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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. Some argue the best way to get more salmon to the starving whales is to tear down four dams on the Lower Snake River, a tributary of the Columbia River, to help migrating fish. But federal agencies and others have pushed back, saying the dams provide benefits to the region in low-cost hydropower, navigation and recreation. Breaching the dams has long been contentious, but it's gained renewed attention as the orcas have hit the lowest numbers in more than three decades. The whales struggle from pollution, boat noise and lack of chinook salmon, which have been declining because of dams, habitat loss and overfishing. Just 74 animals remain in the small group. A task force called by Gov. Jay Inslee is prioritizing a list of potential solutions to address those three threats. At a meeting Thursday, there was little consensus on whether the group should recommend that the governor convene stakeholders to discuss issues related to possible future removal of the dams. Ken Balcomb, a scientist with the Center for Whale Research, who supports dam breaching, told the group that punting on the issue won't help the orcas. 'They're reaching the bottom of their barrel,' he said. 'We have to move the ball forward. The time is now.' A number of whale and fisheries scientists have urged the task force to recommend breaching the dams and spilling more water over Columbia and Snake river dams to help salmon. Many who have commented have also supported the idea. But dam supporters say the structures provide carbon-free electricity and support barging on the Snake River that moves millions of tons of cargo. 'The dams along that river are the lifeblood of those communities,' Tom Davis, government relations director with the Washington Farm Bureau. He called the talk over dams 'a distraction' that continues to divide the state. Some say dam removal could be part of a long-term solution but note that more immediate actions could boost salmon, such as removing smaller dams or increasing habitat protections. 'Everything has to be on the table,' said state Sen. Kevin Ranker, an Orcas Island Democrat who supports dam removal but said more discussions would need to take place. Meanwhile, he said the state can move quickly on other actions, including creating a 'no-go zone' that restricts vessels around feeding whales. Other ideas being weighed by the group include reducing boat noise around the orcas; creating a permit system for commercial whale watching trips; protecting habitat for chinook salmon and the smaller forage fish that they eat; boosting production of hatchery fish; and spilling more water over Columbia and Snake river dams. 'There is no one magic solution to recovery of southern resident killer whales,' said Rob Williams, a Pew Fellow in marine conservation and co-founder of Oceans Initiative. 'The three main threats that the whales are facing are inextricably linked, so recovery actions need to be linked too.' Federal agencies are currently studying dam breaching as one of many options to aid salmon recovery in the Columbia River basin after a federal judge in 2016 ordered a new plan and told the federal government to consider breaching one or more of the four lower Snake River dams. That environmental review won't be complete until 2021. Officials with the Army Corps of Engineers, which operates the four dams, and Bonneville Power Administration, which markets the power, said the structures provide low-cost electricity and adds reliability to the entire system. The dams produce an average of 1,000 megawatts of power a year, or about 5 percent of electricity generated in the Pacific Northwest, and account for about 12 percent of BPA's power. A number of conservation, fishing and other groups say dam removal represents the greatest opportunity to boost salmon runs and that planning must begin now. They note that the two Snake River runs are among 15 priority stocks of chinook salmon for orcas, and increasing those runs would be a big step forward. Michael Milstein, a spokesman with NOAA Fisheries, said those Snake River runs are important but not in isolation. The whales 'depend on a number of stocks up and down the West Coast over the course of the year and they're all important,' he said, adding that returns to the Snake and Columbia rivers have been up in the last 10 years. 'We do think that the whales have access to the same volume of fish that they would have otherwise,' he said. Jeff Friedman, U.S. president of the Pacific Whale Watch Association, said 'the dams are not everything but it's a big piece.' He said there are interests in eastern Washington that would need to be addressed but 'it's time we have that conversation to find out what it is going to take for everybody.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin says Islamic State militants in Syria have recently seized some 700 people as hostages and are carrying out executions. At an international policy forum in Sochi on Thursday, Putin said 'they have been recently expanding their area and took about 130 families hostage, which accounts for about 700 people.' Putin said the militants have put forth demands, which he did not specify, and have warned that they would kill 10 people a day if the demands are not met. 'They killed 10 people the day before yesterday,' he said. 'They are now carrying out their threats.' State news agency Tass Wednesday cited an unnamed 'diplomatic-military source' as saying the hostages were seized in a raid on a refugee camp and were demanding Syria free IS members.
  • Officials in Ecuador say they're expelling Venezuela's ambassador because an official from the neighboring country called its president a 'liar.' The Foreign Ministry office announced its decision Thursday, saying Venezuela's Communications Minister Jorge Rodriguez called Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno a 'liar' for alleging that 140 buses leave Venezuela every day carrying migrants to Ecuador. The rising tensions come as masses of Venezuelans flee a historic crisis that's led to shortages of food and medicine and crumbling services like electricity and running water. Officials in Ecuador say they won't tolerate disrespect from Venezuela and have vowed to continue assisting migrants entering the country. Many in the international community, including the United States, blame Venezuela's socialist President Nicolas Maduro for causing the crisis.
  • The Latest on Italy's plans to ramp up public spending (all times local): 7:45 p.m. The European Commission has chastised Italy for a spending plan that will raise its deficit to three times that which was previously agreed, calling the deviation 'unprecedented in the history' of the EU's stability and growth compact. EU budget chief Pierre Moscovici delivered the letter Thursday to Economic Minister Giovanni Tria in Rome. The letter said a spending increase and a resulting deficit of 2.4 percent of GDP will make it unlikely that Italy will be able to reduce its public debt, now at 130 percent of GDP, to levels agreed upon by European Union member states. In a press conference in Brussels, Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte denied that the deviation was 'unprecedented,' but said Italy had until Monday to offer a formal response to the commission's concerns. ___ 7:20 p.m. The EU budget chief Pierre Moscovici says the EU Commission and many member states are worried by Italy's spending plans that will see the country's budget deficit rise to 2.4 percent of annual GDP. Moscovici met Economy Minister Giovanni Tria in Rome to present a letter outlining concerns over Italy's draft budget. The meeting came as Italy's premier wrapped up a day in Brussels explaining the Italian budget draft to Italy's partners, including the leaders of Germany, France and the Netherlands. Moscovici told reporters that the European Commission will not interfere with Italy's choices, and that its role was one of 'a referee, not an adversary of Italy.' Moscovici said Italy would be treated like any other member state, adding: 'I cannot imagine a Europe without Italy or Italy without Europe.' ___ 5:50 p.m. EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker says the EU has always been generous with Italy when it comes to assessing its budget, but that the latest draft presented this week would be rigorously vetted to see if it meets EU standards. Juncker said after Thursday's summit that some EU leaders had already approached him to make sure not to be too flexible when combing through the details of Italy's spending plans. The EU has limits for member states' deficits and debt levels. Italy's budget proposal is considered out of line with commitments made earlier, with a proposed deficit of 2.4 percent. While that is below the 3 percent EU ceiling, it is still three times the amount initially promised. And it means Italy's debt load — which at over 130 percent of GDP is well over the 60 percent limit — will probably not be lowered as promised. Juncker said: 'I had some colleagues on the phone say they don't want us to add flexibility to already existing flexibility.' He said the EU has no intention of doing so. ___ 5:10 p.m. Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte says after a day of defending the country's budget plan to allies that there is no reason to fear the EU's criticisms. Conte, in a post on Facebook Thursday, said that the measures are 'well-considered, well-constructed and well-realized,' and he said the draft was 'the only instrument that we have to ensure economic growth and social development to our country.' Conte added that 'we knew that these measures devised to satisfy the needs of Italian citizens, long unanswered, are not in line with the expectations of the European Commission,' and that the Italian government was prepared to respond to comments. Conte, who met with the leaders of Germany, France and the Netherlands on the summit sidelines, said that the measures were 'indispensable if we want to change course.' ___ 1:25 p.m. The head of one of Italy's two ruling populist parties says unauthorized changes were made to the draft budget, suggesting a possible rift in the coalition government. Luigi Di Maio, the head of the 5-Star Movement, on Thursday threatened to lodge a formal criminal complaint. He told a late-night talk show that the draft budget presented to President Sergio Mattarella's office contained a proposal to extend a tax amnesty on money held abroad and brought back to Italy. The 5-Star Movement opposes such a move as it risks laundering 'corrupt or mafia capital.' Matteo Salvini, the leader of the League party, called the accusation 'surreal.' Premier Giuseppe Conte told reporters in Brussels that he would review the draft law line by line when he returns Friday to Rome. He denied a rift in the governing coalition. ___ 1:00 p.m. Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte is warning his Italian counterpart Giuseppe Conte not to break the budgetary rules set out by the European Union. Rutte met with Conte at Thursday's EU summit, where Conte is on the defensive for filing a draft budget for 2019 that has a deficit level three times as large as Italy originally promised. Rutte said in a statement that he expressed Dutch concerns regarding Italy's budget plans and said he was giving 'full support' to the European Commission, which is vetting the draft after having expressed its skepticism. Italian leaders say the budget plan will boost economic growth through higher spending, but other EU countries are concerned it will add to Italy's already heavy public debt load.
  • French President Emmanuel Macron is facing criticism from mothers with big families both at home and abroad for comments he made about women and fertility in Africa. Hundreds of French and American women took offense at a September speech that Macron made at the Gates Foundation's Goalkeepers Summit, when he said a critical issue for African's population is that women and girls aren't able choose whether or not to have children — and linked it to a lack of education. He said: 'I always say: 'Please present me the lady who decided, being perfectly educated, to have seven, eight, nine children.' Macron was trying to emphasize that parenthood should be a choice — especially in poorer parts of Africa. But many women around the world who feel stung by Macron's choice of words are using the hashtag #postcardsforMacron on social media to criticize him and share photos of their large families. The hashtag was trending on Twitter in France in recent days, with more than 20,000 posts about the topic on Wednesday and Thursday. It was not the first time that Macron found himself in hot water over fertility issues. In July 2017, he prompted controversy when he suggested it's a problem that African women often have 'seven or eight children.' But during a trip to Burkina Faso four months later, he clarified that he was suggesting that some women in Africa don't have the free will to decide on such issues. 'Are you sure it's a choice from the girl?' he asked, adding that parenthood 'must be a choice, especially for young girls.' Large families are valued in the West African nation, providing a safety net for parents in their later years. Activists say about half of the girls in Burkina Faso get married before 18.
  • Israel's Supreme Court on Thursday overturned an appeals court ruling that agreed with the government's decision to bar an American graduate student from entering the country over her alleged involvement in the boycott movement against the Jewish state. The court accepted Alqasem's appeal, saying her desire to study in Israel undermines the premise of her alleged support for a boycott. It said that if her deportation was based on her political opinion, then the state's order was 'a radical and dangerous step' that could erode Israeli democracy. Lara Alqasem's lawyers said she was released from Ben Gurion International airport, where she had been held in detention since arriving in the country Oct. 2 with a valid student visa to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Alqasem said in a statement that she was 'relieved at the court's decision' and thankful for the support of her friends and family. Alqasem, 22, a Florida native whose father is Palestinian, is a former president of the University of Florida chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine. The group is a branch of the BDS movement, named for its support of boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel. Israel's Strategic Affairs Ministry, which spearheads the government's efforts against the boycott campaign, describes the group as an extremist organization and says BDS aims to delegitimize or even destroy the Jewish state. Last year, Israel passed a controversial law banning entry for any foreigner who 'knowingly issues a public call for boycotting Israel.' It has come under heavy criticism for its handling of Alqasem's case. Alqasem has fought her expulsion order for more than two weeks, the longest anyone has been held in a boycott-related case. She turned to the high court Wednesday after a lower court rejected her appeal. She insists she no longer participates in boycott activities and promises not to engage in boycott activities in the future. Her lawyers called the government's attack on Alqasem 'thought-policing' and said the state failed to present credible evidence against her. Government lawyers argued that Alqasem's deletion of her social media accounts aroused suspicion and that her past affiliation with the BDS movement still makes her a threat. In its ruling, the Supreme Court said the state's evidence was not enough to justify its use of the anti-boycott law. Alqasem's attorneys lauded the high court's ruling as a victory for free speech, academic freedom and the rule of law. 'Lara has ensured that no one else should be denied the right to enter Israel based on sloppy Google searches and dossiers by shadowy smear groups,' lawyers Yotam Ben-Hillel and Leora Bechor said. Gilad Erdan, head of Israel's Strategic Affairs Ministry, said the ruling was a victory for BDS and undermines Israel's anti-boycott law. 'I'm deeply disappointed,' he said. 'This damages the ability of the state of Israel to combat boycott activists that harm us all.' Interior Minister Aryeh Deri likewise lamented the court's decision, calling it a national embarrassment. 'Where is our national pride? Would she also have dared in the United States to act against the state while demanding to remain and study in it?' he wrote on Twitter. Hebrew University, which has vigorously backed Alqasem and joined in her appeals, said it looks forward to welcoming her to classes next week.
  • Kleenex will re-brand its 'Mansize' tissues after consumers complained the name was sexist — touching off a social media conversation about what's in a name. The company behind Kleenex, Kimberly-Clark, said Thursday that the product, which is sold only in the U.K., will now be called 'Kleenex Extra Large.' Packages for the tissues describe them as 'confidently strong' and 'comfortingly soft.' Kimberly-Clark told Britain's Daily Telegraph that it in 'no way suggests' that being both soft and strong was 'an exclusively masculine trait, nor do we believe that the Mansize branding suggests or endorses gender inequality.' 'We are always grateful to customers who take time to tell us how our products can be improved, and we carefully consider all suggestions,' the company said in a statement. The tissues, which had been on shelves for 60 years, were launched at a time when large cotton handkerchiefs were still very popular and the brand offered 'a unique disposable alternative,' the company said. It remains one of their most popular products, with over 3.4 million people buying the tissues every year. Kimberly-Clark is not the first company to run into a branding issue forced by changing social views. Among the more memorable casualties was stationery maker BiC, which ran into disparaging comments when trying to market pink and purple pens 'for her.' Amazon was flooded by reviews poking fun at the strategy and the notion that it was 'designed to fit comfortably in a woman's hand.' In another example, the British grocery chain Waitrose on Thursday said it will be changing the name of its Gentleman's Smoked Chicken Caesar Roll because of complaints the name was sexist. The roll, which is part of celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal's range, contains anchovy mayonnaise, similar to a classic product called Gentleman's Relish created in the 19th century. Amy Lame, who was appointed by London Mayor Sadiq Khan as the capital's first Night Czar in 2016, posted an image of the product on Twitter with a smirking emoticon. 'I never knew sandwiches were gender specific,' she said. 'I'm female but thankfully Waitrose let me purchase this anyway.' The post touched off some spirited replies, with some noting that Pink Lady apples, Lady Grey tea and lady fingers could be subjected to name changes. Waitrose, for its part, said it was changing the name of the sandwich. 'It's never our intention to cause offense — we're not dictating who should eat this sandwich,' the company said in a statement. 'We hope anyone who tries it will love the distinctive flavors.
  • European Union leaders have commissioned work on a new system for slapping sanctions on the perpetrators of cyberattacks, in the wake of the attack on the world chemical weapons watchdog. EU Council President Donald Tusk said Thursday that the leaders want EU 'ministers to work on a sanctions regime that will be specific to cyberattacks.' Tusk said the system 'should help to protect our citizens, companies and institutions from all kinds of cybersecurity threats.' Dutch officials alleged two weeks ago that four agents from Russia's GRU military intelligence agency tried and failed to hack into the Wi-Fi system at the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. The leaders' demand comes amid concerns over possible election interference during the European Parliament vote in May.
  • A high-level meeting to lay out security plans for Afghanistan's upcoming parliamentary elections had just concluded when an elite Afghan guard turned his gun Thursday on the departing delegation in an attack that killed the powerful Kandahar police chief but missed the top U.S. commander in the country, Gen. Scott Miller. The audacious assassination strike, which killed at least one other senior Afghan official and was claimed by the Taliban, underscored the harrowing lack of security in Afghanistan just two days before national elections and more than 17 years after the militant group was driven from power. A Taliban spokesman said Miller was the intended target. However, Army Col. David Butler, who attended the Kandahar meeting with Miller, said the region's powerful police chief, Abdul Raziq, who was killed in the volley of gunfire, was clearly the target, not the U.S. general. 'It was pretty clear he was shooting at Raziq,' Butler told The Associated Press, adding that Miller was nearby but not in the line of fire. The delegates had just gathered for a group photo when gunfire broke out inside the provincial governor's compound in Kandahar City, according to an AP television cameraman who was present when the shooting began. Everyone scattered, and the U.S. participants scrambled toward their nearby helicopter. But a firefight broke out between the U.S. service members and Afghan police when they tried to stop the U.S. delegation from reaching their helicopter, said the cameraman. Besides Raziq, Kandahar's intelligence chief, Abdul Mohmin was killed in the attack, according to deputy provincial governor Agha Lala Dastageri. He said Kandahar Gov. Zalmay Wesa also died of his wounds after being taken to a local hospital, although security officials in the capital maintained Wesa was wounded but survived. Three Americans — a U.S. service member, a coalition contractor and an American civilian — were injured and in stable condition, said NATO spokesman U.S. Col. Knut Peters. Taliban spokesman Qari Yousuf Ahmadi said the militant group carried out the attack, and Gen. Miller was the target. Butler disputed that, saying the assailant shot at Raziq and then appeared to spray the area with gunfire before he was killed. He said Miller and the Afghan leaders had moved outside the palace after several hours of meetings and were standing in small groups in the compound. He said he heard several shots 'and we all took cover. It was over in seconds.' 'We stabilized and treated the wounded and secured the area,' said Butler, adding that Miller made sure the scene was secure and the wounded were taken away by medivac before he left the area and returned to Kabul. Razik was a particularly powerful figure in southern Kandahar and a close U.S. ally despite widespread allegations of corruption. He ruled in Kandahar, the former Taliban heartland, with an iron fist and had survived several attempts to kill him, including one last year that resulted in the death of five diplomats from the United Arab Emirates. Raziq's killing 'may have major implications on the security situation in southern Afghanistan. As the chief of police in Kandahar, he has kept a lid on the Taliban's insurgency, which has intensified over the past several years,' analyst Bill Roggio wrote in the Long War Journal. The Taliban have vowed to disrupt Saturday's parliamentary elections, warning teachers and students not to allow schools to be used for polling and warning Afghans to stay away from the polls. Within hours of the attack, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani addressed the nation to assure Kandahar residents it was safe to go to the polls. In an AP interview, his adviser, Ziaulhaq Amarkhil said the attack was meant to disrupt elections and urged voters to defy Taliban threats, saying casting their ballot 'would be a big slap on the face of the enemy.' At a news conference in the Afghan capital, Afghanistan's Army Chief Gen. Mohammad Sharif Yaftali said additional troops had been moved from neighboring Helmand province to Kandahar. Pakistan's new prime minister, Imran Khan, and its military chief condemned the assault. 'The people and the security forces of Afghanistan have been paying a heavy price due to continued instability and threats from the enemies of peace,' Khan said in a statement. 'Pakistan stands by the government and the people of Afghanistan in their quest for lasting peace and stability.' Security has been steadily deteriorating in Afghanistan with increasingly brazen attacks being carried out by insurgents and Afghanistan's security forces have been on high alert ahead of Saturday's elections. Late Wednesday, a NATO convoy was attacked near the Afghan capital, killing two civilians and injuring five Czech troops, Afghan officials and the Czech military said Thursday. The attack in the Bagram district of Parwan province, also wounded three Afghan civilians, said Wahida Shakar, spokeswoman for the provincial governor. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in Bagram, which is the home of a sprawling U.S. military base. In recent months, Afghan troops have come under near-daily attacks. NATO troops, which handed over security to Afghan forces at the end of 2014, mostly train and assist with air power. So far this year, eight U.S. soldiers and three other NATO service members have died in Afghanistan. ___ Associated Press writers Lolita Baldor in Washington and Karel Janicek in Prague contributed to this report.
  • The U.S. has slapped sanctions on a Colombian man with ties to the South American country's largest rebel group who allegedly controls a narcotics trafficking corridor in northern Colombia. The Treasury Department designated Pedro Luis Zuleta Noscue as a drug kingpin. The move announced Thursday blocks him from accessing U.S. assets he may have. Four Colombian associates were also blacklisted. Treasury says laboratories under Zuleta's control produce cocaine and heroin for international narcotics markets. The labs also produce a highly-potent marijuana known as 'creepy.' It says Zuleta has financially supported narcotics trafficking activities led by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, and continues to supply narcotics to criminal groups. FARC signed a peace deal with Colombian government in 2016.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • As a former FBI agent was sentenced to 4 years in prison Thursday in Minnesota for disclosing classified information to the news media, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions hailed the latest court moves against leakers in the federal government, saying the Trump Administration is waging what may be ‘the most aggressive campaign against leaks’ in the history of the Department of Justice. “Today’s sentence should be a warning to every would-be leaker in the federal government that if they disclose classified information, they will pay a high price,” Sessions said in a statement, making clear that government leakers will be ‘prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and punished.’ Terry Albury, the Minneapolis FBI agent arrested for leaking classified information to the Intercept, gets four years in prison. 'We are conducting perhaps the most aggressive campaign against leaks in Department history,' AG Sessions says in statement: https://t.co/QBFKUUiXy8 — Kevin Collier (@kevincollier) October 18, 2018 The Sessions statement came after a busy week on the leak front for the feds: + On Monday, a former employee of the Senate Intelligence Committee plead guilty to lying to the FBI about leaks to a reporter. + Wednesday, a Department of Treasury official was charged with leaking banking activity reports to a reporter which was linked to the Russia investigation. + Today, former FBI agent Terry Albury was sentenced to four years of jail time for leaking national security material to the Intercept. From press reports in recent days, it is obvious that more leak investigations are underway as well. + The Trump Administration has sent a subpoena to an immigration attorney, trying to find out how leaked an internal government memo from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, on how asylum applications would be handled for domestic violence victims. + The charges this week against a Treasury Department employee for leaking “Suspicious Activity Banking” reports shows another official in the same office had contacts with the news media as well. + Earlier this week, Attorney General Sessions told the Washington Times that there were 27 ongoing leak investigations at the Department of Justice. + Back in February, Sessions vowed that the Justice Department was going “aggressively” to find out who leaked information about transcripts of phone conversations involving former Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.
  • A 63-year-old man was shot and killed by police in Monroe, Georgia, Thursday after pointing what turned out to be a replica Thompson submachine gun, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said. >> Read more trending news  The incident happened about 9 a.m., when police responded to a report of a man with a gun, Monroe Public Safety Director Keith Glass said in a statement. The man was identified as Mahlon Edward Summerour, GBI spokeswoman Nelly Miles said in a statement, adding that Summerour appeared to be wearing a curtain over his clothing. “During the encounter, Summerour pointed the weapon at one of the officers,” Miles said. “One officer fired a shot at Summerour, striking him in the chest. Summerour was transported to a local hospital where he later died.” Officer-involved shootings in Georgia in 2018 are on track to surpass the 97 recorded in 2017, according to the GBI. The Monroe shooting is the 73rd such investigation the agency has opened in 2018.
  • The Georgia State Patrol says a man is dead after he managed to fire a weapon that he had hidden behind his back while he was handcuffed during a traffic stop on Interstate 75 in Georgia. >> Read more trending news The shooting happened at exit 293 in Cartersville, near the exit ramp to Highway 411 in Bartow County. Officials say a trooper pulled a couple over around 5 a.m. Thursday and the trooper found contraband in the car. The female driver was taken into custody. Authorities said the male passenger originally gave a false name and, at some point, the first trooper called for backup. When a second trooper arrived, the officers determined the man was a wanted parole violator who had been on the run for months, officials said. The troopers searched the man’s car for weapons and handcuffed his hands behind his back, according to investigators. >> Man carrying replica machine gun fatally shot by police, cops say The man was able to grab a weapon hidden behind his back in his pants and fired at the troopers. One of the officers was struck in the stomach, but protected by a bullet-proof vest.  The troopers shot back at the suspect, authorities said. The man was taken to the hospital and later died, according to officials.  The trooper was treated at the hospital and released.  Authorities continue to investigate.
  • State authorities are investigating a deadly shooting involving police in Monroe, officials said. >> Read more trending news The incident happened about 9 a.m. Thursday in the 400 block of East Marable Street in Walton County when police responded to a report of a man with a gun, Monroe Public Safety Director Keith Glass said in a statement. >> See the latest on AJC.com A 63-year-old man was shot and killed after police said he was carrying a gun that turned out to be a replica Thompson machine gun, WSBTV reported. The scene is about one block from Athens Technical College’s Walton campus. >> See the latest on WSBTV.com It was one of two officer-involved shootings in Georgia on Thursday. The second was reported in Bartow County. >> Suspect shot dead after pulling gun during traffic stop, injuring officer, Georgia State Patrol says Officer-involved shootings in Georgia this year are on track to pass the 88 recorded in 2017, according to the GBI. The Monroe shooting is the 73rd such investigation the agency has opened in 2018.