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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    Saudi women are in the driver's seat for the first time in their country and steering their way through busy city streets just minutes after the world's last remaining ban on women driving was lifted on Sunday. It's a euphoric and historic moment for women who have had to rely on their husbands, fathers, brothers and drivers to run basic errands, get to work, visit friends or even drop kids off at school. The ban had relegated women to the backseat, restricting when and how they move around. But after midnight Sunday, Saudi women finally joined women around the world in being able to get behind the wheel of a car and simply drive. 'I'm speechless. I'm so excited it's actually happening,' said Hessah al-Ajaji, who drove her family's Lexus down the capital's busy Tahlia Street after midnight. Al-Ajaji had a U.S. driver's license before obtaining a Saudi one and appeared comfortable at the wheel as she pulled up and parked. As for the male drivers on the road, 'they were really supportive and cheering and smiling,' she said. In a few hours, she says she'll drive herself to work for the first time in Saudi Arabia. For nearly three decades, outspoken Saudi women and the men who supported them had called for women to have the right to drive. They faced arrest for defying the ban as women in other Muslim countries drove freely. In 1990, during the first driving campaign by activists, women who got behind the wheels of their cars in the capital, Riyadh, lost their jobs, faced severe stigmatization and were barred from travel abroad for a year. Ultraconservatives in Saudi Arabia had long warned that allowing women to drive would lead to sin and expose women to harassment. Ahead of allowing women to drive, the kingdom passed a law against sexual harassment with up to five years prison for the most severe cases. Criticism against women driving has largely been muted since since King Salman announced last year that they would be allowed to drive. Simultaneously, however, at least 10 of the most outspoken supporters of women's rights were arrested just weeks before the ban was lifted, signaling that only the king and his powerful son, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, will decide the pace of change. With state-backed support for the move, many Saudis now say they support the decision allowing women to drive and see it as long overdue. Not all women are driving at once, though. The overwhelming majority of women in Saudi Arabia still don't have licenses. Many haven't had a chance to take the gender-segregated driving courses that were first offered to women only three months ago. There's also a waiting list of several months for the classes on offer in major cities. And the classes can be costly, running several hundred dollars. Other women already own cars driven by chauffeurs and are in no rush to drive themselves. In many cases, women say they'll wait before rushing to drive to see how the situation on the streets pans out and how male drivers react. 'I will get my driver's license, but I won't drive because I have a driver. I am going to leave it for an emergency. It is one of my rights and I will keep it in my purse,' said 60 year-old Lulwa al-Fireiji. While some still quietly oppose the change, there are men openly embracing it. 'I see that this decision will make women equal to men and this will show us that women are capable of doing anything a man can do,' said Fawaz al-Harbi. 'I am very supportive and in fact I have been waiting for this decision so that my mother, my sisters will drive.' ___ Associated Press writers Fay Abuelgasim and Malak Harb contributed to this report.
  • Soccer fans have converged on Mexico's Angel of Independence to celebrate the national team's second win in the World Cup. The revelers shared space Saturday with marchers from the annual gay pride parade who waved LGBT rainbow flags. The Mexican team won its second game with a 2-1 victory against South Korea, but has been reprimanded for a homophobic slur chanted during soccer matches. FIFA fined the Mexican Football Federation $10,000 for the offensive fan behavior in the country's opener against Germany. The Mexican team thanked its fans in a tweet for not shouting the slur during the South Korea match, saying that Mexico had 'won on and off the pitch.
  • Egypt's state-owned media says the army officer credited with the idea to destroy the Bar Lev line on the Suez Canal's eastern bank during the 1973 Arab Israeli war has died. The Akhbar al-Youm daily said Baki Zaki Youssef died on Saturday at the age of 87. State-run Al Ahram daily hailed him as a 'hero' while recounting war's lead-up and how he thought to destroy the Bar Lev line with water pumps. In 1973, Egyptian forces launched a surprise attack across the Suez Canal, cutting through the Bar Lev line of Israeli defenses in the war that culminated in the Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty. Egypt was the first Arab country to make peace with Israel, in 1979, but relations have always been frosty due to popular support for the Palestinians.
  • French President Emmanuel Macron announced a proposal Saturday that would create closed migrant centers on European soil so authorities can quickly decide whether arriving migrants are eligible to apply for asylum and send back those who don't qualify. European countries would take in migrants who qualify to apply in a shared plan that lifts the burden of carrying for them from the Mediterranean nations on the front line such as Italy, Spain and Greece, Macron said. The French leader spoke at a news conference in Paris with Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez, who was on his first foreign trip since taking office on June 2. Macron and Sanchez both stressed the need for a humanitarian but responsible approach to migration. Spain's decision last week to take in a rescue ship with 630 migrants, and France's offer to accept some of those eligible to apply for asylum, exemplifies the need to share the burden, they both said. The visit by Sanchez came a day before 16 EU leaders meet informally in Brussels to try to find a common approach to the divisive issue of migration before an EU summit next week. A group of EU countries with governments firmly opposed to migration wants a go-it-alone approach. 'National solutions don't work,' Macron said, referring to Hungary and Italy, who have an anti-migrant approach. 'We are interdependent.' 'Extremists play on emotions to propose the worst' solutions, he added. The EU 'must have a common migration policy ... based on solidarity, responsibility and respect for human rights,' Sanchez said. Macron said his proposal is 'complementary' to one by EU Council President Donald Tusk that would put migrant centers for assessing cases in transit countries they used on the way to Europe. Macron said he is favorable to that but his proposal is aimed at migrants who have already reached Europe.
  • Outside a sprawling mall in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, young single men and women walk through an open-air exhibit where Saudi women and traffic police explain the ins and outs of handling a car. Children take a lap around a makeshift course in tiny electric cars as clowns appear on a small stage, dancing for the crowd. A song with a woman's voice blares through the loudspeakers, singing: 'I love you Saudia. My love, Saudia.' Just four years ago, this government-sponsored event was an unthinkable scene in the deeply religious and socially conservative country. But the most visible sign of change came on Sunday, when women in Saudi Arabia were allowed to drive, ending a ban that had stained the kingdom's reputation globally, kept women subjugated in the backseat and hindered the full potential of the country's economic growth. The move places Saudi women at the heart of a major transformation being spearheaded by the country's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. It also places women at the center of a tug-of-war between those agitating for more openings and a religious majority that remains wary of changes that could be influenced by the West. It was only a few years ago that religious police— known for their long beards and shorter white robes— enforced an austere interpretation of Islam that banned music of any kind in public, much less the sound of a woman's voice on loudspeakers. They could detain groups of unmarried men and women for simply standing around or sitting together. They ensured restaurants and stores closed their doors for daily prayers and waved sticks at women who had their hair or face uncovered, shouting through microphones attached to the tops of their cars as they patrolled the streets. Unlike previous Saudi monarchs who took cautious, incremental steps to reform the country, King Salman has granted his 32-year-old son and heir, the crown prince, a free hand to usher in dramatic moves that are reshaping the country. Allowing musical concerts, opening movie theaters, easing restrictions on gender segregation and reigning in the powers of the religious police have all been signature reforms of the young prince. He's seen as the force behind the king's decision to lift the longstanding ban on women driving this Sunday. 'I can say that Mohammed bin Salman, the crown prince, came at the right time. He is young and motivated,' said Lulwa al-Fireiji, speaking at Friday night's event to encourage women to drive. Al-Fireiji, 60, quickly clarified that while there was 'nothing wrong' with previous Saudi rulers, now is the time for change. 'I will get a license, but I won't drive right away because the elders are always scared. But the young people are motivated and we need at this time someone like Mohammed bin Salman - motivated, God bless him, and daring. He will move the country (forward) faster,' she said. Granting women the right to drive is part of a wider blueprint for the future drawn up by the crown prince. In an era of sustained lower oil prices, the government is pushing Saudis to become less reliant on the government for jobs, handouts and subsidies. Some 70 percent of Saudis who work are employed in the public sector and rely on the government for their wages. Official statistics show that women make up the overwhelming majority of job seekers in Saudi Arabia and that around 34 percent of Saudis seeking employment are between 25 and 29 years old. The state alone cannot create enough public sector jobs to keep up with the pace of Saudis seeking work, so foreigners are being booted out of jobs at restaurants, banks, cell phone repair shops and many sales floors to make way for Saudis. Companies are required to stack their workforce with a minimum number of Saudi nationals or face heavy fines. To encourage two-income households, Saudi women are taking on jobs that were once reserved for men at lingerie shops and makeup stores. And Sunday, when they start driving, many will be able to get more easily to work and will no longer need to hire drivers, who often hail from India and Pakistan. Women will even be allowed to work as drivers. Prince Mohammed is set to inherit a country where more than half of its 20 million citizens are under the age of 25. Many are active on social media, where Saudis are vocal about the pace of change. Just last week, conservative citizens took to YouTube and Twitter to criticize a Russian circus that included female performers in body-hugging leotards. Before the show could finish its four-day run in Riyadh, the king had fired the head of the entertainment authority. Under the crown prince, the message pushed by officials is that Saudi Arabia is modernizing, not Westernizing. The prince has branded the reforms as a return to 'moderate Islam'. Even the country's ultraconservative clerics, who for decades warned against allowing women to work and drive, have toed the line with muted statements of support. The tightrope the government has to walk between 'a shrinking insular and traditionalist majority and a growing progressive and internationalist minority' is a defining feature of modern Saudi Arabia, said a report by the Arabia Foundation, a Washington-based think tank that has links with the Saudi government. The report said the government maintains a delicate balance between reformers and conservatives by 'monopolizing the reform process', pre-empting and suppressing grassroots activism or, on occasion, tolerating it as a safety valve for expressing grievances. Just last month, the pendulum appeared to swing away from the latter when several prominent women's rights activists who were at the forefront of calls to lift the driving ban were arrested. At least 10 are still being held in an undisclosed location with no access to lawyers. The arrests highlight how quickly the levers of reform can be pulled back. 'It looks like the only reform they want is the one that comes from above and any sort of calls for changes, no matter how positive they are and will benefit the country, will not be tolerated from below,' said Kareem Chehayeb, a researcher at Amnesty International. Three of the women still detained— Aziza al-Yousef, Loujain al-Hathloul and Eman al-Nafjan— are seen as icons of a larger democratic and civil rights push in the kingdom. The women had also been calling for an end to guardianship laws that give male relatives final say over whether a woman can marry, obtain a passport or travel abroad. Since their arrest, the women have been branded traitors by state-aligned media. Prosecutors accuse them of working with foreign entities and attempting to harm the interests of the kingdom. It comes after Prince Mohammed oversaw the arrests of dozens of writers, moderate clerics and others last year for apparently not emphatically supporting his policies, including the Saudi-led war in Yemen and a standoff with Qatar. In November, he further consolidated power when he arbitrarily detained influential businessmen, officials and at least a dozen high-level princes in a purported anti-corruption campaign. The arrest of the women's rights activists just before women are allowed to drive sends a message that 'you are subjects and not citizens' and that the Saudi leadership alone controls when and how change takes shape, said Kristin Diwan, a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington. 'You could get the idea that OK now we're allowing driving and allowing a real opening, but that kind of encourages women to demand and ask for more,' she said. 'I think they want to make sure that that is not the message they're communicating. You cannot make demands on the government. The government will decide what policies are best.' ___ Follow Aya Batrawy on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ayaelb
  • Some Argentines are taking advantage of World Cup fervor. The security minister of Buenos Aires province said Friday that police have broken up an organization that trafficked marijuana and cocaine in fake World Cup trophies. The so-called 'Narcos de la Copa' took advantage of the global merchandising boom generated by the soccer tournament to move the drug without raising suspicions. 'These merchants of death have endless ingenuity, but don't be fooled. They shouldn't be admired. On the contrary... they are now in jail,' said minister Cristian Ritondo, according to a statement. Officials said 20 kilos of marijuana, 10 kilos of cocaine, 1,800 doses of crack-cocaine known as 'paco,' and 400,000 Argentine pesos ($14,819) were seized. Four men and two women were arrested in the operation.
  • Romania's president said Saturday he would seek a new term in office, pledging to fight corruption after the leader of the ruling Social Democratic Party was convicted for abuse of power in office. President Klaus Iohannis said he decided to make the announcement after Social Democratic leader Liviu Dragnea was given a 3½-year jail sentence this week. The president, whose mandate expires in 2019, said public confidence in the Romanian government is very low. Later Saturday, thousands of Romanians once again held anti-corruption protests outside the government offices in the capital of Bucharest, while thousands more assembled in cities around Romania including Sibiu and Cluj. They waved Romanian flags called for the government to resign and for an early election to be held. After the sentencing, the Social Democrats reiterated their support for Dragnea, saying he should be considered innocent pending a final verdict. They promised to implement new laws that critics say will weaken the nation's fight against corruption. Iohannis, a centrist, said during a visit to his native city of Sibiu that the Social Democrats were lobbying 'for a criminal.' Later, supporters rallied outside his home in Sibiu, yelling: 'Iohannis, don't give up!
  • The Islamic State group released a hostage video on Saturday demanding the release of all Sunni women prisoners from Iraqi jails. The group said it was giving the government a deadline of three days before it would execute the six men in the video, who identified themselves as Iraqi policemen and militiamen. The video was published on jihadist social media groups, one week after the Islamic State group announced it had kidnapped 17 policemen and members of Iraq's Popular Mobilization Forces, which are predominantly Shiite militia groups that fight for the government. A string of kidnappings claimed by IS on the highway connecting Baghdad to the north of the country has raised concerns about lingering threat posed by the group, after Iraqi forces recaptured the city of Mosul last year. Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi has come under pressure in recent weeks to explain the gaps in security outside the capital. A spokesman for the Iraqi military said he was aware of the hostage video and said the armed forces were pursuing the IS sleeper cell it believes is responsible. 'We won't be blackmailed by them, and we will pursue them wherever they are,' said Brig. Gen. Yahya Rasoul.
  • In a week marked by big debuts, it was designer Kim Jones' turn at Dior Men on Saturday. The British designer drew stars from the worlds of film, music and fashion to Paris for his first collection at the storied powerhouse. Stars such as Bella Hadid, Victoria Beckham, Naomi Campbell, Robert Pattinson, Kelly Osbourne and Gwendoline Christie all marveled as the entered the historic courtyard venue in which a 20-meter (66-foot) avatar sculpture of Christian Dior made of flowers towered over guests. Here are some highlights from Saturday's runway shows. KIM JONES' DEBUT AT DIOR British designer Kim Jones dug deep into the Dior women's archives to produce a softer-than-usual collection for men, which retained the house's signature edginess. Gentle pastel colors fused with flashes of cobalt blue, yellow and florals for the display that moved the Dior aesthetic in a gentler direction than that of Jones' predecessor, Kris Van Assche, who looked on from the front row. 'Translating a quintessentially feminine couture identity into a masculine idiom results in clothes which are softer, with rounded shoulders and eased shapes,' the house explained. There was much artistry. The house's staple shirt was given a slashed cowl at the back, exposing the back — in a touch of cool. Floral motifs referenced Dior's love of flowers and a decorative landscape print cropped up in jacquards, embroideries and even in feathers. The program notes said it was a pattern used in the original 1947 boutique on Paris' Avenue Montaigne. The Dior suits, in cashmere and summer mohair, were double breasted in reference to the diagonal shape of a women's Dior jacket from 1950. But to retain the edginess, the suits were worn against a naked torso on a model in sneakers. It was a great touch that perfectly summed up Dior's sportswear-meets-couture style. ___ DIOR AS A FLOWER GIANT The sweet scents from a giant flower figure — by artist Kaws and made of pink, green and black flowers — wafted in between Dior's celebrity guests. The strange man — an avatar of Christian Dior clutching a perfume bottle in the shape of his dog Bobby — bowled over guests, including Kelly Osbourne. 'The set is actually incredible,' said Osbourne, craning her neck. The 33-year-old British singer, who joined model Natalia Vodianova on the front row, said she was attending the Paris debut to support her friend Jones, whose previous job was menswear chief at Louise Vuitton. 'As a proud Brit, it just goes to show how artistically talented we all are ... we're so proud of him,' she said. 'It might be the entire front row crying.' ___ THOM BROWNE'S GARDEN WONDERLAND Floating multicolored balloons, giant lollypops, garden gnomes, colored origami windmills and myriad blooms spilling from colored pots greeted guests at the Leftbank's Ecole des Beaux Arts. To showcase his summer designs Saturday, Thom Browne transformed the chic Paris inner courtyard into a verdant garden wonderland. It drew comparisons to Alice in Wonderland, Willy Wonka's factory and even Munchkinland as models with comic beards pretended to mow the lawn with metal contraptions or push a wheelbarrow full of flowers. One 'gnome' model even climbed inside a tiny garden shed and stayed motionless the entire show. Browne's dramatically oversized clothes continued the wacky, off-kilter vibe. A sheeny sky blue coat with images of whales opened the show, introducing a beautifully random maritime theme that continued in lobsters and crabs. Sloping-shoulder suit jackets, oversize coats, bags and billowing culottes were imagined in picnic blanket-style crisscross. For the 60 looks, it was stripes and check galore. A double breasted coat-jacket in gray had blown-up pinstripes with the dominant silhouette of a wide, flat front. All of the designs were accessorized with a bowler hat with a flower in it, a colored tie and gargantuan striped platform shoes. ___ BROWNE SHOWS WINTER COATS FOR SUMMER AS SEASONS BLUR Thom Browne's decision to include big, thick coats for his summer collection triggered a debate between two front-row fashion editors. 'Winter coats for summer?' asked one, puzzled. 'The seasons are almost the same in the industry now, anyway,' answered the other, with some truth. Progressively over the years, spring-summer and fall-winter fashion seasons have become increasingly blurred. Winter clothes such as big sweaters and big coats are no stranger to the summer catwalks. Often, summer shows are now distinguishable only for their brighter color palette and the occasional pair of shorts — and even that garment has been spotted in some winter shows. Critics cite several reasons for the seasonal blur. Summer collections are first available to buy during the winter months and the proliferation of social media means that more people see, and therefore want, to wear the clothes months earlier than in past decades. Global warming has also been blamed for designers' desire to mix up their styles given that the seasons themselves are less predictable than before. __ VIVID COLORS AT SACAI A multicolored cube of giant speakers tied together with fluorescent yellow banding greeted guests at Sacai's warehouse show, suggesting that a quirky, avant-garde show was coming from one of Japan's top fashion houses. That was not wrong. Men's and women's designs merged in the diverse 57-piece show from Sacai, with geometric prints, checks and denim all mixing with silhouettes. Some coats or billowing skirts had exaggerated tapering proportions. The one thing that created unity in this eccentric display was its vivid colors: purple, dark navy, bitter lemon, crimson and bronze. At times, the bright hues came on printed and patterned garments that evoked the ethnic styles of Latin America. ___ Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K
  • Lech Walesa, Poland's former president and pro-democracy leader, said Saturday he is joining forces with the opposition to prevent Poland's right-wing ruling party from winning a string of upcoming elections. The 74-year-old Walesa spoke at a meeting of opposition parties and activists in the Baltic city of Gdansk, at the center dedicated to the Solidarity movement he led in the 1980s that brought democracy to Poland. He said the ruling conservative Law and Justice party is threatening democracy, and that a joint effort was needed to prevent it from winning further terms in power. Among those at Gdansk meeting were heads of Civic Platform and Modern parties, and movements that have organized massive street protests, including the Committee for the Defense of Democracy and Women's Protest. They oppose the government's policies, saying they are divisive for the nation and destructive for its international relations. Poland has local elections in the fall, European Parliament and national parliament elections in 2019 and a presidential vote in 2020. The European Commission is now threatening sanctions against Poland, saying the ruling conservative government's changes to the justice system are violating the rule of law. 'Our achievements, which we had won through such tough struggle, are being destroyed in the country and outside it,' Walesa told the meeting. 'We must muster all our strength and win back what we have lost through our lack of attention and lack of wisdom.' The Nobel Peace Prize winner was referring to the 2015 presidential and parliamentary elections that the pro-EU Civic Platform party lost to Law and Justice. The meeting Saturday comes as questions are being raised about the future of Law and Justice due to the illness of its leader and Poland's most powerful politician, Jaroslaw Kaczynski. He spent over a month in the hospital being treated for a knee problem and was only briefly seen earlier this month as he returned home. His absence from the public has provoked questions about his health and speculation as to any successors.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A teen girl helped a blind, deaf man communicate on a recent Alaska Airlines flight, according to KIRO. Dianne McGinness with Alaska Airlines shared the heartwarming story after a passenger on the flight wrote a post this week about the interaction that was shared over 400,000 times. The passenger, Lynette Scribner, was traveling on the same flight as the teen and man, and was moved to write a post on the touching encounter.  >> Read more trending news  Scribner said the man, Tim Cook, was traveling home to Portland after visiting his sister. Cook lives at Portland's Brookdale Senior Living.  When passengers of the flight realized Cook was blind and deaf, many helped ensure he was comfortable. A man sitting next to Cook gave him the aisle seat and helped with little tasks like opening his coffee creamer and pouring it into his coffee, Scribner shared. A flight attendant made an announcement asking if a passenger on board knew American Sign Language. Fifteen-year-old Clara Daly, who has studied ASL for the last year, rang her call button. When Daly learned the man could communicate only if someone signed into his hand, she immediately went to help. Cook asked Daly questions and she patiently sign-spelled answers into his hand. Scribner said Daly learned ASL because she has dyslexia, and it was the easiest foreign language for her to learn. “Clara was amazing,” an Alaska Airlines flight attendant said in the news release. “You could tell Tim was very excited to have someone he could speak to -- and she was such an angel.” “When (Cook) asked (Daly) if she was pretty, she blushed and laughed as the seat mate, who had learned a few signs, communicated an enthusiastic yes to Tim,” Scribner shared. “I don't know when I've ever seen so many people rally to take care of another human being. All of us in the immediate rows were laughing and smiling and enjoying his obvious delight in having someone to talk to.” After the flight, McGinness said Cook met a service provider from Brookdale Senior Living at the gate. Cook said the flight was the best trip he's ever taken. Daly told her mom she thought the encounter was 'meant to be,' since her original flight was canceled and she was redirected to Cook's flight. On Thursday, Scribner added a note on her beloved post: “We are all starving for good news and this was just what we needed.”
  • Orange County Sheriff’s Deputies arrested Wueizman Leal, 41, after he allegedly shot and killed his 59-year-old mother Friday evening during an argument at a home near Winter Garden, the Orange County Sheriff's Office said. Deputies were called shortly after 8:45 p.m. to a fight at a home on Bridgewater Crossings Boulevard near Ficquette and Winter Garden Vineland roads, Orange County Deputy Ingrid Tejada-Monforte said. When deputies arrived at the home, they heard people arguing followed by gunfire, Tejada-Monforte said. Investigators said they apprehended Leal while he was trying to leave the home. His mother, Tania Perez Creek , was shot multiple times, deputies said. She was taken to Florida Hospital Winter Garden where she later died from her injuries, deputies said. The man's stepfather was also at the home when the woman was shot, Tejada-Monforte said. The shooting remains under investigation.
  • Anthony Bourdain’s mother revealed that while she was “never really a fan” of her son’s tattoos, she plans to get one in his memory. Gladys Bourdain told the New York Times that she plans to get “Tony” tattooed in small letters on the inside of her wrist some time next week, and use his tattoo artist. >> Read more trending news  The 61-year-old chef and host of CNN’s “Parts Unknown” was found dead on June 8 in a hotel room in France. Investigators say he hanged himself. On Friday, a prosecutor said Bourdain had no traces of drugs or alcohol in his system.  The famous chef had several tattoos, getting his first at 44. Bourdain told Maxim in August 2017 that each tattoo marks a significant moment in his life. “I don't overly place importance on them, but [tattoos] do commemorate in a way that photographs can't,” Bourdain said. “I stopped taking photographs a long time ago when I travel. There's this realization that the lens is inadequate to capture the moment, so maybe I'm just looking to mark time in another way that's very personal.” Gladys Bourdain said that a private ceremony will be held soon, adding, “He would want as little fuss as possible.” A Bourdain family spokesperson told the BBC the family has no plans for a public memorial at this time.
  • White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said she and seven members of her family were kicked out of The Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Virginia on Friday night. TMZ first reported that the restaurant’s owner kicked out Sanders and her family out of “moral conviction.”  >> Read more trending news  A waiter posted on Facebook that Sanders was in the restaurant for “a total of two minutes” before being asked to leave. Sanders confirmed the incident on Twitter. “Last night I was told by the owner of Red Hen in Lexington, VA to leave because I work for @POTUS and I politely left,” Sanders tweeted Saturday. “Her actions say far more about her than about me. I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so.” Sanders’ father, former Gov. Mike Huckabee, tweeted his support, saying it was an act of “bigotry.” The Red Hen’s Facebook and Yelp pages were bombarded with reviews from people from both sides. While some praised the restaurant, many others said the owner was being “intolerant.” This comes after Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen bolted from a Washington, D.C. Mexican restaurant after protesters confronted her at her table -- with the blessing of the manager.
  • Police in Pittsburgh are searching for the driver of a dark sedan who drove through a crowd of protesters on Friday night.  Officials told WPXI no one was hurt.  This happened during the third straight night of protests related to the police shooting death of Antwon Rose, 17, who was killed during a traffic stop earlier in the week. >>Read: Protesters gather in Pittsburgh for third straight night The car plowed into the crowd near PNC Park, where fans were leaving a Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game. >>Read: LIVE UPDATES: Car drives through crowd of protesters at PNC Park One person at the scene Friday night tweeted, “Someone tried to drive through us, police responded in riot gear.” Allegheny County police officials said that Rose was a passenger in a vehicle stopped in East Pittsburgh Tuesday night, because it fit the description of a car seen fleeing the area of a shooting in the nearby borough of North Braddock.  As an officer handcuffed the driver of the car, which investigators said had bullet damage to the back window, Rose and a second passenger got out of the car and ran.  Rose, who police officials said was shot three times, was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead.  Police are now investigating reports that Rose may have fired a weapon during a drive-by shooting before his death, and he had gun powder residue on his hands. In a statement to WPXI, Coleman McDonough, Allegheny County Police superintendent, stated that those claims are “false.” “While ACPD does have a video showing the North Braddock incident, that video does NOT show Antwon Rose firing a gun. The information about gunshot residue is also false. Crime Lab reports are still pending and have not yet been issued,” McDonough said. The East Pittsburgh police officer who fatally shot Rose has been identified as Michael Rosfeld. >>Read: Officer was sworn in hours before killing unarmed teen, mayor says He was sworn into the department just hours before the shooting, but has worked for several police forces, including the University of Pittsburgh. No arrests have been made and investigations are ongoing.