ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
77°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 92° L 75°
  • clear-night
    77°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 92° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    90°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 92° L 75°
  • cloudy-day
    82°
    Evening
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 75°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest News about Government and Politics

    The Trump administration is calling for the expanded use of family detention for immigrant parents and children who are stopped along the U.S.-Mexico border, a move decried by advocates as a cruel and ineffective attempt to deter families from coming to the United States. Immigration authorities on Friday issued a notice that they may seek up to 15,000 beds to detain families. The Justice Department has also asked a federal court in California to allow children to be detained longer and in facilities that don't require state licensing while they await immigration court proceedings. 'The current situation is untenable,' August Flentje, special counsel to the assistant attorney general, wrote in court filings seeking to change a longstanding court settlement that governs the detention of immigrant children. The more constrained the Homeland Security Department is in detaining families together during immigration proceedings, 'the more likely it is that families will attempt illegal border crossing.' The proposed expansion comes days after a public outcry moved the administration to cease the practice of separating children from their migrant parents on the border. More than 2,300 children have been taken from their parents since Homeland Security announced a plan in April to prosecute all immigrants caught on the border. In all, about 9,000 immigrants traveling in family groups have been caught on the border in each of the last three months, according to federal authorities. Immigrant advocates contend detention is no place for children and insist there are other alternatives to ensure they and their parents attend immigration court hearings, such as ankle bracelets or community-based programs. The federal court ruled several years ago that children must be released as quickly as possible from family detention. 'It is definitely not a solution under any circumstances,' said Manoj Govindaiah, director of family detention services at the RAICES advocacy group in Texas. 'At no point should a child be incarcerated, and children need to be with their parents.' Immigration and Customs Enforcement currently has three family detention facilities — a 100-bed center opened in Pennsylvania in 2001 and two much larger facilities opened in Texas in 2014. Only the Pennsylvania facility can house men, and all of the detainees at the Texas centers are women with children. In Dilley, Texas, a facility was built on a remote site that was once an old oil workers' encampment. It includes collections of cottages built around playgrounds. The other Texas center, in Karnes City, is ringed by 15-foot fences and has security cameras monitoring movements. It also offers bilingual children's books in the library, classes, TVs and an artificial turf soccer field. Inside the Karnes City center, there are five or six beds to a room typically shared by a couple of families. Cinderblock walls are painted pastel colors, said Govindaiah, who added that the facilities are run by private prison operators, not humanitarian organizations, as is the case with shelters for unaccompanied immigrant children. Currently, most families spend up to a few weeks in the facilities and are released once they pass an initial asylum screening. They are then given a date to appear before an immigration judge in the cities where they are headed to see if they qualify to stay in the country legally or will face deportation. Those who do not pass initial screenings can seek additional review in a video conference with a judge, a process that lasts about six weeks. But that's much shorter than the six months or a year many families were being held several years ago when the Obama administration began detaining mothers and children in a bid to stem a surge in arrivals on the border, Govindaiah said. At the time, many were being held until their immigration cases — not just the initial screenings — were resolved. Advocates then asked the federal court to enforce a decades-old settlement over the detention of immigrant children, and a judge ruled the children should be released as quickly as possible. The settlement is seen by advocates as a way to ensure children are placed in age-appropriate facilities and for no longer than necessary. State licensing adds another layer of oversight. 'You will have children in facilities that are entirely inappropriate for children and are not meeting child welfare standards,' said Michelle Brane, director of the migrant rights and justice program at the Women's Refugee Commission. 'They are trying to circumvent child welfare standards.' Brane said there is a viable alternative: supervised release to communities around the country. The federal Family Case Management Program — terminated under the Trump administration — compiled a perfect record of attendance by migrants at court hearings, and a 99 percent appearance record at immigration check-ins, according to a 2017 report by the Homeland Security inspector general. Just 2 percent of participants — 23 out of 954 — were reported as absconders. In Friday's notice, ICE said the family detention beds should be in state-licensed facilities and allow freedom of movement for detainees, and should preferably be located in states along the southwest border. In addition to providing private showers and educational field trips for children, the centers should appear 'child-friendly rather than penal in nature,' the agency said. ___ Associated Press writers Will Weissert in McAllen, Texas, and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.
  • Democrats in Congress pressed U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on Friday to explain the reassignments of dozens of senior agency officials, most recently Yellowstone National Park's superintendent, who was offered an unwanted transfer and then told he'd be gone in August. A group of 14 Democrats led by U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman of California asked Zinke for a briefing on the reassignments after their requests for a hearing before the House Natural Resources Committee were denied. The personnel moves have attracted scrutiny from the Interior Office of the Inspector General — the agency's internal watchdog — over complaints that many were politically motivated. The ouster of Yellowstone's Dan Wenk followed disagreements with Zinke and his staff over management of the park's bison, according to Wenk. The livestock industry in Montana, Zinke's home state, wants the park's bison herds reduced to 3,000 animals out of fear they could spread a disease to cattle. Park biologists contend the population of more than 4,000 bison is sustainable. But Zinke and his staff have said the number is too high, Wenk said, and raised concerns that Yellowstone's scenic Lamar Valley is being damaged by overgrazing. Zinke has said he's reorganizing his agency for greater efficiency. His office has refused to comment directly on the removal of Wenk and did not respond to questions about the matter on Friday. A recent investigation into 35 personnel reassignments proposed in the Interior Department under Zinke revealed that 16 senior employees viewed their moves as political retribution or punishment for their work on climate change, energy or conservation. However, the Interior Department inspector general was not able to determine if anything illegal occurred because agency leaders did not document their rationale for the moves. The Democratic lawmakers said in a letter to Zinke that Wenk had served with distinction and his pending removal from the park fit a pattern of seemingly punitive personnel moves. 'We fear the action against Mr. Wenk is intended to send a signal to other career personnel that they will be penalized if they remain loyal to the United States as opposed to a political agenda,' the lawmakers wrote. Wenk already had announced plans to retire in 2019 when his superiors told him he had to be gone in August to make way for his replacement, longtime park service official Cameron 'Cam' Sholly. Wenk said Friday that he has not yet been given a firm departure date. ___ Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MatthewBrownAP
  • I really don't care, do u? Perhaps one day first lady Melania Trump will use her own words to illuminate her fashion 'don't care' message. Until that theoretical moment, we have the memes on one of the digisphere's most perfect blank canvases: Her green $39 jacket — one so five seasons ago, no less. Tony European labels have been more Mrs. Trump's de rigueur, until Thursday's trip to a Texas center housing some of the more than 2,300 migrant children sent there after their families entered the U.S. illegally. When the first lady left Washington and returned, it was in the Zara jacket with the message heard 'round the interwebs scrawled graffiti-style in white block letters on the back. (She switched to a different jacket for the visit) It's the back, where 'I really don't care, do u?' was placed by the global mass market brand Zara, that has become social media's playground, from the compassionate to the downright raunchy. Whatever Mrs. Trump may or may not have intended — her spokeswoman declared 'it's a jacket' with 'no hidden message' — the outerwear's doctored image not only spread rapidly among those looking to sound off, but to raise money benefiting children like those the first lady visited. If Mrs. Trump's jacket, from Zara's spring-summer 2016 collection, was some sort of counter-message, or a clear diss of the 'fake news media' as her husband tweeted, the memes' clear winner is a reconfiguring to read, simply: 'I really do care, do you?' Other messages shouted on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram: 'Rise up' and 'I have no idea what I'm doing.' One was a wordy trope about the wearer's racial, sexual and immigrant background. Not all the fast-spreading, reinvented backs of jackets have been posted by detractors. Some used the military green soapbox to revisit birther theories involving former President Barack Obama. But the majority of the messages were spicy retorts, such as 'November is coming' (others went with the midterm elections instead) and 'I wore the heels on purpose,' referring to Mrs. Trump's sky-high footwear for a trip aboard Air Force One to, again, Texas after Hurricane Harvey. Jackets also read 'Robert Mueller is my hero,' ''I voted for Hillary' and 'I believe Stormy Daniels.' One used a sentiment that also fit nicely on baseball-style caps of the same fatigue green, 'Let them eat cake.' The Statue of Liberty was bandied about. A hand-drawn version shows the old gal holding the hand of a little pink-shirted girl, the other hand raised high with her torch in place. Liberty is in Mrs. Trump's jacket and declares: 'We should all care.' Celebrities got into the act, weighing in with memes and mere words. The ever-Instagram present actress Busy Philipps went DIY in a beachy top with yellow stick-on letters used by kids for their art projects spelling out, 'I care, do u?' Some politicians also did it themselves. Rep. Dina Titus, a Nevada Democrat, taped a hand-drawn sign to her back reading 'I care' and tweeted out a photo of herself next to one of Mrs. Trump boarding Thursday's plane to Texas with a personalized message: 'Hey #FLOTUS, try this on for size. #WhoWoreItBest #ICare.
  • President Donald Trump tried to cast doubt Friday on wrenching tales of migrant children separated from their families at the border, dismissing 'phony stories of sadness and grief' while asserting the real victims of the nation's immigration crisis are Americans killed by those who cross the border unlawfully. Bombarded with criticism condemning the family-separation situation as a national moment of shame, Trump came back firing, sometimes twisting facts and changing his story but nonetheless highlighting the genuine grief of families on the other side of the equation. 'You hear the other side, you never hear this side,' said Trump, standing with a dozen of what he calls the 'angel families' who lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally. He focused on the fact that young migrants separated from parents are likely to be reunited, unlike the victims of murders. 'These are the American citizens permanently separated from their loved ones. The word 'permanently' being the word that you have to think about. Permanently — they're not separated for a day or two days, these are permanently separated because they were killed by criminal illegal aliens.' Amid mushrooming bipartisan concern over depictions of terrified migrant children separated from their parents, Trump on Wednesday had abruptly reversed course and signed an executive order to overturn the policy, although up to 2,000 children are still believed to be separated from their parents. But that rare moment of public capitulation was brief from the president, who laced his remarks at a rally in Minnesota that night with hardline immigration rhetoric that continued Friday. In a tweet, the president raised questions about whether the migrants' hardships really existed. 'We must maintain a Strong Southern Border,' the president tweeted. 'We cannot allow our Country to be overrun by illegal immigrants as the Democrats tell their phony stories of sadness and grief, hoping it will help them in the elections. Obama and others had the same pictures, and did nothing about it!' Trump's suggestion that the stories were erroneous was likely fueled by revelations Friday about one of the defining images to this point in the crisis, a 2-year-old Honduran girl crying as her mother was stopped by a Border Patrol agent. But the girl in the photograph, who ended up on the cover of Time Magazine this week, was not separated from her mother but detained with her, the child's father told the Daily Mail. Time Magazine said it stood by the image because it captures 'the stakes of this moment.' Trump has long chafed at the media's treatment, his fury only growing in the past week when he felt that he did not receive proper credit for his summit in Singapore with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. He told the Trinity Broadcasting Network, in an interview with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee set to air Saturday, that he found the news coverage 'almost treasonous.' Some conservatives seized hold of the migrant photo faux pas to attack the media, and White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted, 'It's shameful that dems and the media exploited this photo of a little girl to push their agenda.' Other Trump allies have gone even further. Ann Coulter, a conservative pundit, said Sunday in an interview on Fox News that kids at the border were 'actor children' who were 'given scripts to read by liberals.' Coulter then turned to the camera and said to Trump, 'Don't fall for it.' A number of Democrats aggressively pushed back against Trump's claims. Rep. Peter Welch of Vermont said Friday that Trump's assertion was 'bizarre' and that the border patrol processing center he visited in Texas in recent days was 'nothing short of a prison.' As part of his defense for his zero tolerance border crossing policy, Trump has frequently pointed to — and exaggerated — the threat posed by members of the violent gang MS-13 who have entered the United States. In what was likely not a coincidence, the Justice Department on Friday unsealed an indictment charging 11 suspected MS-13 gang members in connection with the killings of two teens in Virginia. All the suspects were from El Salvador. But the central piece of Trump's attempts to counter-program against the despairing images at the border was to stand with the 'angel families,' as he did repeatedly during his presidential campaign, including at the 2016 Republican National Convention. At the somber event at the White House complex on Friday, Trump introduced the families, who delivered heartbreaking tales of their loved ones' lives and, at times, gruesome descriptions of their deaths. Many of them held large photos of their loved ones, some of which the president autographed. Trump said that one of the victims looked like the actor Tom Selleck. 'Your loss will not have been in vain,' Trump said. 'We will secure our borders, and we will make sure that they're properly taken care of.' The president also rattled off a litany of statistics that indicated that illegal immigrants commit violent crimes at a far higher rate than U.S. citizens, saying 'you hear it's like they're better people than what we have, than our citizens. It's not true.' But his assertion has been contradicted by a number of studies, including one by the Cato Institute and another in the journal Criminology that found that places with higher percentages of undocumented immigrants do not have higher rates of crime. A Homeland Security report said there were 972 calls reporting crimes to its Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement hotline from April 26 through Sept. 30 last year. The hotline handled a total of 4,602 calls including general comments. The report said some of the calls were made for victim impact statements that lead to the deportation of someone who commits a crime. Victims also testified in immigration court proceedings, and their calls led to the arrest and detention of others. At the event, Trump also bashed 'the mayor of San Diego' for warning citizens about immigration agent raids. But the mayor of San Diego, Kevin Faulconer, is a Republican who did not provide a tip; a mayor who did was Libby Schaaf, a Democrat from Oakland,. ___ Lemire reported from New York. Associated Press writer Colleen Long contributed. ___ Follow Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire
  • President Donald Trump's former longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen retweeted a photo of himself with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a TV show to hunt down recordings of the president, fueling speculation Friday that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. Last month, Vice Media announced that Arnold would be featured in a new show called 'The Hunt for the Trump Tapes' and would investigate rumored recordings of the president. Arnold told NBC News on Friday that he met with Cohen at the Lowes Regency Hotel in Manhattan and they discussed the new show. 'We've been on the other side of the table and now we're on the same side,' Arnold told NBC. 'It's on! I hope he (Trump) sees the picture of me and Michael Cohen and it haunts his dreams.' Arnold tweeted the photo with Cohen and the caption 'I love New York' on Thursday night and Cohen retweeted it without comment. Later Friday, Cohen tweeted that he had a 'chance, public encounter' in the hotel's lobby and that Arnold asked to take a selfie. 'Not spending the weekend together, did not discuss being on his show nor did we discuss @POTUS. #done #ridiculous,' Cohen tweeted. The idea for the show, which is set to air on Viceland later this year, came about after the release of the 'Access Hollywood' tape during the 2016 presidential election, which captured Trump bragging about grabbing women's genitals. In announcing the show last month, Vice said Arnold would 'draw on his high-profile network of celebrity friends, entertainment executives, and crew members he's met over more than 35 years in showbiz to dig for evidence on Trump's most incriminating moments.' 'I say to Michael: 'Guess what? We're taking Trump down together,' and he's so tired he's like, 'OK,' and his wife is like, 'OK, (expletive) Trump,'' Arnold told NBC. Arnold tweeted Friday to clarify that it was him who said he was teaming with Cohen to 'take down' Trump and that Cohen was not being paid by Vice. Cohen replied, 'Thank you Tom for correcting the record.' For more than a decade, Cohen was Trump's personal lawyer and fixer, and he has long been a key power player in the Trump Organization and a fixture in Trump's political life. He regularly threatened lawsuits against those who could pose a challenge to Trump, and a day before the FBI raided his office and hotel room, he tweeted, 'I will always protect my POTUS.' Last week, Trump said he hadn't spoken with Cohen 'in a long time' and said, 'He's not my lawyer anymore, but I always liked Michael.' Cohen is under investigation by federal officials in New York. His home, office and hotel room were raided by the FBI in April as part of a probe into his business dealings. Investigators are also looking into a $130,000 payment made as part of a confidentiality agreement with porn actress Stormy Daniels, who alleges she had an affair with Trump in 2006, which Trump denies. She is suing both Cohen and Trump in an attempt to invalidate the nondisclosure agreement. Daniels' former attorney, Keith Davidson, has sued Cohen and alleges he illegally recorded their telephone calls when Davidson represented Daniels. The lawsuit, filed earlier this month in Los Angeles, provided no proof to substantiate the claims and no details on exactly when the calls were recorded. ___ Submit a confidential tip to The Associated Press at www.ap.org/tips .
  • Donald Trump Jr. urged Montana Republicans to rally against U.S. Sen. Jon Tester in the fall election and said Friday that the two-term Democrat had fallen out of step with the state's voters on issues ranging from immigration to gun control. Tester came into the crosshairs of President Donald Trump after releasing allegations in the spring that derailed the White House's Veterans Affairs nominee, Ronny Jackson. Speaking at the Montana Republican Party's annual convention in Billings, the president's son warned that Democrats are highly motivated heading into the November election — but suggested Tester remains vulnerable. Trump Jr alleged that Tester was 'all for illegal immigration, all for sanctuary cities' and was 'writing and proposing legislation against the second amendment.' 'I'm the son of a billionaire from New York City and I have much more of a Montana platform than the senator, the senior senator from this state. That doesn't make much sense,' Trump Jr. told the crowd of several hundred Republicans. He was joined onstage by U.S. Sen. Steve Daines, U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte and Republican senate candidate and State Auditor Matt Rosendale, who is challenging Tester this fall. Rosendale touted his strong support for Trump's agenda and said Tester was being 'corrupted by the swamp' in Washington, D.C. Rosendale prevailed in a four-way primary election on June 5 after outside political groups spent several million dollars promoting his candidacy and attacking his Republican opponents. The heavy spending signaled that wealthy Republican donors have found in Rosendale a candidate they believe capable of toppling Tester, a farmer from Big Sandy who won two previous senate races by relatively narrow margins. Trump captured Montana by 20 percentage points in 2016. Tester drew President Trump's ire in April by releasing allegations that VA nominee Ronny Jackson overprescribed drugs and got drunk on duty White House aides said in the aftermath of Jackson's withdrawal that Trump intends to campaign in Montana. No visit has been formally announced but U.S. Sen. Steve Daines said Friday that he expects it to happen. Tester has not backed away from the actions he took against Jackson and said in a recent interview that he would welcome a trip by the president to Montana. 'I did my job as a U.S. senator. We vetted him (Jackson) we asked questions, we didn't get any answers and he pulled out,' Tester said. 'I hope (President Trump) comes to Montana. I really do. I hope he comes and looks at some of the veterans clinics we have, here some of the infrastructure needs and some of the border security challenges we have on our Northern border.' ___ Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MatthewBrownAP
  • The U.N. says Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is expected to meet with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to discuss 'issues of mutual concern' that will likely include the Middle East peace process and North Korea. U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq says the meeting is scheduled for Saturday in Washington, where Guterres also plans to attend a Portuguese-American event. The U.S. State Department didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. The meeting comes as Guterres urges the U.S. to rethink plans announced this week to withdraw from the U.N. Human Rights Council. Washington calls the council biased against Israel. Meanwhile, a U.N. General Assembly committee is meeting Monday about financing the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugees after a U.S. decision to withhold aid. The U.S. had been the largest donor.
  • In a fresh reminder that political cooperation is not dead on Capitol Hill, the House on Friday overwhelmingly approved a sweeping package of over fifty bipartisan bills to address the misuse of prescription opioid pain medicine, as lawmakers voted to expand a variety of services under Medicare and Medicaid to deal with the drug scourge. “We can do things when we put partisan politics aside and work together,” said Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), one of a number of lawmakers who touted various provisions in the sweeping opioids measure. “This particular bill, H.R. 6, is the crown jewel of all that legislation,” said Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX). “This legislation will strengthen our efforts to advance treatment and recovery issues, and bolster the fight against deadly and illicit drugs,” said Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA). Today’s SUPPORT bill fights the #OpioidCrisis by Advancing treatment and recovery programs Improving prevention efforts Providing resources to communities Fighting deadly drugs like fentanyl We won’t stop until we’ve ended this epidemic. pic.twitter.com/1lwSUVfE6R — Paul Ryan (@SpeakerRyan) June 22, 2018 “This is a big deal in the fight against the largest public health crisis in our country,” said Speaker Paul Ryan. “Mr. Speaker, so often we hear about the partisan wrangling in Congress and clearly there are dividing lines on some high-profile issues,” said Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA). “But this an issue where Republicans and Democrats have come together.” The final vote was 396-14. The bill now goes to the Senate. “Currently, Medicare doesn’t cover opioid treatment programs,” said Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA). “These bills are pieces of a large, complex puzzle. We need to find realistic solutions with long term outcomes.”
  • The Latest on America's disputes with its trading partners (all times local): 3:05 p.m. A trade association representing a dozen automakers doing business in the United States says President Donald Trump's threat to slap 20 percent tariffs on vehicles imported from Europe is 'not the right approach.' The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers says in a statement that it understands that the administration is trying to level the playing field but that 'tariffs raise vehicle prices for our customers, limit consumer choice and invite retaliatory action by our trading partners.' The group, whose members include European automakers BMW, Volkswagen, Jaguar-Land Rover, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volvo, says automakers favor reducing trade barriers and 'achieving fairness through facilitating rather than inhibiting trade.' ___ 11:55 a.m. Germany's powerful auto lobby group is warning against an escalation of the trade dispute with the United States after President Donald Trump's latest threat to raise tariffs on imported cars. The German Association of the Automotive Industry cautions that 'a further escalation of the trade dispute helps nobody.' It says in a statement: 'The German auto industry calls for continued talks with the United States, despite the current difficult situation, in order to strengthen trans-Atlantic relations and solve existing problems.' It adds that a trans-Atlantic agreement that conforms to the rules of the World Trade Organization 'could be a possible pathway.' ___ 10:44 a.m. President Donald Trump is threatening to slap a 20 percent tariff on cars from the European Union. In a tweet Friday, Trump complains about EU trade barriers and vowed 'if these Tariffs and Barriers are not soon broken down and removed, we will be placing a 20% Tariff on all of their cars coming into the U.S. Build them here!' The EU has just slapped tariffs on $3.4 billion in U.S. products, ranging from bourbon to motorcycles, in retaliation for Trump's decision to tax imported steel and tariffs. Trump has already directed U.S. trade officials to study whether auto imports pose a threat to national security that would justify hitting them with tariffs or quotas.
  • Police generally need a warrant to look at records that reveal where cellphone users have been, the Supreme Court ruled Friday in a big victory for privacy interests in the digital age. The justices' 5-4 decision marks a big change in how police may obtain information that phone companies collect from the ubiquitous cellphone towers that allow people to make and receive calls, and transmit data. The information has become an important tool in criminal investigations. Chief Justice John Roberts, joined by the court's four liberals, said cellphone location information 'is detailed, encyclopedic and effortlessly compiled.' Roberts wrote that 'an individual maintains a legitimate expectation of privacy in the record of his physical movements' as they are captured by cellphone towers. Roberts said the court's decision is limited to cellphone tracking information and does not affect other business records, including those held by banks. He also wrote that police still can respond to an emergency and obtain records without a warrant. But the dissenting conservative justices, Anthony Kennedy, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch, cast doubt on Roberts' claim that the decision was limited. Each wrote a dissenting opinion and Kennedy said in his that the court's 'new and uncharted course will inhibit law enforcement' and 'keep defendants and judges guessing for years to come.' Roberts does not often line up with his liberal colleagues against a unified front of conservative justices, but digital-age privacy cases can cross ideological lines, as when the court unanimously said in 2014 that a warrant is needed before police can search the cellphone of someone they've just arrested. The court ruled Friday in the case of Timothy Carpenter, who was sentenced to 116 years in prison for his role in a string of robberies of Radio Shack and T-Mobile stores in Michigan and Ohio. Cell tower records spanning 127 days, which investigators got without a warrant, bolstered the case against Carpenter. Investigators obtained the records with a court order that requires a lower standard than the 'probable cause' needed for a warrant. 'Probable cause' requires strong evidence that a person has committed a crime. The judge at Carpenter's trial refused to suppress the records, finding no warrant was needed, and a federal appeals court agreed. The Trump administration said the lower court decisions should be upheld. The American Civil Liberties Union, representing Carpenter, said a warrant would provide protection against unjustified government snooping. 'This is a groundbreaking victory for Americans' privacy rights in the digital age. The Supreme Court has given privacy law an update that it has badly needed for many years, finally bringing it in line with the realities of modern life,' said ACLU attorney Nathan Freed Wessler, who argued the Supreme Court case in November. The administration relied in part on a 1979 Supreme Court decision that treated phone records differently than the conversation in a phone call, for which a warrant generally is required. The earlier case involved a single home telephone and the court said then that people had no expectation of privacy in the records of calls made and kept by the phone company. 'The government's position fails to contend with the seismic shifts in digital technology that made possible the tracking of not only Carpenter's location but also everyone else's, not for a short period but for years and years,' Roberts wrote. The court decided the 1979 case before the digital age, and even the law on which prosecutors relied to obtain an order for Carpenter's records dates from 1986, when few people had cellphones. The Supreme Court in recent years has acknowledged technology's effects on privacy. In 2014, Roberts also wrote the opinion that police must generally get a warrant to search the cellphones of people they arrest. Other items people carry with them may be looked at without a warrant, after an arrest. Roberts said then that a cellphone is almost 'a feature of human anatomy.' On Friday, he returned to the metaphor to note that a phone 'faithfully follows its owner beyond public thoroughfares and into private residences, doctor's offices, political headquarters, and other potentially revealing locales.' As a result, he said, 'when the government tracks the location of a cell phone it achieves near perfect surveillance, as if it had attached an ankle monitor to the phone's user.' Even with the court's ruling in Carpenter's favor, it's too soon to know whether he will benefit from Friday's decision, said Harold Gurewitz, Carpenter's lawyer in Detroit. The Cincinnati-based 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will have to evaluate whether the cellphone tracking records can still be used against Carpenter under the 'good faith' exception for law enforcement — evidence should not necessarily be thrown out if authorities obtained it in a way they thought the law required. There also is other evidence implicating Carpenter that might be sufficient to sustain his conviction.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Nearly a year after the drowning death of a Brevard County man, the State Attorneys office announced  Friday, there will be no criminal charges against a group of teens who mocked the man and recorded his death. Jamel Dunn, 31, of Cocoa, died in July 2017. Dunn’s body was found in a pond at Bracco Pond Park days after he had died.  Four teenagers and one adult were initially charged weeks after Dunn's death with failure to report a death. Cocoa Police acknowledged at the time that it would be difficult to make the charges stick because the Florida statute had never been applied in a similar instance.  A Florida state legislator later created a good Samaritan bill that would have made it a crime not to render aid to someone in need, but it was not passed by lawmakers.
  • Republican leaders have delayed a vote on a compromise immigration reform bill until next week, hoping to rally more support for the measure even as President Donald Trump casts doubt on its chances of success. >> Read more trending news Update 4 p.m. EDT June 22: Officials with Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a notice Friday that said it might seek as many as 15,000 beds to detain immigrant families. The notice came days after Trump signed an executive order that ended his administration’s policy of separating migrant children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. Hundreds of children have been separated from their parents as a result of the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, which prompted authorities to separate children from adults who were being prosecuted for illegally coming into the country. The agency has about 3,300 beds for immigrant parents and their children in family detention facilities. The notice came amid a scramble by federal agencies to find space for immigrants. Official with the Pentagon said officials were also drawing up plans to house up to 20,000 unaccompanied children on military bases. Update 12:05 p.m. EDT June 22: Experts with the United Nations’ Human Rights Office said Friday that the executive order signed this week by Trump is inadequate to address the separation of migrant children and parents at the border. Officials with the U.N. called for the U.S. “to release these children from immigration detention and to reunite them with their families based on the best interests of the child and the rights of the child to liberty and family unity.” The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of entering the country illegally. The enforcement plan led authorities to separate children from adults who were detained as part of immigration proceedings. The executive order signed Wednesday by the president ended his administration’s family separation policy, but U.N. officials noted that no mention was made of the fate of children already separated from their parents as a result of the enforcement push. Authorities have said efforts are being made to reunite parents and children, although details about those efforts were not immediately available. Update 10:00 a.m. EDT June 22: President Donald Trump on Friday morning accused the Democrats of telling “phony stories of sadness and grief” and wielding the immigration issue for political gain in a series of tweets calling for immigration reform. >> What does the new executive order on immigration do; can migrants be held indefinitely? “We must maintain a Strong Southern Border,” Trump wrote. Earlier Friday he said America “has pathetically weak and ineffective Immigration Laws” and accused the Democrats once more of obstructing efforts to address immigration. The House is set to vote next week on a Republican immigration reform bill after a more conservative measure failed Thursday. It was unclear whether the bill would be successful. Update 7:34 a.m. EDT June 22: A senior Trump administration official told the Associated Press that approximately 500 of the more than 2,300 children separated from families at the border have been reunited since May. But the official did not specify if the children remained detained with their families or if they have been released, the AP reported.  The official, who spoke with AP on the condition of anonymity, said that many parents and children were reunited after a few days. But some parents have told reporters that they don’t know where their children are and can’t get answers from officials. Some say mothers were deported without their children, the AP reported. After Republicans delayed the vote on immigration reform plans, President Donald Trump posted on Twitter Friday morning, telling lawmakers to wait until November to take on the bill, Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree reported.  Trump also called Democrats obstructionists who won’t give the bill the 10 votes needed to pass. >>From Jamie Dupree: Trump: GOP should give up on immigration until after 2018 elections Update 9:30 p.m. EDT June 21: Despite President Donald Trump’s executive order on Wednesday rescinding his own policy of separating migrant children from their families during illegal border crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border, multiple states are suing the Trump administration over the policy, according to The Hill. The states involved in the lawsuit contend the executive order does not solve the problems created by the separation of  families, The Hill reported. Democratic attorneys general from Washington state, Maryland and Massachusetts, among others, contend the administration “violated the due process rights of parents and children who were separated.” The lawsuit was expected to be filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Washington state. Some 2,300 children have been separated from their families during the past six weeks the administration has been enforcing its “zero tolerance” policy. Update 7:30 p.m. EDT June 21: President Donald Trump is criticizing Democrats for their opposition to the hard-line Goodlatte immigration bill, which was defeated in the U.S. House Thursday. Tweeting that “they won’t vote for anything,” the president complained that Democrats are blocking reform. “You cannot pass legislation on immigration whether it be for safety and security or any other reason including “heart,” without getting Dem votes. Problem is, they don’t care about security and R’s do,” Trump tweeted Thursday night. Update 7:00 p.m. EDT June 21:  House Republicans are delaying a vote on a so-called compromise immigration measure until next week, according to The Associated Press. A vote on the legislation was first rescheduled from Thursday until Friday after another, more severe immigration measure was defeated. Republican leaders reportedly hope they can get more support for the compromise measure by delaying the vote. Update 5:00 p.m. EDT June 21: The more conservative of two immigration bills in the U.S. House of Representatives went down in defeat Thursday as 41 Republicans joined the Democrats in a 231-193 vote against the measure, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.  The hard-line measure called for extreme limits on legal immigration and only temporary protections for “Dreamers,” who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children by their parents. The second bill is seen as more of a compromise measure, but it’s unclear if Republican leadership can manage to get the votes needed to pass it on Friday, and even if they do, it faces an even bigger hurdle in the Senate, where Republicans don’t have the votes to pass an immigration bill on their own. They’ll need Democrats’ support to get it done. The Washington Post is reporting an important House moderate in the immigration debate, Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) has said he won’t support the compromise measure. Hurd has said he opposes the measure because it includes funding for a border wall, a campaign promise Trump made to supporters during the 2016 presidential campaign. He called the proposed wall “an expensive and ineffective 4th century border security tool that takes private property away from hundreds of Texans,” according to the Post. Update 2:45 p.m. EDT June 21:  The Justice Department has asked a federal judge to change the rules around the detention of child migrants one day after the president ended his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the border, The Associated Press reported. Officials aim to change rules governed by the Flores settlement, which requires the government to release children from custody after 20 days to their parents, adult relatives or other caretakers, in order of preference. >> Time cover: Photo of little girl crying at border, Trump illustrates immigration debate The move is aimed at stopping the separation of children from their families amid a new policy where anyone caught crossing the border is charged criminally. Update 2:25 p.m. EDT June 21: The House of Representatives on Thursday rejected one of two proposed GOP immigration reform bills, according to Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree. Meanwhile, aides said the House will wait until Friday to vote on a second immigration bill, The Associated Press reported. Update 1:18 p.m. EDT June 21: Trump discussed the need for immigration reform during a cabinet meeting Thursday, citing national security concerns. Update 12:20 p.m. EDT June 21: First lady Melania Trump is making an unannounced visit to the U.S.-Mexico border Thursday. Melania Trump was in Texas on Thursday morning and planned to tour two facilities holding child immigrants, CNN reported. She previously spoke out against the policy of separating migrant children and parents at the border. 'Mrs. Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform,' said her spokeswoman, Stephanie Grisham, according to CNN. 'She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws, but also a country that governs with heart.' The Trump administration policy was ended Wednesday by an executive order from the president. >> Photos: Melania Trump visits facilities for migrant children in Texas Update 12:10 p.m. EDT June 21: House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday called a pair of proposed Republican immigration reform bills a “compromise with the devil.” She said that the bills make Republicans complicit in Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy. The policy, which directs prosecutors to pursue cases against any person suspected of coming to the country illegally, resulted in the separation of hundreds of children from their parents at the border. Update 11:55 a.m. EDT June 21: House Speaker Paul Ryan said officials are working on reuniting families that have been separated in recent weeks at the border. “I believe (the Department of Homeland Security) is working on that,” Ryan said Thursday at a news briefing. “We obviously want to have families reunited.” >> Airlines taking stand in immigration crisis, refusing to fly separated migrant children He said DHS officials are working with the Department of Health and Human Services to bring the families back together. “What we’re trying to do is put the families at the head of the queue so they can be adjudicated faster,” he said. The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents were separated from their children as they faced prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. >> First lady Melania Trump makes unannounced visit to child migrant detention center Trump ended the policy Wednesday with an executive order days after he first started calling on Congress to stop the separations through legislation. The House is set to vote Thursday on a pair of Republican immigration reform bills, although neither appeared likely to succeed. Original report: “The Border has been a big mess and problem for many years,” Trump wrote. “At some point (Senate Minority Leader Chuck) Schumer and (House Minority Leader Nancy) Pelosi, who are weak on Crime and Border security, will be forced to do a real deal, so easy, that solves this long time problem.” The president’s tweet comes one day after he ended his administration’s much-derided policy of separating migrant children from parents at the border and as the House readies to debate and vote on a pair of Republican immigration reform bills. >> Trump signs executive order ending migrant family separations It was not immediately clear whether the bills would be successful. House Republican leaders were still trying Thursday morning to build support for one negotiated among conservative and moderate factions of the GOP, although the measure is unlikely to pick up much, if any, Democratic support.  >> From Jamie Dupree: House to vote on two GOP immigration bills – both may fail Ahead of the planned vote, the president accused Democrats of “only looking to Obstruct” the immigration bills in order to gain political clout ahead of the mid-term elections. “What is the purpose of the House doing good immigration bills when you need 9 votes by Democrats in the Senate, and the Dems are only looking to Obstruct (which they feel is good for them in the Mid-Terms),” Trump wrote Thursday morning in a tweet. “Republicans must get rid of the stupid Filibuster Rule-it is killing you!” >> Trump ends migrant family separations: Read the executive order Trump signed an executive order Wednesday to end his administration’s policy of separating migrant children from parents suspected of coming to the country illegally at the border. The controversial policy was a result of Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement push announced in April. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A man who as a teenager participated in a terrifying killing spree that left more than a dozen people dead has been granted a new sentencing hearing in Virginia. Lee Boyd Malvo, now 33, was sentenced in 2004 to life in prison without the possibility of parole for a series of four murders he and John Allen Muhammad committed as the Beltway snipers. Malvo was just 17 at the time of the slayings, and Muhammad, his mentor, was 41.  The snipers terrorized the greater Washington, D.C., area during a three-week span in 2002 that saw them kill four people and injure three others in Virginia. Another six people were gunned down in the Maryland suburbs in that same time frame.  The pair was captured in October 2002 as they slept at a rest stop in a Chevy Caprice they had modified so they could fire a rifle, undetected, through a hole in the car’s trunk. The Washington Post reported that Muhammad and Malvo were tied to another 11 shootings across the country, five of them deadly.  In the years since Malvo’s and Muhammad’s convictions, and Muhammad’s subsequent 2009 execution for his Virginia crimes, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that defendants who committed serious crimes while under the age of 18 cannot be sentenced to death. They also cannot be sentenced to a mandatory sentence of life in prison without parole, the ruling stated. The new laws became retroactive in 2016, meaning that sentences of death or life without parole that were legal at the time they were handed down could now be vacated.  A three-member panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled on Thursday that Malvo falls into that category and vacated his four life sentences. His case has been remanded to a lower court for resentencing.  >> Read more trending news “To be clear, the crimes committed by Malvo and John Muhammad were the most heinous random acts of premeditated violence conceivable, destroying lives and families and terrorizing the entire Washington, D.C., metropolitan area for over six weeks, instilling mortal fear daily in the citizens of that community,” Judge Paul Niemeyer wrote in the ruling. “But Malvo was 17 years old when he committed the murders, and he has the retroactive benefit of new constitutional rules that treat juveniles differently for sentencing. “We make this ruling not with any satisfaction but to sustain the law. As for Malvo, who knows but God how he will bear the future.” See the appeals court’s entire ruling below.  The order for a new sentencing applies only to Malvo’s Virginia crimes. He also pleaded guilty to six murders in Maryland, where he was given six life sentences.  Thursday’s ruling does not affect his prison time in Maryland, according to The Washington Post. A Montgomery County judge last August upheld those sentences because they were not mandatory life terms.  A spokeswoman for Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring told the Post that his staff attorneys plan to “review the decision closely and decide how best to proceed in a way that ensures this convicted mass murderer faces justice for his heinous crimes.” The attorney general can either ask the entire appeals court for a rehearing, appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court or go forward with the new sentencing hearing. If the sentencing hearing goes forward, Malvo could still be sentenced to life in prison. The appeals court ruling indicated that it depends on whether the district court finds that Malvo’s crimes reflected “permanent incorrigibility” or the “transient immaturity of youth.” The appeals court’s ruling listed a timeline of most of Malvo and Muhammad’s crimes: Sept. 5, 2002: Malvo shot a pizza restaurant owner six times in Clinton, Maryland, and stole the man’s cash and laptop. The man survived and, according to the FBI, his laptop, which was found in the snipers’ car when they were captured, was used to plot out attack sites and getaway routes.  Sept. 15, 2002: Malvo shot a man in Clinton as the victim closed a liquor store for the night. Sept. 21, 2002: Muhammad used a high-powered Bushmaster rifle to target two women closing down a liquor store in Montgomery, Alabama. Claudine Parker, 52, was killed and her coworker, Kellie Adams, was wounded by a gunshot to the back of her neck and into her jaw. Adams told The New York Times shortly after the shooting that she thought she had been struck by lightning. Witnesses, including two police officers, spotted a man rifling through the women’s purses before escaping during a short foot chase, the Times reported.  A blue sedan was also spotted near the scene, which helped lead investigators to the snipers after Malvo’s fingerprint, found on the page of a magazine he dropped in Montgomery, identified him as a suspect.  Sept. 23, 2002: A Baton Rouge, Louisiana, woman, identified as 45-year-old Hong Im Ballenger, was killed as she closed the store where she worked. Again, witnesses later placed Malvo at the scene, fleeing with the victim’s purse.  Oct. 2, 2002: Back in the D.C. area, the snipers shot and killed James Martin, 55, in a Montgomery County, Maryland grocery store parking lot.  Oct. 3, 2002: Five people were gunned down, four at different sites in Montgomery County and a fifth in Washington, D.C. James “Sonny” Buchanan, 39, was killed as he mowed some grass; taxi driver Prem Kumar Walekar, 54, was killed while gassing up his cab; Sarah Ramos, 34, was killed as she sat on a bus bench and read a book; Lori Ann Lewis-Rivera, 25, was killed as she vacuumed her van at a gas station.  The four Montgomery County victims were killed in the morning within a span of about two hours, according to authorities. Around 9:20 p.m. that same night, Pascal Charlot, 72, was shot while walking in D.C.  Oct. 4, 2002: A woman was shot and seriously wounded as she loaded goods into her car in a Spotsylvania County, Virginia, parking lot. Oct. 7, 2002: A 13-year-old boy was shot and wounded in Prince George’s County, Maryland, as he went to school.  Oct 9, 2002: The snipers shot and killed Dean Harold Myers, 53, as he put gas in his vehicle at a Prince William County, Virginia, gas station. Oct. 12, 2002: The snipers killed FBI analyst Linda Franklin, 47, outside a Home Depot in Fairfax County, Virginia. Oct. 19, 2002: They shot and seriously injured a man leaving a restaurant in Ashland, Virginia. Oct. 22, 2002: The snipers shot and killed bus driver Conrad Johnson, 35, in Montgomery County. The bus driver, who was gunned down as he stood on the steps of his bus, was the last of their victims.  Oct. 24, 2002: The pair was apprehended at a rest stop in Frederick County, Maryland.  The shootings on the appeals court’s list are not all of the crimes that Malvo and Muhammad have been linked to, and Malvo has said that the pair shot more people than those investigators have identified.  Malvo told Virginia investigators after his arrest that he and Muhammad, who he considered his father, acted as a sniper team in order to extort $10 million from the “media and the government,” the appeals court ruling stated. He initially confessed to being the shooter in 10 of the incidents.  When testifying at trial in Fairfax County, however, Malvo admitted only to shooting the 13-year-old boy in Prince George’s County and the Montgomery County bus driver who was killed. All others, Muhammad shot, the teen claimed.  At that point, Malvo’s defense team was asserting an insanity defense, alleging that the boy, who had an abusive and lonely childhood in Jamaica and Antigua, was indoctrinated by Muhammad, who took him under his wing when Malvo was 15. Muhammad had taken his own three children to Antigua without their mother’s knowledge, the court ruling stated.  Muhammad, a U.S. Army veteran who ultimately lost custody of his children, trained Malvo intensively in military tactics for almost a year, telling the teen that he had a plan to get his children back, the ruling stated.  Mildred Muhammad, his ex-wife, has said she believed she was the ultimate target of her former husband’s rage, CNN reported. Prosecutors during John Muhammad’s trials argued that the sniper shootings were a smoke screen to hide his goal of killing Mildred and regaining custody of their children.  Malvo told “Today” in 2012 that he was sexually abused by John Muhammad. He also described the psychological hold he said Muhammad had on him.  “I couldn’t say no,” Malvo said. “I had wanted that level of love and acceptance and consistency for all of my life and couldn’t find it. And even if unconsciously, or even in moments of short reflection, I knew that it was wrong, I did not have the willpower to say no.” In interviews with the Post, Malvo called himself a “monster.” “If you look up the definition, that’s what a monster is” Malvo told the newspaper. “I was a ghoul. I was a thief. I stole people’s lives. I did someone else’s bidding just because they said so. There is no rhyme or reason or sense.” Malvo told “Today” producers that the interview would be his last about the crimes, he said he had forgiven himself for his crimes because that is the “only way (he) can live with (himself.)” He also urged the families of the victims to find peace and forgiveness. “Please do not allow my actions and the actions of Muhammad to hold you hostage and continue to victimize you for the rest of your life,” Malvo said. “If you give those images and thoughts that power, it will continue to inflict that suffering over and over and over, and over and over again. Do not give me or him that much power.” Malvo is housed at Red Onion State Prison in Pound, Virginia. 
  • Chef and author Anthony Bourdain did not have narcotics in his body when he died on June 8, a French judicial official told The New York Times. Bourdain, 61, was found dead in a hotel in a small village in France on June 8. He was staying in Kaysersberg, a small village in the Alsace region of France, filming a new episode of his CNN show “Parts Unknown.” Police ruled his death as suicide by hanging. Local prosecutors say Bourdain, who was open about his lifelong struggle with drugs and alcohol, was not intoxicated when he died. “No trace of narcotics, no trace of any toxic products, no trace of medicines, no trace of alcohol,” prosecutor Christian de Rocquigny told Reuters. >> Read more trending news  Bourdain skipped dinner the night before his body was discovered, The New York Times reports.  When he did not arrive for breakfast with Eric Ripert, Bourdain’s close friend and chef of Le Bernardin in New York, a hotel receptionist went to his room to check on him and found his body. Bourdain was cremated in France. His remains and travel belongings have been sent to his younger brother, Christopher. Gladys Bourdain, Anthony Bourdain’s mother, told the New York Times that the family will likely hold “a small, private ceremony of some kind.” Italian actress Asia Argento remembered her boyfriend Anthony Bourdain on Twitter Friday, marking two weeks since his death. “Two weeks without you,” she tweeted, along with a smiling photo of them together.
  • The families of 15 young boys have filed a class-action lawsuit against Target and the makers of a popular potty training seat, over claims toddler boys’ genitals can get stuck in the seat, causing serious lacerations. The weePOD potty training seats are manufactured by Prince Lionheart Inc.  “Like an old leather car seat and you're wearing a tank top and it sticks, so it's the same mechanism,” attorney John Kristensen told KNBC. “When you pull it off, the penis is still stuck but the rest of the body is moving. That skin is so sensitive that it rips.” >> Read more trending news  Attorneys said that Prince Lionheart knew the seats were defective and made corrections, but over 500,000 defective potty seats are still being sold on store shelves.  Daniel, one father who is participating in the lawsuit on behalf of his son, said he was lifting the 4-year-old out of the family’s weePOD Basix potty when the boy started screaming. “We were, I don’t know how to explain it, horrified to see that happening to our son,” Daniel told KABC. “There was blood, skin, everything everywhere.” The parents said they took the boy to the emergency room. Attorneys representing the families said that Prince Lionheart is refusing to pull the defective child product from store shelves. “They've modified it, but the defective ones are still out there, and they're going to be hurting kids in the future,” attorney John Carpenter told KSAB. An attorney for Prince Lionheart stated that the company disagrees with the claims. Target also issued a statement, saying it requires all vendors to follow product safety laws and Consumer Product Safety Commission guidelines.