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The Latest National News

    A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Officer identified the teenager as Antwon Rose of Rankin. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year. Update 5:30 p.m. ET:  The mayor of East Pittsburgh confirmed that the officer involved in the shooting Tuesday night was sworn in to their department a few hours before. He has been an officer with other departments in the area for seven years. He still has not been identified. Update 4 p.m. ET:  The family of Antwon Rose has hired civil rights Attorney Lee Merritt to represent them. Merritt has previously represented the victims of violence in Charlottesville and several cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement. Update 2:53 p.m. ET:  Rose was shot three times while running from police, said Coleman McDonough, superintendent of the Allegheny County Police Department. McDonough said two guns were found in the car after the traffic stop, but Rose was not armed at the time of the shooting. The driver of the vehicle was initially detained by police. He has since been released, police said. A third person who was in the vehicle and fled has not been located. The East Pittsburgh police officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto released the following statement: “Any loss of life is tragic, and especially the loss of life of a child. This is a devastating situation and I am saddened for Antwon Rose and his family.  “While Tuesday's shooting was not within the city's official borders it impacts all of us in the Pittsburgh region, and particularly those in the African American community. In my reactions to the incident I should have acknowledged that these shootings affect all of us, no matter where we live, and for that I am sorry.  “Tuesday night I was receiving numerous calls and messages asking me to respond to the involvement of police in a shooting in East Pittsburgh borough, and at the time I was attempting to clarify for the national public that the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, which I ultimately oversee, were not involved.”   Original Story:  According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock. >> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street. An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials. Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in 'so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred.' The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center. The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 
  • Award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore said he knew he had managed to capture the emotional impact of the Trump administration’s immigration policy just moments after photographing a young Honduran girl crying at her mother’s feet last week. >> Read more trending news The image appeared on television sets, computer screens and newspaper front pages around the globe. The photo spurred a California couple to start a fundraiser that has since raised millions of dollars to help migrants detained on suspicion of illegally crossing the border. It spurred public outrage over the immigration policy that led to the separation of thousands of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Couple raises more than $4.7 million to help reunite migrant children, parents Moore told The Washington Post that he noticed the girl when her mother stopped to breastfeed her in the middle of the road on June 12. She and dozens of other migrants, nearly all women and children, were stopped by the Border Patrol agents just after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas. “There was no place for privacy,” Moore told the Post. “(The mother) said they’d been on the road for a month, and they were from Honduras. I can only imagine what dangers she’d passed through, alone with the girl.” The woman gave Moore permission to follow her and her 2-year-old daughter as Border Patrol agents processed them, the Post reported. It was after agents confiscated their personal items, when the girl’s mother put her on the ground to allow an agent to search her, that the girl started to wail. The moment passed quickly. “I took a knee and had very few frames of that moment before it was over,” Moore told NPR. “And I knew at that moment that this point in their journey, which was very emotional for me to see them being detained, for them was just part of a very, very long journey.” Moore told the Post that the feeling he had after photographing the girl was similar to emotions he felt while covering war zones and Ebola wards abroad. 'Ever since I took those pictures, I think about that moment often. And it's emotional for me every time,' he told NPR. “I do not know what happened to them. I would very much like to know.” >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. According to CNN, a spokesman later told them that the girl and mother in the viral photo were not separated. President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice.
  • A woman said she was robbed at gunpoint in her own driveway after driving 80 miles home from a shopping trip. Police believe the robbers may have followed her from the shopping center in Atlanta to her home in Dalton. Brittany McEntire told WSB that two men robbed her at gunpoint about three weeks ago. Her mother, husband and three children were also in the driveway.  >> Read more trending news  McEntire said the two men ran up the driveway and took her two Louis Vuitton diaper bags and demanded all of her jewelry, including her late father’s ring that she cherishes. She said the whole robbery took less than a minute, but she has not regained her peace of mind. “I could’ve lost my whole family if they had started shooting,” McEntire told WSB. The suspects allegedly followed McEntire from Buckhead for about two hours in an unidentified white car, police said. McEntire said she is unsure why she was targeted because she did not take home many bags from the store.  “It was not a shopping spree,” McEntire said. Police believe the men will try to follow and rob more people.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice. Update 10:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Democrats took a stand on the floor of the U.S. Senate against President Donald Trump’s immigration plan just hours after the president signed an executive order revoking his policy of separating migrant children from their parents during illegal border crossings. Democrats, who spoke from the Senate floor for two hours, warned that the executive order will worsen the crisis along the U.S.-Mexico border, The Hill reported. 'If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ... Does anybody really believe that we should be imprisoning for an indefinite period of time little children,' Sanders said. Update 6:45 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order overturning his administration’s own policy of separating migrant families at the border. “I am glad the president took this step today,” McConnell tweeted. “When families with children breach our border, we should keep those families together whenever possible while our legal system fairly and promptly evaluates their status,” McConnell said. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Some Republican senators have expressed relief that President Donald Trump rescinded the policy separating migrant families at the border. Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who introduced legislation to address the family separation issue at the border, said Trump’s executive order was a good move, but that Congress needs to act. “I’m pleased the administration has agreed to keep families apprehended at the border together. We can have strong border security without separating parents from their children,” he said on Twitter. Update 6 p.m. EDT June 20: Democratic senators are weighing in on President Donald Trump’s decision to end the practice of separating children from their families during illegal border crossings. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said Trump is actually “doubling down” on his zero tolerance policy with his signing of the executive order. “His new executive order criminalizes asylum-seekers and seeks to indefinitely detain their children,” Durbin said in a tweet. Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) also tweeted that Trump’s executive order does not end the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. “ In fact, the President now wants to detain parents and children together indefinitely, and contemplates DoD building internment camps to house them. This is no solution to a problem Trump created,” Markey said. Update 4 p.m. EDT June 20: White House officials on Wednesday afternoon released the full text of the executive order signed by the president. >> Trump ends migrant family separations: Read the executive order In it, Trump directed officials to detain migrant families together. Officials have come under fire in recent months after reports surfaced that migrant children were being taken from their parents at the border. The order did not address what will happen to children and parents who are currently separated and in government custody. Update 3:20 p.m. EDT June 20: Trump signed the order, which will keep families together but continue the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, on Wednesday afternoon. >> From Jamie Dupree: President Trump to reverse course on immigrant family separations “We're keeping families together and this will solve that problem,” Trump said. “At the same time we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a ‘zero tolerance,’ we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally.” Original report: Trump told reporters Wednesday that he will “be signing something in a little while” to address family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Read more trending news “We want to keep families together, it’s very important,” Trump said. 'I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”  It was not immediately clear what the president planned to sign. Trump has repeatedly called on Congress to change laws that he says mandates the family separations. There is no law that requires children be separated from parents at the border. He blamed Democrats for the continued separations in a Wednesday morning tweet, but he added that he was “working on something.” The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was drafting an executive action for Trump that would allow the Department of Homeland Security to keep migrant families together at the border. Nielsen does not believe Congress will act to resolve the issue of migrant family separations, the AP reported, citing two unidentified sources familiar with the matter. She’s working with officials from other agencies, including the Justice Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, to draft the executive action.  The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The executive action Nielson is drafting “wouldn’t end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families,” according to the AP.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order to end his administration’s controversial policy of separating migrant children from adults suspected of crossing the border into the United State illegally. >> Read more trending news The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution, including nearly 2,000 children separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. >> From Jamie Dupree: Trump stops family separations, keeps ‘zero tolerance’ at border Read the full text of the order: By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq., it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of this Administration to rigorously enforce our immigration laws. Under our laws, the only legal way for an alien to enter this country is at a designated port of entry at an appropriate time. When an alien enters or attempts to enter the country anywhere else, that alien has committed at least the crime of improper entry and is subject to a fine or imprisonment under section 1325(a) of title 8, United States Code. This Administration will initiate proceedings to enforce this and other criminal provisions of the INA until and unless Congress directs otherwise. It is also the policy of this Administration to maintain family unity, including by detaining alien families together where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources. It is unfortunate that Congress’s failure to act and court orders have put the Administration in the position of separating alien families to effectively enforce the law. Sec. 2. Definitions. For purposes of this order, the following definitions apply: (a) “Alien family” means (i) any person not a citizen or national of the United States who has not been admitted into, or is not authorized to enter or remain in, the United States, who entered this country with an alien child or alien children at or between designated ports of entry and who was detained; and (ii) that person’s alien child or alien children. (b) “Alien child” means any person not a citizen or national of the United States who (i) has not been admitted into, or is not authorized to enter or remain in, the United States; (ii) is under the age of 18; and (iii) has a legal parent-child relationship to an alien who entered the United States with the alien child at or between designated ports of entry and who was detained.  Sec. 3. Temporary Detention Policy for Families Entering this Country Illegally. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary), shall, to the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability of appropriations, maintain custody of alien families during the pendency of any criminal improper entry or immigration proceedings involving their members. (b) The Secretary shall not, however, detain an alien family together when there is a concern that detention of an alien child with the child’s alien parent would pose a risk to the child’s welfare. (c) The Secretary of Defense shall take all legally available measures to provide to the Secretary, upon request, any existing facilities available for the housing and care of alien families, and shall construct such facilities if necessary and consistent with law. The Secretary, to the extent permitted by law, shall be responsible for reimbursement for the use of these facilities. (d) Heads of executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent consistent with law, make available to the Secretary, for the housing and care of alien families pending court proceedings for improper entry, any facilities that are appropriate for such purposes. The Secretary, to the extent permitted by law, shall be responsible for reimbursement for the use of these facilities. (e) The Attorney General shall promptly file a request with the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California to modify the Settlement Agreement in Flores v. Sessions, CV 85-4544 (“Flores settlement”), in a manner that would permit the Secretary, under present resource constraints, to detain alien families together throughout the pendency of criminal proceedings for improper entry or any removal or other immigration proceedings. Sec. 4. Prioritization of Immigration Proceedings Involving Alien Families. The Attorney General shall, to the extent practicable, prioritize the adjudication of cases involving detained families. Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect: (i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or (ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals. (b) This order shall be implemented in a manner consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations. (c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person. DONALD J. TRUMP THE WHITE HOUSE, June 20, 2018.
  • A Florida man admitted to stabbing his wife, Julie Stewart, and placing her in the trunk of the family car during a standoff with police, WJAX reports. >> Read more trending news  Gerard Stewart, 45, reportedly called 911 on Friday afternoon, threatening to hurt himself and refusing to come out of his home, according to WJAX. Police and SWAT members had to block off the neighborhood during the standoff, which lasted four hours. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said on Tuesday that Stewart confessed to killing his wife, Julie Stewart, during the standoff. Investigators said he stabbed her, wrapped her up in something and placed her body in the couple’s vehicle. Before going back into the home, Stewart backed the car onto the driveway so that police would have access to the body, police said.  He took pills in an attempt to kill himself before surrendering, officials with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said. “He finally opened the door, came out and fell down to the ground by himself,” neighbor Dorothy Farabee told WJAX. Gerard Stewart and Julie Stewart have one son together, WJAX reports. Julie Stewart was a stay-at-home mom who made money by walking dogs. “We’ve seen them playing catch outside. We never would have thought,” Farabee said. Court documents say that Julie Stewart filed for a divorce in April, after 20 years of marriage, seeking majority time-sharing with their son, alimony and exclusive occupancy of their home. Gerard Stewart is now facing charges of murder and evidence tampering. Neighbor Cal Walton said the couple lived in the home for nearly 15 years. Walton said that Stewart seemed happy last time he spoke to him.  “It was difficult to be out here working in the yard knowing that at one time or another on Saturday I could look across the way and see him doing the same thing,' Walton said. “Cutting the grass. And he’s not. There’s police cars out there.”
  • A tip called in to Los Angeles County authorities led investigators to seize a total of 553 guns from a convicted felon last week, officials said. Manuel Fernandez, 60, of Agua Dulce, was arrested Thursday on charges of being a felon in possession of firearms, possession of an assault rifle, being a felon in possession of ammunition and possession of large-capacity magazines, according to Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department officials. He was released on bond the following day. Sheriff’s Department officials said in a news release Monday that deputies at the department’s Palmdale station received a tip about a felon in possession of a “large arsenal of firearms.” Detectives, along with agents from the California Department of Justice, obtained a search warrant for Fernandez’s home in Agua Dulce.  Agua Dulce is located about 20 miles northeast of Santa Clarita, near Angeles National Forest.  >> Read more trending news Investigators found a total of 432 guns during the execution of the first search warrant at Fernandez’s home, the news release said. That search led them to a second home in Agua Dulce connected to Fernandez. A total of 30 guns were found at that home, which belongs to a woman described by authorities as a female associate of Fernandez’s. The woman, who was not home Monday and has not returned since the search, is expected to face charges. A second warrant served at Fernandez’s home led investigators to find another 91 weapons hidden in the house, the news release said.  “Detectives also seized computers, cellphones and hard drives from the residence believed to be involved in the illicit purchase of firearms by the suspect,” the news release said.  A photo released by the Sheriff’s Department shows rifles and other weapons piled into the bed of a Ford F-150 pickup truck. Other pictures show the massive cache of weapons laid out on a patio at the station.   The number of weapons seized was so large that investigators brought in agents from the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to assist in tracing the purchase history of the guns, authorities said.  “This case is a testament to the community’s involvement in reducing crime and taking guns out of the hands of criminals,” Los Angeles County Sheriff Jim McDonnell said in a statement. McDonnell said the response by his personnel, as well as state and federal officials, shows the positive result of the Sheriff’s Department’s “See Something, Say Something” campaign. “We are proud of the relationship we have built in the Antelope Valley area as we continue to build trust with the communities we serve,” the sheriff said. 
  • Michael Vines has a gun tattooed on his forehead, but that’s not the weapon that put him behind bars in South Carolina. Police in Greenville reported Tuesday that Vines was involved in a recent car crash, after which city firefighters said they saw him toss a weapon into the grass nearby. The firefighters reported it to police officers, who recovered the gun, described as a fully loaded Smith & Wesson .38-caliber revolver.  Vines, whose mugshot shows a tattoo of a handgun in the middle of his forehead, is federally prohibited from having a gun, police officials said. He was charged with unlawful carrying of a firearm, as well as driving under a suspended license and speeding.  “The real weapon was placed in property and evidence,” police officials said on the department’s Facebook page.  >> Read more trending news The department’s social media followers couldn’t resist a few jokes at Vines’ expense. One man asked if someone “held a gun to his head” to make him get the tattoo.  Another man offered this hypothetical exchange: “COP: ‘Sir, do you have any guns on you?’ THIS GUY: ‘No.’ COP: ‘Are you sure?’THIS GUY: ‘Absolutely. No way.’ COP: ‘Are you suuuuuuuurrrrreeeee?’ (Taps him on the forehead.)” “Remorse written all over his forehead,” a commenter said. “No, wait. Nope, that’s a gun. My bad.” Police officials did not say why Vines is prohibited from possessing a gun. 
  • A California couple has raised millions of dollars to help families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border as a result of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy. >> Read more trending news Charlotte and Dave Willner told the San Jose Mercury News that they launched their Facebook fundraiser, called 'Reunite an immigrant parent with their child,” on Saturday morning after seeing a photo of a 2-year-old Honduran girl sobbing as an official patted down her mother at the border. Dave Willner told the Mercury News that the fundraiser “was the closest thing we could do to hugging that kid.” The fundraiser was launched with a goal of $1,500, but by Wednesday morning it had garnered more than $9.6 million in donations. For a few hours Sunday, donations were coming in at a rate of $4,000 per minute, David Willner said in a post on Facebook.  The money will go toward the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, a Texas nonprofit that provides free and low-cost legal services to immigrants and refugees. Among those who donated to the Willners’ fundraiser are Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, Politico reported. The Willners are previously employees of the tech giant. A company spokesperson declined to say how much they donated. >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families “These aren’t kids we don’t have to care about. They’re like our kids,” Charlotte Willner told the Mercury News. “When we look at the faces of these children, we can’t help but see our own children’s faces.” The national debate over immigration has ramped up in recent weeks after reports surfaced that authorities on the U.S.-Mexico border are separating migrant children from their parents as part of the Trump administration’s efforts to deal with people who come into the country illegally. >> Is the immigration separation policy new, where did it come from, where are the detention centers? The Trump administration in April ordered prosecutors to charge every person suspected of illegally crossing the border. Children traveling with the adults have been separated and placed in detention centers. The president has repeatedly called for Democrats to negotiate with Republicans to address the issue after falsely claiming that the party is behind laws that mandate the separation of children from parents at the border. No such law exists.
  • Pope Francis criticized the Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border in an interview published Wednesday by Reuters. >> Read more trending news “It’s not easy, but populism is not the answer,” he said. The pope told Reuters that he agreed with statements made last week by Catholic bishops in America who called the family separation policy “immoral.”  >> Clergy group brings church charges of child abuse, immorality against Jeff Sessions over zero-tolerance policy “While protecting our borders is important, we can and must do better as a government, and as a society, to find other ways to ensure that safety,” Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said in a statement released at the conference’s spring assembly. “Separating babies from their mothers is not the answers and is immoral.” Francis told Reuters that he is “on the side of the bishops’ conference.” >> Recording of crying immigrant children separated from parents at border sparks outrage “I believe that you cannot reject people who arrive,” he said, speaking about the migrant crisis that has sent hundreds of thousands of people into Europe. “You have to receive them, help them, look after them, accompany them and then see where to put them, but throughout Europe.” He said that populists have been “creating psychosis” around the issue of immigration. “Populism does not resolve things,” he said. “What resolves things is acceptance, study, prudence.” >> Immigration: Babies and children held in 'tender age' shelters according to report The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. President Donald Trump has repeatedly claimed that Democrats are to blame for laws that mandate the family separations, however, no law requiring the separations exists.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Officer identified the teenager as Antwon Rose of Rankin. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year. Update 5:30 p.m. ET:  The mayor of East Pittsburgh confirmed that the officer involved in the shooting Tuesday night was sworn in to their department a few hours before. He has been an officer with other departments in the area for seven years. He still has not been identified. Update 4 p.m. ET:  The family of Antwon Rose has hired civil rights Attorney Lee Merritt to represent them. Merritt has previously represented the victims of violence in Charlottesville and several cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement. Update 2:53 p.m. ET:  Rose was shot three times while running from police, said Coleman McDonough, superintendent of the Allegheny County Police Department. McDonough said two guns were found in the car after the traffic stop, but Rose was not armed at the time of the shooting. The driver of the vehicle was initially detained by police. He has since been released, police said. A third person who was in the vehicle and fled has not been located. The East Pittsburgh police officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto released the following statement: “Any loss of life is tragic, and especially the loss of life of a child. This is a devastating situation and I am saddened for Antwon Rose and his family.  “While Tuesday's shooting was not within the city's official borders it impacts all of us in the Pittsburgh region, and particularly those in the African American community. In my reactions to the incident I should have acknowledged that these shootings affect all of us, no matter where we live, and for that I am sorry.  “Tuesday night I was receiving numerous calls and messages asking me to respond to the involvement of police in a shooting in East Pittsburgh borough, and at the time I was attempting to clarify for the national public that the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, which I ultimately oversee, were not involved.”   Original Story:  According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock. >> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street. An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials. Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in 'so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred.' The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center. The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 
  • Florida Gov. Rick Scott has joined other leaders to urge the federal government to stop separating children from their parents when they enter the U.S. illegally. Scott sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Tuesday. Read: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen taunted by protesters as she eats at Mexican restaurant U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a cover-up after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived at the country illegally. Read: Sen. Nelson, other lawmakers denied entry to facility housing immigrant children in Florida Nelson said on the Senate floor Wednesday that he wanted to check to see if the facility was clean and wanted to see where the children were sleeping. .@SenBillNelson: “I wanted to see for myself. I wanted to see, is the facility clean? Are the children sleeping in beds? I also wanted to be able to talk to the young children, the ones who had been separated.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Nelson said the deputy HHS secretary told him it was the department's policy that he would have to fill out a form and wait two weeks before a visit. Nelson told the Senate floor he filled out the form. 'Why do they not want the senator from Florida to get into this detention facility where there are children that have been separated from their parents?' Nelson asked. 'It must be that not only is this department policy, this is being directed from the president in the White House, and they don't want me to see it because they don't want us to know what is going on in there.' Read: Trump announces plan to keep migrant families together Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, ages 13 to 17 -- most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. At some point, the facility had been closed, but it reopened in February, officials said. Martin Levine was one of several protesters who demonstrated outside the Homestead Detention Facility Wednesday. 'The kids were totally innocent. Why not put them together with their parents, which is what the policy used to be?' he said. 'It's never too late to do the right thing. So I would praise him to do the right thing.' President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order, which requires authorities to stop separating immigrant families. 'I didn't like the sight or the feeling of families being separated,' Trump said. 'I consider this to be a very important executive order. It's about keeping families together.' The order doesn't outline a plan for reuniting the 2,300 children who have already been separated from their parents. It's unknown when they'll be released. Immigration attorney Nayef Mubarak told Channel 9 the order is not a simple fix. 'What this does end is perhaps separating a mother and a child, each being in separate cells. But now these children will be in cells indefinitely until their court case has been concluded,' he said. 'It's clear here that these children are not getting out of these facilities, and there's no clear end as to when they're going to be getting out.' The order doesn't change the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy of prosecuting anyone who tries to cross the border illegally. Attorneys expect the order to be challenged in court. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Download: WFTV news and weather apps .@SenBillNelson: “The power to end this painful chapter in American history lies with the President and his pen.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Watch below: Sen. Nelson speaks to Senate floor about denied entry to Homestead facility
  • Award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore said he knew he had managed to capture the emotional impact of the Trump administration’s immigration policy just moments after photographing a young Honduran girl crying at her mother’s feet last week. >> Read more trending news The image appeared on television sets, computer screens and newspaper front pages around the globe. The photo spurred a California couple to start a fundraiser that has since raised millions of dollars to help migrants detained on suspicion of illegally crossing the border. It spurred public outrage over the immigration policy that led to the separation of thousands of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Couple raises more than $4.7 million to help reunite migrant children, parents Moore told The Washington Post that he noticed the girl when her mother stopped to breastfeed her in the middle of the road on June 12. She and dozens of other migrants, nearly all women and children, were stopped by the Border Patrol agents just after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas. “There was no place for privacy,” Moore told the Post. “(The mother) said they’d been on the road for a month, and they were from Honduras. I can only imagine what dangers she’d passed through, alone with the girl.” The woman gave Moore permission to follow her and her 2-year-old daughter as Border Patrol agents processed them, the Post reported. It was after agents confiscated their personal items, when the girl’s mother put her on the ground to allow an agent to search her, that the girl started to wail. The moment passed quickly. “I took a knee and had very few frames of that moment before it was over,” Moore told NPR. “And I knew at that moment that this point in their journey, which was very emotional for me to see them being detained, for them was just part of a very, very long journey.” Moore told the Post that the feeling he had after photographing the girl was similar to emotions he felt while covering war zones and Ebola wards abroad. 'Ever since I took those pictures, I think about that moment often. And it's emotional for me every time,' he told NPR. “I do not know what happened to them. I would very much like to know.” >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. According to CNN, a spokesman later told them that the girl and mother in the viral photo were not separated. President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice.
  • A woman said she was robbed at gunpoint in her own driveway after driving 80 miles home from a shopping trip. Police believe the robbers may have followed her from the shopping center in Atlanta to her home in Dalton. Brittany McEntire told WSB that two men robbed her at gunpoint about three weeks ago. Her mother, husband and three children were also in the driveway.  >> Read more trending news  McEntire said the two men ran up the driveway and took her two Louis Vuitton diaper bags and demanded all of her jewelry, including her late father’s ring that she cherishes. She said the whole robbery took less than a minute, but she has not regained her peace of mind. “I could’ve lost my whole family if they had started shooting,” McEntire told WSB. The suspects allegedly followed McEntire from Buckhead for about two hours in an unidentified white car, police said. McEntire said she is unsure why she was targeted because she did not take home many bags from the store.  “It was not a shopping spree,” McEntire said. Police believe the men will try to follow and rob more people.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice. Update 10:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Democrats took a stand on the floor of the U.S. Senate against President Donald Trump’s immigration plan just hours after the president signed an executive order revoking his policy of separating migrant children from their parents during illegal border crossings. Democrats, who spoke from the Senate floor for two hours, warned that the executive order will worsen the crisis along the U.S.-Mexico border, The Hill reported. 'If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ... Does anybody really believe that we should be imprisoning for an indefinite period of time little children,' Sanders said. Update 6:45 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order overturning his administration’s own policy of separating migrant families at the border. “I am glad the president took this step today,” McConnell tweeted. “When families with children breach our border, we should keep those families together whenever possible while our legal system fairly and promptly evaluates their status,” McConnell said. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Some Republican senators have expressed relief that President Donald Trump rescinded the policy separating migrant families at the border. Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who introduced legislation to address the family separation issue at the border, said Trump’s executive order was a good move, but that Congress needs to act. “I’m pleased the administration has agreed to keep families apprehended at the border together. We can have strong border security without separating parents from their children,” he said on Twitter. Update 6 p.m. EDT June 20: Democratic senators are weighing in on President Donald Trump’s decision to end the practice of separating children from their families during illegal border crossings. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said Trump is actually “doubling down” on his zero tolerance policy with his signing of the executive order. “His new executive order criminalizes asylum-seekers and seeks to indefinitely detain their children,” Durbin said in a tweet. Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) also tweeted that Trump’s executive order does not end the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. “ In fact, the President now wants to detain parents and children together indefinitely, and contemplates DoD building internment camps to house them. This is no solution to a problem Trump created,” Markey said. Update 4 p.m. EDT June 20: White House officials on Wednesday afternoon released the full text of the executive order signed by the president. >> Trump ends migrant family separations: Read the executive order In it, Trump directed officials to detain migrant families together. Officials have come under fire in recent months after reports surfaced that migrant children were being taken from their parents at the border. The order did not address what will happen to children and parents who are currently separated and in government custody. Update 3:20 p.m. EDT June 20: Trump signed the order, which will keep families together but continue the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, on Wednesday afternoon. >> From Jamie Dupree: President Trump to reverse course on immigrant family separations “We're keeping families together and this will solve that problem,” Trump said. “At the same time we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a ‘zero tolerance,’ we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally.” Original report: Trump told reporters Wednesday that he will “be signing something in a little while” to address family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Read more trending news “We want to keep families together, it’s very important,” Trump said. 'I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”  It was not immediately clear what the president planned to sign. Trump has repeatedly called on Congress to change laws that he says mandates the family separations. There is no law that requires children be separated from parents at the border. He blamed Democrats for the continued separations in a Wednesday morning tweet, but he added that he was “working on something.” The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was drafting an executive action for Trump that would allow the Department of Homeland Security to keep migrant families together at the border. Nielsen does not believe Congress will act to resolve the issue of migrant family separations, the AP reported, citing two unidentified sources familiar with the matter. She’s working with officials from other agencies, including the Justice Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, to draft the executive action.  The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The executive action Nielson is drafting “wouldn’t end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families,” according to the AP.