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National
Coronavirus updates: First federal inmate dies from virus
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Coronavirus updates: First federal inmate dies from virus

Coronavirus outbreak: What you need to know

Coronavirus updates: First federal inmate dies from virus

Nearly 622,000 people worldwide -- including nearly 105,000 people in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. Officials are attempting to contain the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. as hospitals brace for unprecedented patient surges.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here.

Live updates for Saturday, March 28, continue below:

First federal inmate dies from virus

Update 10:17 p.m. EDT March 28: The first federal inmate in custody has died from the coronavirus, officials said on Saturday.

Patrick Jones, 49, an inmate at the Federal Corrections Institution in Oakdale, Louisiana, complained of a persistent cough March 19, CBS News reported.

While at the hospital, he tested positive March 20 for the coronavirus. Jones, who has pre-existing conditions, was put on a ventilator. He died Saturday.

He was serving a 27-year sentence for possession with intent to sell crack cocaine.

More than 10 inmates have been taken to the hospital and at least 60 others are in isolation, The New York Times reported.

Instacart employees plan strike over safety fears

Update 10:17 p.m. EDT March 28: Instacart employees are planning to strike Monday over fears that they are exposing themselves to risk of the coronavirus and are not being adequately protected or compensated by their company.

“Instacart has a well established history of exploiting its Shoppers, one that extends years back before our current crisis,” Instacart employees and Gig Workers Collective, an activist organization, wrote in a letter posted on Medium. “Now, its mistreatment of Shoppers has stooped to an all-time low. They are profiting astronomically off of us literally risking our lives, all while refusing to provide us with effective protection, meaningful pay, and meaningful benefits.”

Employees are asking for an additional $5 on each order and personal protection equipment provided at no cost, including hand sanitizer and disinfectant sprays.

It not unclear how many employees would participate. More than 200,000 people work as shoppers for the company, The New York Times reported.

The company had plans to hire thousands more amid demand for delivery while people are quarantined and isolating.

Instacart announced earlier this week new safety guidelines and said it would increase bonuses for its shoppers and extend sick and quarantine pay.

“The health and safety of our entire community – shoppers, customers and employees – is our highest priority,” the company said in a statement, KNTV reported.

66 residents at Maryland nursing home test positive for virus

Update 9:07 p.m. EDT March 28: A coronavirus outbreak has doubled the cases in Maryland after 66 residents at a nursing home tested positive for the deadly virus.

Eleven of the 66 residents at Pleasant View Nursing Home have been hospitalized, WBAL reported.

“Multiple state agencies are on the scene and working closely with the local health department & the facility to protect additional residents and staff who may have been exposed,” Gov. Larry Hogan said on social media.

There have been 10 deaths in the state.

US death toll surpasses 2,000, doubling in two days

Update 6:39 p.m. EDT March 28:  More than 2,000 U.S. citizens have died from the coronavirus as of Saturday, the death toll doubling in about 48 hours, the Washington Post reported. The time between the first confirmed death and the 1,000th was about a month.

There are nearly 120,000 confirmed cases of the virus in the U.S., according to a Johns Hopkins map.

More than 30,000 people have died from the coronavirus worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins.

Columbia Sportswear CEO cuts salary to $10,000

Update 5:59 p.m. EDT March 28: Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle has cut his salary to $10,000 while employees will continue to receive their regular pay.

At least 10 other top executives took a voluntary 15% pay cut, The Oregonian reported.

The company’s nearly 3,500 employees are receiving their regular paychecks through a “catastrophic pay” program while its stores are closed amid the coronavirus outbreak.

The stores closed March 16 and will remain shuttered at least another two weeks. Boyle was paid $3.3 million in total compensation in 2018, The Oregonian reported.

Infant in Illinois dies from virus

Update 4:24 p.m. EDT March 28: An infant less than a year old died from the coronavirus in Illinois. The child is one of 13 new deaths in the state, health officials said Saturday.

“There has never before been a death associated with COVID-19 in an infant. A full investigation is underway to determine the cause of death,” state Health Department Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said in a statement. “We must do everything we can to prevent the spread of this deadly virus. If not to protect ourselves, but to protect those around us.”

In China, a 10-month-old died from the coronavirus, the New England Journal of Medicine reported March 18.

There are 3,491 cases of the coronavirus and 47 deaths in Illinois, according to health officials.

Ireland imposes strict lockdown order

Update 3:42 p.m. EDT March 28: Ireland’s prime minister announced a lockdown with strict restrictions in the country Saturday, The New York Times reported.

“Freedom was hard-won in our country, and it jars with us to restrict and limit individual liberties, even temporarily,” Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said in an address to the nation.

As of early Saturday, Ireland had reported 2,121 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, and 22 deaths, the Times reported. From midnight until at least April 12, Ireland’s residents have been ordered to stay at home except to travel to essential jobs, medical appointments, family care or “brief” exercise, according to the newspaper.

Trump goes to Virginia, sends off Navy ship bound for NYC

Update 2:49 p.m. EDT March 28: President Donald Trump spoke in Front of the USNS Comfort in Norfolk, Virginia, on Saturday, before the Navy hospital ship before it departed for New York City.

“This great ship behind me is a 70,000-ton message of hope and solidarity to the incredible people of New York,” Trump said.

Trump said the ship would not treat patients with coronavirus, but will provide aid for people with other urgent care needs, CNN reported.

“Their mission will be to care for New Yorkers who do not have the virus but who require urgent care," Trump said. “In other words, they’ll be using this, people will be coming out of hospitals who don’t have the virus and they’ll be on this ship where they have great operating rooms and great facilities and the places in-bound, on land will be where people that have the virus will be.”

RI governor confirms 2 deaths, issues stay-at-home order

Update 2:06 p.m. EDT March 28: Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo confirmed the first two deaths in the state and issued a stay-at-home order, telling citizens they could still make necessary trips for food, gasoline or medicine, the Providence Journal reported.

Raimondo also ordered anyone entering the state by any means to self-quarantine for 14 days, she said at a news conference. The governor also said all “non-essential” retail outlets will close Monday until April 13,

“These are the first deaths and certainly will not be the last two,” Raimondo said. “This is for me and for all of us, this a reminder of the stakes that we face.”

Kansas gov. Kelly issues stay-at-home order

Update 1:32 p.m. EDT March 28: At a news conference, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly issued a stay-at-home order for the state beginning Monday at 12:01 p.m.

“As we speak, well over half of Kansas’ population falls under a local stay at home order of some kind. Even without the executive order I’m issuing today, Kansas’ most populous counties have already issued local state orders to their communities," Kelly said at the news conference. “As governor, I left these decisions to local health departments for as long as possible. But the reality is that a patchwork approach is a recipe for confusion in our statewide fight to slow the spread of coronavirus that statewide uniformity will ensure. We’re all playing by the same rules, and it would help prevent an influx of new cases for local health departments, many of which are already stretched to max.”

Cuomo: NY presidential primary moved to June 23

Update 12:39 p.m. EDT March 28: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said during a news conference that the state’s presidential primary, scheduled for April 28, will be postponed until April 28. Cuomo said the prospect of many people congregating to vote in April was not wise.

“I don’t think it’s wise to be bringing a lot of people to one location to vote,” Cuomo said. “A lot of people touching one doorknob, a lot of people touching one pen, whatever you call the new device on the ballots.”

Cuomo also extended the tax filing deadline in the state to July 15.

“This is good news for individuals, for businesses. You don’t have to file your state tax return. You file it with the federal tax return on July 15," Cuomo said. “It’s bad news for the state of New York on a parochial level. That means we receive no revenue coming in until July 15."

UN to donate 250K protective masks to hospitals in NYC

Update 12:29 p.m. EDT March 28: United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres said the organization will donate 250,000 protective face masks to medical facilities in New York City, CNN reported.

The masks will be given to medical professionals “who have been working courageously, selflessly, and tirelessly in response to the spread of COVID-19 across the boroughs in the hope that they play some small role in saving lives,” Guterres said in a statement Saturday.

UK death toll tops 1,000; Johnson tweets, ‘We’ll beat this'

Update 11:02 a.m. EDT March 28: The death toll from the coronavirus in the United Kingdom passed the 1,000 mark, according to figures released by the country’s Department of Health and Social Care. That is an increase of 260 people, with the total at 1,019, according to the BBC.

On Saturday, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeted, “We’re going to beat it, and we’re going to beat it together." Johnson tested positive for coronavirus Friday.

“Thank you to everybody who’s doing what I’m doing, working from home and stopping the virus spreading from household to household," Johnson tweeted.

Death toll surges in Spain, Italy

Update 9:31 a.m. EDT March 28Spain and Italy reported record numbers in the death tolls in their countries. Spanish officials reported 832 new deaths in the past 24 hours, bringing its total to 5,690, The New York Times reported. Spain also reported that 12,248 people have recovered from the virus, the newspaper reported.

Italian officials said 969 people have died in the past day, bringing its total to 9,134, the Times reported.

Trump approves Michigan’s request for disaster relief

Update 9:31 a.m. EDT March 28: The White House announced Saturday that President Donald Trump approved Michigan’s request for a disaster declaration.

Yesterday, President Donald J. Trump declared that a major disaster exists in the State of Michigan and ordered federal assistance to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the areas affected,” the White House said in a statement.

The declaration means federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments, the statement said. Certain private nonprofit organizations also will be eligible for emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, for areas in Michigan impacted by coronavirus.

South Korea says 3 test-kit makers win FDA preapproval

Update 8:42 a.m. EDT March 28South Korea’s foreign ministry said three test-kit makers in the country have won preapproval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The move paves the way for kits to be sent to the United StatesThe New York Times reported. The ministry did not name the manufacturers but said the preapproval, under emergency use authorization, allowed the products to be sold in the United States, the newspaper reported.

Global coronavirus deaths top 28K, worldwide cases near 608K

Update 7:35 a.m. EDT March 28: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus hit 28,125 early Saturday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally.

In the three months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 607,965 people worldwide.

• The United States has reported 104,837 confirmed cases, resulting in 1,711 deaths.

• Italy has confirmed 86,498 cases, resulting in 9,134 deaths.

• China has recorded 81,996 cases, resulting in 3,299 deaths.

• Spain has confirmed 65,719 infections, resulting in 5,138 deaths.

• Germany has reported 53,340 cases, resulting in 395 deaths.

• Iran has recorded 35,408 cases, resulting in 2,517 deaths.

• France has confirmed 33,414 infections, resulting in 1,997 deaths.

• The United Kingdom has reported 14,754 cases, resulting in 761 deaths.

• Switzerland has confirmed 13,187 cases, resulting in 240 deaths.

• South Korea has recorded 9,478 cases, resulting in 144 deaths.

Japanese PM warms of ‘explosive spread’ of coronavirus threatening urban hubs

Update 7:20 a.m. EDT March 28: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe issued a stern warning during a Saturday news conference, urging citizens to prepare for a “long-term battle” as the novel coronavirus threatens an “explosive spread” across the country.

The Washington Post, citing Japanese media coverage of the news conference, reported Abe said cases of unknown origin are spiking, especially in the urban hubs of Tokyo and Osaka.

“An uncontrollable chain of infection could lead to explosive spread somewhere,” he said.

Abe’s comments came one day after Japan recorded its largest single-day spike in new cases of 123, bringing the nationwide total to 1,499 and 49 deaths. Nearly half of those newest cases were detected in Tokyo.

New coronavirus cases spike in South Korea following steady decline

Update 5:13 a.m. EDT March 28: Following a week of significantly decreased volume, South Korea reported a spike of 146 new coronavirus infections on Saturday.

According to the nation’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the new cases bring South Korea’s total infections to 9,478, but Friday’s uptick stood in stark contrast to the fewer than 105 cases reported each day for the past week.

On a more positive note, the country’s CDC confirmed only about 4,500 coronavirus patients remain isolated for treatment, while more than 4,800 patients have been deemed recovered and discharged from isolation.

Italy’s coronavirus cases surpass those in China

Update 5:07 a.m. EDT March 28: The number of confirmed novel coronavirus cases in Italy has reached 86,498, making it the second nation in as many days to surpass China’s total of 81,946.

The United States eclipsed China’s infection total on Thursday – and currently reports slightly under 105,000 confirmed cases – but Italy’s death toll continues to climb as the outbreak ravages Europe. 

Health officials confirmed 969 virus-related deaths in Italy on Friday, alone, making it the largest single-day death toll recorded by an country since the pandemic began. To date, the nation has reported a total of 9,134 fatalities, followed by Spain with 5,138 deaths and China with 3,295.

U.S. Navy locks down Yokosuka base after sailors test positive for coronavirus

Update 3:31 a.m. EDT March 28: The U.S. Navy has ordered a lockdown of its Yokosuka base after recording its second and third cases of novel coronavirus on Friday.

The strategic Pacific base houses the Seventh Fleet.

In a video posted to Facebook, Yokosuka Capt. Rich Jarrett encouraged residents on base to remain in their quarters “maximum extent possible.”

CFAY Modified Shelter in Place Order

ATTENTION: Capt. Jarrett discusses the modified shelter in place order.

Posted by Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka on Friday, March 27, 2020
 

“This is not a time to do lawn maintenance, take the dog for a long walk or go for a run. Time outdoors should be for necessities only and should be conducted as quickly as possible,” Jarrett posted in a Saturday morning update.

Ginnie Mae poised to ease mortgage firms’ coronavirus fallout

Update 3:18 a.m. EDT March 28: Mortgage firms are bracing for the crunch when borrowers begin falling behind on their payments, and Ginnie Mae sits poised to assist them in weathering the financial fallout of he novel coronavirus pandemic, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Ginnie Mae, which already guarantees more than $2 trillion of mortgage-backed securities, told the Journal late Friday it will help companies such as Quicken Loans Inc. and Mr. Cooper Group Inc. with their anticipated cashflow interruptions. The agency will leverage a program typically reserved for natural disaster response.

Read more here.

Duke University develops N95 mask decontamination method to assist coronavirus fight

Update 3:03 a.m. EDT March 28: Duke University researchers in North Carolina have developed a method for cleaning used N95 respirator masks, CNN reported.

By Friday night, Duke’s Regional Biocontainment Laboratory team had already decontaminated hundreds of used N95 respirators without damaging them, so they can be re-worn several times, the network reported.

More importantly, the researchers published their decontamination protocol, encouraging other medical centers and research facilities to follow suit.

Specifically, the method uses vaporized hydrogen peroxide to kill microbial contaminants, CNN reported.

Read more here.

Trump issues order allowing Pentagon to reactivate former troops for coronavirus response

Update 2:40 a.m. EDT March 28: U.S. President Donald Trump issued an order late Friday allowing the Pentagon to return certain troops to active duty in response to the mounting coronavirus crisis, The Washington Post reported.

According to the Post, the order allows for the reactivation of former U.S. troops and members of the National Guard and Reserve to bolster the military’s ongoing efforts to help contain the virus’ spread.

“Generally, these members will be persons in Headquarters units and persons with high demand medical capabilities whose call-up would not adversely affect their civilian communities,” chief Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Rath Hoffman said in a statement released early Saturday morning.

Read more here.

MLB, players strike deal should coronavirus cancel 2020 baseball season

Update 2:14 a.m. EDT March 28: Major League Baseball owners and players ratified a deal Friday that sets terms should the novel coronavirus pandemic postpone or even cancel the 2020 season.

According to NPR, players will be paid $170 million in advanced salaries over the next two months, and should the season ultimately be canceled, the advances will not have to be paid back. Meanwhile, players will receive “service time” credit for an entire year even if they only play portions of the 2020 season.

The season had been slated to open Thursday and run through late October, NPR reported.

Delta offering medical volunteers free flights to emerging US coronavirus hotspots

Update 1:57 a.m. EDT March 28: Delta Air Lines announced Friday it will fly select medical workers to areas of the country hardest hit by the novel coronavirus for free.

By early Saturday morning, the company had confirmed free, round-trip Delta flights will be offered to certain medical volunteers bound for Georgia, Louisiana and Michigan during the month of April.

State-by-state breakdown of 101,242 US coronavirus cases, 1,588 deaths

Update 12:44 a.m. EDT March 28: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States soared past 104,000 across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands early Saturday morning.

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, there are at least 104,661 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 1,706 deaths. U.S. cases now outnumber those in any other nation, including the 86,498 reported in Italy and the 81,946 confirmed in China.

Of the confirmed deaths, 519 have occurred in New York, 175 Washington state and 119 in Louisiana

In terms of diagnosed cases, New York remains the hardest hit with at least 44,635 confirmed cases – more than five times any other state – followed by New Jersey with 8,825 and California with 3,801.

Five other states have each confirmed at least 3,000 novel coronavirus cases, including:

• Washington: 3,723, including 175 deaths

• Michigan: 3,657, including 92 deaths

• Massachusetts: 3,240, including 35 deaths

• Florida: 3,192, including 45 deaths

• Illinois: 3,026, including 34 deaths

Meanwhile, Louisiana, Pennsylvania and Georgia each has confirmed at least 2,000 novel coronavirus infections, while Colorado, Texas, Connecticut, Tennessee and Ohio each has confirmed at least 1,000 cases.

The figures include 21 people aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship and 49 repatriated citizens. The repatriations include 46 sickened aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship and three others retrieved from the outbreak’s epicenter in Wuhan, China.

CNN’s state-by-state breakdown – including presumptive cases – of at least 101,242 cases detected on U.S. soil is as follows:

• Alabama: 638, including 3 deaths

• Alaska: 69, including 1 death

• Arizona: 665, including 13 deaths

• Arkansas: 386, including 3 deaths

• California: 3,801, including 78 deaths

• Colorado: 1,734, including 31 deaths

• Connecticut: 1,291, including 27 deaths

• Delaware: 163, including 2 deaths

• District of Columbia: 267, including three deaths

• Florida: 3,192, including 45 deaths

• Georgia: 2,198, including 65 deaths

• Guam: 49, including 1 death

• Hawaii: 120

• Idaho: 230, including 4 deaths

• Illinois: 3,026, including 34 deaths

• Indiana: 981, including 24 deaths

• Iowa: 235, including 3 deaths

• Kansas: 202, including 4 deaths

• Kentucky: 302, including 7 deaths

• Louisiana: 2,746, including 119 deaths

• Maine: 168, including 1 death

• Maryland: 774, including 5 deaths

• Massachusetts: 3,240, including 35 deaths

• Michigan: 3,657, including 92 deaths

• Minnesota: 398, including 4 deaths

• Mississippi: 579, including 8 deaths

• Missouri: 670, including 9 deaths

• Montana: 109, including 1 death

• Nebraska: 89, including 2 deaths

• Nevada: 535, including 10 deaths

• New Hampshire: 187, including 2 deaths

• New Jersey: 8,825, including 108 deaths

• New Mexico: 191, including 1 death

• New York: 44,635, including 519 deaths

• North Carolina: 763, including 3 deaths

• North Dakota: 68, including 1 death

• Ohio: 1,137, including 19 deaths

• Oklahoma: 322, including 8 deaths

• Oregon: 414, including 12 deaths

• Pennsylvania: 2,218, including 22 deaths

• Puerto Rico: 64, including 2 deaths

• Rhode Island: 203

• South Carolina: 539, including 13 deaths

• South Dakota: 58, including 1 death

• Tennessee: 1,203, including 6 deaths

• Texas: 1,731, including 23 deaths

• U.S. Virgin Islands: 19

• Utah: 480, including 2 deaths

• Vermont: 184, including 10 deaths

• Virginia: 604, including 14 deaths

• Washington: 3,723, including 175 deaths

• West Virginia: 96

• Wisconsin: 842, including 13 deaths

• Wyoming: 70

Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Nearly 6.3 million people worldwide – including more than 1.8 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Tuesday, June 2, continue below:  708 new cases of COVID-19 reported in New Jersey Update 2:05 p.m. EDT June 2: Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey said Tuesday that 708 new coronavirus infections have been reported, raising the total number of COVID-19 cases in the state to 161,545. On social media, the governor encouraged people to continue social distancing, noting that it 'works.' “Wearing a face covering works,” he said. 'Keep it up, and we’ll get through Stage 2 of our restart and recovery.' Officials also reported 51 more deaths associated with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Tuesday, 11,770 people have died statewide of COVID-19. COVID-19 hospitalizations in North Carolina reach single-day high Update 1:45 p.m. EDT June 2: Health officials in North Carolina reported the state’s highest single-day number of hospitalizations connected to the coronavirus pandemic on Tuesday, WSOC-TV reported. Officials with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services said 716 people were hospitalized due to severe complications associated with the novel coronavirus. Officials have reported 29,889 cases of COVID-19 in North Carolina. More than 920 people statewide have died of coronavirus infections, WSOC-TV reported. >> Read more on WSOCTV.com More than 6.3M cases of COVID-19 reported worldwide Update 1:10 p.m. EDT June 2: More than 6.3 million cases of COVID-19 have been reported worldwide as of Tuesday, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University. The United States continues to lead the world with the most number of coronavirus infections reported. As of Tuesday, more than 1.8 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19. More than 105,000 people have died of the viral infection nationwide. The second-most cases in the world have been reported in Brazil, where officials had confirmed more than 526,000 cases of COVID-19 by Tuesday. 1,653 new coronavirus infections reported in the UK Update 12:25 p.m. EDT June 2: Officials in the United Kingdom reported 1,653 new coronavirus infections Tuesday, raising the country’s total number of infections to 277,985. Officials said that as of 5 p.m. local time Tuesday, the most recent date for which data was available, 39,369 people had died nationwide of COVID-19. COVID-19 cases ‘at an all-time low’ in New York, governor says Update 12 p.m. EDT June 2: Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York said Tuesday that COVID-19 cases in the state were “at an all-time low.' The governor said 58 more people have died of COVID-19 statewide. The number of new fatal cases reported one day earlier was 54. 29 new cases of COVID-19 reported in DC Update 11:15 a.m. EDT June 1: Health officials in Washington D.C. said Tuesday that 29 new coronavirus infections have been reported in the area, raising the total number of cases in the area to 8,886. Officials also announced that two more people, both aged 79, had died of COVID-19 in Washington D.C., bringing the total number of deaths in the District to 470. Americans charged, accused of violating social distancing rules in Singapore Update 11 a.m. EDT June 2: Authorities in Singapore have charged two Americans with violating the country’s social distancing rules, according to NBC News. The Americans, identified in court records obtained by NBC as Jeffrey Brown, 52, and Bao Nguyen Brown, 40, were accused of meeting with an Australian man at a restaurant on May 16 to socialize, the news network reported. If convicted, the Browns could face up to 6 months in jail and a fine of up to $7,100, according to NBC News. Stocks open higher as investors hope for economic recovery Update 9:45 a.m. EDT June 2: Stocks opened modestly higher Tuesday on Wall Street, despite deepening unrest across the U.S., as investors hope that the gradual lifting of lockdown provisions will help economies recover from the damage caused by the coronavirus outbreak. The S&P 500 rose 0.2% in the first few minutes of trading Tuesday. The gains were led by stocks that would stand to gain the most from a growing economy, including banks and industrial companies. The price of crude oil rose again, which helped energy companies. Markets in Europe and Asia also rose. Bond yields rose slightly, another sign that pessimism was ebbing among investors. Global cases near 6.3M, death toll tops 376K Update 8 a.m. EDT June 2: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus reached 376,077 early Tuesday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. In the four months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 6,294,222 people worldwide. Meanwhile, 16 nations now have total infection counts higher than China’s 84,160. The 10 nations with the highest number of infections recorded to date are as follows: • The United States has reported 1,811,277 cases, resulting in 105,147 deaths. • Brazil has recorded 526,447 cases, resulting in 29,937 deaths. • Russia has confirmed 423,186 cases, resulting in 5,031 deaths. • The United Kingdom has reported 277,738 cases, resulting in 39,127 deaths. • Spain has confirmed 239,638 cases, resulting in 27,127 deaths. • Italy has reported 233,197 cases, resulting in 33,475 deaths. • India has reported 199,785 cases, resulting in 5,610 deaths. • France has confirmed 189,348 cases, resulting in 28,836 deaths. • Germany has reported 183,771 cases, resulting in 8,557 deaths. • Peru has reported 170,039 cases, resulting in 4,634 deaths. US air travel sees slight uptick as coronavirus restrictions ease Update 7:04 a.m. EDT June 2: Air travel in the United States began crawling out of its coronavirus-imposed gridlock in May, but the road to recovery will be a long one. According to the Transportation Security Administration, nearly 949,000 passengers were screened during the past weekend, compared with only 476,000 during the first weekend of May, CNN reported. Trump administration’s coronavirus testing czar stepping down Update 6:37 a.m. EDT June 2: Adm. Brett Giroir, the Trump administration’s coronavirus testing czar, announced Monday he will step down from the post June 30. Giroir, who assumed the role in March, said during a Monday meeting of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS that he will return to his prior role as assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services, The Washington Post reported. Meanwhile, an HHS spokesperson confirmed to NPR a testing czar successor will not be named for Giroir. US coronavirus cases eclipse 1.8M, deaths top 105K Update 12:41 a.m. EDT June 2: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States climbed past 1.8 million early Tuesday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,811,357 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 105,160 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 371,711 cases and 29,917 deaths and New Jersey with 160,918 cases and 11,723 deaths. Massachusetts, with 100,805 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 7,035, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 121,234. Only 15 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each. Six other states have now confirmed at least 53,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: · California: 114,733 cases, resulting in 4,217 deaths · Pennsylvania: 76,646 cases, resulting in 5,567 deaths · Texas: 65,593 cases, resulting in 1,683 deaths · Michigan: 57,532 cases, resulting in 5,516 deaths · Florida: 56,830 cases, resulting in 2,460 deaths · Maryland: 53,327 cases, resulting in 2,552 deaths Meanwhile, Georgia, Virginia, Connecticut and Louisiana each has confirmed at least 40,000 cases; Ohio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 34,000 cases; North Carolina, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Washington and Arizona each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Iowa with 19,699; Alabama and Wisconsin each has confirmed at least 18,000 cases, followed by Mississippi with 15,752; Rhode Island and Nebraska each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases, followed by Missouri with 13,724, South Carolina with 12,148 and Kentucky with 10,046; Utah, Kansas and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases; New Mexico and Arkansas each has confirmed at least 7,000 cases, followed by Oklahoma with 6,913 and South Dakota with 5,034.. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Protests and demonstrations have led to violence in at least 30 cities across the United States in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Floyd, 46, died after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.  As of Tuesday morning, at least 40 cities across 16 states have imposed curfews.  Live updates for Tuesday, June 2 continue below:  About 300 people arrested during protests in Washington DC Update 2 p.m. EDT June 2: Authorities in Washington D.C. arrested about 300 people during protests Monday in the capitol, most for violating the city’s 7 p.m. curfew, police Chief Peter Newsham said Tuesday. Arrests were also made for burglary and rioting, Newsham said during a news conference. “We are working right now with our investigative team to compile images of anyone who was in our city over the past three or four nights who was involved in destruction of property or the throwing of missiles and the hurting of people,” he said. Law enforcement officers in the Carolinas stand in solidarity with protesters Update 1:20 p.m. EDT June 2: Law enforcement officials in North Carolina and South Carolina joined demonstrators Monday who took to the streets Monday to protest police brutality and the killing of George Floyd, WSOC-TV reported. In Columbia, South Carolina, Kershaw County Sheriff Lee Boan decided to march side-by-side with protesters. Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin also walked alongside demonstrators, according to WSOC-TV. In Fayetteville, North Carolina, there was a touching moment as police were seen kneeling in solidarity with protesters. 9 officers and 2 protesters injured, 20 arrested during protests in Pittsburgh Update 12:55 p.m. EDT June 2: Nine police officers and two protesters were injured Monday during demonstrations in Pittsburgh, according WPXI. Pittsburgh Public Safety Director Wendell Hissrich said the injured officers were evaluated and released from the hospital Monday, WPXI reported. Two protesters were also taken to the hospital with injuries that they said came from bean bags, according to the news station. Hissrich said 20 people were arrested Monday, including four people who are not from Pennsylvania, WPXI reported. >> Read more on WPXI.com Virginia governor rejects national guard request Update 12:35 p.m. EDT June 2: Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam rejected a request from Secretary of Defense Mark Esper to send between 3,000 to 5,000 of the state’s national guard to Washington D.C. as part of a massive show of force organized by the Trump administration in response to violent protests, according to Northam’s chief of staff, Clark Mercer. Mercer said Trump’s comments to governors in a phone call Monday, in which the president said most governors were “weak” and needed to “dominate” the streets, played a role in the decision. “The president’s remarks to the governors heightened our concerns about how the guard would be used,” he said. 6 Atlanta police officers charged with using excessive force during arrest of college students Update 12:15 p.m. EDT June 2: The district attorney in Fulton County, Georgia, on Tuesday charged six Atlanta police officers with using excessive force following the arrest of two college students during protests Saturday night, WSB-TV reported. Body camera footage and video posted on social media showed officers use Tasers on two students, Messiah Young and Taniyah Pilgrim, as they sat in a car Saturday before the officers dragged the pair out of the car and arrested them, according to WSB-TV. Four officers involved in the incident were charged with aggravated assault. Other charges filed against the officers include criminal damage to property and aggravated battery, according to WSB-TV. >> Read more on WSBTV.com Archdiocese of Washington criticizes St. John Paul II National Shrine for allowing Trump visit Update 11:55 a.m. EDT June 2: As President Donald Trump headed Tuesday to the St. John Paul II National Shrine, the archdiocese of Washington on issued a statement criticizing the facility for allowing the president’s visit. In the statement, Archbishop Wilton Gregory said he found it “baffling and reprehensible that any Catholic facility would allow itself to be so egregiously misused and manipulated in a fashion that violates our religious principles, which call us to defend the rights of all people even those with whom we might disagree.” His comments came after police under federal command deployed tear gas Monday to push back protesters who had gathered in Lafayette Park, across the street from the White House, where they were chanting against police brutality and Floyd’s death. “Saint Pope John Paul II was an ardent defender of the rights and dignity of human beings. His legacy bears vivid witness to that truth,” Gregory said. “He certainly would not condone the use of tear gas and other deterrents to silence, scatter or intimidate them for a photo opportunity in front of a place of worship and peace.” New York City mayor extends curfew through end of week Update 11:40 a.m. EDT June 2: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday that an 8 p.m.-to-5 a.m. curfew enacted amid protests of the killing of George Floyd will continue through the end of the week. “I am extending the curfew,” de Blasio said Tuesday after chaos broke out late Monday in midtown Manhattan and the Bronx. “We’re going to have a tough few days. We’re going to beat it back.” On Monday, an 11 p.m. curfew -- the city’s first in decades -- failed to prevent destruction as groups of people smashed their way into shops, including Macy’s flagship Manhattan store. Police said nearly 700 people were arrested and several officers were injured during the chaos Monday night and early Tuesday. Minnesota AG: ‘There is nobody who has culpability who will not be held accountable’ Update 11:30 a.m. EDT June 2: Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said Tuesday that the investigation into the killing of George Floyd is continuing with “nothing off the table.” “We’re moving expeditiously, yet we have to move carefully,” he said during an appearance Tuesday on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” He acknowledged that the pace of the investigation has frustrated some people considering many “have waited too long and been too patient over the years,” but he said that “this case must be done methodically and we are doing that right now.” Investigators are looking into whether to charge the other three officers who were with then-Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin on May 25 when he held his knee to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes as the 46-year-old pleaded for air. On Tuesday, Ellison declined to outline a timeline for charging decisions. “There is nobody who has culpability who will not be held accountable,” Ellison said on “Good Morning America.” He said he expects charges will be filed “very soon.” Biden blasts Trump over clearing protesters for church photo Update 10:55 a.m. EDT June 2: Joining widespread condemnation from Democrats, former Vice President Joe Biden blasted President Donald Trump on Tuesday for having police clear demonstrators from Lafayette Park in front of the White House on Monday so that the President could walk to a nearby church where he was photographed holding a Bible. 'The President held up the Bible at St. John's Church yesterday,' Biden said in a speech in Philadelphia. 'I just wish he opened it once in a while instead of brandishing it. If he opened it, he could have learned something.' “In addition to the Bible, the President might want to open the Constitution once in a while,” Biden added. Biden urges Congress to act on police reform: ‘No more excuses, no more delays’ Update 10:50 a.m. EDT June 2: Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday urged Congress to take action on police reform and vowed to “reverse the systemic racism” if he is elected as president. Biden said that with the upcoming election in November, “We’re in the battle for the soul of this nation.” “We can’t leave this moment thinking that we can once again turn away and do nothing. We can’t do that this time,' he said. “The moment has come for our nation to deal with systemic racism, to deal with the growing economic inequity that exists in our nation, to deal with the denial of the promise of this nation made to so many.” The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee urged Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to take action on the issues highlighted by protests nationwide sparked by the killing of George Floyd. “No more excuses, no more delays,” Biden said. “If Mitch McConnell can bring in the United States Senate to determine Trump’s unqualified judicial nominees who will run roughshod over our Constitution now, it is time to pass legislation that will bring true meaning to our constitutional promise of equal protection under the law.” Trump praises response to DC protests after tear gas used to disperse peaceful protesters Update 10:30 a.m. EDT June 2: President Donald Trump praised the response to protests Monday in Washington D.C. amid criticism over the decision to use tear gas on peaceful demonstrators gathered near the White House. “D.C. had no problems last night,” the president wrote on Twitter. “Many arrests. Great job done by all. Overwhelming force. Domination.” He also praised himself for the lack of violence during protests in Minneapolis. Earlier in the day, George Floyd’s brother, Terrence Floyd, encouraged demonstrators in the city to remain peaceful, saying that destruction was “not going to bring my brother back at all.” Police under federal command deployed tear gas Monday to push back protesters who had gathered in Lafayette Park, across the street from the White House, where they were chanting against police brutality and Floyd’s death. The sudden shift in tactics against the protesters was initially a mystery, according to The Associated Press. Then, after finishing his Rose Garden remarks, Trump emerged from the White House gates and walked through the park to St. John’s Church, where an office had been set on fire the previous night. Trump, who rarely attends church, held up a Bible and gathered a group of advisers — all white — to pose for photos. The moment was quickly decried by Trump's critics, with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo saying the president “used the military to push out a peaceful protest so he could have a photo op at a church.' “It’s all just a reality TV show for this president,' he said on Twitter. “Shameful.” Police apologize for ‘unwarranted’ tear gas deployment on protesters in Virginia Update 10:10 a.m. EDT June 2: Police in Richmond, Virginia, apologized Monday after authorities used tear gas to disperse a peaceful protest against police brutality following the death of George Floyd. In a statement posted on Twitter, police said Chief William Smith reviewed video of the situation Monday, which he called “unwarranted.” “These officers have been pulled from the field,” police said. “They will be disciplined because their actions were out side (department) protocols and directions given.” The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported police used the gas on demonstrators gathered at a statue of Robert E. Lee on Monday, about 30 minutes before the city’s 8 p.m. curfew went into effect. Video posted on social media showed protesters running as smoke and shouts filled the air. Music industry goes silent on social media for ‘Blackout Tuesday’ to protest George Floyd’s killing Update 9 a.m. EDT June 2: Members of the music industry have pledged to go silent Tuesday on social media to protest George Floyd’s death in an event dubbed “Blackout Tuesday.' Music labels and Warner Music Group, Sony Music and Universal Music Group pledged to stay silent, Rolling Stone reported. Their flagship labels also will take part, as will Def Jam Recordings, Interscope and Columbia Records, CNN reported. Television networks, sports teams and celebrities have also joined the protest. Denver police arrest man suspected of driving car into officers during weekend protest Update 7:36 a.m. EDT June 2: Denver police have arrested a man they believe drove his vehicle into three fellow officers during Saturday night protests. Anthony Knapp, 37, was arrested Sunday after the officers suffered serious injuries. According to CNN, Knapp is being held for first-degree assault and attempted first-degree assault.  According to the police department’s Statement of Probable Cause, officers were in full uniform standing next to a fully marked Denver Police vehicle when a dark sedan traveling at a 'high rate of speed swerved toward the officers and, as a result, struck three of the officers with the car,” the network reported. Rep. Seth Moulton implores military to ‘lay down your arms’ if ordered to face protesters Update 6:36 a.m. EDT June 2: Rep. Seth Moulton, a Marine veteran, is calling upon military members to “lay down your arms” if ordered by the U.S. government to confront protesters in cities across the country. The Massachusetts Democrat took to Twitter shortly after President Donald Trump vowed Monday night to deploy active-duty forces on American soil to quell nationwide protests since the death of George Floyd while in police custody. “We must therefore, with every ounce of conviction, every commitment to peace, and every glimmer of hope, join in lawful protest to overcome (Trump’s) tyranny. And if he chooses to abuse the military as a tyrant would do — to stifle dissent, suppress freedom, & cement inequality — then I call on all our proud young men & women in uniform, as a veteran & a patriot, to lay down your arms, uphold your oath, & join this new march for freedom,” Moulton tweeted. Moulton joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 2001, served four tours in Iraq and was awarded the Bronze Star. See the full Twitter thread here. NY state senator pepper sprayed, handcuffed at peaceful Monday protest, he says Update 6:06 a.m. EDT June 2: New York state Sen. Zellnor Myrie told CNN he had been protesting peacefully when police handcuffed and pepper sprayed him late Monday. “I am from Brooklyn. I happen to represent a huge swath of central Brooklyn, and when I heard there was a group of folks protesting police brutality I decided to make my way down,” Myrie told the network. Willing to offer his services as liaison between protesters and police, Myrie said he identified himself to authorities upon arriving, but none of that mattered once things escalated. “As I was obeying orders, they were telling us to back up, I was backing up. Trying to protect some of the protesters behind me. Being compliant. I started getting hit in my back by bicycles wielded by the police officers. I was pushed. I was shoved. Ultimately pepper-sprayed, and subsequently handcuffed. Simply because I was there to forcefully protest,” he told CNN, adding, “Had I not had the luxury of my title, I would have been in the system and processed, much like any of the other protesters.' Hit-and-run driver strikes NYPD sergeant Update 5:30 a.m. EDT June 2: A sergeant with the New York Police Department is in serious but stable condition Tuesday morning after being struck by a black sedan that sped away, CNN reported. NYPD Detective Adam Navarro told the network the sergeant was responding to a break-in at a Bronx pawn shop when the vehicular assault occurred. NYPD Lt. Thomas Antonetti told CNN the sergeant has suffered leg and head injuries. Indianapolis protesters, police hug, march together; BLM calls foul Update 5:03 a.m. EDT June 2: Hundreds of demonstrators squared off briefly with police in Indianapolis near the Indiana governor’s mansion after Monday night before finding common ground and marching forward together, The Washington Post reported. Although officers with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department did, at one point, fire a pepper-spray projectile toward the protesters in an attempt to disperse the crowd for violating the city’s 8 p.m. curfew, the standoff deescalated when protesters began introducing themselves to the officers, the Post reported. Within a short period, the crowd and officers began walking toward downtown, with some law enforcement personnel hugging and linking arms with demonstrators. Meanwhile, Black Lives Matter Indianapolis took exception to the display, offering its own analysis of the exchange via Twitter. Boxing great Floyd Mayweather to pay for George Floyd’s funeral Update 4:42 a.m. EDT June 2: Funeral arrangements for George Floyd in Houston will be handled by boxing champion Floyd Mayweather, ESPN reported. Family attorney Ben Crump confirmed to CNN that Floyd’s funeral is scheduled for June 9. Mayweather’s involvement was confirmed by Leonard Ellerbe, CEO of Mayweather Productions. “He’ll probably get mad at me for saying that, but yes, (Mayweather) is definitely paying for the funeral,” Ellerbe told ESPN in an emailed response. Las Vegas officer shot, 2nd involved in separate shooting as unrest envelops city Update 4:29 a.m. EDT June 2: The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department has confirmed one officer has been shot in the area of the Strip and another has been involved in a shooting in the downtown area, The Associated Press reported. The department said both shootings occurred on Las Vegas Boulevard. The condition of neither officer has been reported. 4 St. Louis police officers shot Update 3:18 a.m. EDT June 2: St. Louis police confirmed four of their own were shot early Tuesday morning after peaceful protests ended and social unrest escalated. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, most of the peaceable protesters dispersed on their own, but police did fire tear gas into the remaining crowd just before 9 p.m. Within one hour, looting and pillaging began with at least one 7-Eleven set ablaze and raided, while heavy gunfire rang through downtown after midnight, the newspaper reported. St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden, during an early-morning news conference, said two officers were shot in the leg, one was shot in the arm and one was shot in the foot. Minnesota officials: No evidence tanker driver plowed into protesters intentionally Update 2:26 a.m. EDT June 2: Bogdan Vechirko was arrested Monday and charged with assault for driving his tanker truck toward protesters in Minneapolis Sunday. By early Tuesday morning, however, Minnesota investigators walked back the initial belief that Vechirko purposefully incited a crowd of peaceful demonstrators. “We don’t have any information that makes this seem like this was an intentional act,” Minnesota Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington told CNN. “He saw the crowd, and from what it looked like, panicked.” According to jail records, Vechirko remains in police custody without bail. US military helicopter buzzes downtown DC protesters Published 2 a.m. EDT June 2: A U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopter flew just above rooftops in a downtown Washington D.C. neighborhood Monday night, employing a military tactic typically reserved for combat zones, The Washington Post reported. The helicopter flew just above rooftop level, snapping branches off trees and shattering some storefront window, the Post reported, noting the low-flying maneuver is normally performed to scare off insurgents. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Employees at a Virginia Walmart weren’t going to miss their graduation because of coronavirus. Any employee who was also attending school was honored with a graduation ceremony at their store, WHSV reported. Nineteen high school students and one college student got to walk in a ceremony to mark their accomplishments. The idea came to fruition thanks to Angela Sowers, the store’s people lead, but she said she got the inspiration from the company’s corporate office, WHSV reported. The ceremony was held in front of the store and each graduate wore a graduation cap and face masks, Northern Virginia Daily reported. They were also given a “Walmart diploma” and gifts, the newspaper reported.
  • 12:30 p.m. UPDATE: Tropical depression 3 has strengthened into Tropical Storm Cristobal in southwestern Gulf of Mexico Monday afternoon.  Over the last 24 hours, the National Hurricane Center tracked its organization over the Bay of Campeche as it slowly drifted to the West.  By Sunday, the storm is expected to have 65 mile per hour winds, but it is not expected to move very far, very fast.  The forecast for Central Florida calls for increased rain chances toward the end of the work week.
  • The current Miss America will have a longer reign than normal. Camille Schrier will wear the crown for two years because the coronavirus has forced the cancellation of the 2020 Miss America Pageant. Schrier, who has two Bachelor of Science degrees in Biochemistry and Systems Biology, is pursuing a Doctor of Pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University. She was crowned in December 2019. Pageant officials have decided to forgo a competition this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead, Miss America will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the competition in 2021. Schrier spoke to People magazine about the postponement saying, “I realized now that I’m probably going to be a “Jeopardy” question. It’s definitely incredible. As someone who is a nontraditional competitor in the Miss America organization ... it’s kind of on-brand for me to do it this way.” Schrier’s platform is to promote drug safety and abuse prevention while promoting STEM education.

Washington Insider

  • Joining widespread condemnation from Democrats, former Vice President Joe Biden blasted President Donald Trump on Tuesday for having police clear demonstrators from Lafayette Park in front of the White House on Monday, so the President could walk to a nearby church where he was photographed holding a Bible. 'The President held up the Bible at St. John's Church yesterday,' Biden said in a speech in Philadelphia. 'I just wish he opened it once in a while instead of brandishing it. If he opened it, he could have learned something.' 'In addition to the Bible, the President might want to open the Constitution once in a while,' Biden added. Biden began his speech by quoting the final words of George Floyd, the black man who was killed by a police officer in Minneapolis, who kneeled on Floyd's neck for over eight minutes. 'I can't breathe,' Biden began, as he said the nation was 'crying out for leadership.' 'That's why I'm running,' the former Vice President added. The likely Democratic Party nominee for President denounced violence in America's cities as a response to the Floyd killing, urging a conversation about the plight of minorities in America. 'There's no place for violence, no place for looting or destroying property or burning churches or destroying businesses,' Biden said. Biden's speech marked his first major campaign appearance since mid-March, when the arrival of the Coronavirus suddenly shut down the 2020 campaign. It was the third straight day that the Floyd story had drawn Biden out of his home in Delaware - where he had been sidelined by the virus outbreak. On Sunday, Biden visited the site of a protest in his home town of Wilmington and spoke with members of the black community. On Monday, Biden visited a local church, and met with black clergy from the area. 'These are difficult days for the country,' Biden said in a Monday live stream with mayors from Los Angeles, Chicago, and Atlanta, as Biden denounced the street violence around the nation. 'Violence that endangers lives, guts local businesses is no way forward,' Biden said, as he joined calls by Democrats for a more direct conversation on what led to the death of Floyd, at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer. 'What are the reforms, if any, within police departments that we should be focusing on,' Biden suggested to the mayors.