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The Latest National News

    A trespasser and possible burglar found himself in a sticky situation this week after he became trapped in the grease vent of a closed-down Chinese restaurant in San Lorenzo, California, deputies said. >> Read more trending news  According to KGO, firefighters on Wednesday rescued the man from the vent, where he had been trapped for two days, after the owner of a nearby business heard him calling for help. He was hospitalized for dehydration and 'is expected to make a full recovery,' the Alameda County Sheriff's Office said. >> See a photo from the scene here The 29-year-old suspect may have been trying to break in to steal copper wire or plumbing, said Sgt. Ray Kelly, a Sheriff's Office spokesman. 'We can confirm this man was not Santa Claus and did not have legal authority to be here,' Kelly said. Authorities are submitting the case to the district attorney, who will determine whether the man will face any charges, the Sheriff's Office said. Read more here.
  • A Kentucky woman is behind bars after police say she killed her newborn baby. According to WKYT, Amber Bowling, 21, of Manchester, has been charged with murder after police say she hid the infant in a garbage bag, then threw the child 'over the upstairs banister' of an apartment building. Police said the baby, born Sunday, was found dead Tuesday morning, WAVE reported. According to the autopsy, the newborn suffered fractures to the cranium and ribs, as well as brain bleeding, WLEX reported. >> Read more trending news  Bowling, who was arrested Wednesday, is being held in the Clay County Detention Center, according to WAVE. Read more here or here.
  • A federal judge in New York sentenced President Donald Trump’s former long-time attorney Michael Cohen to 36 months in prison on Wednesday after he pleaded guilty to several charges earlier this year. >> Read more trending news Cohen, 52, admitted to lying last year to Congress in connection to a Trump Tower deal in Moscow after prosecutors with special counsel Robert Mueller’s team charged him with making false statements. >> Michael Cohen pleads guilty to making false statements to Congress He also pleaded guilty in August to eight charges including multiple counts of tax evasion and arranging illicit payments to silence women who posed a risk to Trump's presidential campaign. >> Trump was implicated in two felonies: What does that mean? Update 6:00 p.m. EST: President Donald Trump refused to answers questions about his former attorney Michael Cohen Wednesday after signing an executive order in the Roosevelt Room at the White House. CNN is reporting Trump ignored reporters’ questions about Cohen’s three year prison sentence handed down Wednesday in New York. CNN also reported, citing inside sources, that Trump is “seething” over the Cohen case and, again, called him “a liar.” Update 1:55 p.m. EST: Cohen prompted American Media Inc. to purchase the rights to Karen McDougal’s story about an affair she claims she had with Trump years before the 2016 presidential election, federal prosecutors with the Southern District of New York confirmed Wednesday. McDougal claimed she had a nearly year-long affair with Trump in 2006 and 2007. The rights to her story were bought in August 2016 by American Media, the publisher of the National Enquirer, the Wall Street Journal reported in July, McDougal’s story was never published. Prosecutors said Wednesday that officials previously reached a non-prosecution agreement with American Media Inc. Company officials admitted to making the $150,000 payment “in concert with a candidate’s presidential campaign and in order to ensure that the woman did not publicize damaging allegations about the candidate before the 2016 presidential election. Cohen also paid adult film star $130,000 in exchange for her silence about an alleged sexual encounter she says she had with Trump in 2006. Prosecutors said Cohen was reimbursed for his payment to Daniels in monthly installments “disguised as payments for legal services pursuant to a retainer, when in fact no such retainer existed.” “Cohen made or caused both of these payments in order to influence  the 2016 election and did so in coordination with one or more members of the campaign,” prosecutors said in a news release. Update 12:45 p.m. EST: U.S. District Judge William Pauley said Wednesday that Cohen’s cooperation with prosecutors 'does not wipe the slate clean' of his crimes. Pauley sentenced Cohen to serve three years in prison for crimes including tax evasion, lying to Congress and arranging illicit payments to silence Daniels and McDougal. Cohen’s former attorney, Lanny Davis, said in a statement released Wednesday that Cohen “continues to tell the truth about Donald Trump’s misconduct over the years.” “Mr. Trump’s repeated lies cannot contradict stubborn facts,” Davis said. “Michael has owned up to his mistakes and fully cooperated with Special Counsel Mueller in his investigation over possible Trump campaign collusion with Russian meddling in the 2016 election.” Trump has accused Cohen of lying to authorities in order to get a lighter sentence and denied any wrongdoing. >> Cohen pleads guilty to 8 charges, says Trump told him to pay off Stormy Daniels, Karen McDougal Update 12:15 p.m. EST: Cohen will be required to surrender to authorities on March 6 to serve the 36-month sentence handed down Wednesday, Bloomberg News reported. U.S. District Judge William Pauley III also required Cohen forfeit $500,000 and pay $1.4 million in restitution and $50,000 in fines, the news site reported. >> More on Robert Mueller's investigation  Update 12:05 p.m EST: U.S. District Judge William Pauley III sentenced Cohen to 36 months imprisonment and three years of supervised release after he pleaded guilty to eight charges in New York over the summer, Newsday reported. He was sentenced to two months for lying to Congress. The sentence will run concurrent with the New York sentence. “Cohen pled guilt to a veritable smorgasbord of fraudulent conduct,' Pauley said before handing down the sentence Wednesday, according to CNN.  Pauley credited Cohen for his cooperation with Mueller's team, however, he added that as an attorney, 'Mr. Cohen should have known better,' Newsday reported. Update 11:50 a.m. EST: Cohen said he takes “full responsibility” for the charges he's pleaded guilty to while addressing the court Wednesday. “This may seem hard to believe but today is one of the most meaningful days of my life,” he said, according to CNN. “I have been living in a personal and mental incarceration ever since the day that I accepted the offer to work for a real estate mogul whose business acumen that I deeply admired.' Update 11:45 a.m. EST: Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Nicolas Roos said Wednesday that Cohen's crimes carried a 'tremendous societal cost,' CNN reported. “In committing these crimes, Mr. Cohen has eroded faith in the electoral process and compromised the rule of law,” Roos said. Update 11:35 a.m. EST: Jeannie Rhee, an attorney for special counsel Robert Mueller's team, said in brief comments in court Wednesday that Cohen provided investigators with 'credible information' related to the investigation into Russian election meddling, Newsday reported. 'Mr. Cohen has sought to tell us the truth, and that is of utmost value to us,' Rhee said. Update 11:15 a.m. EST: Cohen's attorney, Guy Petrillo, said in court Wednesday that Cohen cooperated with special counsel Robert Mueller’s office 'knowing that he'd face a barrage of attack by the president,' according to the Courthouse News Service. Petrillo said Cohen “offered evidence against the most powerful person in our country,” CNN reported. Update 10:55 a.m. EST: Cohen arrived at the federal courthouse in Manhattan early Wednesday ahead of an 11 a.m. sentencing hearing before U.S. District Judge William Pauley III. Original report: Federal prosecutors in New York have asked that Cohen receive a “substantial prison term” of around four years, saying in a court filing last week that he'd failed to fully cooperate with investigators and overstated his helpfulness. Cohen’s attorneys have argued for leniency, arguing that some of Cohen's crimes were motivated by overenthusiasm for Trump, rather than any nefarious intent. >> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: Feds: Manafort lied to prosecutors, Cohen should get jail time  The president has denied that he had affairs with either McDougal or Daniels, but prosecutors said Cohen orchestrated payments to the women at Trump’s direction. On Monday, the president wrote in a tweet that the payments were “a simple private transaction,” and not a campaign contribution. Trump said that “even if it was” a campaign contribution, Cohen should be held responsible. “Lawyer’s liability if he made a mistake, not me,” Trump wrote. “Cohen (is) just trying to get his sentenced reduced. WITCH HUNT!”  >> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: Denouncing Cohen, Trump disputes campaign link to payoff of women A sentence of hard time would leave Cohen with little to show for his decision to plead guilty, though experts told The Associated Press that Wednesday's hearing might not be the last word on his punishment. Cohen could have his sentence revisited if he strikes a deal with prosecutors in which he provides additional cooperation within a year of his sentence, said Michael J. Stern, a former federal prosecutor in Detroit and Los Angeles. 'Few things spark a defendant's renewed interest in cooperating faster than trading in a pair of custom Italian trousers for an off-the-rack orange jump suit,' he said. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • An American Catholic priest has been charged with soliciting sex with underage boys while in the Philippines, according to federal prosecutors.  Rev. Kenneth Bernard Hendricks, 77, of Cincinnati, is charged with engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places, according to the U.S. attorney’s office for the Southern District of Ohio. Hendricks was arrested Dec. 5 in the Philippines, where he was serving as a missionary priest.  At least 10 alleged victims have been identified, according to NBC News. Hendricks is being held in a Manila jail.  The Archdiocese of Cincinnati said in a statement following Hendricks’ arrest that the priest was ordained while overseas and has never been a priest under the archdiocese’s purview. “Although not a priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, Fr. Hendricks is listed on our website as a Catholic missionary serving in Asia,” the statement from the Archdiocese said. “He is one of around 75 missionaries from Southwest Ohio who receive some financial support from the Mission Office of the Archdiocese. None of these individuals work for, or take direction from, the Archdiocese of Cincinnati.” Archdiocese officials said they are cooperating fully with the Department of Justice and Homeland Security investigators. They urged anyone with information about the rogue priest to call Homeland Security at 513-246-1461. “The abuse of children or any vulnerable person is abhorrent and needs to be prosecuted,” the statement said. Hendricks came under suspicion Nov. 13, when Homeland Security officials received information regarding the sexual exploitation of several minor Filipino boys, according to a news release from U.S. Attorney Benjamin C. Glassman. The information alleged that a Catholic priest, later identified as Hendricks, had been sexually assaulting the boys, several of whom had been identified and were cooperating with police in the Philippines.  According to the boys, the abuse included anal and oral sex, as well as mutual masturbation, the news release said. The alleged abuse occurred dozens of times and involved boys as young as 7 years old.  “Hendricks allegedly had a number of minor boys residing with him,” the news release said. “It is alleged he insisted they take baths together and would molest the victims alone or with other boys. The priest allegedly warned the victims that if they told anyone they would all go to prison.” >> Read more trending news Glassman said one conversation between Hendricks and a victim was recorded.  “This will probably be the scenario is, there will be a meeting and then it will be decided, you know, what your parents want to do about anything,” Hendricks said in the recording. “Do they want to try … want to press charges, uh, whatever see, but that’s between them and the Bishop. I have nothing to do with that. I just get the fallout afterwards.” He further said in the conversation that the boy’s parents would ask him if he wanted a case to move forward of if he preferred a settlement.  “But as far as after that, I don’t know what’s going to happen. I really will have to probably really resign, retire now,” Hendricks said, according to the news release.  Read the affidavit in support of charges against Cincinnati priest Kenneth Hendricks below. Warning: Details of the allegations against the 77-year-old are graphic. The criminal complaint has been sealed by a federal judge, but a redacted affidavit in support of the complaint provides further detail of the allegations against Hendricks, who was the parish priest in Naval, the capital of the province of Biliran.  The affidavit, which often grows graphic with details of repeated sexual assaults, states that two of Hendricks’ alleged victims gave sworn statements Nov. 6 to the Philippine National Police. One young man said the abuse began in 2009, when he was 12 and serving as a sacristan at the church.  The victim, who is now 22, said the abuse began when Hendricks kissed him on the lips one day as he cleaned the church. He said he also witnessed Hendricks inappropriately touching other young boys who lived with the priest.  The man, who said he felt he had no choice, ended up moving in with the priest, who financed his education and helped his family. All the while, Hendricks was secretly molesting him, both alone and with other boys, the affidavit says.  Hendricks often insisted the boy take a bath with him, the document reads.  The young man told investigators that, at 15, he contracted a sexually transmitted disease from Hendricks. After being treated for it, he refused to have any additional sexual contact with the priest, the affidavit says.  The affidavit goes over statements made by multiple other victims, whose names are redacted. It also reveals that the recorded conversation mentioned in Glassman’s news release was between Hendricks and the man whose abuse began in 2009. The recording was made in November, once the allegations against Hendricks were taken to law enforcement.   During that conversation, Hendricks admitted sexually abusing several boys, the affidavit says. At one point, he tells his alleged victim that “happy days are gone, it’s all over.” “But the kids, but the kids Father is telling the truth? They are telling everything about you, Father?” the man says.  “Well, that’s, it’s true. I’m not saying it’s not. Did I say it’s not? It happened,” Hendricks says.  The alleged victim again asks Hendricks if he admits to having sex with boys. “It’s already blottered, you put it on a blotter,” Hendricks responds. “Will I lie? It was a mistake on my part. Should have known better than trying to just have a life. “That’s why you make mistakes. You have to learn from them, so I have to learn.” NBC News reported that, along with the U.S. charges, Hendricks is also being charged by authorities in the Philippines. “Our reach in this case is global,” Glassman told the news network. “If someone commits a crime with any connection to the Southern District of Ohio, we can work with other agents for a global reach.” Hendricks faces 30 years in prison if convicted of the U.S. charges. 
  • People in the Southeast were woken up by an earthquake early Wednesday.  >> Visit WSBTV.com for complete coverage of this developing story The U.S. Geological Survey reported the quake happened about 4:15 a.m. near Decatur, Tennessee. It had a magnitude of 4.4. A 3.3-magnitude aftershock followed happened about 15 minutes later. At least two other aftershocks were later reported. Atlanta’s WSB-TV received dozens of phone calls in the minutes following the quake. >> Read more trending news  The earthquake happened along the New Madrid Fault Line, which is along the Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi state lines.  The earthquake was the second strongest on record in east Tennessee, according to the USGS. The strongest was a magnitude 4.7 near Maryville in 1973. There have been several small earthquakes in northwest Georgia over the past few years, including a 1.9-magnitude quake near Villanow, in Walker County, in August.  A 2.7-magnitude quake was reported in Catoosa County, near Fort Oglethorpe, in January, and a 2.3 hit Trion, in Chattooga County, in November 2017. In July 2017, a 2.2-magnitude quake was registered just north of LaFayette in Walker County.
  • As a grieving California couple shares photos of their 13-year-old son with autism, who died last month after being restrained by teachers, other parents have begun pulling their children from the inclusive private K-12 school where it took place.  The parents of Max Benson, a student at Guiding Hands School in El Dorado Hills, shared photos of their son with Fox 40 in Sacramento to show his sweet demeanor, the news station said. The family, from Davis, is also fighting back at Guiding Hands, which a preliminary investigation by the state shows violated multiple rules in its handling of the boy.  Max was allegedly placed in a prone restraint, face-down on the floor, Nov. 28 after school officials said he became violent. The El Dorado Sheriff’s Office, which is investigating the incident, said in a news release that Max was 6 feet tall and weighed about 280 pounds.  An attorney for Max’s family, Seth Goldstein, disputed the claims of the boy’s height and weight, saying that Max was 5 feet, 4 inches tall. At most, he weighed 230 pounds, Goldstein said. “He was not an unmanageable child in any sense of that term, in terms of that size,” Goldstein told The Sacramento Bee.  The Bee previously reported that sources said Max was held in the prone restraint position for about an hour before he became unresponsive.  “A teacher began CPR until medical aid arrived,” a news release from the Sheriff’s Office said. “The student was transported to Mercy Folsom in critical condition and later to UC Davis (Medical Center).” Max died two days later.  “At this time, there appears to be no evidence of foul play or criminal intent,” investigators said in the release. Cherilyn Caler, whose own 13-year-old son witnessed the restraint used on Max, said the teacher and an aide restrained the boy, who had been a student there for just a few months, because he kicked a wall, the Bee reported. A second parent who asked to remain anonymous backed Caler’s account.  Caler told the newspaper her son, who is also on the autism spectrum, told her Max became unresponsive, at which point those restraining him told him to stop pretending to be asleep. After about 30 minutes, they realized he wasn’t pretending, she said. Caler has since removed her son from the school, the Bee reported.  >> Related story: Teen with autism dies after being restrained at school A Dec. 5 letter from the California Department of Education states that staff members at Guiding Hills violated multiple state rules when trying to get Max under control. The Department of Education’s own preliminary investigation found that the staff used an emergency intervention to stop predictable, or non-emergency, behavior. It also found that an emergency intervention was used as a substitute for Max’s behavioral intervention plan, or BIP, which is designed to change, replace, modify or eliminate a targeted behavior. The intervention was also used for longer than necessary and it was used with an amount of force that was “not reasonable and necessary under the circumstances.” The school staff’s actions also failed to take into account Max’s individualized education program, or IEP, which required specific intervention strategies that were not used, the letter says.  Guiding Hands School’s certification has been suspended until the end of 2019, according to the letter. The school can continue to serve current students but cannot accept new pupils.  “The (California Department of Education) is continuing to conduct its investigation into the actions of (Guiding Hands),” the letter reads. It is likely required corrective actions will be issued by the CDE resulting from this investigation.” All corrective actions would have to be completed for the school to regain its certification. Caler is not the only parent who has pulled their child out of Guiding Hands, which had an enrollment of 137 this school year, according to state records.  Melissa Lasater told Fox 40 that she was appalled at how the school handled Max’s death.  “When they were bringing the chaplains from class to class, instead of just letting the chaplains say, ‘We’re here for you,’ the staff also shared their message: ‘Just so you know, we didn’t kill anyone,’” Lasater told the news station.  Lasater said her own 13-year-old son, who knew Max, did not realize his classmate died until his death made the news about a week later.  “He immediately started to, like, cry and started to process, like, ‘Who’s been missing the last few days, who could it be?’” Lasater said. “And then his face just dropped and he’s, like, ‘Mom, mom, it was Max. They killed Max.’ And then he was petrified.” Lasater said the school had used restraints on her son in the past, sometimes leaving him with bruises. In the wake of Max’s death, she initially revoked her permission for the school to use any force on her son.  Ultimately, she chose to pull him from the school. “They’re all still there with the same staff, who are trained in the same techniques, who are going to use them the same way. They use them as punishment,” Lasater told Fox 40. Other parents and students tell stories of physical restraint being used as punishment.  Josh Greenfield, 23, was a student at Guiding Hands until 2013, the Bee reported. Greenfield told the newspaper he was restrained twice during his time there and found the experiences frightening.  The restraints were excessive and were done for dubious reasons, according to the former student. He told the Bee he was once placed in a prone restraint because he ignored a teacher calling his name in a hallway.  Melanie Stark, of Elk Grove, pulled her 9-year-old son from Guiding Hands Thursday, the Bee reported. She also has a pending complaint with the Department of Education regarding the use of restraints in the school.  Stark said her son was restrained on his first day at the school in September. She said a teacher’s aide wrapped her arms and legs around the boy so he could not get up from his desk.  The reasoning was to keep him seated and guide him through the activity he was working on, she said.  “That was too aggressive and it was happening about four times a week,” Stark told the Bee.  Rebecca St. Clair, of Folsom, told the newspaper her son was put in a prone restraint two years ago. In that incident, staff members rolled him inside a gym mat and put their weight on the mat to keep him still.  Despite being upset by the incident, it was not until the week before Max’s death, when she personally witnessed a student being rolled inside a mat that she realized how “alarming and unsettling” the practice is, the Bee reported.  “I tried to assure myself that this was based on trust. I really trusted the teachers,” St. Clair told the newspaper. “That trust has been broken. I thought they were so careful. I feel so wrong about that now.” Lasater and others protested outside the California Department of Education Monday, demanding that Guiding Hands be shut down. One of those protesting was Katie Kaufman, a former student there.  According to CBS Sacramento, Kaufman said she also was restrained multiple times at the school. “They always use the one where you throw the person on the floor in a body slam,” Kaufman told the news station. “It was a matter of time. Someone dies, and they finally start listening.”
  • Investigators in North Carolina are trying to catch the robber behind a violent home invasion in Stanly County.  >> Watch the news report here Officials said a gunman robbed 73-year-old Ted Huneycutt while he was having a heart attack.  >> On WSOCTV.com: Man wearing ninja mask robs woman with her children after church The robbery happened on Yow Road in Stanfield around 8:30 p.m. Sunday.  Outside the weekly trash pickup, there isn't a lot of traffic in the cotton fields of the rural community.  Resident Darren Russell said, 'We ain't never had no problem.' That's why residents were stunned when a quiet home on their quiet country road became the scene of a violent home invasion.  “If you look at Ted’s place over there, you wouldn’t think it’d be robbed,' said Russell.  Investigators said Huneycutt had a heart attack when a masked robber broke in Sunday night.  Still, the gunman didn't show any mercy.  Instead, detectives said, he ordered Huneycutt and his wife to get on the ground and then robbed them. “It’s heartless, man. Think about it. Just to do it is heartless enough,” said Russell.  >> Read more trending news  Huneycutt is raising his nephew's two teenage sons and the robber also forced them to the floor.  Sheriff Jeff Crisco said, “It’s a senseless crime. Mr. Huneycutt is a very respected man in the community and it’s the type of community where everybody knows everybody so I just don’t understand.” Crisco is the new sheriff at the Stanley County’s Sheriff’s Office. He said this home invasion is the most violent case that’s happened in the county since he took over eight weeks ago and he’s putting special emphasis on catching the robber. Crisco said, “Somebody is going to make a mistake. They’re going to brag about what they did and the word will get out. We’re hoping someone in the community will find out and will be able to contact the Sheriff’s Office.” Huneycutt is still in the hospital, but his attacker is somewhere out there, and worried neighbors are praying that changes.  “The word says to love thy neighbor as thyself. We’ve got to start doing that,” Russell said. 
  • Attorneys for President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn asked a judge to spare him prison time in a memo filed Tuesday. >> Read more trending news  In the filing, Flynn’s lawyers recommended for a sentence 'a term of probation not to exceed one year, with minimal conditions of supervision, along with 200 hours of community service, CNN reported. His attorneys said in the memo that “General Flynn accepted responsibility for his conduct and that his cooperation “was not grudging or delayed.”  >> Related: Guilty: Michael Flynn admits in court to lying about Russian communication “Rather, it preceded his guilty plea or any threatened indictment and began very shortly after he was first contacted for assistance by the Special Counsel's Office.” Flynn is scheduled for sentencing next Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Washington for lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian officials. Special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, recommended no jail time for Flynn in a filing last week. Original story: Attorneys for President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn are expected to make a sentencing recommendation Tuesday in a case brought by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office. Prosecutors with Mueller’s team said last week in court filings that Flynn has been cooperative since he pleaded guilty last year to making false statements to the FBI. In light of his assistance, prosecutors asked that Flynn receive little to no jail time for his crime, an argument Flynn’s attorneys are expected to echo, according to The Associated Press. >> Mueller investigation: Report recommends little to no jail time for Michael Flynn Flynn resigned from his post in the Trump administration in February 2017 after serving just 24 days in office. He pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian officials and agreed to fully cooperate with Mueller’s team.  Flynn is scheduled to be sentenced next week by U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan, according to court records.
  • A judge on Tuesday set a January deadline for Paul Manafort’s attorneys to address allegations that the former campaign manager for President Donald Trump lied to investigators after agreeing to cooperate with special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian election meddling. >> Read more trending news Update 3:45 p.m. EST Dec. 11: U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Manafort’s attorneys to file paperwork with the court by Jan. 7 detailing what they plan to debate from the government's filing last week, in which prosecutors accused Manafort of lying to investigators, BuzzFeed News reported. A tentative hearing date was set for Jan. 25, according to the news site. Original report: The legal team for President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, will appear in court Tuesday after prosecutors with special counsel Robert Mueller’s team accused him of lying to authorities. U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson set a scheduling conference for 3 p.m. Tuesday in Manafort’s case. He is not expected to attend. Manafort agreed to cooperate with authorities in September, while pleading guilty to charges of conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct justice through witness tampering. >> Paul Manafort pleads guilty as part of deal with special counsel Robert Mueller However, Mueller’s team said in a court filing Friday that Manafort told “multiple discernible lies” about his contact with Trump administration officials and with a Russian associate. Manafort’s attorneys have denied any wrongdoing.
  • A 23-year-old man has been taken into police custody after he shot and killed a dog after it relieved itself in his yard, officers said in a news release.  The Fresno Bee reported that, according to the Tulare County Sheriff’s Office, Modesto Ramos not only shot and killed the dog, but buried it. >> Read more trending news  Deputies said a woman contacted police Monday saying her dog was missing from her front lawn in Terra Bella, California, since Saturday. She said she suspected Ramos, her neighbor was involved.  “During their investigation, Deputies contacted Ramos and he told them he became angry at the victim’s dog for urinating on his yard and vehicle,” a spokesperson for the Sheriff’s Office said in a news release. “Ramos then shot and killed the dog with a rifle and buried it.” KFSN reported that police found evidence connecting Ramos to the crime and in the process found banned assault weapons. The Fresno Bee reported deputies found AR-15 and AK-47 rifles. Police said Ramos was charged with animal cruelty causing death, illegal weapons possession, and negligent discharge of a firearm. The Sheriff’s Office said the case remains under investigation.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A trespasser and possible burglar found himself in a sticky situation this week after he became trapped in the grease vent of a closed-down Chinese restaurant in San Lorenzo, California, deputies said. >> Read more trending news  According to KGO, firefighters on Wednesday rescued the man from the vent, where he had been trapped for two days, after the owner of a nearby business heard him calling for help. He was hospitalized for dehydration and 'is expected to make a full recovery,' the Alameda County Sheriff's Office said. >> See a photo from the scene here The 29-year-old suspect may have been trying to break in to steal copper wire or plumbing, said Sgt. Ray Kelly, a Sheriff's Office spokesman. 'We can confirm this man was not Santa Claus and did not have legal authority to be here,' Kelly said. Authorities are submitting the case to the district attorney, who will determine whether the man will face any charges, the Sheriff's Office said. Read more here.
  • As President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer was sentenced to three years in prison on Wednesday by a federal judge, prosecutors in New York revealed that the publisher of the National Enquirer tabloid, American Media Inc., had admitted paying $150,000 to a former Playboy model, in order to insure that her story of an affair with Mr. Trump would not become public before the 2016 election. “AMI admitted that it made the $150,000 payment in concert with a candidate’s presidential campaign, and in order to ensure that the woman did not publicize damaging allegations about the candidate before the 2016 presidential election,” the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York stated. The feds made clear the financial transaction was completed for only one reason: “AMI further admitted that its principal purpose in making the payment was to suppress the woman’s story so as to prevent it from influencing the election,” read the “Statement of Admitted Facts” agreed to by the feds and AMI. The candidate involved in the story was President Trump – the person helping negotiate the deal was Cohen, and the head of AMI was Trump ally, David Pecker. In the ‘Admitted Facts’ laid out on Wednesday, Pecker acknowledged having a meeting around August of 2015 with Cohen – and one unidentified member of the Trump campaign – in which “Pecker offered to help deal with negative stories about that presidential candidate’s relationships with women, by among other things, assisting the campaign in identifying such stories so they could be purchased and their publication avoided.” That’s what happened with the case of Karen McDougal, a Playboy model who has claimed she had an affair with the President. In June 2016, McDougal thought she was selling the rights to her story to be published in the National Enquirer – instead, AMI was looking out for the President. “Following the interview, AMI communicated to Cohen that it would acquire the story to prevent its publication,” the feds stipulated about AMI’s role. The U.S. Attorney’s office announced that officials had agreed not to prosecute AMI for that $150,000 transaction on behalf of Cohen and President Trump, even though it amounted to a violation of federal campaign finance laws. SDNY says it reached a non-prosecution agreement with AMI in connection with the $150k McDougal payment. 'AMI further admitted that its principal purpose in making the payment was to suppress the woman’s story *so as to prevent it from influencing the election.'* pic.twitter.com/NpP1uGGyZC — Natasha Bertrand (@NatashaBertrand) December 12, 2018 Pecker’s role in the McDougal story did not end with the $150,000 payment, as in the late stages of the 2016 campaign, Cohen moved to buy the ‘limited life rights’ to the McDougal story from AMI for $125,000. But in October of 2016, Pecker backed off – even after signing an agreement with Cohen which utilized a fake payment explanation through a shell company set up by the President’s personal lawyer. “At no time did AMI report to the Federal Election Commission that it had made the $150,000 payment to the model,” prosecutors wrote, saying that “AMI knew that corporations such as AMI are subject to federal campaign finance laws.” In other words – the feds saw this hush money transaction as a contribution to President Trump’s campaign – by keeping the women’s story out of the headlines. Reporters immediately went back to 2016 to dig up denials by AMI that it had been involved in these kinds of actions. American Media to WSJ in 2016: 'AMI has not paid people to kill damaging stories about Mr. Trump.' Fed prosecutors in 2018: 'AMI admitted that it made the $150,000 payment…in order to ensure that the woman did not publicize damaging allegations about the candidate.' — Joe Palazzolo (@joe_palazzolo) December 12, 2018 The process is known as “catch and kill” – and was documented just before the election by the Wall Street Journal, and then in recent months by the New Yorker magazine. It was not immediately clear if AMI – and Pecker – were in a position to offer other important information to investigators about President Trump and/or his campaign. “The writing’s on the wall,” said Rep. Denny Heck (D-NV) of the President’s legal situation on CNN. “The walls are closing in.”
  • A Kentucky woman is behind bars after police say she killed her newborn baby. According to WKYT, Amber Bowling, 21, of Manchester, has been charged with murder after police say she hid the infant in a garbage bag, then threw the child 'over the upstairs banister' of an apartment building. Police said the baby, born Sunday, was found dead Tuesday morning, WAVE reported. According to the autopsy, the newborn suffered fractures to the cranium and ribs, as well as brain bleeding, WLEX reported. >> Read more trending news  Bowling, who was arrested Wednesday, is being held in the Clay County Detention Center, according to WAVE. Read more here or here.
  • With more evidence of election fraud still surfacing in the race for North Carolina’s Ninth Congressional District, the legislature in the Tar Heel State voted on Wednesday to give new powers to the state elections board, allowing the panel to call for an entirely new election – including a new primary – possibly allowing Republicans to field a new candidate for the seat in 2019. No action on the race – in which Republican Mark Harris defeated Democrat Dan McCready by just 905 votes – has yet been taken by the North Carolina State Board of Elections, which is set to hold a new hearing before December 21; the Governor must decide whether to sign this new bill by December 22. The actions by the state legislature came as new evidence has emerged of possible absentee ballot fraud, including charges that a GOP operative may have been in possession of hundreds of ballots, and that preliminary totals of absentees in one county were tallied before Election Day, a violation of state law. Well, looks like there will be a primary in the #nc09 after all #StayTuned pic.twitter.com/aDJXnURV1I — Michael Bitzer (@BowTiePolitics) December 12, 2018 Under North Carolina law as currently written, the board of elections can only order a new election with the same candidates involved – but Republicans are worried that Harris – who also faces questions about possible fraud in the GOP primary – might be too tainted because of his ties to McRae Dowless, who was running some kind of absentee ballot operation in rural Bladen County for the Harris campaign. While Harris lost the absentee-by-mail votes across the Ninth District to Democrat Dan McCready, Harris on 61 percent of those votes in Bladen County – even though registered Republicans cast only 19 percent of those specific ballots. Stories have also emerged in recent days from people who did work for Dowless, saying that he had hundreds of absentee ballots in his possession, something which is illegal under North Carolina law. Dowless has been accused of not only collecting ballots, but also possibly tampering with, and discarding them. While Harris has denied knowledge of any absentee ballot operation, the GOP winner has been quiet about the almost daily drumbeat of new information, save for a video statement made several days ago. BREAKING: We have obtained a photo of Mark Harris and McCrae Dowless together. The picture was taken in March at a political event in Bladen County. The person who took the photo has asked us to not identify them. #NC09 #ncpol @wsoctv pic.twitter.com/v4w9L6GwAa — Joe Bruno (@JoeBrunoWSOC9) December 12, 2018 If the North Carolina elections board decides to hold a new election, it would probably take months for the primary and general election – leaving that seat vacant as the 116th Congress convenes in January. So far, Democrats have not indicated whether they will investigate the election fraud questions from the November election, along with questions about possible absentee ballot fraud in the GOP primary, which saw Harris win an astounding 95 percent of the absentee-by-mail ballots in Bladen County, as he defeated incumbent Rep. Robert Pittenger (R-NC). Pittenger has not said if he will run again, but has raised questions about Dowless and possible fraud.
  • Winning over the votes of a last rebel group of House Democrats, Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday evening that she would agree to serve no more than four years as Speaker of the House, accepting a plan from younger lawmakers in her party which would limit senior House leadership to a maximum of eight years in those high profile positions. “I am comfortable with the proposal and it is my intention to abide by it whether it passes or not,” Pelosi said in a statement, as Democrats planned a vote by mid-February on the term limit plan. Pelosi’s agreement seems to pave the way for her to bring on board a final group of Democrats who had demanded an overhaul of their party’s leadership in the House, which is dominated by lawmakers – like Pelosi – who are in their 70’s. “I firmly believe that the reforms we have advocated for will create advancement opportunities for the next generation of Democratic leaders and will strengthen our Caucus,” said Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-CA). “I have pushed for new leadership because I want to see generational change in the Democratic Caucus,” said Rep. Earl Perlmutter (D-CO). “We will support and vote for Nancy Pelosi for Speaker of the House in the 116th Congress,” a group including Perlmutter and six other Democratic holdouts said in a statement. BREAKING: Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, a Democrat, says she'll serve no more than four years as House speaker, all but ensuring she'll be elected to the post in January. — AP Politics (@AP_Politics) December 12, 2018 While Pelosi had easily won a vote of House Democrats after Thanksgiving to be the next Speaker, there were still questions about whether she could secure 218 votes on the floor of the House in January. This agreement will seal the deal, as Pelosi said she would serve no more than four more years as Speaker. Pelosi is the first House member to serve as Speaker – then see her party lose the minority, and return as Speaker – since Sam Rayburn did that in the mid-1950’s. While Republicans in the House had embraced term limits for committee chairs, the GOP had not applied those limits to the Speaker. Pelosi had expressed confidence that she would be able to grind out enough votes to win a floor showdown as Speaker, but in the end, she decided to cut a deal to end any suspense. “Over the summer, I made it clear that I see myself as a bridge to the next generation of leaders,” Pelosi said in a statement, “a recognition of my continuing responsibility to mentor and advance new Members into positions of power and responsibility in the House Democratic Caucus.”