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Woman charged with child sex trafficking after recruiting runaways to pose nude, police say
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Woman charged with child sex trafficking after recruiting runaways to pose nude, police say

Woman Charged with Sex Trafficking After Allegedly Recruiting Runaways to Pose Nude, Sell Drugs

Woman charged with child sex trafficking after recruiting runaways to pose nude, police say

A woman recruited runaway teenage girls to pose nude, sell drugs and dance at strip clubs, police said. 

>> Read more trending news 

Tennessee Jackson, 37, and her husband, Donald Jackson, were arrested Jan. 11 and charged with multiple counts of drug possession and child sex trafficking, KNXV reported on Wednesday.

Police said Tennessee Jackson forced the girls to pose nude for photos that were then posted on social media, KNXV reported

Jackson also forced the girls to sell drugs, including marijuana, cocaine and ecstasy. Police had conducted multiple undercover drug purchases over the course of the month before the raid, KNXV reported

One of the victims told police they were taken to a West Virginia strip club to dance. 

Police found $30,000 cash in the house and a notebook containing social media passwords, KNXV reported.

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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

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Washington Insider

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