ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
79°
Isolated Thunderstorms
H 92° L 76°
  • clear-night
    79°
    Current Conditions
    Isolated Thunderstorms. H 92° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    90°
    Afternoon
    Isolated Thunderstorms. H 92° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    82°
    Evening
    Thunderstorms. H 92° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National
Everything you need to know to prepare for hurricane season
Close

Everything you need to know to prepare for hurricane season

9 Ways to Prepare Your Home for Hurricane Season

Everything you need to know to prepare for hurricane season

Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean begins June 1 and runs until Nov. 30. Officials agree that the best way to avoid catastrophic damage is to be proactive.

"Advance planning and preparation are essential for protecting property, reducing risk and ultimately saving lives," National Weather Service officials said in the introduction the NWS hurricane guide for the Southeast.

Charley English, former director of the Georgia Emergency Management Agency/Homeland Security said in a news release from 2014: "Learn your flood risk, create a ready kit for your home and car, and develop an evacuation and family communications plan."

GEMA said in that release that research shows "69 percent of Georgians do not know designated evacuation routes from their community, and 67 percent have not arranged a family meeting place or reconnection plan."

Ready Georgia provides a host of tools and information at its website.

It recommends evacuation:

• If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Be sure to follow their instructions.

• If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure – such shelters are particularly hazardous during a hurricane no matter how well fastened to the ground.

• If you live in a high-rise building – hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.

• If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an island waterway.

• You should be able to move your valuables within 15 minutes. 

Here are more tips to help you prep for the storms, from the NWS guide.

• Elevation matters: Are you in a flood or evacuation zone?

• Mobile homes: Check tie-downs and prepare to evacuate.

• Landscaping: Always trim trees, shrubbery and dead limbs, especially close to your home.

• Roofing: Inspect it for loose tiles, etc., and clear loose or clogged gutters and drainspouts.

• Doors: Reinforce garage doors and tracks or replace with a hurricane-tested door; and reinforce double-entry doors with heavy-duty foot and head bolts. Use security dead bolts with a minimum 1-inch bolt length.

• Windows: If possible, install hurricane shutters. Alternatively, use five-eighths inch (or greater) grade exterior plywood secured by 2 1/2 inch screws and/or special clips. 

• Renters need to prepare, too: Review your renter's and flood insurance; prepare to relocate to a lower floor

• For pets: Update their vaccinations and have proof; have a current photo; have properly sized pet carriers; pack enough food and water for the duration of the evacuation; and be sure to have proper ID collars. Read more.

The NWS also recommends preparing emergency evacuation kits for functional and medical needs clients, those clients who either require support to maintain their independence or support of trained medical professionals.

• Contact information, including doctor's contact

• Special equipment, if needed; and a list with style and serial numbers of included medical devices

Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • The Orlando Police Department said the University of Florida's band director was grabbed and pushed to the ground after the football game against the Miami Hurricanes on Saturday night. Police said Director Jay Watkins was walking back to the buses when a Hurricanes fan began pushing her way through the band.  He attempted to stop the woman, but he was grabbed from behind and pushed to the ground, according to police. Watkins was treated by a paramedic for cuts and scrapes to his head and elbow before he boarded the bus to go home. Police said Watkins did not want to press charges, but did ask the incident to be documented. This is a developing story. Check back for more details.
  • A 911 call led to the arrest of a Pennsylvania woman after police said they found her son home alone surrounded by drugs. >> Read more trending news  Police said Leslie Brown, 29, of Penn Hills, called them from a Family Dollar in Lincoln-Lemington saying her son was missing and she had lost sight of him in the store. Employees told WPXI-TV that she was frantic and that they searched every aisle and back room. Police said the child was never in the store with her but was at home alone surrounded by heroin. When police went to the home, they said the boy answered the door and police immediately saw bundles of heroin and stamp bags right next to where the child said he watched TV. Police said the boy told them: 'It's Mommy's medicine. She makes it sometimes.'  Brown admitted to making and selling heroin as her only source of income, according to police. Police said they found drugs in her home and car marked 'Power trip,' 'Panda,' 'Say hello to my little friend,' and 'Playboy.'  Brown was taken into custody and charged with endangering the welfare of children and nearly a half-dozen drug charges. Police said the child is safe and now with his grandparents.
  • Police are investigating after a 12-year-old boy was found shot at a Georgia elementary school. >> Read more trending news  The Rockdale County Sheriff's Office said deputies responded around 6:30 p.m. Friday to a person shot at Peek's Chapel Elementary School.  Deputies found a 12-year-old boy with a gunshot wound. He was taken to a local hospital, where he is in the intensive care unit but stable. His identity hasn't been released.  A 15-year-old has been charged with aggravated assault and aggravated battery. The teen's identity has not been released.  WSB-TV investigative reporter Nicole Carr was in Rockdale County, digging into how the shooting could have happened. The school district released a statement saying no students or staff were on campus at the time of the shooting:  'We are deeply concerned about the incident that occurred after hours on the property of Peek's Chapel Elementary Friday night. At this time, our thoughts and prayers are with the young man who was injured. Again, this occurred after hours when no students or staff were on campus. We will assist law enforcement as needed during their investigation.' Carr learned, however, that the campus was open to the public when the shooting happened because the school grounds and basketball court are open on evenings and weekends.  Carr spoke to a neighbor, who said the basketball court was full of young people as the helicopter took off with the injured child.  Another neighbor who has a grandson at the school, Angela Glenn, said enough is enough.  'I'm just worried about these kids,' Glenn said. 'First of all, how are they getting their hands on guns so easily, you know?
  • Officials are investigating after an explicit video was shared “inadvertently and unknowingly” from a Mississippi teacher’s phone, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  According to a statement from Horn Lake police, the department received information regarding the video Wednesday.  DeSoto County Schools are conducting an investigation into the video, which reportedly showed explicit content of a teacher in the district. Police said if there was a “criminal element regarding the release of the video,” Horn Lake officers will then initiate a full investigation. School officials have not identified the teacher who was seen in the video, and the contents of the video have not been released at this time. The school district did confirm to WHBQ that the teacher involved is no longer an employee there. Again, officials told WHBQ that the video was shared without the teacher’s knowledge.
  • This is a timely update to “Watching Tropical Depression Five’s path,” published August 24 at 3:39pm Tropical Depression Five has gained enough strength to become Tropical Storm Dorian, the National Hurricane Center announced Saturday evening. Dorian is the fourth tropical storm of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season. NHC Forecasters say it could turn into a hurricane by Thursday, August 29. Forecast cone as of 8/24/2019, courtesy of the National Hurricane Center (above)  Current models show a possibility that Dorian could strengthen even further after entering the Caribbean, impacting Puerto Rico and surrounding islands as a hurricane. In the same amount of time, while Dorian is still expected to gain strength as it passes over those warmer waters, there’s also a chance that it won’t amount to much more than heavy rain and winds. The NHC has issued two advisory points at the time of this report: 1. Dorian is forecast to strengthen and could be near hurricane strength when it approaches the Lesser Antilles on Tuesday (August 27). 2. It is too soon to determine the specific timing or magnitude of impacts in the Lesser Antilles, but tropical storm or hurricane watches may be needed for a portion of the area on Sunday (August 25). We’re still days away from learning what will be the case, so we’ll keep an eye on the tropics. While you’re here, check out our hurricane guide.

Washington Insider

  • While Democrats still have over 20 major candidates competing for their party's nomination, the small 2020 GOP field has not created any concerns for the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump, as a former Tea Party Congressman announced this weekend he would take on Trump for the GOP nomination. 'He must not be re-elected,' Tea Party lawmakers turned conservative radio talk show host Joe Walsh wrote on Twitter Sunday night about President Trump. But a quick look back at Walsh's time in Congress, his attacks on President Barack Obama, and his recent change to hard-line Trump opponent didn't exactly leave political experts feeling like this was the start of something bad for Mr. Trump. On the ABC News program, 'This Week,' Walsh acknowledged that he was at the tip of the spear for Republicans in terms of pushing the party more and more to the right - creating an opening for President Trump. Also challenging the President is a former Governor of Massachusetts, William Weld - the Vice Presidential nominee of the Libertarian Party in 2016 - who has not moved the political meter against Mr. Trump. If one is looking to compare Weld, Walsh and any other GOP candidates, for a similar historical moment in modern Presidential politics, maybe you could look at 1968 when challenges built against President Lyndon B. Johnson, or in 1980, when Ted Kennedy took on President Jimmy Carter. But the difference is obvious right away - Walsh and Weld are not big names right now. Eugene McCarthy and Robert Kennedy were big names taking on LBJ. Ted Kennedy damaged Carter so much that it made Ronald Reagan's campaign that much easier. While President Trump has very strong approval ratings from Republican voters, his policies have certainly caused concerns among some in the GOP - like on tariffs - where President Trump has suddenly turned the party of free trade into the party of protectionism. 'The tariffs are attacks on the American people,' said ex-Rep. Dave McIntosh (R-IN), who now heads the conservative group Club for Growth, though McIntosh made clear he wasn't going to abandoning the President any time soon. Business groups - once a super reliable source of support for the GOP - are also increasingly going public with their concerns about the President's extra tariffs on China. 'Tariffs hurt retail,' said Matthew Shay, the head of the National Retail Federation. 'It's impossible for businesses to plan for the future in this type of environment,' the group said over the weekend. Other groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce fully support more aggressive American treatment of unfair trade practices by the Chinese - but they are worried the President's tariffs aren't the right answer. 'While we share the President’s frustration, we believe that continued, constructive engagement is the right way forward,' the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in a statement. But there's certainly been no rush to throw Mr. Trump overboard, no matter the policy differences.