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The Latest Local News

    Florida Gov. Rick Scott has joined other leaders to urge the federal government to stop separating children from their parents when they enter the U.S. illegally. Scott sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Tuesday. Read: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen taunted by protesters as she eats at Mexican restaurant U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a cover-up after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived at the country illegally. Read: Sen. Nelson, other lawmakers denied entry to facility housing immigrant children in Florida Nelson said on the Senate floor Wednesday that he wanted to check to see if the facility was clean and wanted to see where the children were sleeping. .@SenBillNelson: “I wanted to see for myself. I wanted to see, is the facility clean? Are the children sleeping in beds? I also wanted to be able to talk to the young children, the ones who had been separated.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Nelson said the deputy HHS secretary told him it was the department's policy that he would have to fill out a form and wait two weeks before a visit. Nelson told the Senate floor he filled out the form. 'Why do they not want the senator from Florida to get into this detention facility where there are children that have been separated from their parents?' Nelson asked. 'It must be that not only is this department policy, this is being directed from the president in the White House, and they don't want me to see it because they don't want us to know what is going on in there.' Read: Trump announces plan to keep migrant families together Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, ages 13 to 17 -- most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. At some point, the facility had been closed, but it reopened in February, officials said. Martin Levine was one of several protesters who demonstrated outside the Homestead Detention Facility Wednesday. 'The kids were totally innocent. Why not put them together with their parents, which is what the policy used to be?' he said. 'It's never too late to do the right thing. So I would praise him to do the right thing.' President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order, which requires authorities to stop separating immigrant families. 'I didn't like the sight or the feeling of families being separated,' Trump said. 'I consider this to be a very important executive order. It's about keeping families together.' The order doesn't outline a plan for reuniting the 2,300 children who have already been separated from their parents. It's unknown when they'll be released. Immigration attorney Nayef Mubarak told Channel 9 the order is not a simple fix. 'What this does end is perhaps separating a mother and a child, each being in separate cells. But now these children will be in cells indefinitely until their court case has been concluded,' he said. 'It's clear here that these children are not getting out of these facilities, and there's no clear end as to when they're going to be getting out.' The order doesn't change the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy of prosecuting anyone who tries to cross the border illegally. Attorneys expect the order to be challenged in court. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Download: WFTV news and weather apps .@SenBillNelson: “The power to end this painful chapter in American history lies with the President and his pen.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Watch below: Sen. Nelson speaks to Senate floor about denied entry to Homestead facility
  • A photo of a billboard in the Texas panhandle is quickly gaining national attention because it tells “liberals” to keep driving until they’re out of the state. The sign on Interstate-40 near Vega, Texas reads: “Liberals please continue on I-40 until you have left our GREAT STATE OF TEXAS,” according to a photo originally taken by Kyle Mccallie. Mccallie, 25, told USA TODAY he saw the sign on Tuesday about a 35-mile drive from the New Mexico Border.  USA TODAY says a spokesperson for Burkett Media of Austin, Texas said the company is unaffiliated with the content of the billboard, which has the company’s logo at the bottom.
  • The NFL is coming to Orlando – albeit for just a week – for the third year in a row. The league announced the 2019 Pro Bowl will be played at Camping World Stadium on Jan. 27. The game will be televised on ESPN. Download the free WFTV News & Weather apps The all-star game will be one week before Super Bowl LIII, which will be played at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium. When Camping World Stadium hosted the Pro Bowl in 2017 and 2018, attendance averaged nearly 56,000 people. Read: 9 facts about the NFL Pro Bowl Like the prior years, the league is expected to also host Pro Bowl Week festivities across the Orlando area. News & Analysis: Stay up to date with WFTV Sports
  • Funeral services have been arranged for the four Orlando children killed by a man who shot an officer and was the center of a 21-hour standoff with police.    An attorney representing the family said on his website there will be funeral Mass Saturday at St. James Catholic Cathedral on North Orange Avenue in Orlando.    Detectives believe Gary Lindsey, 35, shot the children either shortly before or after police officers came to the door of his apartment June 10 in response to a domestic battery call from his girlfriend, Ciara Lopez. She had escaped the apartment.   Lindsey fired at the responding officers, seriously wounding Officer Kevin Valencia, who remains in a coma. Lindsey was then holed up in the apartment for almost a full day. Officers found him dead in a closet when they entered the apartment about 9 p.m. the following day.   The children, Dove, 1, Aiden, 6, Lillia, 10, and Irayan, 12, were found in their beds, police said.    Lindsey's girlfriend was the mother of all four children, and Lindsey was the father of two of the children.   Information from the attorney: “The family is continuing to grieve considerably and coming to the realization that the children are not coming home. A private visitation will be held this week for immediate family. There will be a funeral mass held on Saturday, June 23rd at St. James Catholic Cathedral Church (215 N Orange Ave, Orlando, FL 32801) in downtown Orlando at 12 noon to honor the lives of the children. This will be open to the public, to offer their prayers and condolences. But please understand that parking and space will be limited. We are forever grateful for your outpouring of support for Ciara, and invite you to share in this day with us, celebrating the lives of these beautiful children.”
  • A woman who was already on the radar of Florida Department of Children and Families was arrested after deputies said they found her either asleep or passed out in her vehicle with a baby in the backseat.    Lake County deputies said they made contact with Lucy Maldonado, 39, at about 5 p.m. Tuesday at a Wawa gas station in Clermont.  They said deputies noticed track marks on her arms and said she was slurring her speech.    Deputies said Maldonado then put the vehicle in gear and drove away.    They were able to stop the vehicle about 30 minutes later using stop sticks near the Orange County line, ending the pursuit at a Walmart on Apopka Vineland Road.   Deputies said they found an infant in her car, along with multiple needles and drug paraphernalia.   Deputies called the Florida Department of Children and Families investigators, who said they already had an open case against Maldonado and have been looking for her for weeks.   They said the child, who is believed to be 6 months old, had no pre- or post-natal care.   Deputies said Maldonado also had a felony drug warrant out of Orange County.   She is facing charges that include fleeing and eluding and aggravated child abuse. She will appear in court in Lake County Wednesday morning.   No one was injured.   No other details were released.
  • The NFL announced Tuesday that it picked up the third year option on it's agreement with the city beautiful and the 2019 Pro Bowl will be played in Orlando again. The leagues all star game will take place on January 27, 2019, at Camping World Stadium. In addition to the game, there is a number of events that take place in the the city and at ESPN's Wide World of Sports complex at Walt Disney World leading up to game day.  Last year's game drew about 55,000 fans and the City as earned upwards of $50 million with the last two Pro Bowl games.
  • A Stuart man is accused of threatening Republican representative Brian Mast's children over the Trump administration's immigration policy. According to an FBI report, Laurence Key called Mast's Washington office Monday and said, 'I'm going to find the congressman's kids and kill them,' according to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court, Key went on to say, 'If you are going to separate kids at the border, I'm going to kill his kids.'  Mr. Key has previously called Mast's office more than 475 times, and recently contacted the offices of Senators Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson.  Key who was recently arrested in St. Lucie County, is charged with communication of a threat to kidnap or injure a person.  Mast's representatives are not currently commenting on the investigation which is on going.
  • People are still heading to the beach to cool off, but they are having to dodge the jellyfish. Officials with Volusia County Beach Safety said there were 550 stings Tuesday and almost 400 stings Monday. That is on top of the 250 people who were stung by jellyfish on Father’s Day. There have been 3,000 stings in the last 11 days, officials said. Photos: The types of jellyfish found in Florida Lifeguards are also watching the ocean because there have been several water rescues; 11 people were rescued Monday, officials said. “We’re in the ocean’s world when we are at the beach. It’s not our world, it’s theirs. So Just pay attention and be cautious,” said beachgoer Amanda Belich. Beach safety officials said they believe there's a surge of jellyfish because of the wind direction and the tide is bringing the jellyfish closer to shore. If you are stung by a jellyfish, leave the water and flag down a lifeguard. Click here to read how to treat a jellyfish sting. Watch: How to treat a jellyfish sting Download: Free WFTV news and weather apps

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Officer identified the teenager as Antwon Rose of Rankin. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year. Update 5:30 p.m. ET:  The mayor of East Pittsburgh confirmed that the officer involved in the shooting Tuesday night was sworn in to their department a few hours before. He has been an officer with other departments in the area for seven years. He still has not been identified. Update 4 p.m. ET:  The family of Antwon Rose has hired civil rights Attorney Lee Merritt to represent them. Merritt has previously represented the victims of violence in Charlottesville and several cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement. Update 2:53 p.m. ET:  Rose was shot three times while running from police, said Coleman McDonough, superintendent of the Allegheny County Police Department. McDonough said two guns were found in the car after the traffic stop, but Rose was not armed at the time of the shooting. The driver of the vehicle was initially detained by police. He has since been released, police said. A third person who was in the vehicle and fled has not been located. The East Pittsburgh police officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto released the following statement: “Any loss of life is tragic, and especially the loss of life of a child. This is a devastating situation and I am saddened for Antwon Rose and his family.  “While Tuesday's shooting was not within the city's official borders it impacts all of us in the Pittsburgh region, and particularly those in the African American community. In my reactions to the incident I should have acknowledged that these shootings affect all of us, no matter where we live, and for that I am sorry.  “Tuesday night I was receiving numerous calls and messages asking me to respond to the involvement of police in a shooting in East Pittsburgh borough, and at the time I was attempting to clarify for the national public that the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, which I ultimately oversee, were not involved.”   Original Story:  According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock. >> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street. An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials. Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in 'so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred.' The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center. The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 
  • Florida Gov. Rick Scott has joined other leaders to urge the federal government to stop separating children from their parents when they enter the U.S. illegally. Scott sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Tuesday. Read: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen taunted by protesters as she eats at Mexican restaurant U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a cover-up after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived at the country illegally. Read: Sen. Nelson, other lawmakers denied entry to facility housing immigrant children in Florida Nelson said on the Senate floor Wednesday that he wanted to check to see if the facility was clean and wanted to see where the children were sleeping. .@SenBillNelson: “I wanted to see for myself. I wanted to see, is the facility clean? Are the children sleeping in beds? I also wanted to be able to talk to the young children, the ones who had been separated.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Nelson said the deputy HHS secretary told him it was the department's policy that he would have to fill out a form and wait two weeks before a visit. Nelson told the Senate floor he filled out the form. 'Why do they not want the senator from Florida to get into this detention facility where there are children that have been separated from their parents?' Nelson asked. 'It must be that not only is this department policy, this is being directed from the president in the White House, and they don't want me to see it because they don't want us to know what is going on in there.' Read: Trump announces plan to keep migrant families together Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, ages 13 to 17 -- most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. At some point, the facility had been closed, but it reopened in February, officials said. Martin Levine was one of several protesters who demonstrated outside the Homestead Detention Facility Wednesday. 'The kids were totally innocent. Why not put them together with their parents, which is what the policy used to be?' he said. 'It's never too late to do the right thing. So I would praise him to do the right thing.' President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order, which requires authorities to stop separating immigrant families. 'I didn't like the sight or the feeling of families being separated,' Trump said. 'I consider this to be a very important executive order. It's about keeping families together.' The order doesn't outline a plan for reuniting the 2,300 children who have already been separated from their parents. It's unknown when they'll be released. Immigration attorney Nayef Mubarak told Channel 9 the order is not a simple fix. 'What this does end is perhaps separating a mother and a child, each being in separate cells. But now these children will be in cells indefinitely until their court case has been concluded,' he said. 'It's clear here that these children are not getting out of these facilities, and there's no clear end as to when they're going to be getting out.' The order doesn't change the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy of prosecuting anyone who tries to cross the border illegally. Attorneys expect the order to be challenged in court. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Download: WFTV news and weather apps .@SenBillNelson: “The power to end this painful chapter in American history lies with the President and his pen.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Watch below: Sen. Nelson speaks to Senate floor about denied entry to Homestead facility
  • Award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore said he knew he had managed to capture the emotional impact of the Trump administration’s immigration policy just moments after photographing a young Honduran girl crying at her mother’s feet last week. >> Read more trending news The image appeared on television sets, computer screens and newspaper front pages around the globe. The photo spurred a California couple to start a fundraiser that has since raised millions of dollars to help migrants detained on suspicion of illegally crossing the border. It spurred public outrage over the immigration policy that led to the separation of thousands of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Couple raises more than $4.7 million to help reunite migrant children, parents Moore told The Washington Post that he noticed the girl when her mother stopped to breastfeed her in the middle of the road on June 12. She and dozens of other migrants, nearly all women and children, were stopped by the Border Patrol agents just after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas. “There was no place for privacy,” Moore told the Post. “(The mother) said they’d been on the road for a month, and they were from Honduras. I can only imagine what dangers she’d passed through, alone with the girl.” The woman gave Moore permission to follow her and her 2-year-old daughter as Border Patrol agents processed them, the Post reported. It was after agents confiscated their personal items, when the girl’s mother put her on the ground to allow an agent to search her, that the girl started to wail. The moment passed quickly. “I took a knee and had very few frames of that moment before it was over,” Moore told NPR. “And I knew at that moment that this point in their journey, which was very emotional for me to see them being detained, for them was just part of a very, very long journey.” Moore told the Post that the feeling he had after photographing the girl was similar to emotions he felt while covering war zones and Ebola wards abroad. 'Ever since I took those pictures, I think about that moment often. And it's emotional for me every time,' he told NPR. “I do not know what happened to them. I would very much like to know.” >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. According to CNN, a spokesman later told them that the girl and mother in the viral photo were not separated. President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice.
  • A woman said she was robbed at gunpoint in her own driveway after driving 80 miles home from a shopping trip. Police believe the robbers may have followed her from the shopping center in Atlanta to her home in Dalton. Brittany McEntire told WSB that two men robbed her at gunpoint about three weeks ago. Her mother, husband and three children were also in the driveway.  >> Read more trending news  McEntire said the two men ran up the driveway and took her two Louis Vuitton diaper bags and demanded all of her jewelry, including her late father’s ring that she cherishes. She said the whole robbery took less than a minute, but she has not regained her peace of mind. “I could’ve lost my whole family if they had started shooting,” McEntire told WSB. The suspects allegedly followed McEntire from Buckhead for about two hours in an unidentified white car, police said. McEntire said she is unsure why she was targeted because she did not take home many bags from the store.  “It was not a shopping spree,” McEntire said. Police believe the men will try to follow and rob more people.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice. Update 10:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Democrats took a stand on the floor of the U.S. Senate against President Donald Trump’s immigration plan just hours after the president signed an executive order revoking his policy of separating migrant children from their parents during illegal border crossings. Democrats, who spoke from the Senate floor for two hours, warned that the executive order will worsen the crisis along the U.S.-Mexico border, The Hill reported. 'If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ... Does anybody really believe that we should be imprisoning for an indefinite period of time little children,' Sanders said. Update 6:45 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order overturning his administration’s own policy of separating migrant families at the border. “I am glad the president took this step today,” McConnell tweeted. “When families with children breach our border, we should keep those families together whenever possible while our legal system fairly and promptly evaluates their status,” McConnell said. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Some Republican senators have expressed relief that President Donald Trump rescinded the policy separating migrant families at the border. Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who introduced legislation to address the family separation issue at the border, said Trump’s executive order was a good move, but that Congress needs to act. “I’m pleased the administration has agreed to keep families apprehended at the border together. We can have strong border security without separating parents from their children,” he said on Twitter. Update 6 p.m. EDT June 20: Democratic senators are weighing in on President Donald Trump’s decision to end the practice of separating children from their families during illegal border crossings. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said Trump is actually “doubling down” on his zero tolerance policy with his signing of the executive order. “His new executive order criminalizes asylum-seekers and seeks to indefinitely detain their children,” Durbin said in a tweet. Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) also tweeted that Trump’s executive order does not end the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. “ In fact, the President now wants to detain parents and children together indefinitely, and contemplates DoD building internment camps to house them. This is no solution to a problem Trump created,” Markey said. Update 4 p.m. EDT June 20: White House officials on Wednesday afternoon released the full text of the executive order signed by the president. >> Trump ends migrant family separations: Read the executive order In it, Trump directed officials to detain migrant families together. Officials have come under fire in recent months after reports surfaced that migrant children were being taken from their parents at the border. The order did not address what will happen to children and parents who are currently separated and in government custody. Update 3:20 p.m. EDT June 20: Trump signed the order, which will keep families together but continue the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, on Wednesday afternoon. >> From Jamie Dupree: President Trump to reverse course on immigrant family separations “We're keeping families together and this will solve that problem,” Trump said. “At the same time we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a ‘zero tolerance,’ we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally.” Original report: Trump told reporters Wednesday that he will “be signing something in a little while” to address family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Read more trending news “We want to keep families together, it’s very important,” Trump said. 'I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”  It was not immediately clear what the president planned to sign. Trump has repeatedly called on Congress to change laws that he says mandates the family separations. There is no law that requires children be separated from parents at the border. He blamed Democrats for the continued separations in a Wednesday morning tweet, but he added that he was “working on something.” The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was drafting an executive action for Trump that would allow the Department of Homeland Security to keep migrant families together at the border. Nielsen does not believe Congress will act to resolve the issue of migrant family separations, the AP reported, citing two unidentified sources familiar with the matter. She’s working with officials from other agencies, including the Justice Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, to draft the executive action.  The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The executive action Nielson is drafting “wouldn’t end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families,” according to the AP.