the WWII memorial in Washington D.C. Follow @talkradiojoe on social for a behind the scenes look!
  • U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings has died at age 68, his office announced Thursday morning. >> Read more trending news  According to WBAL, the Maryland Democrat died about 2:45 a.m. Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore 'due to complications concerning longstanding health challenges,' his office said in a statement. The news came one day after the Baltimore Sun reported that Cummings had not returned to Washington after having a recent 'medical procedure.' His office did not say what the procedure was. Cummings, who represented Maryland's 7th District for more than 23 years, was the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee. The Sun described him as 'a key figure in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.' In a statement published Thursday morning on Twitter, Trump shared condolences for Cummings' family. 'I got to see first hand the strength, passion and wisdom of this highly respected political leader,' he said. 'His work and voice on so many fronts will be very hard, if not impossible, to replace!' According to Cummings' congressional website, the Baltimore native graduated from Howard University with a bachelor's degree in political science before completing law school at the University of Maryland. He eventually was awarded 13 honorary doctorates, the website says.  Before he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, Cummings was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1983 to 1996. Cummings' website says he was 'the first African American in Maryland history to be named speaker pro tem.' Cummings is survived by his wife, Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, and three children, the Washington Post reported. After learning of his death, friends, colleagues and other public figures remembered Cummings on Twitter, calling him a 'patriot' and a 'warrior.
  • Only on Orlando’s Morning News with Joe Kelley You don’t usually have to look too far to find fun things to do around Central Florida, and we’ve got you covered by selecting the best of the best each week. Shelley talks through our top weekend picks early Friday morning on Orlando’s Morning News with Joe Kelley. icFlorida Fun 3: Taste of Nona: Diamonds and Denim The 7th Annual Taste of Nona is your chance to enjoy an evening out with a huge assortment of delectable dining options, live entertainment, and a silent auction. This year's Taste will feature more than 30 fantastic regional restaurants, dessert makers and catering services! Each vendor will bring a sampling of some of their most celebrated offerings. All of this is included in every ticket purchased for the Taste of Nona, and Boxi Park will provide cash bars for a full-sized taste of beverages offered by some of the vendors. Want the VIP Experience? VIP Ticket Holders will receive access to the event one full hour before the public: in this hour, VIPs will have the first go at all samples and beverages. Enjoy a private, luxurious VIP Zone and an exclusive cash bar to indulge in full-sized drinks and minimal lines. The VIP Zone is open throughout the event. All the proceeds from the Silent Auction will benefit Nemour's Hospital Children's Health Fund, Lake Nona.  Immerse 2019 October 18 & 19, IMMERSE yourself in an inspiring experience you can't have anywhere else in the world. Now in its seventh year, IMMERSE 2019 will be an even more spectacular display of creativity through music, dance, acrobats, murals, projection experiences, theater, and interactive installations. This global-destination experience in the streets and public spaces of Downtown Orlando bring the City Beautiful to life with hundreds of performances and installations.   Gators, Ghosts, and Goblins at Gatorland  This all-ages daytime Halloween event is taking place the last two weekends in October and Halloween day at Gatorland! Stroll through spooky areas like the “Graveyard of the Darned”, have an encounter with Skunk Ape “the Florida Bigfoot” at the Cryptozoo, then grab your Lederhosen for Frank & Stein’s Ooky Kooky Octoberfest, featuring live music from an undead polka band as well as German beer and food for purchase! And don’t miss the “Monster Movie Madness Show” starring Bubba, Cooter, and members of the audience! Plus animal meet and greets, fun shows, a variety of specialty vendors, games, giveaways and more! All this fun and excitement is included with your regular park admission! This isn’t a trick or treat event, and they won’t be giving out candy. BUT Kids can wear family-friendly costumes if they like. (Nothing scary or gory, please, Bubba and Cooter are easily spooked).   3 More Fun Things:  Gators, Ghosts, and Goblins at Gatorland  Spooky Seas at SEA LIFE Orlando  Halloween Spooktacular at SeaWorld Orlando  Stay in the know about what fun things are happening throughout Central Florida at icFlorida.com. - http://www.icflorida.com/   
  • Authorities in Indiana said a baby is alive and well after someone discovered the child inside a plastic bag near a fence in Seymour. >> Read more trending news  According to the Tribune and WAVE-TV, police responded to a call about the infant just before 4 p.m. Tuesday. A resident, who had been walking a dog off South Jackson Park Drive, found the child about 20 feet away from the street, investigators said. Here are the latest updates: Update 6:59 a.m. EDT Oct. 17: Investigators are questioning a man after a newborn baby was found alive inside a plastic bag on Tuesday, the Tribune reported Wednesday. Police also described the girl as Latina, according to the newspaper. Meanwhile, the woman who found the infant told WAVE-TV that she initially thought the bag contained kittens. 'I got to looking more, and it was a baby’s foot trying to press against the plastic bag,' Angela Butler said in an interview with the news outlet. 'And I said, ‘Oh my God, that is a baby.'' Update 2:10 p.m. EDT Oct. 16: Investigators told WDRB that it was unclear how long the infant was left outside before she was discovered Tuesday afternoon. 'I don't think we can tell how long she was there when she was found,' Seymour Police Detective Sgt. C.J. Foster told The Tribune. 'I just know that she was a few hours old.' The newspaper reported the infant was identified as a baby girl. Foster told WAVE the baby was found in an area off the roadway that was not easily visible. He told The Tribune the person who found the infant was walking a dog at the time and that the pooch 'kind of led them to that area.' The baby, who was determined to be healthy, has since been taken to Schneck Medical Center in Seymour for an examination, The Tribune reported. “We do not know where either of the parents are,” Foster told the newspaper. “We are still digging.” Original report: Crews rushed the baby to a nearby hospital, the news outlets reported. Doctors said the child is healthy, according to WAVE. Seymour police said they made contact Wednesday with a person of interest in the case. They emphasized the person was not a suspect in the investigation. Authorities have not yet made any arrests in connection with the incident, the Tribune reported. Read more here or here.
  • A letter that President Donald Trump wrote to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been made public. In it, President Trump warns Erdogan to not be a ‘tough guy’ or ‘a fool.’ 'Dear Mr. President,' the Oct. 9 letter began, 'Let's work out a good deal! You don't want to be responsible for slaughtering thousands of people, and I don't want to be responsible for destroying the Turkish economy — and I will.' He continues, “History will look upon you favorably if you get this done the right and humane way. It will look upon you forever as the devil if good things don't happen.” Mobile users see the letter here.

Washington Insider

  • Capitol Hill on Thursday was mourning the unexpected death of Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, as lawmakers in both parties saluted the veteran Chairman of the House Oversight Committee, who died early this morning at a hospice facility in his home town of Baltimore. Cummings had risen to the forefront of Congress in recent months as part of Democratic Party efforts in the U.S. House to investigate President Donald Trump and his administration. “When the history books are written about this tumultuous era, I want them to show that I was among those in the House of Representatives who stood up to lawlessness and tyranny,” Cummings said last month about his support for the impeachment of President Trump. 'The Congress and the nation have lost one of the great ones,' said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-VA). 'This is a heartbreaking loss for Baltimore, Congress, and our entire country,' said Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL). 'Elijah Cummings was a good friend and a powerful advocate for what he believed,' said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO). First elected to Congress in 1966, Cummings had in recent years become the top Democrat on the House Oversight Committee, sparring first with Republican investigations of the Obama Administration, and then taking the lead on investigations of President Trump and his administration. “The news that our friend and colleague Elijah Cummings has passed away marks a sad day for the members of the United States Congress, the people of Baltimore, and the entire nation,” said Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY). In a statement released by aides to Cummings, his staff gave few details on his health troubles, saying that Cummings had died around 2:30 am on Thursday, in a hospice care facility, where the Maryland Democrat had been treated for 'longstanding health challenges.'  It had been obvious to reporters in recent months that Cummings was facing some sort of health challenge, as he was using a wheelchair in the halls of Congress, and then a walker to make his way on to the floor of the House. But in interviews with reporters in the Speaker's Lobby just off the House floor, his voice still seemed strong, and gave no hint of immediate medical troubles. 'We're going to uphold the rule of law,' Cummings told me and other reporters in mid-May, as he outlined efforts to get information from the White House, which were routinely stonewalled by the Trump Administration. Cummings had returned after Labor Day, but had missed most votes after mid-September. Earlier this year, Cummings had drawn the ire of President Trump over investigations of the White House, as Mr. Trump called the Maryland Democrat a racist. “His loss will be felt across our country,” said Rep. Chrissy Houlihan (D-PA). Throughout the Mueller investigation - and other probes of the Trump Administration, Cummings had repeatedly urged voters to consider the totality of the situation involving President Trump, as he openly expressed concern about damage to the underpinnings of the federal government. “We are going to uphold the rule of law,” Cummings told a group of reporters in May. “Ladies and Gentlemen, we are in search of the truth,” Cummings said.