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    A Virginia man has been charged with felony animal cruelty after police said he set fire to a pit bull at a Richmond park. The dog later died. >> Dog tied to pole, intentionally set on fire, police say According the Richmond Police Department, Jyahshua A. Hill, 20, was arrested Monday in connection with the Feb. 10 incident at Abner City Park, where the dog 'was tied to a chain-link fence, doused with a flammable liquid and set on fire.' >> Read the Police Department's Facebook post here Witnesses told police that a man 'wearing multiple layers of pants' fled the scene afterward, Richmond Animal Care and Control said at the time. The male pit bull was taken to Cary Street Veterinary Hospital for treatment of the burns, which covered more than 40 percent of his body, police said. The dog, whom officials named Tommie, died Feb. 15. >> Pit bull tied to pole, set on fire, dies Animal control officials offered a $25,000 reward in the case, according to WHSV. State lawmakers also passed 'Tommie's Law,' which takes effect in July. It will enact 'harsher penalties for anyone convicted of animal cruelty' in Virginia, the station reported. >> Read more trending news  If convicted, Hill could face a $2,500 fine and a five-year prison term, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. Read more here.
  • Former White House counsel Don McGahn agreed to follow President Donald Trump’s directive Monday to ignore a Congressional subpoena to testify in a scheduled hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. >> Read more trending news Update 10:45 p.m. EDT May 20: House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler warned former White House counsel Don McGahn  that if he fails to appear at a hearing Tuesday morning “the Committee is prepared to use all enforcement mechanisms at its disposal.” In a letter to McGahn’s attorney, William Bruck, Nadler called Trump’s order for McGahn to ignore the subpoena from the committee to testify “unprecedented.” He also said Trump’s order “does not excuse your (McGahn’s) obligation to appear before the Committee.” “Although the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel has produced an opinion purporting to excuse you (McGahn) from testifying, that opinion has no support in relevant case law, and its arguments have been flatly rejected by the courts,” Nadler said. Nadler said the committee hearing will convene Tuesday morning, whether McGahn chooses to appear or not. Update 8:40 p.m. EDT May 20: Despite a subpoena, former White House counsel Don McGahn has informed the House Judiciary Committee that he will not  appear at a hearing Tuesday, according to a report from The Hill. >> Jamie Dupree: Former White House counsel refuses to testify about Mueller probe McGahn’s lawyer, William Bruck, sent a letter to Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler informing him that McGahn would not comply with the subpoena and would not attend to the hearing, The Hill Reported. The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed McGahn and four other White House officials as part of an investigation into possible obstruction of justice, corruption and abuse of power charges, according to CNN. Update 7:00 p.m. EDT May 20: President Donald Trump told reporters on his way to a rally in Pennsylvania Monday afternoon that he ordered former White House counsel Don McGahn to ignore a Congressional subpoena for the greater good of the presidency. “As I understand it they're doing that for the office of the presidency for future presidents. As I understand it it's a very important precedent. The attorneys say they're doing it not for me, they're doing it for the future,” Trump said. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler said in a statement that the hearing will convene as planned, even though McGahn has been ordered not to testify Nadler said McGahn witnessed 'egregious' acts of obstruction to the Mueller investigation by Trump and that the president “clearly does not want the American people to hear firsthand about his alleged misconduct.” “This move is just the latest act of obstruction from the White House that includes its blanket refusal to cooperate with this committee. It is also the latest example of this administration’s disdain for the law,” he said. Original report: The committee is scheduled to hold a hearing starting at 10 a.m. Tuesday about the report submitted earlier this year by special counsel Robert Mueller, who spent 22 months investigating Russian election interference and its possible ties to Trump and his campaign officials. In the report, Mueller said his team found no evidence of collusion, but he declined to make a decision on whether there was enough evidence to charge Trump with obstruction of justice. >> Trump: 'We're fighting all the subpoenas' In an opinion released Monday, Justice Department officials said the president’s “immediate advisors” can’t be compelled to give congressional testimony due to the “fundamental workings of the separation of powers.” “Because Congress may not constitutionally compel the former Counsel to testify about his official duties, he may not be civilly or criminally penalized for following a presidential directive not to appear,” the opinion stated. >> Read the opinion released by the DOJ  In a statement released Monday afternoon, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pointed to a newly issued opinion and noted that “McGahn has been directed to act accordingly.” “This action has been taken in order to ensure that future Presidents can effectively execute the responsibilities of the Office of the Presidency,” she said. >> Former White House counsel Don McGahn subpoenaed by House Judiciary Committee House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., issued a subpoena last month to compel McGahn’s testimony. The committee was looking particularly at bringing in a member of Trump’s staff with direct knowledge of his efforts to undermine the Mueller probe, CNN reported last month, citing an unidentified source.
  • Joshua Randall Harmon went to a friend’s house one night in May 1988 to see if his friend could come outside to play. It was the last time the 8-year-old Georgia boy was seen alive. Joshua’s 55-pound body was found two days later. He had been struck on the head, strangled to death and discarded under some loose dirt and pine straw in a wooded area a few hundred yards from the Roswell apartment where he lived with his mother and stepfather.  Logs had been placed over his body to delay detection. The boy’s murder remains unsolved and last week, 31 years to the day after his brutal death, Roswell police officials pleaded with the public for information that could help solve the long-cold case.  Joshua vanished Sunday, May 15 while playing near his apartment complex, then known as the Roundtree Apartments. The complex still stands on Raintree Way in Roswell, but is now known as River Crossing at Roswell, according to the Roswell Police Department.  >> Read more trending news Joshua’s family had moved to the apartment complex about three weeks before he was killed, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported the day his body was found. Police officials initially thought he might have run away, even unwittingly, and was trying to get back to their former home.  A newspaper clipping shows Joshua’s mother, then known as Cherie Laws, told a reporter her son, a special education student at the now-shuttered Kimball Bridge Elementary School, was not one to wander from home. “He was easily frightened and intimidated,” Laws said of Joshua, who had a learning disability.  Douglas Laws echoed his wife’s sentiments just hours before his stepson’s body was found.  “Joshua was too frightened of everything, too dependent on his mother to be away from her long,” Douglas Laws told the newspaper. “He would not leave in any stressful situation.” Joshua had spent the day of his disappearance playing outside, both alone and with friends, police officials said.  “Joshua regularly played outside in the area of his apartment building and the other buildings in the immediate vicinity,” a post on the department’s Facebook page read. “He searched for turtles around the lake in the complex and played in the ‘fort’ in the woods behind his building.” Cherie Laws told the Journal-Constitution she first grew uneasy when, around 7 p.m. that evening, she heard the ice cream truck’s bell ringing outside, but her son never came running in for the dollar she had set aside for him to get himself a treat.  “I wondered then why he didn’t come in and ask for money to buy ice cream,” Laws said, according to the clipping.  Douglas Laws also could not find the boy when he went out to tell him to stay close to home because dinner would be ready soon, police officials said. The couple called police around 7:30 p.m. to report him missing. Neighbors told Joshua’s family he had stopped by their apartment around 7 p.m. to see if their son, a friend of his, could come outside to play, according to police. Because the boy’s family was having their own dinner, he could not.  Joshua told his friend he would wait for him at the fort, where they often played together.  “This is the last reported sighting of Joshua alive,” the police’s Facebook post read. Roswell police officers spent the next 48 hours searching the 60 acres of woods surrounding the apartment complex but did not find Joshua’s body in the first search, the Journal-Constitution reported at the time. His body was eventually discovered the afternoon of May 17, 1988, in a gully in the woods where the boy, described as a “nature nut,” loved to play.  See images of newspaper clippings covering the 1988 death of Joshua Harmon below. A police lieutenant involved in the search stumbled upon Joshua’s body by accident, authorities said.  Cherie Laws was so devastated when her son’s body was found that she was hospitalized. She and her husband later moved to Woodstock, too overcome by grief to stay in the apartment from which Joshua vanished.  “I keep hoping it will all turn out to have been a mistake that the body they found wasn’t really his and I’ll wake up one morning and find him back at home,” Laws told the Journal-Constitution a year after Joshua died. “I know that’s not going to happen, but I can’t help wishing.” Cherie Laws, who now goes by Cherie Harmon, wrote in an online memorial to her son that she and his father, Larry Harmon, later got back together. “I see a lot of you in him, and he sees a lot of you in me,” she wrote to her son. “It helps us keep you with us.” She described her son as the “most incredible and amazing child in the world.”  “He had a truly unconditional love for all people, and more so for all of God's creatures,” she wrote on the memorial page, which she created in 2007. “It was as if he was one with them, and would spend hours with any creature, however, his favorite were rabbits.  ‘We are looking for anything’ There were plenty of potential suspects in the early days of the investigation. Authorities told the Journal-Constitution a convicted child molester had escaped from the North Fulton County Jail in Alpharetta the day he disappeared. Joshua had also had a run-in earlier in the day with some teenage boys who his family said “roughed him up” after he’d thrown a rock at the apartment where one of the boys lived.  All the potential suspects were ruled out.  “Evidence was collected during the investigation that is still available,” police officials said last week. “There have been incredible advancements in forensic technology since 1988 but science is not all that can be used to catch this killer.” Cold case detectives are reaching out to witnesses interviewed in the initial investigation. They are also looking for new witnesses who may have obtained knowledge about Joshua’s death, either from the time frame of his killing or information obtained in the intervening years.  “In the last 31 years, we believe that the killer may have spoken to someone about this incident and disclosed their involvement,” authorities said.  Roswell police spokeswoman Sgt. Britney Rodgers told the Journal-Constitution Friday that nothing has specifically triggered a reexamination of the case.  “We are looking for anything,” Rodgers told the newspaper. “Maybe this will help jog somebody’s memory.” Anyone with information on Joshua’s murder is asked to call Roswell police Detective Jennifer Bennett at 770-640-4380 or contact her via email at jbennett@roswellgov.com. Information can also be submitted anonymously to the Crime Stoppers Atlanta tip line at 404-577-TIPS (8477) or online at StopCrimeATL.com. 
  • A 16-year-old boy from Guatemala died in U.S. custody Monday morning, one week after he was apprehended in South Texas, authorities with U.S. Customs and Border Protection confirmed in a statement. >> Read more trending news The boy, whose name was not released, is the fifth Guatemalan migrant known to have died since December after being detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. Officials said the 16-year-old was apprehended and processed May 13 near Hidalgo, Texas, after he entered the country illegally. Authorities said he was transferred Sunday from the Rio Grande Valley Sector’s Central Processing Center to the Border Patrol station in Weslaco, Texas, ahead of a planned placement with the Heath and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement. >> Guatemalan toddler, 2, dies in US custody after being detained at border He was found unresponsive Monday during a welfare check, officials said. “The men and women of U.S. Customs and Border Protection are saddened by the tragic loss of this young man and our condolences are with his family,” Acting CBP Commissioner John Sanders said in a statement. “CBP is committed to the health, safety and humane treatment of those in our custody.” The Border Patrol has faced months of scrutiny over its care of children it apprehends at the border. Last week, authorities said a 2-year-old boy died after he and his mother were detained at the border. Authorities said he was diagnosed with pneumonia and hospitalized for about a month before his death, according to The Associated Press. >> 7-year-old Guatemalan migrant dies of dehydration, shock in Border Patrol custody Authorities are also investigating the April 30 death of Juan de Leon Gutierrez, a 16-year-old migrant from Guatemala who died after officials at a Texas youth detention facility noticed he was sick. His cause of death remained unclear Monday. In December, 7-year-old Jakelin Caal Maquin died of dehydration and septic shock two days after she was taken to a Border Patrol station, CNN reported. The news network reported 8-year-old Felipe Gómez Alonzo died of flu complicated by sepsis weeks later, on Christmas Eve, while he was in U.S. custody. Both children were from Guatemala. >> Migrant mother, 7-year-old son reunited after being separated at border Trump administration officials have said they have passed a 'breaking point' in the immigration detention system, with the numbers of parents and children crossing the border dramatically exceeding the capacity at facilities. That strain is particularly acute in the Rio Grande Valley, which has more unauthorized border crossings than any other region. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A married Georgia police officer appeared in court with black eyes last week for his first court appearance in the homicide of his girlfriend, a paramedic who was found shot to death May 11 in her home.  William Leonard Talley, 51, is charged with murder, possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime and a violation of his oath as a public officer, according to Muscogee County Jail records. A judge on Saturday ordered Talley, a sergeant with the Columbus Police Department, be held without bond on the murder charge.  Talley, a married father of two teenage daughters, is accused of shooting Kelly Susanne Levinsohn, 44, inside her home. He was arrested in neighboring Harris County after crashing Levinsohn’s truck on Interstate 185, The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported.  >> Read more trending news The longtime police officer, who was left in critical condition in the crash, was hospitalized at Piedmont Columbus Regional Hospital for five days before being released Thursday and booked into the jail.  His attorney, Jennifer Curry, told the Ledger-Enquirer that Talley is being housed away from the general population while he continues to recover from his injuries. Curry said Talley, a police officer since 2002, would be at risk among fellow inmates he helped put behind bars.  Curry on Saturday waived her client’s preliminary hearing and entered a not guilty verdict on his behalf.  “Our goal today really was to protect families on both sides, especially Mr. Talley’s children,” Curry told the newspaper. “They didn’t ask for this, so I’m trying to respect their privacy.” Talley’s wife was among the scant number of people in the courtroom Saturday. Despite his marital status, Columbus police officials have characterized Levinsohn’s death as the result of a domestic situation. They have not confirmed a romantic relationship between her and her alleged killer, though some of Levinsohn’s neighbors told WTVM in Columbus that the pair had been dating for more than a year.  Curry declined to comment Saturday on the nature of her client’s relationship with Levinsohn, the Ledger-Enquirer reported.  “Again, my goal today was to protect his two daughters,” Curry said. “I’m hoping that both families have time to understand what happened and come to terms with where we’re at now.” Columbus police officials said officers were called to Levinsohn’s home around 8 p.m. Saturday by an unidentified caller who told 911 dispatchers someone had been injured or killed in the home. The caller identified the suspect in the slaying as an officer with the department.  The caller met officers at Levinsohn’s home and told them the suspect had been in a car crash in Harris County, the Ledger-Enquirer reported. Officers went inside the home, where they found Levinsohn dead of a single gunshot wound.  They also found the paramedic’s vehicle to be missing, the newspaper said.  Columbus police Chief Ricky Boren told the Ledger-Enquirer that investigators recovered a gun believed to be the murder weapon. It was not a department-issued weapon, Boren said.  Talley, a patrol sergeant and SWAT team member, is on leave without pay pending a resolution of the case, the newspaper said.  Clark Rowell, who lives across the street from the crime scene, told WTVM his neighbor’s relationship with Talley was not always a peaceful one.  “One time, they had a bad argument out there on the front porch,” Rowell told the news station. “He went to the door, she opened it up and she wouldn’t let him in.” Rowell said after Levinsohn slammed the door on him, Talley “stomped” to his patrol car and left.  Talley’s own personnel record shows that he was also handcuffed by colleagues called to Levinsohn’s home more than a year before her slaying. Records obtained by the Ledger-Enquirer show officers were called to the scene around 7:41 p.m. March 11, 2018. Talley had been drinking, according to the report obtained by the newspaper.  “Talley had to be placed in handcuffs due to a brief struggle while officers attempted to calm him down and speak with him about his personal issues,” the report stated.  Two on-duty supervisors had to be called to Levinsohn’s home to deal with the situation. According to the Ledger-Enquirer, Talley served a single day’s suspension in September related to the incident.  He was not arrested, the newspaper said. It was his first disciplinary action in nearly a decade and his previous disciplinary issues were minor ones.  A sergeant since November 2009, Talley briefly became a detective in 2015, but transferred back to the patrol division less than a year later. Aside from the handful of disciplinary actions against him, he was given “glowing” performance evaluations, the Ledger-Enquirer reported.  Supervisors in 2017 complimented his “initiative” and recommended he try for a promotion to lieutenant.  From all accounts, Levinsohn also excelled at her job as an advanced emergency medical technician with Care Ambulance, the Ledger-Enquirer reported. Muscogee County Coroner Buddy Bryan told the newspaper Levinsohn had been with the service for 12 years.  Bryan said her slaying came as a shock to those she worked with. “She was very dedicated to her job. It’s a hard job, both physically and mentally hard. She took it in stride, never showed any kind of negative mood towards one of the patients that she was transporting,” Bryan said. “She was always there to ease the patient’s pain and suffering, and she was just the kind of person you would want to see come to the scene to be with you.” He said Levinsohn was also a friendly face for first responders, who were often exposed to horrific situations.  “In our line of business, me as a coroner and her as an EMT, we see a lot, car accident victims, gunshot victims, stabbing victims, sick people,” Bryan said. “(Levinsohn) was a very emotionally stable person. She kept a level head the whole time, and I praised her for that quite often.” The coroner said he was taking extra care that Levinsohn’s body was treated with respect as her mother, Wylma Levinsohn, traveled home from Israel to see about burying her daughter, who friends described as her best friend.  According to Kelly Levinsohn’s obituary, her funeral was Sunday in Columbus.  Longtime friend Staci Warman described Kelly Levinsohn as a loyal friend with a smile that was “the most contagious part about her.” “She was the best friend anybody really could ever have,” said Warman, who last spoke to Levinsohn in April, the day after Levinsohn’s birthday.  At the time, Levinsohn was on a trip to Aruba with her mother, Warman said.  Kay Witt, who had known Levinsohn since her childhood, also spoke about the tropical vacation, saying that Wylma Levinsohn will be left with a treasured memory.  “They spent a week in Aruba and had an absolute ball, snorkeling, driving around, laying on the beach, eating,” Witt told the Ledger-Enquirer. “All the things that you would do on your fantasy vacation, they did.” Witt said Kelly Levinsohn was also her mother’s “rock” as her father, Bill Levinsohn, battled cancer before his 2017 death.  Besides her mother, Levinsohn is also survived by an older brother, Gary Levinsohn, who “loved her from the minute she was born and was so proud of what she became,” her obituary said. 
  • A police officer died and two others were injured after they responded to a domestic violence call late Sunday at an Alabama mobile home park, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news  After an hours-long manhunt, authorities arrested Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, on charges connected to the shooting. The slain officer was identified as William Buechner, WSFA reported. The news station reported the injured officers were identified as Webb Sistrunk and Evan Elliott. Here are the latest updates: Update 1:30 p.m. EDT May 20: Auburn police Chief Paul Register said early Monday that the two officers injured in Sunday’s shooting were expected to recover. 'This is probably the worst day of my time here,' Register said. 'Words cannot express the loss for this family, our family and this community.' One of the injured officers, identified as K-9 Officer Webb Sistrunk, was being treated Monday at a hospital in Columbus, Georgia, WMBA reported. The other officer, identified as Officer Evan Elliott, was treated for his injuries and released, according to the news network. Authorities on Monday arrested Grady Wayne Wilkes on charges including capital murder, WMBA reported. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey decried the violence. 'This is so tragic and so useless. I'm just heartbroken,' she said Monday during an appearance in Montgomery. Update 12:40 p.m. EDT May 20: Police on Monday identified the slain officer as William Buechner, a 13-year veteran of the Auburn Police Department, WBMA reported. Police Chief Paul Register identified the injured officers as Webb Sistrunk and Evan Elliott, AL.com reported. Authorities earlier Monday arrested Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, the man suspected of shooting the officers. Officials continue to investigate. Update 8:32 a.m. EDT May 20: Police have apprehended the man accused of fatally shooting one police officer and injuring two others late Sunday at an Auburn mobile home park. According to WVTM reporter Sarah Killian, Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, was captured Monday. >> See the tweet here Original report: According to the Opelika-Auburn News, a white man opened fire just after 10 p.m. Sunday as Auburn police officers responded to a domestic disturbance call at a mobile home park. “Responding officers were injured by gunfire and were transported to local hospitals,” Auburn police said in a news release. Although authorities have not release the officers’ names or conditions, the Opelika-Auburn News reported that one died and two more were seriously injured.  Police said the suspect, Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, is on the run. He is described as a 6-foot-4, 215-pound white male with brown hair and hazel eyes. He was wearing body armor, camo clothing and a helmet. Wilkes is believed to be “armed and dangerous,” authorities said. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A man who broke into a home in Houston early Sunday died after he was shot several times by the man who found him in his teenage daughter’s bedroom, according to police and multiple reports.  >> Read more trending news Police said they were called around 2:40 a.m. Sunday to respond to a shooting at a home on North Bellaire Estates Drive. The homeowner told police he found an armed man in his 13-year-old daughter’s upstairs bedroom after a break-in. The homeowner said he wrestled the gun away from the burglar before firing it multiple times, striking the intruder, according to authorities and the Houston Chronicle. Police said the burglar, who was not identified, broke into the home through a downstairs window and walked up the stairs to get to the girl’s bedroom. Four children between the ages of 4 13 and 4 were home at the time of the incident, officials said. Detective Blake Roberts told reporters a neighbor helped get the kids out of the home after the shooting. “They did observe the suspect downstairs in the residence, stabbing himself … (with) a kitchen knife,” Roberts said, according to KPRC-TV. Authorities took the injured intruder to Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said. It was not immediately clear why the home was targeted. 'This appears to be random,' Roberts said. “Of course, it's still under investigation. We still have a lot of research to do on the male that broke into the house as far as his criminal history, his mental history and anything we can find in order to determine what would be the motive for this.”
  • A 3-year-old Georgia girl died Saturday after what police described as a heinous sexual assault and beating. The girl, identified by police as Janiyah Armanie Brooks, of Albany,  died at 12:15 p.m. Saturday at an Atlanta hospital, where she had been on a ventilator, WALB-TV reported. >> Read more trending news  Update 10:15 a.m. EDT May 20: Janiyah was unresponsive when Albany police responded to her home one week ago. She had been severely beaten with injuries to her head, ribs and hands, according to police. She also had injuries to her vaginal area. It wasn’t the first time Janiyah had been hurt, an investigation by the agency’s family protection unit and the Georgia Department of Family and Children Services found. An exam showed further evidence of old wounds, Albany police said in a news release. Her parents called 911 around 7:30 a.m. May 13, but they did not disclose the nature of the problem with their daughter. Her stepfather, 20-year-old Gregory Parker, only told officers the girl was unconscious, police said.  Parker was arrested on Friday in connection with the assault. The next day, Janiyah died, WALB-TV reported. Parker was initially arrested on charges of aggravated child molestation, rape, aggravated sodomy, aggravated battery and first-degree cruelty to children. Police have not said if additional charges will be filed in light of his stepdaughter’s death. Original report: Albany police responded to the girl's home about 7:30 a.m. May 13 for an 'unknown problem,' the department said in a news release Friday. When officers arrived, Gregory Parker, 20, said his stepdaughter was 'unresponsive,' police said. Emergency personnel transported the girl to the hospital. Investigators said the girl 'had been severely beaten and sexually assaulted,' according to the news release. 'The child had injuries to her vaginal area, ribs, along with swollen hands and unknown trauma to her head,' the release said. 'She appeared to have old wounds, as well.' Parker, 20, was arrested and charged with rape, aggravated child molestation, aggravated sodomy, aggravated battery and first-degree child cruelty, authorities said. The girl's mother, 19-year-old Crystal Brooks, also faces charges of aggravated battery, battery, first-degree child cruelty and giving a false statement initially, police said. >> Read the Police Department's Facebook post here Medical examiners will perform an autopsy on the child Monday, officials said. Read more here or here.
  • An Ohio woman died Sunday while running the Cleveland Marathon, officials said. >> See a photo of Ceepo here According to WEWS-TV, Taylor Ceepo, 22, of Medina, collapsed during the race and was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital.  The news came as a shock to family friend Ed Sutter, who described Ceepo, a soccer player, as 'extremely fit.' 'None of it makes sense other than something that's undetected,' he told WEWS. Ceepo's alma mater, Walsh University, issued a statement offering condolences to her family and friends of the recent graduate. >> Read more trending news  'Taylor graduated just a few weeks ago from Walsh University, with a biology – pre professional major, and minors in both psychology and chemistry,' the statement read, according to WEWS. 'Taylor was a member of the Women's Soccer Team, and hailed from Medina. Her mother, dear friends, and her boyfriend (also a Walsh student) were with her. Our love and deepest sympathies go to her family and loved ones. Your Walsh family will keep you all in prayer.' The Cleveland Marathon echoed the sentiment in a tweet Sunday afternoon. 'We are extremely saddened to learn of the passing of the young woman who collapsed during the race this morning,' the tweet read. 'Our thoughts and sympathy go out to her family and friends at this time.' >> See the tweet here Read more here.
  • The suspect in a bus attack that left an elderly Nevada man dead has been released on bond. >> Read more trending news  Cadesha Bishop, 25, is accused of shoving Serge Fournier, 74, from a Las Vegas bus in March after a verbal argument with other passengers. Fournier hit his head on the sidewalk and later died of the injury. Update 6:00 p.m. EDT May 19: The suspect in an attack on a Las Vegas bus that left an elderly man dead has been released from jail. Cadesha Bishop, 25, was arrested on May 6 and charged with open murder in the March death of Serge Fournier, 74. Bishop was jailed on a $100,000 bond, but released a little over a week ago after posting bail, according to KSNV-TV. “I'm not happy,” District Attorney Steve Wolfson told KSNV. “I respect the judge's decision, but I can also disagree with the judge's decision.” A Las Vegas judge had ruled Bishop could be released. 'I think the bail was set too low. I base it on the violent nature of this offense. This was an unprovoked, unnecessary attack on a senior citizen with a walker,' Wolfson told the news station. Bishop was placed on “high-level” electronic monitoring and house arrest, according to court documents, until her next court date. Original report: Police released surveillance footage Tuesday that appears to show a woman pushing a 74-year-old man off a Las Vegas bus, causing injuries that killed him weeks later, authorities said. >> Watch the video here (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised.) According to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, the incident occurred March 21 as a 25-year-old woman, Cadesha Bishop, argued with other passengers on the bus.  >> Read more trending news  'When the bus stopped to allow passengers off, Bishop and the victim got into a verbal argument,' police said in a news release Tuesday. 'As the victim attempted to exit, Bishop shoved him out of the bus and onto the ground.' Bishop then walked away with her son, witnesses told KSNV. The man, Serge Fournier, 'hit his head on the concrete sidewalk,' KSNV reported. He initially refused medical treatment but went to the hospital that night, police said. He died April 23, his family told police earlier this month.  Bishop was arrested May 6 and charged with open murder on an elderly-vulnerable person, authorities said. She was being held on $100,000 bond. Now, police are seeking the public's help to locate anyone who witnessed the incident. If you have information, call Las Vegas police at 702-828-3521 or email homicide@lvmpd.com. You also can contact authorities anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at 702-385-5555 or visiting www.crimestoppersofnv.com. Read more here.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • The dragons on Game of Thrones certainly look spine-chilling, but their ghastly roar came from animals a little less alarming. In fact, some might even think they’re cute. And they live right here in Florida. Sound designer Paula Fairfield visited the White Oak Conservation Center in Northeast Florida to gather all sorts of sounds for the show’s creatures. Part of the magic of the dragon’s roar included resident rhinos and Mississippi sandhill cranes. Fairfield even let the conservation center record a sneak peek of her work for their Instagram. Mobile users see Instagram video here. The sound designer said she felt that using endangered species vocalizations was important, telling SYFY WIRE, “We live in a world where our animals are disappearing at a rapid rate, so it’s powerful for me to listen to their beautiful voices and use them in this space. Some of them are very startling and unusual.” She also used the sound of some objects, including some 40 pounds of dry animal bones fashioned into a wind chime, and human voices to create the overall mix of the terrifying roar. Mobile users see behind the scenes video here.
  • The Alachua County Sheriff is reassuring resident near Lake Forest Creek that their latest call is not straight from a horror flick. They sent this tweet after the body of a five and a half foot shark was found in the creek. When deputies responded they also encountered an alligator lurking nearby. The headline on the tweet “This is the most Florida call of the week.” The tweet went on to explain that deputies believe the shark was caught elsewhere and dumped. 
  • Imagine flying from New York to London in 90 minutes! A U.S. venture-capital firm is asking investors to bet on the development of a hypersonic aircraft that can fly over 3,000 miles per hour.  The new startup is Hermeus Corp., who’s mission is to increase the speed air transportation by developing vehicles that can fly ''in excess of Mach 5.    The Atlanta Based Corporation announced its advisory board  includes the former president of Blue Origin and former associate administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration.  The idea is to connect the world's cities ''significantly faster than ever before,'' which Hermeus CEO A.J. Piplica likened to the broadband era of data transmissions. The round of seed investment led by Khosla Ventures will continue the development of Hermeus' hypersonic propulsion system, a media statement said.  ''Hermeus is developing an aircraft that not only improves the aviation experience with very reduced flight times, but also has the potential to have great societal and economic impact,' Vinod Khosla, founder of Khosla Ventures, said in the statement.  Hermeus is not alone in their quest for speed Boeing is also working on a passenger plane that can hit Mach 5.  I’m not sure our Consumer Warrior Clark Howard would approve, a ticket is expected to cost about $3,000. 
  • A SeaWorld Orlando spokesperson confirmed that lung disease was the cause of death for Kayla, the killer whale that died at the theme park in January. The results come from a post-mortem investigaton after the 30-year-old orca died unexpectedly. Kayla was born in captivity at SeaWorld San Antonio and was transported to Orlando n 2006. She seemed healthy before she began showing signs of discomfort. Despite treatment, her condition worsened and she died two days later. SeaWorld Orlando announced Kayla’s death on January 28, 2019. There are still five orcas in care at SeaWorld Orlando. 
  • The Fraternal Order of Police still have the link to the fundraiser for Orlando Police Officer Anthony Wongshue on their Facebook page, but when you click on the link it says Campaign Not Found. Wongshue turned himself in. last week,  after he was indicted on a manslaughter charge last week for the May 7, 2018 killing of Juan Alberto Silva, 32. Silva was an accomplice in a shoplifting bust at a Marshall’s in Colonial Plaza in Orlando, police said. Investigators said the officers were responding to a nearby crash when they were called for a reported shoplifting at the store. The officers asked Silva to stop his van, but he drove away, and they shot him, police said. Only Wongshue was charged in the shooting. As for the GOFUNDME.com campaign, Nearly $3000 had been raised to assist Officer Wongshue  in less than an hour. In a second Facebook post, the F.O.P. said all of the GOFUNDME donations will be refunded by the site but, they would begin another campaign on a different platform soon.  Immediately after the arrest the Fraternal Order of Police issued the following statement.  'As members of the Orlando Police Department return from Washington D.C. where they honored Fallen Heroes from around the nation, the Fraternal Order of Police was saddened to hear of the recent charges placed against Master Police Officer Anthony Wongshue. It is particularly disturbing because this matter had been looked into for the better part of a year without charges being filed. During that time, Master Police Officer Wongshue made himself fully available to the investigation. A Police Officer's job, at its essence, is to protect citizens from each other. In doing so, they put their lives on the line every day and risk their safety in every situation they come upon. We would ask that, as this long journey begins for Master Police Officer Wongshue to prepare and present his side of the story, that he be given the same courtesies, rights and protections that he has given to all others to whom he has sworn to protect for 16 plus years.  As with all those he has had to arrest, he is presumed innocent and the state must prove his guilt beyond and to the exclusion of every reasonable doubt. As an organization, we staunchly stand with Master Police Officer Wongshue today and in the future as he faces this challenge.  Please keep Master Police Officer Wongshue and all law enforcement officers in your thoughts and prayers.

Washington Insider

  • The struggle between Democrats in the House and President Donald Trump over the Russia investigation intensified on Monday with the White House telling former Counsel Don McGahn not to honor a subpoena for  his testimony on Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee, as Democrats said it was all part of a broad effort the President and the Trump Administration to stonewall Congress about the Mueller Report and other investigations. In a letter to Democrats, McGahn's lawyer William Burck said, 'the President has unambiguously directed my client not to comply with the Committee’s subpoena for testimony.' 'Under these circumstances, and also conscious of the duties he, as an attorney, owes to his former client, Mr. McGahn must decline to appear at the hearing,' the letter added. Democrats said they would still convene the hearing at 10 am EDT on Tuesday, as they held out the possibility of finding McGahn in contempt, just as the same committee voted to find Attorney General William Barr in contempt for refusing to honor a subpoena for an unredacted version of the Mueller Report. Democrats wanted testimony from McGahn because of the information he gave to investigators for the Mueller investigation, in which McGahn detailed repeated demands by President Trump to oust the Special Counsel. While President Trump has sternly denied that he ever ordered McGahn to get rid of Mueller, the evidence offered by the Special Counsel painted a different picture. McGahn testified that the President called him on June 17, 2017 - about a month after Mueller had been named as Special Counsel - and pressed for Mueller to be ousted, an order that McGahn repeatedly ignored. On page 300 of the Mueller Report, 'McGahn recalled the President telling him 'Mueller has to go' and 'Call me back when you do it.''  The Mueller Report described McGahn - who reportedly answered questions for 30 hours over multiple interviews - as a 'credible witness with no motive to lie or exaggerate.' McGahn also claimed in his testimony that once news of the President's request was reported in the press, Mr. Trump then pressed McGahn to dispute the veracity of the story that the President had pressed for Mueller's ouster. McGahn refused to do what the President had asked. The White House based its refusal for McGahn to testify on a new 15 page legal opinion from the Justice Department, which said McGahn - as a former top adviser - was under no requirement to testify before Congress. 'The President's immediate advisers are an extension of the President and are likewise entitled to absolute immunity from compelled congressional testimony,' the Office of Legal Counsel opinion stated. In summary, the Justice Department said simply, 'we conclude that Mr. McGahn is not legally required to appear before the Committee.' Democrats denounced the decision, and charged it was just adding more evidence to what they say is a cover up, focused on obscuring obstruction of justice by President Trump. 'This move is just the latest act of obstruction from the White House that includes its blanket refusal to cooperate with this Committee,' said Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), the Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. 'The President is intimidating witnesses and stonewalling the American people and the rule of law. Congress and the American people deserve answers from Mr. McGahn,' said Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D-PA). '(T)he White House Counsel serves interests of the American people, not the President, and their conversations do not have the protection of blanket attorney-client privilege,' said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). 'It’s pretty clear what the Trump Administration is doing here,' said Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE), 'they’re trying to hide the facts from the American people.' Democrats have promised to move forward to hold McGahn in Contempt of Congress - but there has also been discussion of other penalties, from what is known as 'inherent contempt' - which could involve levying fines against those who refuse to cooperate with investigations by Congress. 'The cover-up continues,' said Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA). 'And we will fight it.