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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    Pakistan's Foreign Ministry and officials say Indian troops have killed a Pakistani villager and wounded two others in 'unprovoked firing' in the Himalayan region of Kashmir. In a statement, the ministry said it summoned an Indian diplomat Saturday to lodge a protest with New Delhi over the incident. Pakistan and India often exchange fire in Kashmir. The overnight incident took place hours after Pakistan's parliament elected former cricket star and longtime politician Imran Khan as the country's prime minister. Khan has said that he wants to resolve the issue of Kashmir, which is divided between Pakistan and India and is claimed by both in its entirety.
  • Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi has ratified an anti-cybercrime law that rights groups say paves the way for censoring online media. The law, published Saturday in the country's official gazette, empowers authorities to order the blocking of websites that publish content considered a threat to national security. Viewers attempting to access blocked sites can also be sentenced to one year in prison or fined up to EGP100,000 ($5,593) under the law. Last month, Egypt's parliament approved a bill placing personal social media accounts and websites with over 5,000 followers under the supervision of the top media authority, which can block them if they're found to be disseminating false news. Amnesty International criticized the legislations in a July statement saying they 'give the state near-total control over print, online and broadcast media.
  • Macedonian authorities say two paragliders have died in central Macedonia when their parachutes collided in the air. Police said in a statement Saturday that the accident occurred mid-day Friday near the central town of Krusevo. They say a 56-year-old Ukrainian citizen, identified only by his initials as I.V., was killed at the site, while a 54-year-old British citizen, also identified only by his initials as I.P, died in a nearby hospital during resuscitation attempts. The prosecutor's office said it has ordered that video and data from the paragliders' tracker systems be downloaded and autopsies performed on the two bodies. Krusevo is known as a good location for paragliding.
  • Hundreds of neo-Nazis waving flags with the colors of the German Reich are marching through central Berlin, protected from counter-protesters by police in riot gear. Berlin police spokesman Thilo Cablitz said officers had to physically remove some left-wing demonstrators who had staged sit-down protests along the route of Saturday's march. He added that stones and bottles were thrown at some of the far-right protesters, but couldn't immediately say how many people were injured. The far-right protesters wore white shirts to commemorate the 31st anniversary of the death of high-ranking Nazi official Rudolf Hess and carried banners with slogans such as 'I regret nothing.' Hess, who received a life sentence at the Nuremberg trials for his role in planning World War II, died on Aug. 17, 1987.
  • Reactions to the death of Kofi Annan, the first black African to become U.N. secretary-general and a Nobel Peace Prize winner who died early Saturday at age 80 after a short illness: ___ 'In a world now filled with leaders who are anything but that, our loss, the world's loss, becomes even more painful.' — U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein ___ 'I sincerely admired his wisdom and courage as well as his ability to make balanced decisions even under the most dire and critical circumstances.' — Russian President Vladimir Putin ___ 'A relentless champion for peace and a passionate ambassador for Sesame Street and the world's children.' — Sesame Street ___ 'We are devastated ... Africa and the world has lost a special human being.' — Nelson Mandela Foundation ___ 'A towering global leader and an unwavering champion for peace, justice and rule of law.' — Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif ___ 'The U.N. and the world have lost one of their giants.' — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg ___ 'We give great thanks to God for Kofi Annan, an outstanding human being who represented our continent and the world with enormous graciousness, integrity and distinction.' — Former South African archbishop Desmond Tutu
  • The German government says it has made no preparations for the possibility that aliens might land in the European country. In a response to questions from opposition Green Party lawmaker Dieter Janecek, the government said 'there are no protocols or plans for a possible first contact with alien life.' Justifying that stance, the government added it believes 'a first contact on German territory is extremely unlikely, based on today's scientific knowledge.' Janecek linked the government's responses to a media article Saturday. Separately, German news agency dpa reported Saturday the classic children's book 'The Little Prince' has been translated into Klingon — the fictitious language of the eponymous space race in the science fiction franchise 'Star Trek.' Dpa quoted Saarbruecken-based translator Lieven L. Litaer as saying the book, titled 'ta'puq mach,' will be published in October.
  • German federal prosecutors say they're taking seriously a Yazidi woman's claim that she ran into her former Islamic State captor in Germany, but say they need more information to identify him. Spokeswoman Frauke Koehler told The Associated Press on Saturday that the woman's statement to authorities 'wasn't precise enough' and when they tried to follow up, she had left Germany. Ashwaq Haji Hami, 19, told the AP she was abused in Iraq by an IS member called Abu Humam, whose real name she said was Mohammed Rashid. After fleeing, she allegedly encountered him in Germany in 2016 and again this February. She reported the incidents to police, but fearing for her safety, she moved back to Iraq in June. Koehler said prosecutors want to speak to her again if she returns to Germany.
  • In Britain, there is a growing sense of Brexit deja vu. Two years after the country voted to leave the European Union, emotional arguments about membership in the bloc are raging as fiercely as they did during the 2016 referendum. With seven months until Britain officially leaves the bloc, negotiations faltering, chances are rising of an acrimonious divorce — and the one thing that pro- and anti-EU forces have in common is that they are both unhappy. Former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage announced Saturday that he was returning to political campaigning in a bid to derail British Prime Minister Theresa May's plan for future ties with the EU. Farage, the right-winger who helped lead the successful 'leave' campaign in 2016, wrote in the Daily Telegraph that he would join a cross-country bus tour by the group Leave Means Leave to oppose May's 'cowardly sell-out.' Referring to U.K. politicians and civil servants, he said 'unless challenged, these anti-democrats will succeed in frustrating the result' of the referendum. Negotiations on future relations between the U.K. and the bloc have faltered, largely due to divisions within May's Conservative government over how close an economic relationship to seek with EU. Last month the government finally produced a plan, proposing to stick close to EU regulations in return for free trade in goods. That infuriated Brexit-backers such as Farage and former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who say it would leave the U.K. tethered to the bloc and unable to strike new trade deals around the world. Opponents of Brexit say that, even if the EU accepts May's plan — which appears unlikely — it would still erect barriers between Britain and the EU, its biggest trading partner. Meanwhile, time is running out. Britain and the EU say they aim to hammer out an agreement on divorce terms and future trade by October — or, at the latest, December — so that it can be approved by all individual EU countries before the U.K. leaves the bloc on March 29. This week Latvian Foreign Minister Edgars Rinkevics put the chances of getting a Brexit deal at 50-50, a figure echoed by other EU leaders. U.K. businesses, however, have warned strongly that leaving without a deal could cause mayhem for trade and travel, bringing higher food prices, logjams around U.K. ports and disruption to everything from aviation to medical supplies. The U.K. government says it remains confident of reaching a deal, but is preparing for a 'no deal' scenario. Anti-Brexit campaigners are urging a second referendum on whether to accept any agreement that is reached. The idea is opposed by the government but supported by a growing number of politicians, trade unions and groups including the British Medical Organization. Bob Kerslake, a former head of Britain's civil service, said Saturday that the consequences of leaving the EU without a deal were so serious that Brexit should be put on hold if agreement wasn't reached. 'If the government can negotiate a good deal, then so be it,' he told the BBC. 'But if they can't and we end up in this position, then we have to reopen the question of whether we go forward with Brexit at all. It is not too late to do that.
  • Streets were hushed as the West African nation of Ghana on Saturday mourned Kofi Annan, the grandson of tribal chiefs who became the first black African to assume the world's top diplomatic post. President Nana Akufo-Addo ordered flags to fly at half-staff for a week while trying to reassure the country's 28 million people that the former U.N. secretary-general and Nobel Peace Prize winner left the world without pain. 'I am comforted ... that he died peacefully in his sleep,' the president said on Twitter after speaking with Annan's wife. 'Rest in perfect peace, Kofi. You have earned it.' The normally vibrant capital, Accra, was somber after initial disbelief from some residents dismissing Annan's death as fake news. 'It was a great shock to hear this news,' former President John Kufuor told The Associated Press. He said Annan had continued to visit Ghana about three times a year and if there were any invitations he honored them. 'Grandpa used to tell us a lot about how he was such a nice person,' said Kojo Manu, a mechanic who said his late grandfather had lived in the same neighborhood with Annan. 'Big man Kofi Annan gave some of us a reason to live and to continue to have faith in our roots as Africans,' said Emmanuel Youri, an advertising executive. 'He was a great African by every standard,' lawmaker Ras Mubarak said. Annan was born in the Ashanti heartland two decades before Ghana became the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to gain independence from colonial rule. The son of a provincial governor, he attended an elite boarding school and became fluent in English, French and several African languages and quickly entered the diplomatic world. He spent almost his entire professional life in the United Nations, and Africa played a major part of his work. The continent also was the source of one of the greatest failures during his time as U.N. peacekeeping chief, the 1994 genocide in Rwanda in which U.N. peacekeepers failed to save civilians' lives. Africa's widespread health and development challenges shaped Annan's crafting of what became known as the Millennium Development Goals, and played a central role in creating the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. After stepping down as U.N. chief, Annan was still called on to apply his diplomatic skills to some of Africa's biggest crises, either on his own or as chair of The Elders, an elite group of former leaders founded by South Africa's Nelson Mandela. On Saturday, Kenyan opposition leader Raila Odinga said he had 'fond memories' of Annan because he stepped in to save the country from civil war after a flawed presidential election in 2007 that led to more than 1,000 deaths. Annan brokered a power-sharing deal to calm tensions. The global diplomat also spoke sharply at times about the continent and its ills, saying late last year on Twitter that 'the African officials who are signing away their countries' resources at an almost giveaway rate to big multinationals in the expectation that they will get something are really betraying their people. It denies them development and food.' Annan's last major public appearance in Africa was last month in Zimbabwe on the brink of a historic presidential election, the first without longtime leader Robert Mugabe on the ballot. As Annan urged Zimbabweans to vote peacefully and met with the country's leaders, he struggled to walk and coughed from time to time, with his aides closely following behind. 'Annan's origin and home will always be traced to Ghana, but his exceptional leadership roles, humanitarian spirit and contributions to global peace and development will remain indelible in the history of the entire world,' President Muhammadu Buhari, the leader of another West African power, Nigeria, said Saturday. ___ Associated Press writer Tom Odula in Nairobi, Kenya and AP photographer Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi in Harare, Zimbabwe contributed. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • First it was the athletes parading side-by-side in matching uniforms behind the 'unification' flag carried by South Korean basketballer Lim Yung-hui and North Korean footballer Ju Kyong Chol. Then it was an image of South Korea's Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon and North Korean Deputy Prime Minister Ri Ryong Nam hand-in-hand with their arms raised high that grabbed the spotlight at a spectacular opening ceremony for the Asian Games on Saturday night. The two countries, still technically at war after their 1950-53 conflict ended in an armistice, have fielded 60 athletes in combined teams in three sports — including women's basketball — along with larger contingents for their respective national squads at the 18th Asian Games. It was a virtual repeat of the joint march involving athletes from the North and South during the Winter Olympics in February in the South Korean ski resort of Pyeongchang — but without the gloves, parkas and fur hats. The setting this time was distinctly tropical as about 42,000 people packed the Bung Karno stadium in the Indonesian capital for an elaborate show highlighting the diverse Indonesian culture. It began with a slickly produced video portraying Indonesian President Joko 'Jokowi' Widodo stuck in traffic — a witty play on one of Jakarta's major challenges in hosting the games — donning a black helmet and jumping a motorbike over a ramp to reach the stadium in time. The motorbike shown in the video sped into the stadium and its helmeted driver disappeared into a tunnel moments before the real Jokowi appeared in the VIP area. Much of the stadium infield was filled with a rainforest-covered volcano scene that formed the backdrop for a show based on air, earth, wind and fire themes and featuring thousands of performers representing the dozens of ethnic groups in Indonesia, a country of more than 260 million people. It concluded Susi Susanti, the 1992 Olympic badminton gold medalist, igniting the cauldron. Susanti was Indonesia's first Olympic champion, and she was the final torchbearer on Saturday before triggering a spectacular eruption and lava flow. Organizing committee chairman Eric Thohir said the games would highlight Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation, as a model of harmony and emphasize the diversity of Asia. 'We are all here to celebrate our diversity, to celebrate our differences, to celebrate our humanity,' he told the crowd. The other obvious theme was unity. More than 11,000 athletes from 45 countries and territories are competing across 40 sports at the games, which are being co-hosted by Jakarta and Palembang. Aside from the rousing applause for the Koreans, teams from Palestine, Syria, Taiwan and Indonesia received extra bursts of support from the crowd. Tensions between the Koreas have ebbed this year with a historic meeting between their two leaders at the heavily fortified border. Korean spectator Hwang Miri said the sight of the athletes marching together made her feel unification of the two countries was possible in her lifetime. 'Looking at all of these people working together and playing together, even walking all together in this unified uniform and the unified flag,' Hwang said, 'It is such an enormous feeling.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Adam Charles Eades was last seen leaving his home on Cedro Drive in Kissimmee on Friday at around 5:35 p.m. Adam was last seen wearing a white t-shirt, yellow basketball shorts with a red stripe and a Mickey Mouse logo on the side, grey socks and black Crocs. Adam wears glasses and both pinky fingers are crooked.  Adam left in good health and does not take any medications. Anyone who has seen him or knows where he is is asked to call 911 immediately.
  • Orange County detectives are asking for help to identify an armed robber who stole money from a gas station Thursday evening. At 9:47 p.m., the armed robber entered the Townstar/Marathon gas station at 300 North Kirkman Road and pointed a handgun at the cashier, demanding money.  The victim complied and places stacks of cash on the counter. Once the suspect got the money, he ran away on foot heading northbound from the station.  Police describe him as a male in his 20s, about 5'7-5'9'' with a skinny build. He was last seen wearing a black ski mask, gloves, a plaid-style long sleeve shirt, and a black t shirt with the 'punisher' logo on the front.  Anyone with any information is asked to call Crimeline at 800-423-8477.
  • A woman in San Bernardino, California, told CBSLA agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detained her husband as they drove to the hospital to deliver their child. >> Read more trending news Maria del Carmen Venegas said that her husband, Joel Arrona-Lara, was driving her to the hospital for a planned Cesarean section Wednesday when ICE agents surrounded their car at a gas station. Venegas, a mother of five, told CBSLA she showed officers her identification, but her husband did not have his ID with him. She said they lived nearby and offered to drive back to the house to get his ID, but officers placed Arrona-Lara into custody, leaving Venegas alone at the gas station, images from the store’s surveillance video showed. She said she drove herself to the hospital to deliver their child. “My husband needs to be here,” Venegas said. “He had to wait for his son for so long, and someone just took him away.” Venegas told CBSLA that her husband has never been in trouble with the law, and they are currently working on finding an attorney to help secure his release. ICE confirmed to the local Univision and Telemundo stations that Arrona-Lara is in custody. “Mr. Arrona-Lara is currently in the custody of ICE pending deportation procedures before the Executive Office of Immigration Review,” a spokesperson said. “All those who violate immigration laws would be subject to an immigration arrest and, if a final order determines their removal, be deported from the United States.”
  • A body was found in a burned car in the parking lot of a mini-golf course at Walt Disney World in Florida Saturday morning, officials said.  >> Read more trending news Orange County deputies began investigating the body in the Fantasia Gardens mini-golf course parking lot on Epcot Resorts Boulevard around 4 a.m. after the Reedy Creek Fire Department called for assistance, WFTV reported. Once firefighters extinguished the car, officials found a body inside, officials said.  Officials did not identify the body or the vehicle’s owner. The fire marshal, homicide detectives and Sector 6 investigators are on scene conducting an investigation, according to the sheriff’s office.  
  • Within weeks of a South Georgia teacher’s disappearance, two of her former students told friends at a party they had killed Tara Grinstead and burned her body, according to documents filed this week in Irwin County Superior Court, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  >> Read more trending news  Grinstead’s case was featured on the popular true crime podcast, “Up and Vanished.” >>Related: Georgia irresistible to true-crime podcasts Grinstead was reported missing in October 2005, and the following month, Ryan Alexander Duke and Bo Dukes told others they were responsible for her death and it was reported to police, court documents state. But the case remained cold until early 2017, when both Duke and Dukes were arrested.  So did investigators drop the ball? Yes, according to Duke’s attorneys. And because it took so long to arrest the suspects, most of the charges should be dropped due to the statute of limitations, the motion states.  >>Related: Who was Tara Grinstead? “It is undisputed that Irwin County law enforcement knew of these crimes within months of the disappearance of Tara Grinstead,” a court motion states. “In fact, a search of the area where Ms. Grinstead’s body was allegedly burned was conducted...” Grinstead, 30, an Irwin County High School teacher and former beauty queen, was last seen on Oct. 22, 2005, when she left a cookout and said she was going straight home. Two days later, she was reported missing when she didn’t show up to teach history. Ryan Alexander Duke, 33, was arrested and charged with murder in the death of Tara Grinstead. Because Duke and Dukes were identified as suspects later in 2005 but not charged until 2017, all but the murder charge should be dropped, Duke’s public defenders claim in one of two dozen motions filed in the past week.  “Duke and Dukes were identified as suspects and known to law enforcement in 2005,” the motion states. “By a generous application of the statute of limitations of four years, the statute would have run (expired) near December of 2009.” The GBI declined to comment on the allegations in the motion and referred questions to the District Attorney. The District Attorney could not be reached for comment Friday afternoon.  In another motion, Duke’s attorney asks that his indictment be dismissed because the language used is too “vague, ambiguous and indefinite.” In April 2017, a grand jury indicted Duke on six counts, including malice murder, felony murder, aggravated assault, burglary and concealing the death of another. In June 2017, Dukes was indicted on charges including concealing a death, tampering with evidence, and hindering apprehension of a criminal.  Dukes “did unlawfully and knowingly destroy physical evidence by burning the body of Tara Faye Grinstead, a human being, at a location off Bowen’s Mill Highway,” in Fitzgerald, the indictment states.  After Duke and Dukes were arrested, the GBI searched woods behind a pecan farm in the area but have not publicly said what was found. A hearing on the motions has been scheduled for Sept. 20 in Irwin County.