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National
'I was brought up in the old school': Man allowed underage girl to drive to store for beer, snacks
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'I was brought up in the old school': Man allowed underage girl to drive to store for beer, snacks

'I was brought up in the old school': Man allowed underage girl to drive to store for beer, snacks
Mark Papczynski (Brevard County Sheriff)

'I was brought up in the old school': Man allowed underage girl to drive to store for beer, snacks

One man was arrested after police in Florida said he allowed an underage girl to take the wheel during a trip to the store, according to the Brevard County Sheriff's Office.

>> Read more trending news

Officials said a vehicle was observed be driven into the opposite lane and into dirt off the side of the roadway Thursday in the area of North Tropical Trail at about 6:15 p.m.

Police came in contact with the vehicle, where 62-year-old Mark Papczynski said he allowed the girl to drive to the store "to get her a snack and himself another 18 pack of beer," according to an arrest report.

Papczynski admitted that letting the girl drive was dangerous.

In a post-jail interview Papczynski said, "I was brought up in the old school, where parents always taught their children the ways of life," in regards to the incident. He also said that "it wasn't like she was doing it for the first time."

He faces two charges of child neglect without great bodily harm and permitting an unauthorized person to drive, according to jail records.

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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Orange County Sheriff John Mina announced a free Pitbull concert on June 1 in Orlando to benefit severely injured OPD Officer Kevin Valencia. Valencia was shot in the head responding to a domestic hostage situation in June 2018.  He was trying to rescue four children from the man who would go one to kill them and then himself. Since then Valencia has been treated at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta where his condition did not improve much.  He’s now back in Central Florida and continues coverings and getting treatment.  A GoFundMe continues raising money for him and his family. The free Pitbull concert will be held June 1 at the Central Florida Fairgrounds.  A Facebook post from Orange County Sheriff John Mina says the concert will be produced by attorney Dan Newlin.  Mina was Orlando Police Chief when Valencia was shot. (Post)
  • Newly uncovered court documents show that Joseph James DeAngelo Jr., the man accused of the notorious Golden State Killer serial murders and rapes in the 1970s and 1980s, was arrested on an unrelated charge in 1996, but was let go. DeAngelo, a U.S. Navy veteran and former police officer, faces 13 murder charges and 13 counts of kidnapping related to some of more than 50 sexual assaults the Golden State Killer, also known as the East Area Rapist and the Original Night Stalker, is believed to have committed over a span stretching from 1975 to 1986. Following his arrest outside his Citrus Heights, California, home last April, authorities said the only prior arrest they knew of was a 1979 shoplifting incident that led to DeAngelo losing his job with the Auburn Police Department.  He stole a hammer and a can of dog repellent in the incident, according to reports.  The Sacramento Bee, which requested a bevy of court records following DeAngelo’s high-profile arrest last year, reported Friday that the records the newspaper received included documents from a lawsuit DeAngelo filed following a 1996 arrest in which he was accused of stealing from a gas station by leaving without paying for some gas.  >> Read more trending news DeAngelo, then 50, was arrested in an April 16, 1996, sting operation in which law enforcement officials in Placer County targeted people with outstanding warrants by notifying them that they had won free Super Bowl tickets, the Bee reported. The targets were told they could pick up the tickets at a Sacramento office.  DeAngelo was one of the people who responded to the ruse, the Bee said. He was jailed and released, and the charge against him was later dismissed, the court records showed.  Related story: Alabama man charged in 1999 double murder of teen girls Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office officials said there was no way to know in 1996 that DeAngelo was the murder suspect they and several other law enforcement agencies had sought for so long. “We had no way of knowing at the time who we actually had in our jail, because the evidence wasn’t there, the technology wasn’t there,” Sgt. Shaun Hampton told the newspaper Friday. “I don’t think there’s any way we could have known. There was no way for us to identify this person by him simply being in our jail for a few hours.” DeAngelo later sued the gas station manager for false arrest, claiming the gas pump had malfunctioned before he finished pumping the gas for which he’d already paid. The attendant, who the records alleged did not speak English well, reported him as an attempted robber after he demanded cash back for the gas it failed to pump.  “Eventually, the case was dismissed and the court entered an order finding plaintiff factually innocent and sealed the record,” the lawsuit said, according to the Bee.  The $1 million suit was eventually settled out of court, the Bee said. William Wright, who sued on DeAngelo’s behalf, told the newspaper he could not remember details of the settlement.  Wright expressed shock upon learning Friday that his client in 1996 was the Golden State Killer suspect. He said he remembered “Joe” as a nice guy who was “very upset about this gas station business.” “I’d seen the guy on TV, but I never made the connection,” Wright told the Bee. “He was very pleasant when he was talking to me.” Related story: Genealogy, DNA solve case of newborn left to freeze to death in ditch 38 years ago The newspaper reported that Sacramento County officials did not begin collecting DNA samples from suspects arrested for felonies until a few years after DeAngelo’s 1996 arrest. The process became routine statewide after the 2004 passage of Proposition 69, a law pushed by Bruce Harrington.  Harrington’s brother and sister-in-law, Keith and Patrice Harrington, were two of DeAngelo’s alleged victims in 1986, 10 years before his arrest in the gas station incident. The couple were found slain by Bruce and Keith Harrington’s father when he arrived at their home for dinner.  DeAngelo became a suspect in the Golden State Killer case after cold case investigators tried a novel approach to solving the crime -- taking DNA evidence left behind by the killer and comparing it to DNA profiles shared to public commercial databases by people hoping to find relatives they were not aware of.  Detectives were able to narrow down the DNA profiles they found on GEDmatch to close relatives of potential suspects, including DeAngelo. They confirmed they were on the right track after DNA taken from the handle of a driver’s side door on DeAngelo’s vehicle matched the evidence left at multiple Golden State Killer crime scenes.  They verified the match with a direct sample from DeAngelo following his arrest.  Since DeAngelo’s arrest, law enforcement agencies across the country have started using the same “genetic genealogy” technique to solve cold cases they have been working for decades. Buzzfeed News reported last month that Parabon Nanolabs Inc., a company that in the weeks after DeAngelo’s arrest established a commercial forensic genealogy service, has helped police identify suspects in three dozen cases since last May. Bode Technology, the largest forensic DNA testing company in the U.S., is launching its own rival service.  Alabama authorities on Monday announced that they had solved the 1999 double homicide of two 17-year-old girls who were found shot to death in a car trunk after getting lost on their way to a party for one of the girls’ birthday. Parabon Nanolabs provided the DNA analysis that led to a suspect.  Coley Lewis McCraney, of Dothan, is charged with five counts of capital murder and one count of first-degree rape in the July 31, 1999, deaths of J.B. Beasley and Tracie Hawlett, who were each shot once in the head. McCraney, who was 25 when he allegedly raped Beasley and killed her and her friend, faces the death penalty in the slayings.  South Dakota investigators earlier this month announced the arrest of a Florida woman accused of leaving her newborn son to freeze to death in a ditch in Sioux Falls 38 years ago. Theresa Josten Bentaas, now 57, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of the infant, who the community named Andrew John Doe and buried in a local cemetery after his family could not be located.  Parabon Nanolabs provided the DNA analysis in that case, as well.  DeAngelo is awaiting trial in the Sacramento County Jail, the same facility he was booked into in 1996. 
  • Prosecutors have offered plea deals to New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and several other men charged in connection with a south Florida prostitution sting, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news The Wall Street Journal was the first to report on the proposed deal, in which the men would admit they would have been proven guilty at trial in exchange for deferred prosecution. >> Patriots owner Robert Kraft charged in prostitution bust The Palm Beach State Attorney confirmed to The Associated Press that the deal, part of the standard diversion program for first-time offenders, was offered to Kraft and 24 other men. Under the terms of the agreement, the men would be required to perform 100 hours of community service, attend a class on the dangers of prostitution and pay $5,000 per count against them, the AP reported. In exchange, prosecutors would drop charges of misdemeanor soliciting prostitution against the men. >> Could Robert Kraft face sanctions from NFL for prostitution charges? Kraft, 77, was charged last month following a series of raids on massage parlors on Florida's east coast. Authorities said Kraft visited Jupiter's Orchids of Asia Day Spa twice in January, where authorities said he was videotaped in a sex act. He was charged with two counts of soliciting another to commit prostitution, a misdemeanor. Kraft has denied the allegation. >> Robert Kraft pleads not guilty to soliciting prostitution About 300 men have been charged and 10 massage parlors closed in multiple counties between Palm Beach and Orlando as part of a crackdown on illicit massage parlors and human trafficking. Several operators and employees have also been charged. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Florida prosecutors offered to drop charges against New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft if he agrees to a deal that would have him admit he would have been proven guilty if the case went to trial. According to The Wall Street Journal, prosecutors offered a “deferred prosecution” agreement to Kraft and others who are charged with soliciting prostitution in South Florida.  The deal would require them to complete an education course about prostitution, complete 100 hours of community service, screen for sexually transmitted disease and pay a portion of court costs. The Journal also reports that Kraft would have to review the case against him and agree that the state would have found him guilty if he went to trial for it. It is not clear right now whether Kraft will accept the offer or not.  Last month Kraft pleaded not guilty to two charges of soliciting prostitution after he was among more than two dozen men arrested for allegedly paying prostitutes for sex acts at a massage parlor in Jupiter. 
  • “Mom, I love you very much.” Those were the last words Diana Alejandra Keel texted to her mother in Colombia before the North Carolina emergency room nurse and mother of two vanished, according to The Washington Post. Keel’s husband, Rexford Lynn Keel Jr., 57, is now charged with murder in her fatal stabbing -- and investigators are taking another look at the death of his first wife, 42-year-old Elizabeth “Bess” Edward Keel, in 2006.  Diana Keel, 38, of Nashville, was reported missing March 8 by her 18-year-old daughter, a college freshman who had not been able to reach her by phone. The emergency room nurse’s supervisors also reported that she had not been to work in two days.  >> Read more trending news In a 911 call obtained by ABC11 in Raleigh, a co-worker at Wilson Medical Center said it was out of character for Diana Keel to miss work. “She was supposed to work tonight. She’s on the schedule,” the nurse told a dispatcher. “She’s the type of co-worker, she’s always like 30 minutes early. And if you text her, she replies back, like, reasonably. She has not done any of them.” Nash County Sheriff’s Office officials said Diana Keel’s vehicle was parked at the home she shared with her husband and their 10-year-old son, but there was no sign of her.  A delivery driver told authorities he delivered a package to Diana Keel around 11 a.m. March 8, Nash County Sheriff Keith Stone said Sunday during a news conference. It was the last time she was seen alive.  Rexford Keel, who goes by his middle name, Lynn, told authorities he had last seen his wife that same day. The Post reported that Lynn Keel claimed he watched his wife leave the house with friends, and that he expected her to return home as she had in the past.  Diana Keel never did. North Carolina Department of Transportation workers found her decomposing body March 12 in a wooded area outside Leggett, a town a 30-minute drive from her home in neighboring Edgecombe County, Sheriff’s Office officials said. Nashville is about 50 miles northeast of Raleigh.  The moments after the discovery was also captured by a 911 call. “It looks like something is laying in the woods,” the caller said. “I don’t know what it is, a body, a something, I don’t know.” Diana Keel died of multiple stab wounds, Stone said.  “My heart goes out to Diana Keel's family. My heart goes out to the son, 10 years old, that’s without a mother today and has got a father that’s being detained in Tuscon, Arizona. And to the daughter, that’s trying to further her education. “What a traumatic experience, what a sad experience this is.”  Watch Sheriff Keith Stone speak about Diana Keel’s homicide, courtesy of WRAL. Lynn Keel was questioned by investigators the day after his wife’s body was found. Sometime after that interview, he fled the area in his father’s gold 1998 Chevy pickup, authorities said.  A first-degree murder warrant was obtained for Lynn Keel, 57, on Friday. The manhunt ended Sunday, when he was pulled over by Arizona state troopers on Interstate 10 just outside Tuscon, Stone said.  “With the arrest, he was found to have a large amount of cash on him and some bank receipts,” Stone said during Sunday’s news conference, which was held about 90 minutes after Keel’s capture.  Keel was armed with a pocket knife, Stone said.  The sheriff indicated he believed Keel was trying to leave the country.  “I have speculations, as would anybody, if you’re that close to the Mexican border and you’ve got a large amount of cash on you,” Stone said.   Nash County investigators are working to have him extradited back to North Carolina. Keel remained in the Pima County Jail Tuesday morning.  Stone said there are also theories about the motive for Diana Keel’s slaying, but he declined to give details Sunday.  Taryn Edwards, a longtime friend of the victim’s, told WRAL in Raleigh that Diana Keel had been trying for years to leave her husband. Edwards, who said she was forced to back away from her best friend after Lynn Keel made his wife cut those ties, told the news station, along with ABC11, that she never felt comfortable around the man.  “It was just the atmosphere and the aura that, you know, that vibe you get from somebody?” Edwards said. “It was always very tense.” She said Lynn Keel “hovered a lot” and would not allow his wife to be alone with other people for very long. She described him as controlling of his wife.  “The verbal and emotional abuse was evident to me as a friend,” Edwards told Raleigh’s ABC11. Edwards said Diana Keel never indicated that she was in fear of physical harm by her husband, however.   “I wish I had found some way to stay in communication with her, and I’ll never forgive myself for that,” she told WRAL.  Diana Keel’s mother, Esperanza Prada, confirmed to ABC11 that her daughter wanted to leave her husband years ago, but couldn’t because she said her Lynn Keel had threatened her. Prada said her daughter again planned to divorce her husband and had met with a lawyer before her slaying. Prada and Diana Keel’s brother are traveling to North Carolina from Columbia.   Stone told the news station that deputies went to the couple’s home about a year before Diana Keel’s disappearance and death for a domestic incident. “There had been concerns between the husband at one time and Mrs. Keel, but there has been nothing lately that has been reported on that,” the sheriff told ABC11.  Diana Keel’s daughter, Laura Keel, established a GoFundMe page to pay for her mother’s funeral and help support her younger brother, Max, who is now living with family members. The University of North Carolina Wilmington student wrote that her part-time job does not pay enough to cover her mother’s arrangements.  “My priorities now are to make sure my mother is laid to rest in a manner much more fitting than her death and to make sure my brother continues to feel the love that our mother shared with us daily,” Laura Keel wrote. “By doing so, I hope to honor my mother’s legacy.” She wrote on Facebook on Sunday that she understood people feeling anger toward her stepfather, but begged them, for her little brother’s sake, to not spread hate. “Hate creates hate and social media is very present right now,” the teen wrote. “My brother is so pure-hearted, he doesn’t need to see that hate. We all just need to focus on how wonderful my mother was, in order to heal the best we can.” Stone confirmed Sunday that his office is taking a new look into Bess Keel’s death on New Year’s Day 2006, when she had what was ruled an accidental fall. Lynn Keel told investigators at the time that his wife fell and struck her head on the corner of the front steps of their home.  Bess Keel died at the same home from which Diana Keel was reported missing. Photos and video posted on social media by local reporters show the steps outside the home.  A memorial to Diana Keel has popped up on those same steps where Bess Keel died. Bess Keel’s cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head.   “We’re going to work all the leads on that, and we’re going to go back and look at the information we had from the first incident reports,” Stone said of Bess Keel’s death. “We’re going to talk with the District Attorney's Office. Definitely, it’s something we need to be looking at.” Bess Keel’s family issued a statement to WRAL in which they said they have “always questioned Bess’ death and feel deeply saddened that another life has now been taken.” Bess Keel’s friends were also stumped by her sudden death, the news station reported.  “Bess was outdoorsy and liked to ride horses,” a former co-worker, Matthew Lambert told KRAL. “They thought it odd that she would fall down the steps.” Lambert said Lynn Keel, who worked as a truck driver while Bess Keel was alive, would sometimes accompany his wife to Christmas parties and other events with her colleagues at Microbac Laboratories. He said he and other co-workers hoped to see the investigation into Bess Keel’s death reopened.  Stone on Sunday had few details of the new look at the 2006 case, but he expressed satisfaction with Lynn Keel’s arrest in Diana Keel’s slaying.  “I’m just glad we got a killer off the road and brought some closure to this case,” Stone said. 

Washington Insider

  • Using his veto pen for the first time in just over two years in office, President Donald Trump on Friday rejected a special resolution from Congress which would block his national emergency declaration to shift money into construction of a border wall, a day after the GOP Senate joined the Democratic House in rebuking the President. 'Congress’s vote to deny the crisis on the southern border is a vote against reality,' President Trump said in the Oval Office. 'It's against reality. It is a tremendous national emergency. It is a tremendous crisis.' The measure now goes back to the House and Senate, where any effort to override the President's veto is far short of the necessary two-thirds super majority. 'On March 26, the House will once again act to protect our Constitution and our democracy from the President’s emergency declaration by holding a vote to override his veto,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. But the President sternly disagreed. Here's the text of the President's veto message, as sent back to the Congress: To the House of Representatives:   I am returning herewith without my approval H.J. Res. 46, a joint resolution that would terminate the national emergency I declared regarding the crisis on our southern border in Proclamation 9844 on February 15, 2019, pursuant to the National Emergencies Act.  As demonstrated by recent statistics published by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and explained in testimony given by the Secretary of Homeland Security on March 6, 2019, before the House Committee on Homeland Security, our porous southern border continues to be a magnet for lawless migration and criminals and has created a border security and humanitarian crisis that endangers every American. Last month alone, CBP apprehended more than 76,000 aliens improperly attempting to enter the United States along the southern border -- the largest monthly total in the last 5 years. In fiscal year 2018, CBP seized more than 820,000 pounds of drugs at our southern border, including 24,000 pounds of cocaine, 64,000 pounds of methamphetamine, 5,000 pounds of heroin, and 1,800 pounds of fentanyl. In fiscal years 2017 and 2018, immigration officers nationwide made 266,000 arrests of aliens previously charged with or convicted of crimes. These crimes included approximately 100,000 assaults, 30,000 sex crimes, and 4,000 killings. In other words, aliens coming across our border have injured or killed thousands of people, while drugs flowing through the border have killed hundreds of thousands of Americans.   The current situation requires our frontline border enforcement personnel to vastly increase their humanitarian efforts. Along their dangerous trek to the United States, 1 in 3 migrant women experiences sexual abuse, and 7 in 10 migrants are victims of violence. Fifty migrants per day are referred for emergency medical care, and CBP rescues 4,300 people per year who are in danger and distress. The efforts to address this humanitarian catastrophe draw resources away from enforcing our Nation's immigration laws and protecting the border, and place border security personnel at increased risk.   As troubling as these statistics are, they reveal only part of the reality. The situation at the southern border is rapidly deteriorating because of who is arriving and how they are arriving. For many years, the majority of individuals who arrived illegally were single adults from Mexico. Under our existing laws, we could detain and quickly remove most of these aliens. More recently, however, illegal migrants have organized into caravans that include large numbers of families and unaccompanied children from Central American countries. Last year, for example, a record number of families crossed the border illegally. If the current trend holds, the number of families crossing in fiscal year 2019 will greatly surpass last year's record total. Criminal organizations are taking advantage of these large flows of families and unaccompanied minors to conduct dangerous illegal activity, including human trafficking, drug smuggling, and brutal killings.   Under current laws, court decisions, and resource constraints, the Government cannot detain families or undocumented alien children from Central American countries in significant numbers or quickly deport them. Instead, the Government is forced to release many of them into the interior of the United States, pending lengthy judicial proceedings. Although many fail ever to establish any legal right to remain in this country, they stay nonetheless.   This situation on our border cannot be described as anything other than a national emergency, and our Armed Forces are needed to help confront it.   My highest obligation as President is to protect the Nation and its people. Every day, the crisis on our border is deepening, and with new surges of migrants expected in the coming months, we are straining our border enforcement personnel and resources to the breaking point.   H.J. Res. 46 ignores these realities. It is a dangerous resolution that would undermine United States sovereignty and threaten the lives and safety of countless Americans. It is, therefore, my duty to return it to the House of Representatives without my approval.   DONALD J. TRUMP   THE WHITE HOUSE, March 15, 2019.