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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    Hundreds of family members were waiting in desperation at a small port on Indonesia's Lake Toba for news of missing relatives as the search for more than 190 people unaccounted for after a ferry sinking entered its fourth day. Separately, Indonesia's President Joko 'Jokowi' Widodo called for an overhaul of safety standards for passenger boats in response to what is likely the worst sinking in the archipelago nation in more than a decade. Only 18 passengers were rescued and four confirmed dead since the overcrowded ferry sank early Monday evening in waters said to be up to 500 meters (1,640 feet) deep. No more bodies had been recovered as of midmorning Thursday.
  • The British government saw its flagship Brexit legislation pass through Parliament on Wednesday, but remains locked in a tussle with lawmakers over the direction of the country's departure from the European Union. The EU Withdrawal Bill was approved after Prime Minister Theresa May's government narrowly won a key vote. The House of Commons rejected by 319-303 a proposal to require Parliament's approval before the government agrees to a final divorce deal with the EU — or before walking away from the bloc without an agreement. Later in the day, the withdrawal bill — intended to replace thousands of EU rules and regulations with U.K. statute on the day Britain leaves the bloc — also passed in the unelected House of Lords, its last parliamentary hurdle. It will become law once it receives royal assent, a formality. A majority of lawmakers favor retaining close ties with the bloc, so if the amendment requiring parliamentary approval had been adopted, it would have reduced the chances of a 'no deal' Brexit. That's a scenario feared by U.K. businesses but favored by some euroskeptic members of May's Conservative minority government, who want a clean break from the EU. May faced rebellion last week from pro-EU Conservative legislators, but avoided defeat by promising that Parliament would get a 'meaningful vote' on the U.K.-EU divorce agreement before Brexit occurs in March. Pro-EU lawmakers later accused the government of going back on its word by offering only a symbolic 'take it or leave it' vote on the final deal and not the ability to take control of the negotiations. Labour Party Brexit spokesman Keir Starmer accused May of telling Parliament: 'Tough luck. If you don't like my proposed deal, you can have something much worse.' The rebels sought to amend the flagship bill so they could send the government back to the negotiating table if they don't like the deal, or if talks with the EU break down. The government claimed that would undermine its negotiating hand with the EU. 'You cannot enter a negotiation without the right to walk away,' Brexit Secretary David Davis told lawmakers. 'If you do, it rapidly ceases to be a negotiation.' But Davis also told lawmakers it would be for the Commons speaker to decide whether lawmakers could amend any motion on a Brexit deal that was put to the House of Commons. The concession was enough to get Conservative lawmaker Dominic Grieve, a leader of the pro-EU rebel faction, to back down and say he would support the government. Grieve said the government had acknowledged 'the sovereignty of this place (Parliament) over the executive.' While the withdrawal bill cleared a major hurdle, the government faces more tumult in Parliament in the months to come over other pieces of Brexit legislation. It has been two years since Britain voted by 52-48 percent to exit the 28-nation EU after four decades of membership, and there are eight months until the U.K. is due to leave the bloc on March 29, 2019. But Britain — and its government — remains divided over Brexit, and EU leaders are frustrated with what they see as a lack of firm proposals from the U.K about future relations. May's government is divided between Brexit-backing ministers such as Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson who support a clean break with the EU, and those such as Treasury chief Philip Hammond who want to keep closely aligned to the bloc, Britain's biggest trading partner. A paper setting out the U.K. government position on future relations, due to be published this month, has been delayed until July because the Cabinet cannot agree on a united stance. The European Parliament's leader on Brexit, Guy Verhofstadt, said Wednesday that he remains hopeful a U.K.-EU withdrawal agreement could be finalized by the fall so national parliaments have time to approve it before March. 'The worst scenario for both parties is no deal,' he told a committee of British lawmakers. 'The disruption that would create to the economy, not only on the continent but certainly in Britain, would be huge and that we have to avoid.
  • In an outpouring of concern prompted by images and audio of children crying for their parents, hundreds of thousands of people worldwide are donating to nonprofit organizations to help families being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. Among those that have generated the most attention is a fundraiser on Facebook started by a Silicon Valley couple, who say they felt compelled to help after they saw a photograph of a Honduran toddler sobbing as her mother was searched by a U.S. border patrol agent. The fundraiser started by David and Charlotte Willner had collected nearly $14 million by Wednesday afternoon. The Willners, who have a 2-year-old daughter, set up the 'Reunite an immigrant parent with their child' fundraiser on Saturday hoping to collect $1,500 — enough for one detained immigrant parent to post bond — but money began pouring in and within days people had donated $5 million to help immigrant families separated under the Trump administration's 'zero-tolerance' policy that criminally prosecutes all adults caught crossing the border illegally. 'What started out as a hope to help one person get reunited with their family has turned into a movement that will help countless people,' the couple said in a statement released by a spokeswoman Wednesday. The couple, who were early employees at Facebook, declined to be interviewed. 'Regardless of political party, so many of us are distraught over children being separated from their parents at the border.' The money collected from more than 300,000 people in the United States and around the world will be given to the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, or RAICES, a Texas nonprofit that that offers free and low-cost legal services to immigrants. After days of mounting pressure, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday ending the process of separating children from families at the border. The order keeps families together while they are in custody, expedites their cases, and asks the Department of Defense to help house them but it is not clear what will happen to the families who have already been separated. 'The photos of the little girl crying while her mother is body searched/removing her shoe laces has rocked me to my core,' Natalia Barnes, of New Zealand, wrote on RAICES's Facebook page. 'Please tell us you will be able to reunite that baby with her mother!!' RAICES said Wednesday it will use the funds not only to reunite families and provide legal services, but to start a joint reunification fund for the more than 2,300 migrant children that have been separated from their families at the border with Mexico since May. 'We've been occasionally crying around the office all day when we check the fundraising totals,' RAICES wrote on Facebook. 'This is such a profound rejection of the cruel policies of this administration. Take heart.' Donations have also been pouring in at the American Civil Liberties Union, which has focused on defending immigrant families, said Mark Wier, the ACLU's chief development officer. The ACLU has raised $2.5 million online from more than 40,000 people since June 14, when celebrity couple Chrissy Teigen and John Legend donated $72,000 each to the organization in honor of Trump's 72nd birthday. 'We've also seen people launch more than 200 peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns on the ACLU's website alone,' he said. The outpouring is similar to the promulgation of the Trump administration's first so-called Muslim ban in January 2017, when the ACLU received $24 million in online donations in two days, Wier said. RAICES, which has 50 lawyers, said it also plans to hire more attorneys, train more volunteers and even set up a network of therapists and psychologists to help children when they leave detention, Jenny Hixon, RAICES's development director, told the Washington Post. 'It's not just the funding. We're getting literally thousands of people contacting us, wanting to volunteer. Many are like, 'I'll come to Texas,'' Hixon said. Markus Klofelt, a father of two from Stockholm, Sweden, said he felt compelled to help after seeing his Facebook newsfeed filled with news about families being torn apart. 'As parents and out of humanity and morality, we felt we needed to be part of this campaign,' Klofelt said. The technology consultant said the news in Sweden has also been overwhelmingly about what is happening in the United States even though Europe is also struggling to deal with an influx of refugees from Africa and the Middle East.
  • ABC News is apologizing for a graphic that incorrectly said that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort had pleaded guilty to five charges of manslaughter. The graphic aired Wednesday during live coverage of President Trump's meeting with congressional leaders, where it was announced he would sign an executive order ending the practice of splitting up families being prosecuted for illegally crossing the border. ABC said it is investigating to find out how such a graphic was in its system and how it was allowed to get on the air. The network said it apologized to its viewers and Manafort. 'There simply is no excuse for this sort of mistake,' the network said. Trump pointed out the mistake on his Twitter account, linking to a picture of himself that ran on ABC above the faulty chyron. 'Look what Fake ABC News put out,' Trump wrote. 'I guess they had it prepared from the 13 Angry Democrats leading the Witch Hunt!
  • Fair or not, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen will probably always be the face of family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. The brusque 46-year-old former Bush administration official this week became known as the Cabinet member who skewed the facts at a combative press conference in defense of President Donald Trump's 'zero-tolerance' policy, and who convened a 'working dinner' at a Mexican restaurant while audio of hysterical Spanish-speaking children circulated on social media. On Wednesday, she helped Trump walk it back with a new executive order that would reverse the decision. She got praise from the president. But several congressional Democrats had already demanded her resignation, with one senator repeatedly accusing her of lying and quoting Martin Luther King Jr. in a tweet criticizing the Cabinet secretary. 'He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it,' tweeted Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., after reports that Nielsen had denied family separations at the border was a form of child abuse. 'We have high standards,' Nielsen had told reporters earlier this week in defending the policy. 'We give them meals and we give them education and we give them medical care. There are videos, there are TVs.' According to people close to the secretary, family separations weren't her idea. One person, who like the others spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly, said Nielsen had been 'working nonstop' to find a solution. The polarizing path Nielsen has taken is somewhat surprising for a government bureaucrat and policy wonk known more for her loyalty to White House chief of staff John Kelly and her expertise in cybersecurity than the hardline immigration views espoused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions and White House adviser Stephen Miller. Nielsen was considered an expert in both homeland and national security policy who worked in the Bush administration and had a hand in its handling of Hurricane Katrina. Two years after the 2005 hurricane, Congress issued reports that faulted the White House Homeland Security Council — where Nielsen directed preparedness and response — for failing to take the lead in staying on top of the unfolding disaster. Following Trump's election, Nielsen joined the transition team, on the recommendation of several former co-workers, to help guide Kelly through the confirmation process to become Trump's secretary of homeland security. Nielsen quickly won the retired general's trust, impressing him with her work ethic and command of the issues. A constant presence in Kelly's orbit, Nielsen followed the retired general to the White House and quickly established herself as the West Wing 'enforcer.' But, people inside and outside the White House also complained she was controlling access to Kelly, alienating staffers and failing to return phone calls — criticism that often comes with any chief of staff job. Trump eventually tapped Nielsen to take over as head of the sprawling Department of Homeland Security, and the Senate confirmed her last Dec. 5. By April, Sessions announced there would be 'zero tolerance' at the border for people crossing illegally. That meant that anyone who did not arrive at a designated port of entry and claimed asylum would be arrested. As public backlash grew, Nielsen misled the public by denying that separating families was part of U.S. policy. While the policy never specifically called for children to be taken from parents, separation became inevitable. That's because the adult was detained and charged — and any children traveling with them couldn't go to jail with them. Nielsen, like Trump, also suggested that it was up to Congress to fix the problem — even though the enforcement of laws happens at the president's discretion. The Bush and Obama administrations largely allowed families to stay together. Nielsen undercut her own argument Wednesday when she abruptly reversed course and headed to Capitol Hill to brief lawmakers on an executive order ending separations. While her allies say she was merely following the law, it's likely there was another reason Nielsen tirelessly defended the policy: She has a track record of working to make her bosses happy. Also, her history with Trump was bumpy. Earlier this spring, Trump had unloaded on Nielsen during a Cabinet meeting over a spike in border apprehensions and legal setbacks, according to people familiar with the exchange. Nielsen, one person said, tried to explain the issues were complex and that the department's powers were limited by legal restrictions. She told the president her team was doing everything it could, but the president was left unconvinced. After news of the dressing-down spread, Nielsen did not deny the meeting had grown heated and issued a statement saying, 'I share his frustration.' By Tuesday, Nielsen appeared to be back in Trump's good graces, with the president tweeting praise for her press conference. And at the order-signing Wednesday, Trump invited first Vice President Mike Pence and then Nielsen, standing to his right, to speak. She thanked Trump for his leadership. The president looked over his shoulder at Nielsen and issued more praise: 'Great job.' Trump then signed the order and handed Nielsen the pen. ___ AP reporters Colleen Long, Jill Colvin and Laurie Kellman contributed to this report.
  • Egypt arrived in Russia with Mohamed Salah and some high expectations. The team, playing at the World Cup for the first time since 1990, was sure it had the ability to grind out results, even with Salah still recovering from a shoulder injury. But after two matches, the Egyptians were eliminated. 'I always say that behind a player there must be a team,' Egypt coach Hector Cuper said after Tuesday's 3-1 loss to Russia. 'I feel proud we had a team, but perhaps we weren't decisive enough.' Salah was hurt last month in the Champions League final. He dressed for the opening match, but sat on the bench as Egypt held Uruguay scoreless for 89 minutes. Eventually, however, Uruguay scored and won. Salah started the second match against Russia and even scored from the penalty spot, but the host nation also proved to be too much. Those two losses combined with wins for both Russia and Uruguay over Saudi Arabia confirmed the team's elimination despite one final Group A match on Monday. Most of the expectation, and pretty much all of the hype, had been placed on the shoulders of the 26-year-old Salah, who scored 44 goals in 51 games for Liverpool and was named Premier League player of the year. But he clearly lacked match fitness in his World Cup debut, only showing a few glimpses of the speed and marksmanship he has displayed over the last year. Still, he was by far the most dangerous of Egypt's forward trio even if he was missing the kind of service he normally receives at Liverpool. Cuper said Salah had not undergone the intense training his teammates had in the three weeks prior to the World Cup. He missed warm-up matches against Kuwait, Colombia and Belgium. Salah apart, Egypt typically gave the ball away too easily, didn't threaten and made defensive blunders that belied the solid reputation of a back four led by West Bromwich Albion defender Ahmed Hegazy. Egypt's run to the World Cup, and the sensational exploits of Salah in both the shirt of the national team and Liverpool, raised the level of soccer madness back at home recently. The results in Russia have divided the millions of fans in Egypt who have been captivated by the squad since qualification in October, with one side being harshly critical while others resign themselves to the limitations of the team. News of the loss to Russia made the front page of every Cairo daily, but the tone varied. Careful not to allow the result to deepen popular discontent over a recent wave of steep price hikes for fuel, drinking water and electricity, the staunchly pro-government Al-Youm Al-Sabae, or Seventh Day, ran the headline: 'You have done us proud.' But the independent Al-Shorouk said the team was 'clinically' out of the tournament. Sports commentators and social media users, whose views are often more reflective of the mood on the streets, blamed Cuper's tactics, his selection of players and a large group of wealthy businessmen, actors and TV personalities who they accuse of distracting the players the day before the game against Russia by staying at the team's hotel in St. Petersburg. 'Who allowed this chaos at the squad's hotel?' said Ibrahim Fayeq, a sports anchor at a private TV channel. 'And who convinced these celebrities that their presence was so essential for Egypt to win?' ___ Associated Press writer Samy Magdy in Cairo contributed to this report. ___ More AP World Cup coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/WorldCup
  • Nothing has stopped Argentine fan Nora Espector from following Lionel Messi wherever he plays. Espector, who needs a wheelchair because she has multiple sclerosis, traveled to the World Cup in Russia with her youngest son. The soccer passion runs in her family: Her grandfather worked for popular Argentine club Boca Juniors. Growing up, he would take her to watch games at the Bombonera, the club's stadium which translates to Chocolate Box. The 55-year-old Espector is a self-described heart and soul Boca fan, but above all, she feels admiration and motherly love for the Argentina captain and five-time world player of the year. 'I have a son who is (Messi's) age, and that makes me identify a lot with him,' said Espector, who works in the tourism industry in the Patagonian ski resort of Bariloche. 'I'm touched by his story, and always think about his mom. I always thought he was a special person. Such a down to earth kid, so humble in his way of being, a magical human being,' she said. 'And he's miraculous as a soccer player. Sometimes, I think we're not worthy of him' given the way he's sometimes criticized in Argentina. Messi quit the national team following three successive losses in finals: the 2014 World Cup, the 2015 Copa America and 2016 Copa America. He later returned on a wave of support after fans, players, and even Argentina's president asked him to reconsider. But he has faced criticism again after the 1-1 draw in Argentina's opening game to Iceland, where he missed a penalty shot. 'The tie is not so bad,' Espector said. 'It's not a failure. The Icelanders put in place an impassable wall.' The two points lost to Iceland also don't bother her as much, because she says that in her family, 'there's great affection' for Nordic people. Espector's former husband and the father of her three sons, is Swedish, and she lived there for two years. This is the third time that she is seeing Messi in person. She also attended a 'clasico' match which Barcelona won 2-1 over Real Madrid in 2013, and a game in 2016 against Deportivo La Coruna, where she stayed in the same hotel as the players of the Catalan club. That time, she got to see the Argentina captain up close. 'I couldn't believe it. I was so emotional that I broke down in tears,' she said. Espector enrolled in Russian language lessons so she could know the basics before the tournament kicked off on June 14. 'She can read a lot (in Cyrillic), and that's very helpful to us,' said her son, Emil Davisson, 26, who also works in the tourism industry in Bariloche. The mother and son rent cars to travel to the cities, and park close to the stadium with special permission. 'The (World Cup's) organization is very good,' Davisson said. 'Going to the stadium is not that complicated, the hotels and transportation part is more complex,' said Davisson, who is the youngest of three brothers. Davisson said that people in wheelchairs have a section reserved for them at the stadium at the front and sides of the stands. 'If people stand up, they block you, so I lift my mom and hold her up,' he said. 'Nothing stops us. I'll solve anything that comes along.' His mom chimed in: 'I feel like I won an award,' she said proudly. 'He's with me and supports me with everything.' The trip to Russia came after they applied for special tickets noting that Espector is in a wheelchair. They got five games at a total cost of $660. They then traveled with air miles to New York, and only paid for airfare from there to Moscow. 'It's a sacrifice, but we've been saving for the trip since we found out that we had tickets,' Espector said. 'All the money coming in was reserved to pay for this trip.' Soccer is only part of the experience. 'Besides the games, we're thrilled about what surrounds them — the colorful atmosphere. It's something that transcends scores,' Espector said at the hotel where she is staying in the Russian city of Nizhny Novgorod before Thursday's Argentina-Croatia game. Although she obviously wants Argentina to win, she says no one should question Messi regardless of the score. 'No one can talk badly about him in front of me. My friends know that,' she said. 'You just don't mess with my children!' ___ More AP World Cup coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/WorldCup
  • Pope Francis backed the Catholic bishops in the United States who condemned the practice of separating children from parents after families are caught crossing the U.S-Mexico border illegally, according to an interview published Wednesday. Francis was asked about the family-separation policy during the interview with Reuters conducted Sunday. The pope replied: 'Let it be clear that on these things I respect' the bishops' stance. Galveston-Houston Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, who heads the U.S. bishops' conference, said last week that 'separating babies from their mothers is not the answer and is immoral.' Francis said during the Vatican interview that his position on both that issue and U.S. developments in general 'lines up with the Episcopate.' 'I take the side of the Episcopate and stand behind them. Not to wash my hands, but because I don't know well things from there,' Reuters quoted the pontiff saying. He recalled celebrating Mass near the border during his 2016 visit to Mexico. Cardinal DiNardo said in a June 13 statement that he was joining Bishop Joe Vasquez, who chairs the conference's committee on migration, in 'condemning the continued use of family separation at the U.S./Mexico border as an implementation of the (Trump) administration's zero-tolerance policy.' However, Francis told Reuters that the problem with American immigration policy 'isn't just Trump's, but also of the governments before.' Elsewhere in the interview, Francis was asked for his solutions within the context of Europe's mass migration debate. Italy's new populist government this month refused to give a Mediterranean Sea rescue ship carrying 630 migrants permission to dock. The country's right-wing interior minister also criticized the pope for urging people to show more solidarity with migrants, saying Francis should take more new arrivals at the Vatican. 'It's not easy, but populisms aren't the solution,' the pope said. He added: 'I believe you mustn't push back people who arrive, you must receive them, help' them, as well as 'see where they will be put, but everywhere in all of Europe. Italy and Greece have been courageous and generous in welcoming these people.' Francis also was asked for his opinion on the Trump administration's decisions to withdraw the United States from an international accord on climate change and to take 'steps backward in relations with Cuba.' The pope helped broker the re-establishment of diplomatic ties between Cuba and the United States under U.S. President Barack Obama. 'About Cuba, I was saddened because it was a good step forward, but I don't want to judge because to take a decision of that kind, he (Trump) would have had some motive,' Francis said. Francis also has spoken out about the threat of global warming and urged oil company executives to work on finding clean energy sources. 'Yes, President Trump's decision on Paris caused me some pain because the future of humanity is at stake,' he said. 'But he sometimes makes it understood that he will rethink it, and I hope that he'll rethink well the Paris accords.
  • A meeting of Italy's anti-migrant interior minister with like-minded Austrian populist leaders on Wednesday in Rome heralded a new hard-line axis forming in Europe on migration issues with pledges to more firmly protect Europe's southern border. Italy's interior minister, Matteo Salvini, leveraged on his recent refusal to allow landfall in Sicily to a ship carrying some 630 migrants rescued at sea off the Libyan coast. The new Socialist government in Spain agreed to take them in, acknowledging Europe had abandoned Italy, after the tiny island nation of Malta also balked. 'It is a historic moment because Europe has never had the possibility to change like in these days. We think it can change for the better on the topics of immigration, security and the fight against terrorism. Finally there is a decision to protect the exterior border,' Salvini said. Salvini and his Austrian counterparts — vice chancellor Heinz Christian Strache and interior minister Herbert Kickl — signaled their common approach to reinforcing the exterior border while deferring specifics to Austria's EU presidency, and other forums, including an upcoming EU summit. Salvini said he was briefing Premier Conte and vice premier Luigi Di Maio on his proposals later in the day. But Salvini made clear that he would continue to press neighbors to do more. While welcoming Spain's acceptance of the migrants, he noted that Spain has only taken 235 of an agreed-upon EU quota of 3,265. 'They can take the next four boats that arrive,' he said. He also slammed France, which has only taken 640 of the 9,800 migrants it has pledged to receive. Salvini said he had trust in the Austrian EU presidency to make a difference in discussions about changing the Dublin accords, noting 'the mood has changed,' but also hinting that Italy would be willing to play hardball, and hold back payments to the EU, if significant changes were not made. Salvini said he wanted to see EU funds better spent, and said he would travel to Libya, the main departure point for migrants heading to Italy, in the coming days to work on stemming the migrant tide as well as economic development issues. While more than 640,000 migrants have arrived in Italy since 2014, the number of arrivals in Italy this year is down over 80 percent, to over 14,500. Austria's interior minister, Kickl, said the message had to go out 'that those who rely on traffickers have given up all chances of asylum in Europe.' Kickl said they were examining the possibility of setting up centers in the Balkans for asylum-seekers whose applications have been rejected, saying 'if they stay in the country, there is no difference between a negative and a positive response.
  • Hungarian lawmakers voted to tighten the country's asylum eligibility rules and threatened Wednesday to incarcerate people who help asylum-seekers, votes that coincided with a United Nations' observance dedicated to refugees. The approved changes include a constitutional amendment making it more difficult for refugees to qualify for asylum depending on how they reached Hungary. For example, asylum-seekers' claims will be rejected if they traveled through countries where they were not persecuted or at risk of persecution. The criteria would make it possible to turn back Syrian refugees who cross into Hungary from Serbia, like most now do after following a route through the Balkan region to western Europe. The amendment passed on a 159-5 vote, with lawmakers from Prime Minister Viktor Orban's Fidesz party, a small ally party and the nationalist Jobbik party all in support. The National Assembly also voted 160-18 to pass the so-called 'Stop Soros' law, which allows criminal penalties of up to a year in prison for those convicted of aiding asylum-seekers. Orban blames financier George Soros and civic groups he supports for encouraging mass migration to Europe, charges they deny. The law applies to 'the promotion of illegal immigration' and would criminalize acts such as distributing informational leaflets or organizing 'border observation.' 'The Stop Soros bill and the constitutional amendment vindicate the will of the Hungarian people, entailing a new, strong protection for the country against illegal migration,' Orban's office said after the votes. Orban has become an unrelenting opponent of immigration, especially by the Muslims he repeatedly calls a threat to Christian Europe. He was elected in April to a third consecutive term, his fourth overall, after campaigning almost exclusively on an anti-migration platform. Migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees, even those Hungary recognizes as deserving protection, already have been affected by Orban's uncompromising policies. His government has greatly restricted benefits and assistance for people escaping persecution or violence who hope to settle in Hungary. One of the civic groups targeted by the 'Stop Soros' bill is the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, which receives some of its funding from Soros. 'The Hungarian government has decided to persecute instead of to provide protection against persecution,' co-chair Marta Pardavi said. 'The Hungarian government has followed through with its nasty campaign promise of punishing those who give humanitarian or legal assistance to people who are seeking protection in Hungary.' Hungary passed the Stop Soros law despite calls from the Council of Europe to wait for an opinion on the legislation experts on its Venice Commission plan to issue Friday. A separate proposal by the Hungarian Finance Ministry would impose a 25 percent 'special tax on immigration' on the revenues of civic groups assisting asylum seekers and refugees. Amnesty International called the new laws 'draconian' 'Criminalizing essential and legitimate human rights work is a brazen attack on people seeking safe haven from persecution,' Amnesty Europe director Gauri van Gulik said. 'It is a new low point in an intensifying crackdown on civil society and it is something we will resist every step of the way.' The amendment included articles unrelated to migration that also legalize long-desired government initiatives. These include a ban on homelessness, the creation of new courts to handle public administration cases, new rules which critics fear will be used to limits protests and an obligation for the Hungarian state to 'defend' the country's Christian culture.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Officer identified the teenager as Antwon Rose of Rankin. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year. Update 5:30 p.m. ET:  The mayor of East Pittsburgh confirmed that the officer involved in the shooting Tuesday night was sworn in to their department a few hours before. He has been an officer with other departments in the area for seven years. He still has not been identified. Update 4 p.m. ET:  The family of Antwon Rose has hired civil rights Attorney Lee Merritt to represent them. Merritt has previously represented the victims of violence in Charlottesville and several cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement. Update 2:53 p.m. ET:  Rose was shot three times while running from police, said Coleman McDonough, superintendent of the Allegheny County Police Department. McDonough said two guns were found in the car after the traffic stop, but Rose was not armed at the time of the shooting. The driver of the vehicle was initially detained by police. He has since been released, police said. A third person who was in the vehicle and fled has not been located. The East Pittsburgh police officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto released the following statement: “Any loss of life is tragic, and especially the loss of life of a child. This is a devastating situation and I am saddened for Antwon Rose and his family.  “While Tuesday's shooting was not within the city's official borders it impacts all of us in the Pittsburgh region, and particularly those in the African American community. In my reactions to the incident I should have acknowledged that these shootings affect all of us, no matter where we live, and for that I am sorry.  “Tuesday night I was receiving numerous calls and messages asking me to respond to the involvement of police in a shooting in East Pittsburgh borough, and at the time I was attempting to clarify for the national public that the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, which I ultimately oversee, were not involved.”   Original Story:  According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock. >> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street. An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials. Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in 'so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred.' The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center. The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 
  • Florida Gov. Rick Scott has joined other leaders to urge the federal government to stop separating children from their parents when they enter the U.S. illegally. Scott sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Tuesday. Read: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen taunted by protesters as she eats at Mexican restaurant U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a cover-up after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived at the country illegally. Read: Sen. Nelson, other lawmakers denied entry to facility housing immigrant children in Florida Nelson said on the Senate floor Wednesday that he wanted to check to see if the facility was clean and wanted to see where the children were sleeping. .@SenBillNelson: “I wanted to see for myself. I wanted to see, is the facility clean? Are the children sleeping in beds? I also wanted to be able to talk to the young children, the ones who had been separated.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Nelson said the deputy HHS secretary told him it was the department's policy that he would have to fill out a form and wait two weeks before a visit. Nelson told the Senate floor he filled out the form. 'Why do they not want the senator from Florida to get into this detention facility where there are children that have been separated from their parents?' Nelson asked. 'It must be that not only is this department policy, this is being directed from the president in the White House, and they don't want me to see it because they don't want us to know what is going on in there.' Read: Trump announces plan to keep migrant families together Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, ages 13 to 17 -- most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. At some point, the facility had been closed, but it reopened in February, officials said. Martin Levine was one of several protesters who demonstrated outside the Homestead Detention Facility Wednesday. 'The kids were totally innocent. Why not put them together with their parents, which is what the policy used to be?' he said. 'It's never too late to do the right thing. So I would praise him to do the right thing.' President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order, which requires authorities to stop separating immigrant families. 'I didn't like the sight or the feeling of families being separated,' Trump said. 'I consider this to be a very important executive order. It's about keeping families together.' The order doesn't outline a plan for reuniting the 2,300 children who have already been separated from their parents. It's unknown when they'll be released. Immigration attorney Nayef Mubarak told Channel 9 the order is not a simple fix. 'What this does end is perhaps separating a mother and a child, each being in separate cells. But now these children will be in cells indefinitely until their court case has been concluded,' he said. 'It's clear here that these children are not getting out of these facilities, and there's no clear end as to when they're going to be getting out.' The order doesn't change the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy of prosecuting anyone who tries to cross the border illegally. Attorneys expect the order to be challenged in court. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Download: WFTV news and weather apps .@SenBillNelson: “The power to end this painful chapter in American history lies with the President and his pen.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Watch below: Sen. Nelson speaks to Senate floor about denied entry to Homestead facility
  • Award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore said he knew he had managed to capture the emotional impact of the Trump administration’s immigration policy just moments after photographing a young Honduran girl crying at her mother’s feet last week. >> Read more trending news The image appeared on television sets, computer screens and newspaper front pages around the globe. The photo spurred a California couple to start a fundraiser that has since raised millions of dollars to help migrants detained on suspicion of illegally crossing the border. It spurred public outrage over the immigration policy that led to the separation of thousands of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Couple raises more than $4.7 million to help reunite migrant children, parents Moore told The Washington Post that he noticed the girl when her mother stopped to breastfeed her in the middle of the road on June 12. She and dozens of other migrants, nearly all women and children, were stopped by the Border Patrol agents just after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas. “There was no place for privacy,” Moore told the Post. “(The mother) said they’d been on the road for a month, and they were from Honduras. I can only imagine what dangers she’d passed through, alone with the girl.” The woman gave Moore permission to follow her and her 2-year-old daughter as Border Patrol agents processed them, the Post reported. It was after agents confiscated their personal items, when the girl’s mother put her on the ground to allow an agent to search her, that the girl started to wail. The moment passed quickly. “I took a knee and had very few frames of that moment before it was over,” Moore told NPR. “And I knew at that moment that this point in their journey, which was very emotional for me to see them being detained, for them was just part of a very, very long journey.” Moore told the Post that the feeling he had after photographing the girl was similar to emotions he felt while covering war zones and Ebola wards abroad. 'Ever since I took those pictures, I think about that moment often. And it's emotional for me every time,' he told NPR. “I do not know what happened to them. I would very much like to know.” >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. According to CNN, a spokesman later told them that the girl and mother in the viral photo were not separated. President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice.
  • A woman said she was robbed at gunpoint in her own driveway after driving 80 miles home from a shopping trip. Police believe the robbers may have followed her from the shopping center in Atlanta to her home in Dalton. Brittany McEntire told WSB that two men robbed her at gunpoint about three weeks ago. Her mother, husband and three children were also in the driveway.  >> Read more trending news  McEntire said the two men ran up the driveway and took her two Louis Vuitton diaper bags and demanded all of her jewelry, including her late father’s ring that she cherishes. She said the whole robbery took less than a minute, but she has not regained her peace of mind. “I could’ve lost my whole family if they had started shooting,” McEntire told WSB. The suspects allegedly followed McEntire from Buckhead for about two hours in an unidentified white car, police said. McEntire said she is unsure why she was targeted because she did not take home many bags from the store.  “It was not a shopping spree,” McEntire said. Police believe the men will try to follow and rob more people.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice. Update 10:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Democrats took a stand on the floor of the U.S. Senate against President Donald Trump’s immigration plan just hours after the president signed an executive order revoking his policy of separating migrant children from their parents during illegal border crossings. Democrats, who spoke from the Senate floor for two hours, warned that the executive order will worsen the crisis along the U.S.-Mexico border, The Hill reported. 'If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ... Does anybody really believe that we should be imprisoning for an indefinite period of time little children,' Sanders said. Update 6:45 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order overturning his administration’s own policy of separating migrant families at the border. “I am glad the president took this step today,” McConnell tweeted. “When families with children breach our border, we should keep those families together whenever possible while our legal system fairly and promptly evaluates their status,” McConnell said. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Some Republican senators have expressed relief that President Donald Trump rescinded the policy separating migrant families at the border. Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who introduced legislation to address the family separation issue at the border, said Trump’s executive order was a good move, but that Congress needs to act. “I’m pleased the administration has agreed to keep families apprehended at the border together. We can have strong border security without separating parents from their children,” he said on Twitter. Update 6 p.m. EDT June 20: Democratic senators are weighing in on President Donald Trump’s decision to end the practice of separating children from their families during illegal border crossings. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said Trump is actually “doubling down” on his zero tolerance policy with his signing of the executive order. “His new executive order criminalizes asylum-seekers and seeks to indefinitely detain their children,” Durbin said in a tweet. Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) also tweeted that Trump’s executive order does not end the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. “ In fact, the President now wants to detain parents and children together indefinitely, and contemplates DoD building internment camps to house them. This is no solution to a problem Trump created,” Markey said. Update 4 p.m. EDT June 20: White House officials on Wednesday afternoon released the full text of the executive order signed by the president. >> Trump ends migrant family separations: Read the executive order In it, Trump directed officials to detain migrant families together. Officials have come under fire in recent months after reports surfaced that migrant children were being taken from their parents at the border. The order did not address what will happen to children and parents who are currently separated and in government custody. Update 3:20 p.m. EDT June 20: Trump signed the order, which will keep families together but continue the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, on Wednesday afternoon. >> From Jamie Dupree: President Trump to reverse course on immigrant family separations “We're keeping families together and this will solve that problem,” Trump said. “At the same time we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a ‘zero tolerance,’ we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally.” Original report: Trump told reporters Wednesday that he will “be signing something in a little while” to address family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Read more trending news “We want to keep families together, it’s very important,” Trump said. 'I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”  It was not immediately clear what the president planned to sign. Trump has repeatedly called on Congress to change laws that he says mandates the family separations. There is no law that requires children be separated from parents at the border. He blamed Democrats for the continued separations in a Wednesday morning tweet, but he added that he was “working on something.” The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was drafting an executive action for Trump that would allow the Department of Homeland Security to keep migrant families together at the border. Nielsen does not believe Congress will act to resolve the issue of migrant family separations, the AP reported, citing two unidentified sources familiar with the matter. She’s working with officials from other agencies, including the Justice Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, to draft the executive action.  The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The executive action Nielson is drafting “wouldn’t end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families,” according to the AP.