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    A self-identified California survivalist was sentenced Monday to three consecutive life sentences, without the possibility of parole, in the murders of a couple sleeping on a beach in 2004, as well as the 2017 murder of his own brother. Shaun Michael Gallon, 40, pleaded no contest last month to the murders of Lindsay Cutshall, 22, and Jason Allen, 26, who were shot to death between Aug. 14 and Aug. 16, 2004, as they slept on Fish Head Beach near Jenner in Sonoma County. The case remained unsolved until 2017, when Gallon was accused of using a rifle to kill his younger brother, 36-year-old Shamus Gallon, in the Forestville home they shared with their mother. Following his arrest, Shaun Gallon confessed to the Allen-Cutshall homicides. He pleaded no contest June 13 to all three killings. At the time, Sonoma County officials said there was no apparent motive for Gallon to shoot his brother. “There doesn’t appear to be an altercation of any significance that led to the shooting,” Sgt. Spencer Crum told the Press Democrat. Even prior to his brother’s slaying, Shaun Gallon’s name had long been on law enforcement’s radar. The San Francisco Chronicle reported he was well-known for his erratic behavior, and his rap sheet was a long one. He was convicted in 2009 of assault with a deadly weapon for shooting an arrow at a man in Guerneville, the Chronicle reported. His Facebook page shows multiple photos of homemade bows and arrows, as well as a photo of hiself with a spear he made. “Further, Gallon was also alleged to have attempted to kill a Monte Rio man in June 2004 by using a disguised homemade explosive device, and seriously injuring a second unintended victim when it detonated,” a news release from the Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office read. Gallon was charged in 2017 with felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, as well as possession of an illegal assault rifle, the district attorney said. The charges to which Gallon pleaded no contest are lengthy, court records show. “There were multiple special allegations and enhancements alleged against Gallon, including that he murdered multiple victims, that he committed great bodily injury on those victims, that he used a firearm to inflict great bodily injury on each of his murder victims and that he had suffered a prior ‘strike’ conviction in 2009 for assault with a deadly weapon,” Ravitch’s news release said. “In his change of pleas, Gallon admitted all charges and enhancements.” Gallon waived all rights of appeal by entering into the plea agreement. Ravitch said the agreement was reached after a review of the records, a review of mitigating material offered by the defense and talks with the victims’ families, as well as the surviving victims of Gallon’s prior crimes. Photos recovered from their camera shows they took photos of one another in front of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz, the newspaper reported. They then headed north in Cutshall’s red 1992 Ford Tempo for the Sonoma coast, where they found themselves in Jenner, a village Allen had visited a few years earlier. Several witnesses, some conflicting, reported seeing the couple along the way as they stopped for gas and other items. A front desk clerk at the Jenner Inn told police the couple showed up there either Friday, Aug. 13, or the following night. Though the couple ate at the inn, there were no available rooms, so they said they would camp outdoors instead, the Chronicle said. The manager, who declined to give her name, said she chatted with the couple again the following morning when they came in for breakfast. “I asked them if they were having fun,” the woman told the newspaper. “They said they stopped in San Francisco. They were just a happy couple trying to get away for the weekend.” Various accounts indicate Allen and Cutshall were told Fish Head Beach would be a good spot to camp, even though it was illegal to sleep on the beach there.  Police believe it was the night of Aug. 14, 2004, when the couple parked Cutshall’s Tempo in a pullout along nearby Highway 1 before setting up their gear on the beach. According to Sonoma magazine, both made notations in a visitor’s log kept near the beach. “As I stir this mac and cheese, I think to myself, ‘What a wonderful life,’” Allen wrote. “I’ve just spent two awesome days with my fiancée, Lindsay. Can life ever be so perfect? Only with a person who is so great. God gives me this privilege in life and He has given me a wonderful woman to enjoy it.” “The sun is going down in the horizon,” Cutshall wrote, according to the magazine. “All I see is the beams shining on the cliff face. And I know that God is awesome. I look around and I see his creation all around me.” Authorities believe the couple was killed, each by a single rifle shot to the head, that night or early the following morning as they slept in their sleeping bags, their Bible nearby. Family and friends grew concerned when the couple had not turned up back at the Christian camp by Sunday. According to the Chronicle, Lindsay was due to fly home a week later to begin planning her wedding. A missing person report was filed Monday, Aug. 16, by friends at the camp. The couple's bodies were found two days later, first spotted by deputies in a Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department helicopter sent up to search for a man stuck on a cliff near Jenner, the Chronicle reported. Instead, the spotters saw two bodies in bloodstained sleeping bags. With no apparent motive -- there were no signs of robbery or sexual assault at the scene -- detectives were stymied for years. It would take another 13 years before investigators learned what happened or why. ‘I went crazy’  A Sonoma County Probation Department report, obtained by the Press Democrat, paints a disturbing portrait of Gallon’s life and shows ways in which his family shielded him from arrest before he killed his brother. Gallon’s father, David Gallon, admitted to police he got rid of his son’s guns in 2004, a week after Allen and Cutshall were found slain. Shaun Gallon, who had been arrested on unrelated weapons charges, called his father and asked him to dispose of the weapons. David Gallon told investigators he did so “because he feared (Shaun) Gallon was unstable,” the document says. The records show Shaun Gallon became a potential suspect in the double homicide on the beach after deputies found him near a beach in Guerneville with a loaded, stolen gun in the pocket of his camouflage jumpsuit.
  • President Donald Trump plans to nominate lawyer Eugene Scalia, son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to serve as his next labor secretary, according to an announcement posted Thursday on Twitter. >> Read more trending news  Scalia, 55, is a partner in the Washington office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, where he specializes in administrative law and handles cases related to labor and employment, according to The Washington Post and NPR. He previously served as solicitor of the U.S. Department of Labor under President George W. Bush. He also served as special assistant to Attorney General William Barr during his previous tenure as Bush's attorney general. 'I am pleased to announce that it is my intention to nominate Gene Scalia as the new Secretary of Labor,' Trump wrote Thursday in a Twitter post.  'Gene has led a life of great success in the legal and labor field and is highly respected not only as a lawyer, but as a lawyer with great experience working with labor and everyone else.'  Scalia has long represented companies that have pushed back against unions and strengthening labor laws, The New York Times reported. In 2005, he was hired by Walmart after former employees sued the company, claiming they had been illegally fired for whistle-blowing, according to NPR. His nomination is likely to get some pushback from Democrats, though he's expected to be easily confirmed in the Republican-controlled Senate, according to the Times and the Post. If confirmed, Scalia will replace outgoing Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, who announced his resignation last week amid criticism of his handling of a secret 2008 plea deal with Jeffrey Epstein. The deal, which came under renewed scrutiny after federal authorities revealed new sex trafficking charges against Epstein last week, allowed the 66-year-old to avoid significant jail time and federal prosecution after he was accused of molesting teenage girls. Acosta's deputy, Patrick Pizzella, will serve as acting secretary of labor after his resignation goes into effect Friday. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • An airman was reportedly shot in the leg Thursday night at Nellis Air Force Base. >>Read more trending news The airman was taken to a hospital with survivable injuries, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Lt. Adrian Beas told The Las Vegas Review-Journal. The circumstances surrounding the incident are unclear. Police were called shortly after 9:30 p.m. and found the injured airman near the O’Callaghan Federal Hospital, Beas said. Police and base personnel are investigating how the shooting happened, KVVU-TV reported.
  • Thousands of Britons, including dozens of members of Parliament, London Mayor Sadiq Khan and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, have signed a letter in support of four liberal Democratic congresswomen after President Donald Trump wrote in a series of tweets that they should 'go back' to the countries they came from. >> Read more trending news The letter, from British the anti-racism and anti-fascism group Hope not Hate, was addressed to Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY). Signatories said they were 'disgusted' by Trump's attacks on the congresswomen and that they stood in solidarity with them. 'His blatant, unashamed racism has appalled people around the world,' the letter said. 'You embody the best of America. Its diversity is its strength. Thank you for showing the world that America can still provide leadership to be proud of, even when the White House has abdicated that role.' The letter was signed by nearly 14,000 people in its first 36 hours online, according to the Evening Standard. 'Love and solidarity will always trump hate,' Khan, a frequent Trump critic who called the president a 'global threat' ahead of Trump's visit to London last month, said in a post on Facebook. 'These progressive congresswomen, Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley, represent hope for the future. Their home is America, but their message crosses borders.' Trump set off a firestorm Sunday when he wrote in a series of tweets that Ocasio-Cortez, Tlaib, Omar and Pressley should go back to the 'totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.' Of the congresswomen targeted in Trump's tweets, only one, Omar, was born outside the U.S. and all are U.S. citizens. Omar was born in Mogadishu, Somalia, according to The Washington Post. Her family fled civil war in the country when she was a child, and she became a U.S. citizen when she was a teenager, the newspaper reported. Trump has defended his comments, telling reporters Monday that the congresswomen are 'very unhappy' and 'hate our country.' 'I'm watching them. All they do is complain,' Trump said. 'So, all I'm saying is, if they want to leave, they can leave.
  • Kentucky police officials have charged a Louisville attorney with assault after he allegedly attacked a colleague with a Lysol can during a fight in the courthouse. Lindsey Scott, 63, is charged with second-degree assault in the incident, according to WDRB in Louisville. He was booked into and released from the metro jail. >> Read more trending news  Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office officials said another defense attorney, James “J.R.” Moore, was working on some of his cases around 8 a.m. Wednesday in an attorney workroom next to a district courtroom. At some point, Scott entered the room. “Some sort of altercation developed,” Lt. Col. Carl Yates, a spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office, told the news station. Scott is accused of hitting Moore with the aerosol can, causing cuts to his head. When deputies got to the room, Moore was restraining Scott and both were covered with blood, Yates said. The workroom had to be shut down and cleaned of the blood. Surveillance footage released to local news stations by the Sheriff's Office shows the bloody scene, as well as a handcuffed Scott sitting on a bench with blood covering his white suit. Moore was sent to the hospital, where he told WAVE 3 News in Louisville he received about a dozen staples to his head. Scott, who told deputies he was suffering chest pains, was taken to the hospital as well, but was later booked into the jail. Moore later posted a message on Facebook about the skirmish. “Today, I was totally blindsided while peacefully eating my breakfast,” Moore wrote, according to WAVE 3 News. “First thing I felt was a thud. Just a scalp wound. “My friends need not be concerned. All concerns should be for my perpetrator. Something is apparently very wrong in his life. He is a good man.” Other attorneys also expressed shock over the incident, saying both Moore and Scott are well-known and well-liked. Wednesday’s incident is not the first time Scott has been behind bars. According to the Courier-Journal, the attorney was at the center of a sensational court case in the 1980s when, as a corporal in the U.S. Marine Corps, he was convicted of raping and attempting to kill a fellow Marine’s wife at the Quantico military base in Virginia. Scott, a Louisville native, was sentenced to 30 years in prison, but the verdict was later overturned on the grounds he received ineffective counsel from his civilian lawyer, the Courier-Journal reported. The Washington Post in 1988 covered his second military trial, at the end of which he was exonerated by the military jury of charges of attempted murder, rape, sodomy and abduction. Scott, who had spent four years in Fort Leavenworth, wept silently, the Post reported. “In the tiny spectators’ gallery, Scott’s ailing mother, Mildred, began to shout in a gravelly voice, ‘Thank you, Jesus! Thank you, Lord Jesus! Thank the Lord for giving me back my innocent child!’ before she was pulled from the courtroom by four or five supporters,” the Post story read. The Post reported there was one significant difference in evidence between the first and second trials: the recollection of a former security officer at a Zayre department store in Woodbridge, about 12 miles from Quantico, who testified she saw Scott shopping in the store at the time the victim was being attacked on the base. Her testimony backed up Scott’s claim that he had spent the evening of the attack shopping for his pregnant wife’s birthday, which was the following day, the Post said. The victim also had trouble identifying Scott in the days after the attack, saying each time that other men in the photos and lineup resembled him. The Post reported she said she picked Scott out of the lineup because, “He scares me the most.” No physical evidence linked Scott to the crime, the newspaper said. The case relied on circumstantial evidence, including the determination that the woman's throat was slashed with a serrated knife. Scott had borrowed a serrated knife from his apartment manager that day and never returned it, the Post reported. He told investigators he inadvertently threw it away after using it to clean his stove. Scott also lived in the same apartment complex as the 23-year-old woman and her husband and, because he was a military policeman training as a criminal investigator, would have had knowledge of police procedures regarding evidence gathering. The woman's attacker knew her address, her husband's name and his job, as well as the 'jargon' used by military police, the Post said. According to investigators, the assailant lured the woman from her home by calling and saying her husband had been in an accident, then offering to drive her to the hospital. He instead took her to a wooded area and assaulted her, leaving her for dead, authorities said. The victim picked Scott's car out of a lineup, telling authorities it was the one in which she had been sexually assaulted, the Post reported. Scott's supporters argued that race was a factor in his conviction because he is black and his alleged victim was white. “I maintained my innocence from the beginning,” Scott told reporters after the not guilty verdict. “It was proven today by a jury of my peers that I was innocent. I’m innocent. I’m free.” Gary R. Myers, one of Scott's defense attorneys, told the Post after the verdict: 'I think (jurors) just came to the conclusion that it was a tossup, and a tossup is not a guilty verdict.' Scott’s case was the basis of a 1999 movie, “Dangerous Evidence: The Lori Jackson Story,” which focused on the civil rights activist who fought to have the courts take a second look at Scott’s conviction. WAVE 3 News reported that those who know Scott said his experiences motivated him to go into law. The Courier-Journal reported that, at age 43 in 1999, he began law school at the University of Louisville. According to the Kentucky Bar Association, Scott was admitted in October 2002. He is in good standing and has no record of public discipline.
  • A federal judge in New York declined Thursday to grant bail to wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein as he awaits trial on allegations of sex trafficking. >> Read more trending news  Update 12 p.m. EDT July 18: Lisa Bloom, the attorney for three of Epstein's accusers, issued a statement after a judge denied Epstein bail. 'We are pleased that the judge denied bail,' Bloom said on Twitter. 'It gives us hope that justice may truly be possible against this sex offender who has hurt so many for so long.' Update 11:35 a.m. EDT July 18: U.S. District Judge Richard Berman has rejected Epstein's bail application, citing danger to others and the community. Prosecutors had asked Berman to hold Epstein, 66, without bail, arguing in court on Monday that Epstein is a flight risk and danger to the community who has shown no remorse for victimizing dozens of girls as young as 14 between 2002 and 2005. Attorneys for Epstein had argued he poses no flight risk, as evidenced by his conduct since pleading guilty in 2008 to two counts of soliciting a minor for prostitution after he was accused of molesting girls in Palm Beach County, Florida. Update 9:50 a.m. EDT July 18: An Austrian passport found by authorities during a search of Epstein's Manhattan mansion included several stamps inside, 'including stamps that reflect use of the passport to enter France, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Saudi Arabia in the 1980s,' prosecutors said in a letter filed Thursday in court. Authorities said the passport, issued in the 1980s and bearing Epstein's image but not his name, was found July 6 in a safe. Attorneys for Epstein claimed in court filings that the Austrian passport had never been used. 'Epstein -- an affluent member of the Jewish faith -- acquired the passport in the 1980s, when hijackings were prevalent, in connection to Middle East travel,' Epstein's attorneys said. 'The passport was for personal protection in the event of travel to dangerous areas, only to be presented to potential (kidnappers), hijackers or terrorists should violent episodes occur.' It was not immediately clear how Epstein obtained the passport. Update 12:40 p.m. EDT July 15: Two of Epstein's alleged victims on Monday asked Berman not to allow the 66-year-old to be released on bail pending his trial. Both spoke at his bail hearing in New York. Courtney Wild said she was 14 years old when Epstein started sexually abusing her in Palm Beach, Florida, according to Courthouse News. She told the court that if Epstein were to be granted bail, he would be 'a scary person to have walking the streets,' CNN reported. Annie Farmer said she met Epstein when she was 16 years old and that he behaved inappropriately, though she declined to give details, according to Courthouse News. She also asked Berman not to grant bail to Epstein. Prosecutors said Monday that during a search of Epstein's home safe, authorities found a bogus passport that listed a Saudi Arabia residence, 'piles of cash' and 'dozens of diamonds.' The passport, issued in the 1980s, had Epstein's photo on it but a different name. Prosecutors said previously that federal agents found a trove of nude photos during the raid on Epstein's mansion following his arrest on sex trafficking charges. Update 10:30 a.m. EDT July 15: Epstein will remain incarcerated until at least Thursday, when a judge said he'll likely rule on whether to grant bail to the 66-year-old, CNN reported. Several of Epstein's alleged victims were in court Monday, according to Courthouse News. Prosecutors said Friday in a court filing that multiple victims have told government officials that they want Epstein detained until his trial because they fear his release will give him the opportunity to harass them. Original report: Epstein's attorneys have asked a judge to allow their client to be detained at his Manhattan mansion until trial and offered to put up a 'substantial' bond to ensure his compliance with the proposed terms of his release. Among other things, Epstein's attorneys proposed he be fitted with a GPS device and said their client would agree to ground his private jet. In a response filed Friday, prosecutors argued Epstein should be held without bond due the severity of his charges and his financial means. Prosecutors said they believe Epstein might have tried to influence witnesses after discovering that he had paid a total of $350,000 to two individuals, including a former employee, in the last year. Authorities said that several more women have come forward to accuse Epstein of sexually abusing them since charges against the New York hedge fund manager were made public last week. Officials have said authorities found 'hundreds or thousands of nude and seminude photographs of young females in his Manhattan mansion on the night of his arrest,' evidence which they say eliminates 'any doubt that the defendant is unrepentant and unreformed.' Epstein is accused of sexually exploiting and abusing dozens of girls at his homes in New York and Florida, heading a sex trafficking scheme that saw his victims recruiting other girls to be abused. He pleaded not guilty last week to sex trafficking and sex trafficking conspiracy charges. Epstein avoided significant jail time and federal prosecution in 2008 as part of a deal overseen by then-U.S. Attorney Alex Acosta. As part of the non-prosecution agreement, Epstein pleaded guilty to a pair of lesser charges and agreed to register as a sex offender. He served 13 months in jail as part of the deal. Acosta said his office 'proceeded appropriately, based on the evidence' in 2008, but scrutiny of the once-secret deal, detailed in a series of in-depth reports published last year by The Miami Herald, prompted him to resign last week from his role as President Donald Trump's secretary of labor. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Update: The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has found the missing 1-year-old boy who went missing from Putnam County in Bowling Grabsen, Kentucky. >> Read more trending news Earlier:  On Wednesday, according to the TBI, 1-year-old Lachlan Thomas Capo had last been seen with Margot Walker.  Investigators said Walker may be driving either a blue 2002 Volvo with Tennessee tag 4K7-7F9 or a black 2002 Volvo with Tennessee tag B77-71L.  It is unclear what Walker’s relationship is to the child. Capo was described as 3 feet tall with brown hair and brown eyes. He weighs 30 pounds. Anyone with information regarding the child’s whereabouts is asked to call the Putnam County Sheriff’s Office at 931-528-8484. – Visit Fox13Memphis.com for the latest on this developing story.
  • A 29-year-old mother and her three young children were found stabbed to death at a Columbus, Georgia, apartment Wednesday night, according to multiple media reports. >> Read more news stories Jerriciah Spellman and her children were killed near 20th Avenue and Cusseta Road, Muscogee County coroner Buddy Bryan told Columbus-based news station WTVM.  The children were 3 years old, 1 year old and approximately 4 or 5 months old, the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported. The incident happened sometime Wednesday evening at the Elizabeth Canty apartment complex. No details on what events led to the deadly stabbing have been released. Columbus police officers discovered the quadruple homicide scene after receiving a tip earlier in the day at a separate scene, WTVM reported. Investigators are talking to a person of interest, but no suspects have been named, the news station reported. Anyone with information is asked to call 911. – Visit AJC.com for the latest on this developing story.
  • A Las Vegas woman missing for more than a week before police found her body, alongside the body of her alleged killer in an apparent murder-suicide, met the man about a month ago on a dating site, police said. Juliane Kellner, 42, was reported missing July 2 by one of her roommates, according to the Las Vegas Sun. Her decomposing body was found in an apartment in Henderson eight days later. Kellner had been shot in the chest, according to the Sun. >> Read more trending news  Her alleged killer, identified by the Clark County Coroner's Office as Victor Crisan, 39, was found dead of a gunshot wound to the head, KLAS in Las Vegas reported. Henderson police told the news station Kellner and Crisan met on the Plenty of Fish dating site. They had known one another for about a month. Little is known about Crisan and the motive for the murder-suicide was unclear. Kellner’s family and friends have been critical of Las Vegas and Henderson investigators, who they believe did not do enough to find her after she was reported missing. Kellner’s son, Brandon Wilt, 21, of Cape Coral, Florida, told news stations there and in Nevada that his mother’s Volkswagen Jetta was found parked at Crisan’s apartment complex June 30, two days after Kellner was last seen alive by her roommates. It took another 10 days before officers went into Crisan’s apartment. “Family, friends, everybody’s screaming and crying, telling them this is not right,” Wilt told KLAS. “‘Her car is parked there. There is something wrong here, and you guys need to do something about it.’ And they would not.” “There’s no reason she should’ve sat in that apartment for that many days when there was so many people that cared for her and was pushing for them to go into that apartment,” Wilt told Fox 4 in Cape Coral. Henderson police officials told KVVU-TV in Vegas that the initial report they got was of the discovery of Kellner’s car, which family and friends found at the Palm Villas at Whitney Ranch. Lt. Kirk Moore, the department’s public information officer, said at that point, the vehicle was not tied to a particular incident or suspect at that location. “When we got that information, we knocked, of course, on that door, we knocked on many of the other apartments in that complex with a picture of the missing (woman) to see if anybody had seen or knew who she was,” Moore told the news station. No one reported having seen Kellner, who police had no concrete reason to believe was in danger, authorities said. “Absent of those circumstances, we can’t just go into somebody’s house or a structure warrantlessly. You know, we just can’t do that,” Moore said. Meanwhile, friends and family were frantically trying to find Kellner, who had not shown up for work on July 1 and had not been in touch with anyone. A missing person flier said it was unlike her to miss work. “It is HIGHLY unusual that she hasn’t been in contact with anyone,” the flier read. A July 7 post on her Facebook page indicates it was posted by a friend trying to glean information from the social media platform or from Kellner’s online friends. “At this point we are just looking for any hint of where she might have been or who with?” the post reads. “If you know something and are scared to come forward, PLEASE ASK YOURSELF IF YOU WOULD WANT TO BE FOUND? Would you want your life to matter enough that people would be willing to come forward? Would you want your family and children to be able to sleep? “A person’s life should matter. If you called yourself a friend and are sitting there reading this holding a piece of information, I pray you find it in yourself to do the right thing.” By July 10, Las Vegas police investigators had obtained enough information to warrant going into Crisan’s apartment, KVVU-TV reported. Officials did not detail what that information was. “They were able to obtain a key and we went with them, and we discovered what, unfortunately, was a very horrific scene,” Moore told the news station. Kellner’s twin 15-year-old daughters had been scheduled to travel to Las Vegas on July 5 to spend time with their mother, who moved there from Florida last year. Instead, it was Wilt who traveled to Nevada to bring his mother home. “I couldn’t even kiss my mom one last time,” Wilt told KTNV in Las Vegas. “They would not let me see her.” Kellner moved to Vegas last year in an attempt to get her life back on track, her family said. Wilt told the Las Vegas Review-Journal his mother got sober after a long struggle with addiction, found a job at the Las Vegas Athletic Club, bought a car and found her faith. “She seemed like a whole different person and that’s why she stayed,” Wilt said. “She was doing so well in life that she didn’t want to give up on that.” Kellner was reportedly a childhood victim of sex trafficking. In a YouTube video from January, in which Kellner speaks of her past, she tells her audience that her parents, who were about 45 and 19 when she was born in Germany, sold her into sexual slavery. The trauma brought with it a lifetime of heartache that included not only addiction, but sex work as an adult. Watch Juliane Kellner speak about her childhood trauma and her recovery below.  Wilt said his mother went to Las Vegas to enter treatment at Refuge for Women, which describes itself as a “national, faith-based organization providing a residential healing and recovery program for survivors of trafficking and sexual exploitation to receive safe housing, counseling, life and work skills development.” By her family’s accounts, the 12-month program appeared to work for Kellner. The outgoing mother and grandmother, who her son said “could make anybody laugh,” began speaking in public about the trauma of her past and her recovery. In that January video, a beaming Kellner praises God, who she says she knows never meant the harm that came to her throughout her life. “Today, I know God’s faithfulness,” Kellner says. “Today, I can say with the utmost confidence that God’s plans for me are good.”
  • The House of Representatives blocked the resolution to impeach President Donald Trump Wednesday afternoon. >> Read more trending news  The measure, introduced by Rep. Al Green (D-TX), did not pass by a vote of 332 to 95. It was put forth after the House voted mostly along party lines Tuesday to condemn 'racist comments' the president made over the weekend directed at four liberal Democratic congresswomen of color. Trump has denied the tweets, in which he told the congresswomen to 'go back' to their home countries, were racist. He said Tuesday that he doesn't have 'a racist bone in my body.' Green's resolution cites Trump's comments and says he's unfit to be president, according to The Associated Press.  'This president has committed impeachable offenses,' Green said on the House floor Wednesday morning. 'Yesterday we condemned him for them. Today is our opportunity to punish him for them.' Green has twice before introduced articles of impeachment against Trump, without success. On Wednesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated she would not support his latest effort. 'We have six committees that are working on following the facts in terms of any abuse of power, obstruction of justice and the rest that the president may have engaged in,' Pelosi told reporters Wednesday. 'That is the serious path we are on – not that Mr. Green is not serious, but we'll deal with that on the floor.' Green said a vote on the measure will take place Wednesday between 4 and 5 p.m.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 48 year old woman has been charged with DUI manslaughter for a crash that killed a toddler on a family bicycle ride.  According to the Altamonte Springs Police Department, Shona Wallace, was arrested and charged in connection with with a crash June 2 on State Road 414.   The Zisa family was on a bike ride to help 17-month-old Adalyn fall asleep when deputies say a car jumped the curb and struck the trio, killing the toddler and seriously injuring her parents.   In addition to DUI manslaughter, Wallace is also charged with DUI with serious bodily injury, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
  • A self-identified California survivalist was sentenced Monday to three consecutive life sentences, without the possibility of parole, in the murders of a couple sleeping on a beach in 2004, as well as the 2017 murder of his own brother. Shaun Michael Gallon, 40, pleaded no contest last month to the murders of Lindsay Cutshall, 22, and Jason Allen, 26, who were shot to death between Aug. 14 and Aug. 16, 2004, as they slept on Fish Head Beach near Jenner in Sonoma County. The case remained unsolved until 2017, when Gallon was accused of using a rifle to kill his younger brother, 36-year-old Shamus Gallon, in the Forestville home they shared with their mother. Following his arrest, Shaun Gallon confessed to the Allen-Cutshall homicides. He pleaded no contest June 13 to all three killings. At the time, Sonoma County officials said there was no apparent motive for Gallon to shoot his brother. “There doesn’t appear to be an altercation of any significance that led to the shooting,” Sgt. Spencer Crum told the Press Democrat. Even prior to his brother’s slaying, Shaun Gallon’s name had long been on law enforcement’s radar. The San Francisco Chronicle reported he was well-known for his erratic behavior, and his rap sheet was a long one. He was convicted in 2009 of assault with a deadly weapon for shooting an arrow at a man in Guerneville, the Chronicle reported. His Facebook page shows multiple photos of homemade bows and arrows, as well as a photo of hiself with a spear he made. “Further, Gallon was also alleged to have attempted to kill a Monte Rio man in June 2004 by using a disguised homemade explosive device, and seriously injuring a second unintended victim when it detonated,” a news release from the Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office read. Gallon was charged in 2017 with felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, as well as possession of an illegal assault rifle, the district attorney said. The charges to which Gallon pleaded no contest are lengthy, court records show. “There were multiple special allegations and enhancements alleged against Gallon, including that he murdered multiple victims, that he committed great bodily injury on those victims, that he used a firearm to inflict great bodily injury on each of his murder victims and that he had suffered a prior ‘strike’ conviction in 2009 for assault with a deadly weapon,” Ravitch’s news release said. “In his change of pleas, Gallon admitted all charges and enhancements.” Gallon waived all rights of appeal by entering into the plea agreement. Ravitch said the agreement was reached after a review of the records, a review of mitigating material offered by the defense and talks with the victims’ families, as well as the surviving victims of Gallon’s prior crimes. Photos recovered from their camera shows they took photos of one another in front of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz, the newspaper reported. They then headed north in Cutshall’s red 1992 Ford Tempo for the Sonoma coast, where they found themselves in Jenner, a village Allen had visited a few years earlier. Several witnesses, some conflicting, reported seeing the couple along the way as they stopped for gas and other items. A front desk clerk at the Jenner Inn told police the couple showed up there either Friday, Aug. 13, or the following night. Though the couple ate at the inn, there were no available rooms, so they said they would camp outdoors instead, the Chronicle said. The manager, who declined to give her name, said she chatted with the couple again the following morning when they came in for breakfast. “I asked them if they were having fun,” the woman told the newspaper. “They said they stopped in San Francisco. They were just a happy couple trying to get away for the weekend.” Various accounts indicate Allen and Cutshall were told Fish Head Beach would be a good spot to camp, even though it was illegal to sleep on the beach there.  Police believe it was the night of Aug. 14, 2004, when the couple parked Cutshall’s Tempo in a pullout along nearby Highway 1 before setting up their gear on the beach. According to Sonoma magazine, both made notations in a visitor’s log kept near the beach. “As I stir this mac and cheese, I think to myself, ‘What a wonderful life,’” Allen wrote. “I’ve just spent two awesome days with my fiancée, Lindsay. Can life ever be so perfect? Only with a person who is so great. God gives me this privilege in life and He has given me a wonderful woman to enjoy it.” “The sun is going down in the horizon,” Cutshall wrote, according to the magazine. “All I see is the beams shining on the cliff face. And I know that God is awesome. I look around and I see his creation all around me.” Authorities believe the couple was killed, each by a single rifle shot to the head, that night or early the following morning as they slept in their sleeping bags, their Bible nearby. Family and friends grew concerned when the couple had not turned up back at the Christian camp by Sunday. According to the Chronicle, Lindsay was due to fly home a week later to begin planning her wedding. A missing person report was filed Monday, Aug. 16, by friends at the camp. The couple's bodies were found two days later, first spotted by deputies in a Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department helicopter sent up to search for a man stuck on a cliff near Jenner, the Chronicle reported. Instead, the spotters saw two bodies in bloodstained sleeping bags. With no apparent motive -- there were no signs of robbery or sexual assault at the scene -- detectives were stymied for years. It would take another 13 years before investigators learned what happened or why. ‘I went crazy’  A Sonoma County Probation Department report, obtained by the Press Democrat, paints a disturbing portrait of Gallon’s life and shows ways in which his family shielded him from arrest before he killed his brother. Gallon’s father, David Gallon, admitted to police he got rid of his son’s guns in 2004, a week after Allen and Cutshall were found slain. Shaun Gallon, who had been arrested on unrelated weapons charges, called his father and asked him to dispose of the weapons. David Gallon told investigators he did so “because he feared (Shaun) Gallon was unstable,” the document says. The records show Shaun Gallon became a potential suspect in the double homicide on the beach after deputies found him near a beach in Guerneville with a loaded, stolen gun in the pocket of his camouflage jumpsuit.
  • President Donald Trump plans to nominate lawyer Eugene Scalia, son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to serve as his next labor secretary, according to an announcement posted Thursday on Twitter. >> Read more trending news  Scalia, 55, is a partner in the Washington office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, where he specializes in administrative law and handles cases related to labor and employment, according to The Washington Post and NPR. He previously served as solicitor of the U.S. Department of Labor under President George W. Bush. He also served as special assistant to Attorney General William Barr during his previous tenure as Bush's attorney general. 'I am pleased to announce that it is my intention to nominate Gene Scalia as the new Secretary of Labor,' Trump wrote Thursday in a Twitter post.  'Gene has led a life of great success in the legal and labor field and is highly respected not only as a lawyer, but as a lawyer with great experience working with labor and everyone else.'  Scalia has long represented companies that have pushed back against unions and strengthening labor laws, The New York Times reported. In 2005, he was hired by Walmart after former employees sued the company, claiming they had been illegally fired for whistle-blowing, according to NPR. His nomination is likely to get some pushback from Democrats, though he's expected to be easily confirmed in the Republican-controlled Senate, according to the Times and the Post. If confirmed, Scalia will replace outgoing Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, who announced his resignation last week amid criticism of his handling of a secret 2008 plea deal with Jeffrey Epstein. The deal, which came under renewed scrutiny after federal authorities revealed new sex trafficking charges against Epstein last week, allowed the 66-year-old to avoid significant jail time and federal prosecution after he was accused of molesting teenage girls. Acosta's deputy, Patrick Pizzella, will serve as acting secretary of labor after his resignation goes into effect Friday. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission shared photos of Bago the manatee’s return to the wild.  The 800-pounder was rescued from the cold waters of Lake Griffin State Park in January. He spent the last six months recovering from stress at SeaWorld's Marine Animal Rescue in Orlando Central Florida News 13 reported that the sea cow was hesitant to leave the plush environment and go back to the wild.  App users click here to see the video.  Officials eventually were able to get Bago to cooperate and released him in the St. Johns River near Palatka.  But not before he was fitted  with a tracking device so that researchers can follow his progress.
  • A cruise line worker is accused of trying to smuggle himself out of the U.S. in a case that spans from Port Canaveral to the Canadian border. Investigators said Kenyan national Fuwad Nassir was barely on the job two weeks when he jumped ship. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement said Nassir told Canadian officials he was seeking asylum Nassir saw a judge Thursday afternoon, but it's not clear who will prosecute this case. It could be the Brevard or Seminole State Attorney's Office or the statewide prosecutor. With a half-million-dollar bond, Nassir isn't likely to be going anywhere anytime soon. Nassir was in a Brevard County courtroom Thursday, facing a charge of conspiracy to commit human smuggling after investigators said he deserted his position aboard the Carnival Liberty at Port Canaveral back in October in violation of his visa. FDLE said he then caught a ride with an in-law who flew into Florida from Utah to pick him up and drove him to New York state, where he attempted to cross into Canada by way of the Rainbow Bridge point of entry.  Officials there refused him entry and turned Nassir over to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. He remained in federal detention until his return to Brevard County.  Carnival Cruise Lines officials said the company would not comment specifically on this case. 

Washington Insider

  • A day after distancing himself from a campaign rally crowd which chanted, 'Send her back' about Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), President Donald Trump on Friday had more tough words for Omar from the Oval Office, making it clear he's not backing away from his criticism of a group of minority women Democratic lawmakers in the Congress. 'I'm unhappy when a Congresswoman goes and says, 'I'm going to be the President's nightmare,'' Mr. Trump said on Friday, as he called those attending his North Carolina campaign rally, 'incredible people and incredible patriots.' 'She's lucky to be where she is,' the President said of Omar, who called Mr. Trump a 'fascist' on Thursday. 'The things that she has said are a disgrace to our country,' the President added. Just as the President hasn't backed off his criticism of Omar, who emigrated to the U.S. from Somalia as a child, the freshmen from Minnesota hasn't pulled any punches with Mr. Trump in recent days. 'We have said this President is racist,' Omar told reporters outside the Capitol on Thursday. 'We have said he is fascist.' As Omar arrived back in Minneapolis, a crowd of supporters greeted her at the airport 'When I said I was the president's nightmare, well you're watching it now,” Omar told a cheering crowd. “Because his nightmare is seeing a Somali-immigrant refugee rise to Congress,” she added. Some Republicans have joined the President in going after Omar, especially targeting her positions on Israel. 'When will the Left condemn this rank anti-Semitism and take some responsibility?' said Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO). 'It’s official - Omar is a loon & utterly ignorant of history,' tweeted former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.