ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
89°
Sunny
H 92° L 72°
  • clear-day
    89°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 92° L 72°
  • clear-day
    73°
    Morning
    Sunny. H 92° L 72°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 95° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    Elle Fanning, the youngest juror ever at the Cannes Film Festival, said she's been transformed by her experience at the French festival. The 21-year-old actresses' jury service came to an end Saturday with the Cannes closing ceremony. She wanted the festival to keep going. 'I didn't know how I would come out of this experience. I do feel like I see films in a different way. I learned so much,' Fanning said after the ceremony. 'I will never forget these ten days. I don't want it to be over.' Fanning was part of the nine-person jury that elected Bong Joon-ho's 'Parasite' the Palme d'Or winner. Mexican director Alejandro Inarritu, president of the jury, praised Fanning for bringing a younger perspective to the jury. 'Having Elle in the jury was a gift,' said Inarritu. 'Elle is an old soul in a way. She has been doing films forever. But to have the fresh ideas, it really grounded us.' 'We saw it through her young eyes,' he added. 'We learned a lot from her too.' Throughout the French film festival, Fanning was one of the standouts of the red carpet, regularly drawing praise for her glamorous and varied looks. The only downside of her Cannes may have been when she collapsed at the Chopard Trophee dinner on Monday. She later posted on Instagram a thumbs-up photo and said she had fainted because her Prada gown was too tight.
  • Witnesses say at least 20 people are dead and many others are missing after suspected extremists ambushed a military and civilian convoy in Nigeria's northeast. The witnesses say the military was relocating civilians to a displacement camp in Damboa on Saturday morning when the ambush occurred. The Boko Haram extremist insurgency has long been active in the region. A driver told The Associated Press he saw about 20 bodies and many burned-out vehicles. Another survivor said the convoy contained hundreds of civilians and a few dozen soldiers but only a few people reached Damboa. The fate of the others was not immediately clear. Both witnesses spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear for their safety. Army spokesman Sagir Musa did not immediately respond to calls for comment.
  • Representatives of the Venezuelan government and opposition have returned to Norway for a mediation effort aimed at resolving the political crisis in the South American country, the Norwegian government said Saturday. Norway said it will facilitate discussions next week in Oslo, in an indication that the negotiation track is gaining momentum after months of escalating tension between Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and Juan Guaidó, the U.S.-backed opposition leader. Top Maduro aide Jorge Rodríguez and Héctor Rodríguez, the governor of Miranda state, both of whom were in Oslo earlier this month for an earlier round of exploratory talks, will once again lead the government delegation. They will be joined this time by Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza and Larry Devoe, the government's top human rights official, said a Venezuelan official who was not authorized to discuss the talks and spoke on condition of anonymity. The opposition delegation is being led by Stalin González, a senior member of the opposition-controlled congress, former Caracas area Mayor Gerardo Blyde and former Transport Minister Fernando Martínez Mottola, according to a person familiar with the talks who also spoke on the condition of anonymity. They will be joined by Vicente Diaz, a supporter of past negotiations with the government who previously served on the nation's electoral council. Both delegations traveled Saturday for the meetings, according to the two people. Norwegian Foreign Minister Ine Eriksen Soreide praised both sides for their involvement. Representatives of Venezuela's political factions traveled to the European country earlier this month for talks, but it had been unclear if they would continue to engage with one another amid increased tensions over the opposition's call for a military uprising on April 30. The opposition had previously ruled out talks, accusing Maduro of using negotiations between 2016 and 2018 to play for time, and has demanded Maduro's resignation and early elections. Maduro, in turn, alleges the opposition tried to seize power by force. The U.S. State Department said the only thing to negotiate with Maduro is 'the conditions of his departure' from office. 'We hope the talks in Oslo will focus on that objective, and if they do, we hope progress will be possible,' spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said. The diplomatic effort reflects recognition in Venezuela that neither side has been able to prevail in the struggle for power, leaving the country in a state of political paralysis after years of hyperinflation and shortages of food and medicine. Several million Venezuelans have left the country, creating Latin America's biggest migration crisis. The United States and more than 50 other countries support Guaidó's claim to be Venezuela's rightful leader. The U.S. has imposed oil sanctions to try to force out Maduro, whose key allies are Cuba, Russia and China. Norway has a long, successful history of foreign mediation: The country hosted peace talks between Israelis and Palestinians in September 1993 and Maoist rebels and the government in the Philippines in 2011. The government also brokered a 2002 cease-fire between Sri Lankan government and Tamil Tiger rebel negotiators. Seven years ago, mediators from the Colombian government and left-wing FARC rebels held their first direct talks in a decade in Norway. ___ Associated Press journalist Joshua Goodman contributed from Bogota, Colombia.
  • The Latest on the Cannes Film Festival (all times local): 8:25 p.m. South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's social satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, has won the Cannes Film Festival's top award, the Palme d'Or. The win for 'Parasite' marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. The awards were handed out in a ceremony Saturday after being chosen by a jury presided over by filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu. The festival's second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop's 'Atlantics.' Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes. Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar's 'Pain and Glory' and best actress went to Emily Beecham of Britain for 'Little Joe.' Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne won best director for 'Young Ahmed.' ___ 8 a.m. History could be made when the top award of the Cannes Film Festival, the Palme d'Or, is handed out Saturday night. The Palme d'Or is decided by a nine-person jury, headed this year by the filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu. Their deliberations are done in secret but milestone victories could occur if some of the festival's most acclaimed films were to win. If French director Celine Sciamma's period love story 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' won, it would be the first time a female filmmaker has won the Palme d'Or outright. Pedro Almodovar could make personal history by winning the Palme for 'Pain and Glory.' Though he's been one of Europe's pre-eminent filmmakers for decades, the 69-year-old Spanish director has never won Cannes' top award despite being in the running five times before. Also in the mix is Bong Joon-ho's class satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family. A win for 'Parasite' would mark the first Korean film to ever win the Palme d'Or. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Albanian opposition supporters marched in another anti-government protest Saturday to demand the prime minister's resignation as the European Union and the U.S. warned them to avoid violence and to hold talks instead to resolve the country's political deadlock. Protesters gathered from around the country in Tirana, the capital, waving national and EU flags, shouting 'Rama Go!' and blowing vuvuzelas. Some protesters threw flares, smoke bombs and other projectiles and police responded with water cannon. Opposition leaders were seen trying to stop those hurling stones at police. The center-right Democratic Party-led protests, which have been going on since mid-February, have often turned violent. A statement from the EU office in Tirana condemned the past violence, urging all sides to hold talks to find 'a way out of the current political situation.' The United States embassy in Tirana also urged all sides 'to practice restraint, disavow violence and engage in constructive dialogue.' The opposition has declined to talk with Rama unless he resigns. It accuses his Cabinet of corruption and links to organized crime. The governing Socialists deny those claims and say the violent opposition protests are hurting the country's image. The Democrats leader, Lulzim Basha, said Saturday that Rama's resignation was 'the only way to open the dialogue.' He then led his supporters in a march toward the Parliament building with lit cellphones held high. The opposition is boycotting Albania's June 30 municipal election. In June, Albania expects the EU to grant its request to launch full membership negotiations. ___ Follow Llazar Semini on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lsemini
  • The Latest on the European Parliament elections taking place Saturday (all times local): 5:40 p.m. Early vote counts and an exit poll in Ireland suggest that the Green Party is gaining strength in that European Union nation as it challenges three larger parties in local and European elections. In the Irish votes Friday, an exit poll of more than 3,000 voters suggests that Ireland's top two parties — the governing party Fine Gael and the more conservative opposition party Fianna Fail — are running neck and neck, followed by the nationalist Sinn Fein party and the pro-environment Greens. Early vote counts on Saturday in Ireland's local election confirmed these trends. Vote counting in the European parliament races will begin Sunday morning. The Red C Research exit poll, which had a margin of error of 3%, also suggests very strong support for a proposal to liberalize Ireland's divorce laws. Irish voters last year decided in a referendum to overturn the country's ban on abortions. ___ 10:15 a.m. A far-right party in Slovakia that openly admires the country's wartime Nazi puppet state could win seats in the European Parliament for the first time. Slovaks are among four countries voting Saturday in the Europe-wide vote, which finishes Sunday. Polls favor the leftist Smer-Social Democracy party, the senior member of Slovakia's current coalition government to win the most votes. Polls suggest People's Party Our Slovakia, a far-right party that has 14 seats in Slovakia's parliament, will win seats in the European legislature for the first time. Party members use Nazi salutes, blame Roma for crime, consider NATO a terror group and want the country out of the alliance and the European Union. The election reflects a continental struggle between nationalists who want to wrest power back from the EU and moderates who want to make the EU stronger. ___ 8 a.m. Voters in Slovakia, Malta, Latvia and the Czech Republic are casting ballots in European Parliament elections. The stakes for the European Union are especially high in this year's elections, which are taking place over four days and involve all 28 EU nations. Many predict nationalists and far-right groups will gain ground. They would try to use a larger presence in the legislature to claw back power from the EU for their national governments. More moderate parties want to cement closer ties among countries in the EU. Britain, Ireland and the Netherlands have already voted. The Czech Republic started voting Friday and continues Saturday. Slovakia, Malta and Latvia are holding their European Parliament elections Saturday — and all the other nations vote Sunday. Results are expected Sunday night. ___ For more news from The Associated Press on the European Parliament elections go to https://www.apnews.com/EuropeanParliament
  • An Afghan security forces raid against Taliban fighters in eastern Nangarhar province mistakenly killed at least six civilians, including a woman and two children, provincial officials said Saturday. Attahullah Khogyani, the provincial governor's spokesman, said 10 insurgents were also killed in the Friday night attack in Sherzad district. The civilians' vehicle was exiting the area right after the raid and security forces thought that Taliban fighters were trying to escape, so they opened fire and mistakenly killed the civilians, Khogyani said. Ajmal Omer, a provincial councilman, said villagers carrying the victims' bodies in a procession in the provincial capital of Jalalabad demanded justice for the victims' families. Both Taliban and Islamic State group fighters are active in eastern Afghanistan, especially in Nangarhar. The U.N. Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) said Saturday it was concerned about the heavy toll on civilians in the conflict during the holy month of Ramadan, and urged parties to do more to prevent casualties. It condemned the insurgents for incidents in which civilians have been deliberately targeted and said that during the first week of Ramadan, the Taliban killed six civilians and wounded 28 others in a premeditated attack against a non-governmental organization in Kabul. The statement said the U.N. mission is looking into the attack inside a mosque in the capital of Kabul during Friday prayers. Two people, including the prayer leader, were killed and 16 others were wounded. 'Deliberate and indiscriminate attacks against civilians can never be justified and amount to war crimes,' said Tadamichi Yamamoto, the Secretary-General's special representative for Afghanistan. 'An attack in a mosque, especially at a time of prayer during Ramadan, is particularly heinous,' Yamamoto was quoted in the statement. The U.N. mission said recent airstrikes against anti-government targets in southern Helmand and eastern Kunar provinces killed as many as 14 civilians. In the May 20 and 22nd attacks in the Greshk district of Helmand and the Chawki district of Kunar, the civilians killed included four women and eight children, and 12 other civilians were wounded, the U.N. said. Meanwhile, the Taliban claimed responsibility for Friday's attack on an armored vehicle belonging to Romanian NATO forces at Kandahar air base. Five Romanian NATO soldiers were injured. Separately, Col. Dave Butler, U.S. Forces Afghanistan spokesman, said a NATO helicopter had a hard landing due to mechanical failure in southern Helmand province. 'There was no hostile fire or enemy contact involved,' he said in a statement. Both Afghan and U.S. personnel were injured but were all in stable condition and expected to recover, he said. He said the aircraft was destroyed. Taliban insurgents are active in Helmand and control several districts in the province.
  • New evidence has emerged linking the embattled head of Colombia's army to the alleged cover-up of civilian killings more than a decade ago. The documents, provided to The Associated Press by a person familiar with an ongoing investigation into the extrajudicial killings, come as Gen. Nicacio Martínez Espinel faces mounting pressure to resign over orders he gave troops this year to step up attacks in what some fear could pave the way for a return of serious human rights violations. Colombia's military has been blamed for as many as 5,000 extrajudicial killings at the height of the country's armed conflict in the mid-2000s as troops under pressure by top commanders inflated body counts, in some cases dressing up civilians as guerrillas in exchange for extra pay and other perks. What became known as the 'false positives' scandal has cast a dark shadow over the U.S.-backed military's record of battleground victories. Fifteen years later not a single top commander has been held accountable for the slayings. Human Rights Watch in February harshly criticized President Ivan Duque's appointment of Martínez Espinel, noting that he was second-in-command of the 10th Brigade in northeast Colombia during years for which prosecutors have opened investigations into 23 illegal killings . The rights group revealed that then Col. Martínez Espinel certified payments to an informant who led to 'excellent results' in a purported combat operation in which an indigenous civilian and 13-year-old girl were killed. A court later convicted two soldiers of abducting them from their home, murdering them and putting weapons on their bodies so they appeared to be rebels. Martínez Espinel at the time of the report said he had 'no idea' if he had made the payments. 'God and my subalterns know how we've acted,' he said. But new documents from Colombia's prosecutor's office show that Martínez Espinel in 2005 signed off on at least seven other questionable payments . The documents were provided to the AP by someone on the condition of anonymity because they fear retaliation. Some of the rewards, which never exceeded $500, went to supposed informants whose names and IDs didn't match. In two cases, judicial investigators found the real beneficiary was soldier Oscar Alfonso Murgas, who would go on to be sentenced to 40 years for his role in a third, unrelated civilian killing. One hidden recipient was a former paramilitary commander sentenced to 15 years for extortion. In another inconsistency, on two occasions Martínez Espinel vouched for information leading to fighting that the same documents show took place days later. Such was the case for a payment made on May 17, 2005 to an unnamed informant and which bears Martínez Espinel's signature. The payment refers to combat with purported guerrillas on May 20 — three days later — in which an unidentified 'no name' male was reported killed possessing a grenade and pistol. 'A decade ago, soldiers across Colombia lured civilians to remote locations under false pretenses — such as with promises of work — killed them, placed weapons on their lifeless bodies, and then reported them as enemy combatants killed in action,' said José Miguel Vivanco, Americas director at Human Rights Watch. 'One can't help wonder if any of the cockades in their uniforms, or the promotions throughout 'successful' careers, corresponds to the murder of innocent civilians committed over a decade ago.' Martínez Espinel in a statement said he faces no criminal or disciplinary investigations. He said it was up to judicial authorities to evaluate the value of the documents bearing his signature but that during his time at the 10th Brigade he had no involvement or responsibility in combat operations, instead performing a purely administrative role. 'I always have been and will be ready to answer any questions by authorities,' he said. Vivanco said it's no surprise Martínez isn't under investigation given authorities' willingness to turn a blind eye to the responsibility of top commanders in the killing spree. While Colombian courts have convicted hundreds of low-ranking soldiers for their roles in the 'false positive' murders, not a single general and only a handful of coronels have so far been convicted. Under international law, commanders can be held responsible for crimes carried out by subordinates that they knew about or should have known about. Now there are reports that Martínez Espinel as army chief is looking to reinstate the policies that critics say led to the executions. The New York Times reported recently that Martínez Espinel commanded troops to double the number of leftist guerrillas and criminals they kill, capture or force to surrender in combat. The new guidelines, made in writing at the start of Martínez Espinel's tenure as army chief in January, raised concerns among unnamed officers cited by the Times about the heightened risk of civilian causalities. Opponents of Duque have called for Martínez Espinel to resign, pointing to a number of suspicious killings and cover-ups by soldiers this year coinciding with the new orders. But the conservative leader has so far stood by the commander even while attempting to contain the damage. 'Zero tolerance for those who dishonor the fatherland's uniform by committing crimes,' Duque said hours after the Times report sent shockwaves through the armed forces, one of Colombia's most-respected institutions. Meanwhile, in response to the Times article the armed forces rolled back part of the controversial policy requiring field commanders to pledge in writing to double their operational results against criminal gangs and holdout rebels who have filled the void left by a 2016 peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. They left unchanged, however, orders instructing officers not to 'demand perfection' from sources, saying attacks on military targets should be launched when there is a '60-70% credibility' about the veracity of information. On Friday, Duque announced the creation of a blue-ribbon panel to evaluate all military protocols and manuals to make sure they are in accordance with the government's commitment to respecting human rights and international humanitarian law. ___ Follow Goodman on Twitter: https://twitter.com/APjoshgoodman
  • The U.S. ambassador to China urged Beijing to engage in substantive dialogue with exiled Tibetan Buddhist leader the Dalai Lama during a visit to the Himalayan region over the past week, the U.S. Embassy said Saturday. Terry Branstad also 'expressed concerns regarding the Chinese government's interference in Tibetan Buddhists' freedom to organize and practice their religion,' an embassy statement said. 'He encouraged the Chinese government to engage in substantive dialogue with the Dalai Lama or his representatives, without preconditions, to seek a settlement that resolves differences,' it said. Branstad also raised long-standing concerns about the lack of consistent access to the Tibetan Autonomous Region. The rare visit to the TAR and neighboring Qinghai province ran from Sunday through Saturday. Hosted by the Tibet Autonomous Region government, Branstad was given access to important religious and cultural sites, including the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, Norbulingka, and Sera Monastery in the Tibetan capital, Lhasa. He also met with senior Tibetan religious and cultural leaders, the embassy said. China tightly restricts access to Tibet by foreigners, especially journalists and diplomats. In response to those restrictions, the U.S. Congress last year passed an act that would deny entry to the United States for those involved in formulating or enforcing such policies. There was no immediate response from Beijing, although Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang last week said China welcomed Branstad to witness the 'earth-shaking changes in the people's production and life since Tibet's peaceful liberation more than 60 years ago.' 'I hope that this visit to Tibet can help Ambassador Branstad make a conclusion without prejudice in the spirit of respecting the facts ... instead of being confused and disturbed by some long-standing hearsay and defamatory speeches,' Lu said at a regularly scheduled briefing. China says Tibet has been part of its territory for centuries, but many Tibetans say they were effectively an independent nation for most of that time. Beijing's control was most recently asserted when the Communist Party's military wing, the People's Liberation Army, invaded the region in 1950. The Dalai Lama fled to India amid an abortive uprising against Chinese rule in 1959 and calls for genuine autonomy for Tibet under Chinese rule. Beijing labels the 83-year-old cleric a dangerous separatist, has refused contacts with his representatives for more than a decade and objects strongly to any meetings between him and foreign politicians. In recent years there has been a significant tightening of control over Tibetan Buddhism, use of the Tibetan language and traditional cultural expression. Following anti-government protests in 2008, Beijing imposed a policy of 'grid policing' that substantially reduces travel and social life for Tibetans, even while China ramps up domestic tourism in the region. Those methods have been subsequently imposed in the neighboring region of Xinjiang, where an estimated 1 million members of its native Muslim ethnic groups have been confined to detention centers.
  • Pope Francis said Saturday that abortion can never be condoned, even when the fetus is gravely sick or likely to die, and urged doctors and priests to support families to carry such pregnancies to term. Speaking to a Vatican-sponsored anti-abortion conference, Francis said the opposition to abortion isn't a religious issue but a human one. 'Is it licit to throw away a life to resolve a problem?' he asked. 'Is it licit to hire a hitman to resolve a problem?' Francis denounced decisions to abort based on prenatal testing, saying a human being is 'never incompatible with life.' Even those babies destined to die at birth or soon thereafter deserve to receive medical care in the womb, Francis said, adding that their parents need to be supported so they don't feel isolated and afraid. While one can argue about using medical resources this way, there is value to it for the parents, he said. 'Taking care of these children helps parents to grieve and not only think of it as a loss, but as a step on a path taken together,' Francis said. Francis has spoken out strongly against abortion but also has expressed sympathy for women who have had them and made it easier for them to be absolved of the sin of abortion. His comments come as the abortion debate is again making headlines in the U.S. with state initiatives seeking to restrict the procedure.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • As you spend this Memorial Day weekend celebrating with your friends and family, its important to remember that the freedom many of our nation's heroes have fought and died for always comes at a price. Well in honor of the occasion, as you would expect, here are some freebies and deals through Memorial Day that veterans, active duty and retired military members and their families can take advantage of( standard disclaimer: some locations may not be participating, so its important to always contact them ahead of time):  Ace Hardware: While supplies last, you can get a free 8 by 12 inch flag on May 25th.  AAA: Through Tuesday, you can get free tipsy low service.  Apple: They have special offers on their products, including their Apple Care Protection Plans.  Cinemark Theatres: It varies by location, but if you show your military ID, you get a special discount.  Delta Airlines: Military personnel get a free bag check.  Home Depot and Lowe's: Veterans and their families get 10 percent off. Just show your ID  Hooters: Show your military ID on May 27th and you can get free entrees including 10 free boneless wings, Buffalo chicken salad, Hooters Burger or a Buffalo Chicken sandwich.  Longhorn Steakhouse: Check out the coupon below to get a free appetizer or dessert when you get an entree through May 26th.  https://www.longhornsteakhouse.com/customer-service/coupons/free-app-or-dessert-with-2-entrees-lh74-052319?cmpid=br:lh_ag:ie_ch:eml_ca:LHQ419L52COUP_dt:20190523_vs:1NV_in:Specials_pl:image01_FreeApp_rd:9bc86910b47843f7a15abeafd3d66e28  Sea World and Busch Gardens: The Waves of Honor program gives free entry to military families and members with their ID through December 31st. TGI Fridays: Check out the coupon to a free entree when you buy one and two drinks from May 25-27.  https://share.rivet.works/fridays
  • An ex-Magic Kingdom worker from Clermont has been arrested, accused of trying to set up a sexual encounter with an 8 year old girl.  According to the United States Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Florida, Frederick M. Pohl Jr.  sent inappropriate pictures of himself to what he believed was the 8 year old girl and talked online with her and her father in order to arrange a meeting. When he arrived at an Orlando hotel that they were supposed to meet at, Pohl was arrested by an undercover federal agent who was the one posing as the girl he was talking to.  According to the submitted criminal complaint, Pohl was in possession of condoms and a child sized pink dress. While the Middle District did confirm that he was an employee at the Magic Kingdom, they did not say what his role was.
  • A man who was shot and killed in an officer-involved shooting outside a mosque in South Florida on Friday was wanted in Osceola County for attempted murder, according to law enforcement officials. >> Read more trending news  The U.S. Marshals Service Florida and Caribbean Regional Fugitive Task Force were involved in the shooting at the parking lot of the Masjid Al-Iman mosque in Fort Lauderdale. The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office said the man who was shot was Hamid Ould-Rouis, 58, who was wanted for attacking two people at a home on Luminous Loop in Kissimmee on Thursday.  Deputies said Ould-Rouis entered the home and battered a man before attacking a woman with a knife. The woman is in a hospital in critical condition, deputies said. Marshals said they were attempting to arrest Ould-Rouis, but a threat posed by him prompted members of the task force to fire their weapons. There is no indication that the mosque is related to the incident, officials said. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating the shooting.
  • A man who was shot and killed in an officer-involved shooting outside of a South Florida Mosque Friday afternoon was wanted in Osceola County for attempted murder. According to the Osceola County Sheriff's Office, Police in Broward County and U.S. Marshals had been looking for Hamid Ould-Rouis,58, who was accused of beating up a man and stabbing a woman nearly to death in a Kissimmee home early Thursday. The woman remains hospitalized in critical condition.  Members of the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force tracked him to the parking lot near the Masjid Al Iman mosque, in Fort Lauderdale. When he got out of a black SUV with a weapon, several officers opened fire. He died on the scene.  There is no indication that the mosque is related to the incident, officials said.  The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating the shooting.
  • Game dates and kickoff times for Orlando’s Camping World Bowl and Citrus Bowl games were announced Thursday as part of ESPN’s 2019-20 college football bowl schedule. This year, the Camping World Bowl, which traditionally features teams from the ACC and Big 12 conference will be broadcast on ABC for the first time in the bowl’s 30-year history.  It is set for Saturday, December 28 at Noon.  Last year’s contest saw Syracuse beat West Virginia 34-18 which helped guide the Orange to a 10-3 record, the team’s best finish since 2001.  The Citrus Bowl, which typically features teams from the ACC, SEC and Big Ten conference will continues its News Years Day tradition, kicking off at 1 o' clock on January 1, 2020.  It will also be broadcast on ABC.  In last year’s game, Kentucky defeated Penn State 27-24.  “We are thrilled to present two big-time bowl games from Orlando on national television this season,” Florida Citrus Sports CEO Steve Hogan said. “It’s an amazing opportunity to showcase the Central Florida community twice in five days this postseason.”  The Cure Bowl, Orlando’s third bowl game, had already announced that this years game will be played at Orlando City Stadium, on Saturday, Dec. 21.

Washington Insider

  • Victims of Hurricanes, floods, wildfires, and other natural disasters will have to wait into next month for Congress to give final approval to a $19.1 billion relief bill, as final passage of the plan in the House was blocked on Friday by a lone Republican lawmaker, forcing a delay until Congress returns for legislative business in the first week of June.   “I respectfully object,” said Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX), a more conservative Republicans who stayed in town after the House had completed its legislative business on Thursday, and came to the floor Friday morning to object to acting on the plan without a full roll call vote.   The House had approved $19.1 billion in disaster aid in early May; the Senate on Thursday amended the plan with the backing of President Trump – but it wasn’t good enough to get unanimous consent for approval in the House. “If I do not object, Congress will have passed into law a bill that spends $19 billion of taxpayer money without members of Congress being present here in our nation’s capital,” Roy said on the House floor, forcing a further delay on the disaster aid measure. One of Roy’s objections was that no money was included in the plan for the immigrant surge along the southern border - President Trump had backed off of that in order to secure a deal on Thursday. Roy’s maneuver drew the scorn of fellow Republicans from states which are need of aid - like Georgia - where farmers suffered devastating losses from Hurricane Michael. Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA) tweeted that “our farmers need aid today,” as this move by his GOP colleague will delay that process into June, leaving a bad taste in the mouths of fellow Republicans with farmers in need of assistance.   Democrats were furious. “House Republicans’ last-minute sabotage of an overwhelmingly bipartisan disaster relief bill is an act of staggering political cynicism,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  “Countless American families hit by devastating natural disasters across the country will now be denied the relief they urgently need,” Pelosi added in a statement. “This is a rotten thing to do,” said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), who noted to reporters that Roy was blocking aid for his own home state of Texas. “We should have passed this months ago,” said Rep. Donna Shalala (D-FL), who asked for approval of the measure on the House floor. “I am beyond fed up. This is wrong,” said Rep. Cindy Axne (D-IA).  “This bill is about helping people – not about playing Washington politics.” “Republican politicians are playing games while people’s homes are literally underwater,” said Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-OH).   Unless Republicans relent next week, the House would not be able to set up a vote on the disaster aid measure until the week of June 3. “There are people who are really hurting, and he’s objecting,” Shalala said.  “He’s holding hostage thousands of people.”  The House has two ‘pro forma’ meetings scheduled for next week - on Tuesday and Friday.  Republicans could object to passing the bill at those times as well.