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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    G-7 leaders are wrapping up a summit dominated by tensions over U.S. trade policies and a surprise visit by Iran's top diplomat. U.S. President Donald Trump and summit host French President Emmanuel Macron will finish off the three-day summit with a joint news conference Monday. But first the leaders of the Group of Seven rich democracies — the U.S., France, Britain, Germany, Japan, Canada and Italy — are holding a string of meetings on climate change, how digitalization is transforming the world and other issues. The troubled world economy is overshadowing the meetings in the French Atlantic resort of Biarritz. Macron also took a big gamble by inviting the Iranian foreign minister to Biarritz, hoping to secure a breakthrough in global tensions over Iran's nuclear program.
  • Lawmakers on each side of Hong Kong's political divide say the other side bears responsibility after violence during anti-government protests over the weekend. Pro-government members of the Legislative Council on Monday condemned the violence by protesters who blocked streets, threw gasoline bombs and assaulted police officers. Pro-democracy legislators said the government and the police need to take responsibility, the former for introducing the extradition legislation that sparked the protests and the latter for selective enforcement of the law targeting government opponents. Protesters clashed with police, who used tear gas to clear the streets on Saturday and Sunday. The protesters are demanding democratic elections and an independent inquiry into alleged police violence in breaking up demonstrations.
  • Lebanon's state-run National News Agency says Israeli warplanes have attacked a Palestinian base in the country's east, near the border with Syria. The report says there were three strikes early on Monday, minutes apart, that struck a base for a Syrian-backed group known as the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine — General Command. There was no immediate comment from Israel on the strike, which the agency said hit near the Lebanese village of Qusaya in the eastern Bekaa Valley. The strike comes amid heightened regional tensions and a day after one alleged Israeli drone crashed in a Hezbollah stronghold in southern Beirut while another exploded and crashed nearby. Airstrikes by Israel against Palestinian factions in Lebanon, such as this one, have been rare in the past years.
  • Asian shares tumbled Monday after the latest escalation in the U.S.-China trade war renewed uncertainties about global economies, as well as questions over what President Donald Trump might say next. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 started plummeting as soon as trading began and stood at 20,233.39 in the afternoon, down 2.3%. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 slipped 1.7% to 6,414.60. South Korea's Kospi lost 1.6% to 1,918.55. Hong Kong's Hang Seng dropped 3.0% to 25,412.30, while the Shanghai Composite was down 1.2% at 2,863.32. Shares were also down in Singapore, Taiwan, Indonesia and Thailand. Stephen Innes, managing partner at Valour Markets in Singapore, compared the difficulty of assessing the volatile market situation to reading tea leaves. 'Nobody understands where the president is coming from,' he said, adding that the best thing Trump can do for market stability is to 'keep quiet.' 'The problem that we're faced right now is that we are making a lot of assumptions ahead of the economic realities,' he said. The market is now dominated by fears of a portending U.S. recession, although the American economy is actually holding up, and much of the U.S. economy is made up of consumption, Innes said. If interest rates come down, he added, consumer spending is likely to go up, working as a buffer for the economy. 'What the market's really waiting for is for them to drop interest rates,' Innes said. 'Right now, we are still sitting on that uncertainty.' The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged more than 600 points Friday after the latest escalation in the trade war between the U.S. and China rattled investors. The broad sell-off sent the S&P 500 to its fourth straight weekly loss. The tumbling began after Trump responded angrily on Twitter following China's announcement of new tariffs on $75 billion in U.S. goods. In one of his tweets he 'hereby ordered' U.S. companies with operations in China to consider moving them to other countries — including the U.S. Trump also said he'd respond directly to the tariffs — and after the market closed he delivered, announcing that the U.S. would increase existing tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods to 30% from 25%, and that new tariffs on another $300 billion of imports would be 15% instead of 10%. The ongoing trade dispute between Washington and Beijing, and especially its unpredictability, is certain to have damaging effects on Asia. The unpredictability affects the real decisions central banks make on fiscal policy and companies make on their strategies and investments, setting off ripples of uncertainty. Zhu Huani of Mizuho Bank in Singapore said that what he called Trump's 'tariff tantrum' was setting off 'the sense that tariffs could continue to rise,' with the 'the unpredictability of timing and extent of these trade actions risk accentuating the paralysis of business decisions and big-ticket business spending.' 'No matter which way you cut the cake, it is nearly impossible to construct a bullish, or even neutral scenario for equity markets today,' said Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at Oanda. The tweets from Trump around 11 a.m. Friday ignited a wave of selling. The S&P 500 fell 75.84 points, or 2.6%, to 2,847.11. The index is now down 4.5% for the month. It's still up 13.6% for the year. The Dow lost 623.34 points, or 2.4%, to 25,628.90. The Dow has had five declines of 2% or more this year, with three of them coming this month. The Nasdaq gave up 239.62 points, or 3%, to 7,751.77. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks skidded 46.52 points, or 3.1%, to 1,459.49. Trump also said Friday morning that he was 'ordering' UPS, Federal Express and Amazon to block any deliveries from China of the powerful opioid drug fentanyl. The stocks of all three companies fell as traders tried to assess the possible implications. Some analysts think the Federal Reserve will lower interest rates this year. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell indicated last week that the central bank was prepared to cut interest rates but gave no clear signal on when or by how much, while suggesting that uncertainty over Trump's trade wars have complicated the central bank's ability to set interest rate policy. A quarter-point rate cut reduction in September is considered all but certain. Some think the Fed will cut rates again in December. The price of benchmark crude fell 62 cents to $53.55 a barrel. It sank $1.18, or 2.1%, to settle at $54.17 a barrel Friday, as traders worried that the latest escalation in the trade battle could sap global demand for energy. Brent crude oil, the international standard, fell 58 cents to $58.76 a barrel. The dollar fell to 105.23 Japanese yen from 106.65 yen on Friday. The euro strengthened to $1.1146 from $1.1057. ___ AP Business Writers Alex Veiga and David Koenig contributed to this report.
  • Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has insulted adversaries and allies, disparaged women, blacks and homosexuals, and even praised his country's 1964-1985 dictatorship. Yet nothing has rallied more anger at home and criticism from abroad than his response to fires raging in parts of the Amazon region. The far-right populist leader initially dismissed the hundreds of blazes and then questioned whether activist groups might have started the fires in an effort to damage the credibility of his government, which has called for looser environmental regulations in the world's largest rainforest to spur development. In response, European leaders threatened to end a trade deal with Brazil and other South American nations. Thousands of people have demonstrated in cities across Brazil and outside Brazilian embassies around the world. #PrayforAmazonia became a worldwide trending topic. Pope Francis added his voice to the chorus of concern, warning that the 'lung of forest is vital for our planet.' Bolsonaro finally took a less confrontational approach Friday and announced he would send 44,000 soldiers to help battle the blazes, which mostly seem to be charring land deforested, perhaps illegally, for farming and ranching rather than burning through stands of trees. Some say it's not enough and comes too late. 'No democratic government has suffered such international criticism as Bolsonaro is going through,' said Mauricio Santoro, an international relations professor at Rio de Janeiro State University. 'By breaching international environmental agreements, Brazil has been discredited, blurred and unable to exercise any type of leadership on the international stage.' Brazilian military planes began dumping water on fires in the Amazon state of Rondonia over the weekend, and a few hundred of the promised troops deployed into the fire zone. But many Brazilians again took to the streets in Rio de Janeiro and other cities Sunday to demand the administration do more. Some held banners that read: 'Bol$onaro is burning our future.' Bolsonaro has previously described rainforest protections as an obstacle to Brazil's economic development. Critics say the record number of fires this year has been stoked by his encouragement of farmers, loggers and ranchers to speed efforts to strip away forest. Although he has now vowed to protect the area, they say it is only out of fear of a diplomatic crisis and economic losses. 'The international pressure today has a bigger impact than the demonstrations by Brazilians on the streets,' Santoro said. The leaders of the Group of Seven nations said Sunday that they were preparing a plan for helping Brazil battle the fires and repair the damage. French President Emmanuel Macron said the help would involve both technical and financial mechanisms 'so that we can help them in the most effective way possible.' German Chancellor Angela Merkel said her country and others will talk with Brazil about reforestation in the Amazon once the fires have been extinguished. 'Of course (this is) Brazilian territory, but we have a question here of the rainforests that is really a global question,' she said. 'The lung of our whole Earth is affected, and so we must find common solutions.' Fires are common during Brazil's dry season, but this year has set an alarming record. The country's National Space Research Institute, which monitors deforestation, has recorded more than 77,000 wildfires in Brazil this year. That is an 85% rise over last year, and about half of the fires have been in the Amazon region. 'We've had eight months without any type of concrete action in defense of the Amazon,' said Rómulo Batista, a member of Greenpeace Brazil's Amazonia Campaign. He said the flames licking over swaths of the Amazon are a reflection of Bolsonaro's environmental policy. 'The government created a sense of impunity among farmers who were willing to commit illegal acts to deforest,' he said. 'Thousands of species of plants and animals are being killed, many of them that we don't even know. The population of nearby cities is suffering terrible damage because they're breathing that air and it's causing them respiratory problems. And the rise in deforestation can completely alter the rain patterns by region and devastate agriculture, even in South America.' Bolsonaro has argued with critics who note that the Amazon produces vast amounts of oxygen and is considered crucial for efforts to contain climate change. But Batista predicts the fires will prove a turning point and the pressure by G-7 leaders will shift Bolsonaro's view on the environment. Brazil's federal police agency announced Sunday that it would investigate reports that farmers in the state of Para, one of those most affected by the blazes, had called for 'a day of fire' to ignite fires Aug. 10. Local news media said a group organized the action over WhatsApp to show support for Bolsonaro's efforts to loosen environmental regulations. Justice Minister Sergio Moro, who oversees the police, said on Twitter that Bolsonaro 'asked for a rigorous investigation' and said 'the criminal fires will be severely punished.' Merkel noted Bolsonaro is putting 'significant forces' into the effort to save the rainforest. But Bolsonaro has had a tense relationship with foreign governments — including Germany's — and non-governmental groups that he accuses of meddling in his country's management of the Amazon. Macron's office on Friday complained that the Brazilian leader 'had lied to him' about environmental commitments. Asked if he would speak with Macron, Bolsonaro said Saturday: 'If he calls me, I will answer. I am being extremely well-mannered with him even though he called me 'a liar.'' ___ Associated Press writer Luis Andres Henao reported this story in Porto Velho and AP writer Marcelo De Souza from Rio de Janeiro. AP journalists Frances D'Emilio in Rome, Sylvie Corbet and Lori Hinnant in Biarritz, France, and Geir Moulson in Berlin contributed to this report.
  • Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates pledged Monday to keep their floundering coalition war against Yemen's Houthi rebels together after an Emirati troop pullout and the rise of the southern separatists they supported. The joint communique came as the Houthis launched at least six ballistic missiles and two drone attacks into Saudi Arabia, keeping up its pressure on the kingdom as online infighting between the Emirati and Saudi intelligentsia exposed growing cracks between the usually lockstep oil-rich nations. The statement, carried by both the Emirati and Saudi state news agencies, said both nations' 'political, military, relief and development efforts' would continue. It also said the countries both rejected and condemned the 'accusations and defamation campaigns targeting the UAE' since its decision in June to begin withdrawing troops. The UAE, an autocratic federation of seven sheikhdoms home to Dubai, has not publicly acknowledged how many troops it withdrew from Yemen. Yemeni officials have suggested Emirati troop strength has dropped by as much as 75% out of around 10,000 troops. The Emirati withdrawal followed rising tensions between Iran and the U.S. over Tehran's collapsing nuclear deal with world powers, suggesting Abu Dhabi worried about having forces at home in case an armed conflict broke out. While Emirati troops often weren't directly involved in front-line combat, they organized local forces and handled intelligence operations in Yemen's south. Those forces included separatists seeking their own nation who have swept into areas to seize control from Yemen's internationally recognized government, leading to clashes between the supposed allies. The withdrawal of Emirati forces drew derision from Saudi-allied intellectuals online. The kingdom, itself an autocracy, has a tightly controlled media that has whipped up nationalistic fervor since the rise of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Prince Mohammed is thought to be very close to Abu Dhabi's powerful crown prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan. In recent days, even the foreign minister of Bahrain, an island nation closely tied to Saudi Arabia, stepped into the fray to say on Twitter that the spilled blood of Emirati war dead 'is not erased by statements that deny it.' Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia said it intercepted six ballistic missiles and two drones launched by the Houthis into the kingdom. The Houthis earlier said they launched 10 missiles. The discrepancy could not be immediately explained.
  • RAI state TV says seven people have been injured when a section of overhead monorail at an Italian amusement park crashed to the ground. None of the injured, including two children, suffered critical injuries. The accident occurred Sunday at Movieland, one of several attractions at Canevaworld amusement park in Lazise, a town on the shores of Lake Garda. Police were investigating the cause. After the accident, a stretch of twisted rail, with rail cars tipped to the side, lay on the ground.
  • A global attempt by more than 120 countries to find a way to more fairly tax global internet giants is moving ahead despite individual countries' deciding to impose their own tax, says the head of the international organization leading the project. Angel Gurria, secretary general of the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, said Sunday at the Group of Seven summit in France that 'what we are seeing is a very strong and a very clear signal of wanting to find a multilateral solution.' France introduced a 3% tax last month on digital companies that may be headquartered elsewhere but do billions in digital business such as advertising and retail in France. That includes companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook but also big Chinese and French online businesses too. The move has angered U.S. President Donald Trump, who is threatening tariffs on French wine in retaliation. The aim of the French tax is to stop the companies from setting up regional headquarters in low-tax jurisdictions to limit their exposure in high-tax countries like France. The French government says it will drop the tax if there's a solution in the OECD process, which aims for a result by the end of 2020. France and other countries that have moved toward a tax on digital companies have said they would 'sunset' their measures, meaning they would drop them if the OECD talks lead to a result. Under the OECD framework countries are working on a better way to define where companies are taxes. There is also a parallel effort to make sure that multinational corporations pay a minimum level of tax. The 36-country OECD is a source of economic data and brings together member and partner countries to work together on key global issues.
  • Injecting fresh uncertainty at a time of global economic jitters, President Donald Trump sent mixed messages Sunday on the U.S.-China trade war as leaders at a global summit pushed the unpredictable American president to ease frictions over tariffs and cooperate on other geopolitical challenges. Trump's head-snapping comments at the Group of Seven summit about his escalating trade fight with China — first expressing regret, then amping up tariff threats — represented just the latest manifestation of the hazards of the president's go-it-alone mantra. Allies fault his turbulent trade agenda for contributing to a global economic slowdown. Despite Trump's insistence that reports of U.S. tensions with allies are overblown, fissures between the U.S. and six of the world's other advanced economies were apparent on trade policy, Russia and Iran as the leaders gathered at a picturesque French beach resort. Two days after the U.S. and China traded a fresh round of retaliatory tariffs and Trump threatened to force U.S. businesses to cut ties with China, the president appeared to harbor qualms about the trade war, which has sent financial markets tumbling. Asked during a meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson if he had any second thoughts about escalating the trade conflict, Trump told reporters, 'Yeah. For sure.' He added, 'I have second thoughts about everything.' Hours later, the White House backpedaled. Press secretary Stephanie Grisham issued a statement saying the press had 'greatly misinterpreted' Trump's comments. She said the president only responded 'in the affirmative - because he regrets not raising the tariffs higher.' White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow, who was in the room when Trump spoke and was later interviewed by CBS' 'Face the Nation,' offered his own explanation. Kudlow claimed Trump 'didn't quite hear the question' although reporters asked the president three times whether he had any second thoughts about ramping up the trade war and he responded three times. At first, Trump's admission appeared to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the famously hardnosed leader. The subsequent explanation fits a pattern of Trump recoiling from statements he believes suggest weakness. Earlier this month, Trump backed off on a threat to place even tougher tariffs on Chinese imports as aides fretted about their impact on the holiday shopping season and growing fears of a recession in the U.S. Trump had hoped to use the summit to rally other leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the U.S. before he stands for reelection in November 2020. Johnson, for his part, praised Trump for America's economic performance — but chided the U.S. leader for his unbending China policy. 'Just to register a faint sheep-like note of our view on the trade war,' he told Trump. 'We're in favor of trade peace.' Trump said he had 'no plans right now' to follow through on his threat of an emergency declaration, but he insisted he would be within his rights to use a 1977 law designed to target rogue regimes, terrorists and drug traffickers as the newest weapon in the clash between the world's two largest economies 'If I want, I could declare a national emergency,' Trump said. He cited China's theft of intellectual property and the large U.S. trade deficit with China, saying 'in many ways that's an emergency.' For all of that, Trump disputed reports of friction with other G-7 leaders, saying he has been 'treated beautifully' since he arrived. The cracks started to emerge moments later after the French government said the leaders had agreed at a Saturday dinner that French President Emanuel Macron would deliver a message to Iran on behalf of the group. Trump denied he had signed off on any such message. 'No, I haven't discussed that,' he told reporters during a meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Administration officials said Trump was noncommittal when the leaders discussed the subject of a message to Iran during a conversation about Iran's nuclear program. For several months, Macron has assumed a lead role in trying to save the 2015 nuclear accord, which has been unraveling since Trump pulled the U.S. out of the agreement. The French went even further Sunday, inviting Iranian Foreign Minister Jawad Zarif to Biarritz in a bid to open talks meant on lowering tensions. Trump curtly told reporters he had 'no comment' on Zarif's presence. Officials said the White House was not aware in advance of the invitation to Zarif — a further indication of Trump's diminished role. Trump also faced opposition from European leaders over his stated desire to find a way to re-admit Russia to the G-7 before next year's meeting of the world leaders, which will be held in the United States. Russian President Vladimir Putin was expelled from the former G-7 in 2015 following Moscow's invasion of Ukraine. And, sitting feet away from Abe, Trump declined to forcefully condemn North Korea's flouting of international sanctions with a recent burst of short-range ballistic missile tests, calling them 'much more standard missiles. Abe views them as a critical security threat. Trump told reporters: 'We're in the world of missiles, folks, whether you like it or not.' ___ Follow Darlene Superville and Zeke Miller on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervillap and http://www.twitter.com/ZekeJMiller
  • Sudan's new prime minister said in an interview Sunday that ending his country's international pariah status and drastically cutting military spending are prerequisites for rescuing a faltering economy. Abdalla Hamdok, a respected former official with the U.N. Economic Commission for Africa, told The Associated Press that he has already talked to U.S. officials about removing Sudan from Washington's list of countries sponsoring terrorism, and portrayed their reaction as positive. He also called for sharply reducing military spending, hoping for a 'peace dividend' if current efforts to negotiate deals with armed rebels are successful. He said military spending takes up as much as 80% of the state budget. Sudan stagnated for three decades under former President Omar al-Bashir, convulsed by a bloody civil war and rebellions in its far-flung provinces. Al-Bashir's autocratic rule ended in April when the military ousted him after mass street protests by a pro-democracy movement, which began late last year. 'For 30 years, we were isolated,' Hamdok said in the interview in the capital of Khartoum. 'We were treated as a pariah state. We want to tell the world we are moving away from sanctions, issues of punishment and all that, to a Sudan that is coming back to the fold of normal nations.' As Sudan begins a new chapter, getting off America's state sponsor of terror list is the 'key to anything that we can do in this country,' Hamdok said, adding that a 'democratic Sudan is not a threat to anybody in the world.' Still, tensions between the military and civilians are expected to feature prominently in Hamdok's unruly transitional government, which is expected to last three years before general elections. In such an environment, Hamdok faces an uphill battle to carry out ambitious economic reforms, said Jehanne Henry, a Sudan researcher at Human Rights Watch. Henry said Hamdok 'has to work with the generals, who could veto things.' Although Hamdok heads the transitional Cabinet, the military leaders that ousted al-Bashir still want a large role in the transition. Sudan's top general, Abdel-Fattah Burhan, was sworn in Wednesday as the leader of a joint military-civilian Sovereign Council. Five of its 11 members are from the military. Hamdok said he is committed to making a partnership with the generals work. The United States named Sudan a state sponsor of terror in 1993, and the designation stuck through the al-Bashir regime. As one of the last acts of the Obama administration, the United States began a formal process to de-list Sudan in January 2017, but this was put on hold when mass protests began in December. Moves to de-list Sudan could resume once the country's political situation has stabilized. The U.S. State Department was not immediately available for comment Sunday. 'We appreciate and understand that there is a process, both I think in government and Congress,' Hamdok said, adding he hopes it happens soon because 'it has very serious implications on our situation.' Removing Sudan from the state sponsor of terror list would open the door to foreign investment and allow the country to receive a sorely needed International Monetary Fund and World Bank bailout package, Hamdok said. Sudan is nearly $60 billion in debt, and Hamdok said the interest on the debt payments is roughly $3 billion. He said his aim is economic stability and a properly managed currency, along with transparency and opportunities for foreign investors. 'If you make profit and you want to repatriate your profit, we will be open to that,' Hamdok said. 'This is the last frontier. The rest of the world has finished its infrastructure projects.' Hamdok said he wants to bring all state spending, including for the military under the control of the ministry of finance. Asked if the military budget should be smaller, Hamdok said: 'Absolutely.' Hamdok said ending the country's rebellions would allow him to allocate no more than 20% of the budget to the military. 'The rest of it should go to development issues — addressing issues of health, education and infrastructure development and reviving the economy,' he said. The economy largely stagnated under al-Bashir and sharply deteriorated last year, leading to the protests that eventually brought him down. During his rule, al-Bashir failed to keep the peace in the religiously and ethnically diverse nation, losing three quarters of Sudan's oil wealth when the mainly animist and Christian south seceded in 2011 following a referendum. Sudan is also one of the world's most corrupt nations. The power-sharing agreement signed this month between the military and protesters calls for the government to reach a peace agreement with armed groups within six months. The country's most infamous conflict, in the Darfur region, broke out in 2003. Al-Bashir's government mobilized Arab militias accused of burning villages to the ground, massacring civilians and carrying out mass rapes among non-Arabs in the region. Al-Bashir, who is imprisoned in the capital of Khartoum, faces charges of war crimes and genocide linked to the Darfur conflict, although the military has said he won't be extradited to the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Hamdok said that immediately after the new government is formed, a 'peace commission' will be established to try to reconcile with the country's armed groups. He also said there needs to be accountability for violence committed against rebels and against scores of protesters killed in the pro-democracy protests. 'Justice has to be resolved. And it has to be seen as being achieved,' he said. 'We will have to reach a conclusion that satisfies the victims.' 'In the past there were no intentions from both sides, the government and the armed groups, to reach an agreement,' he said. 'But today there is resolve, there is determination.' A cease-fire has held since the military overthrow of al-Bashir in April. The rebels had held rounds of talks with the now-dissolved military council and the pro-democracy movement. The military has taken trust-building moves, including dropping charges and death sentences against rebel leaders and releasing dozens of rebel prisoners. The armed groups had rejected a final deal between the civilians and government officials over the structures of the transitional government, Hamdok said.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 911 call led to the arrest of a Pennsylvania woman after police said they found her son home alone surrounded by drugs. >> Read more trending news  Police said Leslie Brown, 29, of Penn Hills, called them from a Family Dollar in Lincoln-Lemington saying her son was missing and she had lost sight of him in the store. Employees told WPXI-TV that she was frantic and that they searched every aisle and back room. Police said the child was never in the store with her but was at home alone surrounded by heroin. When police went to the home, they said the boy answered the door and police immediately saw bundles of heroin and stamp bags right next to where the child said he watched TV. Police said the boy told them: 'It's Mommy's medicine. She makes it sometimes.'  Brown admitted to making and selling heroin as her only source of income, according to police. Police said they found drugs in her home and car marked 'Power trip,' 'Panda,' 'Say hello to my little friend,' and 'Playboy.'  Brown was taken into custody and charged with endangering the welfare of children and nearly a half-dozen drug charges. Police said the child is safe and now with his grandparents.
  • Police are investigating after a 12-year-old boy was found shot at a Georgia elementary school. >> Read more trending news  The Rockdale County Sheriff's Office said deputies responded around 6:30 p.m. Friday to a person shot at Peek's Chapel Elementary School.  Deputies found a 12-year-old boy with a gunshot wound. He was taken to a local hospital, where he is in the intensive care unit but stable. His identity hasn't been released.  A 15-year-old has been charged with aggravated assault and aggravated battery. The teen's identity has not been released.  WSB-TV investigative reporter Nicole Carr was in Rockdale County, digging into how the shooting could have happened. The school district released a statement saying no students or staff were on campus at the time of the shooting:  'We are deeply concerned about the incident that occurred after hours on the property of Peek's Chapel Elementary Friday night. At this time, our thoughts and prayers are with the young man who was injured. Again, this occurred after hours when no students or staff were on campus. We will assist law enforcement as needed during their investigation.' Carr learned, however, that the campus was open to the public when the shooting happened because the school grounds and basketball court are open on evenings and weekends.  Carr spoke to a neighbor, who said the basketball court was full of young people as the helicopter took off with the injured child.  Another neighbor who has a grandson at the school, Angela Glenn, said enough is enough.  'I'm just worried about these kids,' Glenn said. 'First of all, how are they getting their hands on guns so easily, you know?
  • Officials are investigating after an explicit video was shared “inadvertently and unknowingly” from a Mississippi teacher’s phone, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  According to a statement from Horn Lake police, the department received information regarding the video Wednesday.  DeSoto County Schools are conducting an investigation into the video, which reportedly showed explicit content of a teacher in the district. Police said if there was a “criminal element regarding the release of the video,” Horn Lake officers will then initiate a full investigation. School officials have not identified the teacher who was seen in the video, and the contents of the video have not been released at this time. The school district did confirm to WHBQ that the teacher involved is no longer an employee there. Again, officials told WHBQ that the video was shared without the teacher’s knowledge.
  • This is a timely update to “Watching Tropical Depression Five’s path,” published August 24 at 3:39pm Tropical Depression Five has gained enough strength to become Tropical Storm Dorian, the National Hurricane Center announced Saturday evening. Dorian is the fourth tropical storm of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season. NHC Forecasters say it could turn into a hurricane by Thursday, August 29. Forecast cone as of 8/24/2019, courtesy of the National Hurricane Center (above)  Current models show a possibility that Dorian could strengthen even further after entering the Caribbean, impacting Puerto Rico and surrounding islands as a hurricane. In the same amount of time, while Dorian is still expected to gain strength as it passes over those warmer waters, there’s also a chance that it won’t amount to much more than heavy rain and winds. The NHC has issued two advisory points at the time of this report: 1. Dorian is forecast to strengthen and could be near hurricane strength when it approaches the Lesser Antilles on Tuesday (August 27). 2. It is too soon to determine the specific timing or magnitude of impacts in the Lesser Antilles, but tropical storm or hurricane watches may be needed for a portion of the area on Sunday (August 25). We’re still days away from learning what will be the case, so we’ll keep an eye on the tropics. While you’re here, check out our hurricane guide.
  • The Groveland Police Department said a pilot is dead after a plane crashed Friday morning. Police went to the crash site after the small two-seat ultralight plane went down near Sorrel Way and Homestead Drive around 11:15 a.m. The pilot was the only one on board the aircraft, according to police. Officials said the plane came from the Florida Flying Gators Airpark at 10817 Libby Road. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the scene.

Washington Insider

  • While Democrats still have over 20 major candidates competing for their party's nomination, the small 2020 GOP field has not created any concerns for the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump, as a former Tea Party Congressman announced this weekend he would take on Trump for the GOP nomination. 'He must not be re-elected,' Tea Party lawmakers turned conservative radio talk show host Joe Walsh wrote on Twitter Sunday night about President Trump. But a quick look back at Walsh's time in Congress, his attacks on President Barack Obama, and his recent change to hard-line Trump opponent didn't exactly leave political experts feeling like this was the start of something bad for Mr. Trump. On the ABC News program, 'This Week,' Walsh acknowledged that he was at the tip of the spear for Republicans in terms of pushing the party more and more to the right - creating an opening for President Trump. Also challenging the President is a former Governor of Massachusetts, William Weld - the Vice Presidential nominee of the Libertarian Party in 2016 - who has not moved the political meter against Mr. Trump. If one is looking to compare Weld, Walsh and any other GOP candidates, for a similar historical moment in modern Presidential politics, maybe you could look at 1968 when challenges built against President Lyndon B. Johnson, or in 1980, when Ted Kennedy took on President Jimmy Carter. But the difference is obvious right away - Walsh and Weld are not big names right now. Eugene McCarthy and Robert Kennedy were big names taking on LBJ. Ted Kennedy damaged Carter so much that it made Ronald Reagan's campaign that much easier. While President Trump has very strong approval ratings from Republican voters, his policies have certainly caused concerns among some in the GOP - like on tariffs - where President Trump has suddenly turned the party of free trade into the party of protectionism. 'The tariffs are attacks on the American people,' said ex-Rep. Dave McIntosh (R-IN), who now heads the conservative group Club for Growth, though McIntosh made clear he wasn't going to abandoning the President any time soon. Business groups - once a super reliable source of support for the GOP - are also increasingly going public with their concerns about the President's extra tariffs on China. 'Tariffs hurt retail,' said Matthew Shay, the head of the National Retail Federation. 'It's impossible for businesses to plan for the future in this type of environment,' the group said over the weekend. Other groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce fully support more aggressive American treatment of unfair trade practices by the Chinese - but they are worried the President's tariffs aren't the right answer. 'While we share the President’s frustration, we believe that continued, constructive engagement is the right way forward,' the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in a statement. But there's certainly been no rush to throw Mr. Trump overboard, no matter the policy differences.