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Florida man drives through roadblock, crashes into medical helicopter
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Florida man drives through roadblock, crashes into medical helicopter

Florida man drives through roadblock, crashes into medical helicopter

Florida man drives through roadblock, crashes into medical helicopter

A medical helicopter was hit by a suspected drunk driver in Orange County, Fla. overnight after the chopper had landed in the street to tend to a pedestrian who was hit by another car. 

The chopper was on the ground near US-192 and SR-429 when the suspected impaired driver drove around roadblocks and hit the helicopter hard enough to damage the tail and prevent it from taking off. 

The injured pedestrian was transported to the hospital by ambulance.

The helicopter had to be towed away. 

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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Hours after a federal judge ordered the White House to reinstate the press pass of CNN reporter Jim Acosta, President Donald Trump said new rules would be put in place at the White House governing the behavior of reporters, and if those rules are violated, then that would be grounds to pull the press pass of the offending reporter. “People have to behave. We’re writing up rules and regulations,” President Trump told reporters after a bill signing ceremony at the White House, saying he wants to enforce rules of decorum. “Decorum. You can’t take three questions and four questions. You can’t stand up and not sit down,” the President added, as he said there was one other option as well. “We always have the option of leaving,” Mr. Trump said. “We’ll just leave, and then you won’t be very happy, because we get good ratings.” 'We want total freedom of the press, that's very important to me. It's more important to me than anybody would believe. But you have to act with respect. You're in the White House,' Trump says pic.twitter.com/XdpWUjJfVT — TicToc by Bloomberg (@tictoc) November 16, 2018 It wasn’t clear exactly what the rules would say, or when the possible changes would be instituted – but the President made clear he wanted them to give his aides the legal predicate to get rid of reporters who don’t display the necessary ‘decorum.’ “With the rules and regulations, we will end up back in court and we will win,” Mr. Trump said in a photo op. The President made his comments just moments after CNN’s Acosta returned to the White House, immediately after a federal judge appointed by the President had said that no legitimate reason had been given by the government for revoking his ‘hard pass’ to the White House. Acosta could have – but did not – attend the photo op. LIVE: CNN reporter Jim Acosta returns to the White House after a judge ruled that Trump must reinstate his press access https://t.co/PBmUT5rgSD — TicToc by Bloomberg (@tictoc) November 16, 2018 In a statement, the group representing reporters at the White House said Acosta’s return was the correct move. “The White House Correspondents’ Association welcomes today’s ruling, in which a federal judge made it clear that the White House cannot arbitrarily revoke a White House press pass.”
  • A judge ruled Friday that the White House must reinstate CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s press credentials after the news network filed suit earlier this week against President Donald Trump and his top aides. >> Read more trending news U.S. District Court Judge Timothy J. Kelly granted CNN a temporary restraining order after determining that the White House likely violated Acosta’s right to due process when he was banned from the White House last week. Update 1 p.m. EST Nov. 16: Speaking to reporters at the White House on Friday, Trump said officials are writing up rules and regulations for journalists to ensure proper decorum in the White House. 'You can't take three questions and four questions,' he said. 'You can't stand up and not sit down.' >> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: After Acosta ruling, Trump says press will face new rules on behavior Trump spoke hours after Kelly determined that Acosta’s right to due process was likely violated by the White House’s decision to abruptly ban him last week. 'We want total freedom of the press,' Trump said. 'But you have to act with respect when you're at the White House, and when I see the way some of my people get treated at news conferences, it's terrible.' He said that if reporters fail to follow the yet-to-be written rules, “We'll end up back in court and we'll win, but most importantly, we'll just leave. And then you won't be very happy. Because we do get good ratings.” Update 11:45 a.m. EST Nov. 16: The White House will reinstate Acosta’s press pass after a judge ruled Friday that officials likely violated his right to due process last week when they abruptly barred him. “In response to the court, we will temporarily reinstate the reporter’s hard pass,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. “We will also further develop rules and processes to ensure fair and orderly press conferences in the future.” Huckabee Sanders said the court “made clear that there is no absolute First Amendment right to access the White House,” though Kelly emphasized in court that his ruling did not address questions over whether Acosta’s First Amendment rights had been violated, CNN reported. “There must be decorum at the White House,” Huckabee Sanders added. Acosta’s press credentials were revoked last week after he got into a heated back-and-forth with the president while questioning him over a caravan of migrants headed for the U.S. from Honduras. Update 11:15 a.m. EST Nov. 16: CNN has formally requested that the White House return Acosta’s press pass. Update 10:55 a.m EST Nov. 16: In court Friday, Kelly noted that attorneys for the government could not say who made the initial decision to revoke Acosta’s pass, The Associated Press reported. Kelly found White House officials likely violated Acosta’s right to due process when they revoked his press credentials last week. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders accused Acosta in a statement released after the incident of “placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern.” She also shared video of the incident in question on Twitter. >> Sarah Sanders tweeted ‘doctored’ video of Jim Acosta: WaPost Kelly said Friday that the “belated efforts were hardly sufficient to satisfy due process,” according to the AP. The judge also determined that the decision to bar Acosta from the White House caused him “irreparable harm” that was not lessened by the fact that other CNN reporters maintained their White House press passes, The Washington Post reported. Kelly emphasized in court that his ruling was limited and did not address questions over whether Acosta’s First Amendment rights had been violated, CNN reported. He told attorneys to file additional court papers in the case by Monday, according to the AP. Update 10:40 a.m. EST Nov. 16: “This is a great day for the First Amendment and journalism,” CNN attorney Ted Boutrus said in a brief statement outside the courthouse Friday. Acosta thanked other journalists who have thrown their support behind him and CNN as the case went to court. More than a dozen news organizations on Wednesday announced their intent to support CNN in the suit. “Let’s get back to work,” Acosta said. Update 10:30 a.m. EST Nov. 16: U.S. District Court Judge Timothy J. Kelly ruled Friday that the White House must return Acosta’s press credentials, according to CNN. The decision came at a 10 a.m. hearing Friday after Kelly told the court CNN was likely to prove Acosta’s credentials were revoked without proper due process, The Washington Post reported. Update 8:45 a.m. EST Nov. 16: U.S. District Court Judge Timothy J. Kelly is set to rule Friday on CNN’s request to have Acosta’s press credentials reinstated. Update 1:05 p.m. EST Nov. 15: A judge on Thursday delayed a scheduled ruling on the case, CNN’s chief media correspondent Brian Stelter said, citing court records. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy J. Kelly is scheduled to hand down his decision at 10 a.m. Friday on whether to grant a temporary restraining order in the case.  Update 5:40 p.m. EST Nov. 14: The judge in the CNN lawsuit against President Donald Trump and other administration officials over banning reporter Jim Acosta from the White House said he’ll issue a ruling Thursday at 3 p.m., according to news outlets. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy J. Kelly heard arguments from both sides in a two hour hearing Wednesday afternoon. It’s the first hearing in CNN and Acosta’s federal lawsuit against Trump and other administration officials over the suspension of Acosta’s White House press pass. The network and Acosta contend the suspension violated the First and Fifth Amendments. The White House said in a Justice Department filing Wednesday that it has “broad discretion” to decide which journalists get permanent press passes. Journalism advocates said that the White House position is a break with historical tradition, with past administrations granting press access to large and small news outlets, and that the Acosta suspension is an unprecedented step that could have a negative impact on journalism. Update 12:05 p.m. EST Nov. 14: In a court filing Wednesday, the Justice Department argued, 'No journalist has a First Amendment right to enter the White House,' after CNN sued the Trump administration for revoking Acosta’s press credentials, The Hill reported. 'The president and White House possess the same broad discretion to regulate access to the White House for journalists (and other members of the public) that they possess to select which journalists receive interviews, or which journalists they acknowledge at press conferences,' attorneys said in the filing, according to The Hill. Attorneys for CNN filed suit Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Washington. A judge scheduled a hearing in the case for 3 p.m. Wednesday. Update 11:45 a.m. EST Nov. 14: More than a dozen news organizations on Wednesday announced their intent to support CNN in the network’s suit against the Trump administration. 'Whether the news of the day concerns national security, the economy, or the environment, reporters covering the White House must remain free to ask questions,' officials from organizations including The Associated Press and The New York Times, said Wednesday in a joint statement.  'It is imperative that independent journalists have access to the President and his activities, and that journalists are not barred for arbitrary reasons.' Update 11:15 a.m. EST Nov. 14: Fox News plans to file an amicus brief in support of CNN in the news network's lawsuit against the Trump administration, Fox News president Jay Wallace said Wednesday in a statement. 'Secret Service passes for working White House journalists should never be weaponized,' Wallace said. 'While we don't condone the growing antagonistic tone by both the President and the press at recent media avails, we do support a free press, access and open exchanges for the American people.' CNN filed suit against Trump and several officials Tuesday, days after reporter Jim Acosta had his press credentials revoked following a contentious exchange with the president. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders accused Acosta in a statement released after the incident of “placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern.” Update 10:25 p.m. EST Nov. 13: A federal judge has given the Trump administration until 11 a.m. Wednesday morning to respond to CNN’s lawsuit demanding a temporary restraining order in the battle over the White House’s revocation of reporter Jim Acosta’s press credentials, according to The Washington Post. A hearing is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon in U.S. District Court in Washington. CNN’s attorney said the network is considering whether to request financial damages in its claim against President Donald Trump. Original report: In the lawsuit, filed in D.C. District Court, attorneys for CNN asked for Acosta’s press credentials to be immediately reinstated and protected. >> White House suspends CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s press credentials “While the suit is specific to CNN and Acosta, this could have happened to anyone,” CNN officials said in a statement. “If left unchallenged, the actions of the White House would create a dangerous chilling effect for any journalist who covers our elected officials.” Attorneys for CNN named six defendants in the suit, including Trump, chief of staff John Kelly and White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. The lawsuit alleged the decision to revoke Acosta’s credentials was a “severe and unprecedented punishment” following “years of hostility by President Trump against CNN and Acosta based on the contents of their reporting.” “(It’s) an unabashed attempt to censor the press and exclude reporters from the White House who challenge and dispute the President’s point of view,” CNN attorneys said in the lawsuit. Acosta’s press credentials were suspended Wednesday after a White House intern attempted to take his microphone during a news conference with Trump. Huckabee Sanders released a statement after the incident accusing Acosta of “placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern.”
  • A west Alabama district attorney on Thursday survived what authorities are calling an “ambush-style shooting” by an unlikely suspect -- a former state trooper, who was subsequently killed by police.  Steven Smith Jr. was shot dead by officers who had just eaten lunch with Greg Griggers, the district attorney for the 17th Judicial Circuit, according Capt. Jason Roberts, of the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency’s State Bureau of Investigation. The 17th Judicial Circuit includes Marengo, Greene and Sumter counties. >> Read more trending news “It’s very, very shocking,” Roberts said during a news conference Thursday.  Roberts said the shooting took place around 12:45 p.m. on the main street in Demopolis, Marengo County’s biggest city. Griggers and the officers had returned to his office after eating at a nearby café. The Tuscaloosa News reported that as Griggers opened the door of his truck to exit it, Smith began firing at him with a shotgun from across the street. The two officers with the district attorney fired back, killing the 60-year-old former trooper.  Griggers, 52, was struck in the face, WVTM 13 News in Birmingham reported. His wounds were minor and he was treated and released from a hospital.  Roberts said that Smith, who was hired as a trooper in 1982, was fired in 1996. The News reported that while still a trooper, Smith was investigated after two shotgun blasts were fired into the home of 17th Judicial Circuit Court Judge Eddie Hardaway.  AL.com reported that Hardaway was the first black judge to preside over the 17th Judicial Circuit.  Smith at that time owned a white Mitsubishi that matched witnesses’ descriptions of the shooter’s car, AL.com said. Smith was also called before a special grand jury to testify. The then-trooper complained publicly and to the news media about the handling of that investigation, which the News reported included authorities questioning his then-girlfriend. He was fired after speaking to reporters about the case, AL.com said.  The case was ultimately dismissed in 1997 after the grand jury was dismantled. The News reported that Smith’s termination was upheld by the Alabama Court of Civil Appeals. Roberts said Smith’s records show he was not eligible for rehire.  The motive for Griggers’ shooting was not yet known, the investigator said.  “We’re very early in this investigation,” Roberts said. “All we know at this point is that the district attorney was fired upon in an ambush-style shooting and we will be investigating it as an independent investigation.” Watch Thursday’s news conference below, courtesy of WTOK-TV. Demopolis Police Chief Tommie Reese asked that residents keep Griggers, who has served as district attorney since 2003, in their prayers.  “His family is very important to us, and he’s important to our circuit,” Reese said. “This is a heinous crime and the city of Demopolis will do everything we can to get it resolved.” The crime was an oddity for Demopolis, which the 2010 U.S. Census put at just under 7,500 residents. Reese said, however, that a shooting of a public official can happen anywhere in America.  “We’re kind of shocked that it happened in the city of Demopolis,” Reese said. “We don’t know the motive behind this case right now.” The chief said that Griggers, who he’s known for 20 years or longer, has been a great friend and prosecutor, but the job of district attorney can sometimes make a person some enemies.  “Otherwise, beyond that, Greg is a great person in the community,” Reese said. “He’s well liked, well respected.” Jay E. Town, U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, sent his thoughts and prayers to Griggers and his family.  “District Attorney Griggers is a dedicated public servant and an honorable man,” Town said in a statement. “This serves as yet another reminder of the perils and dangers that law enforcement at every level face daily.”
  • A jury on Friday found former Uber Eats driver Robert Bivines guilty of several charges, including felony murder, for the February shooting death of his customer Ryan Thornton. >> Read more trending news  Update 12:45 p.m. EST Nov. 16: Jurors in Fulton County deliberated for roughly three hours Friday before finding Biviens guilty of malice murder, felony murder, aggravated assault and possession of a weapon during the commission of a felony.  Bivines, 36, a former Uber Eats driver, has long claimed he shot and killed Thornton, 30, in self-defense after he was threatened while delivering food to Thornton’s Buckhead condominium on the night of Feb. 17. Original report: Was Robert Bivines justified in killing Ryan Thornton? That’s the question jurors must answer when deliberations begin Friday morning.  Bivines, 36, a former Uber Eats driver, has long claimed he shot and killed Thornton, 30, in self-defense after he was threatened while delivering food to Thornton’s Buckhead condominium on the night of Feb. 17. Bivines is on trial in Fulton County Superior Court this week for the February shooting death of Thornton. Bivines testified Thursday that Thornton threatened to “(expletive) him up” because he was angry the driver would not bring his food upstairs. Bivines said Thorton approached him in an aggressive manner and motioned with is hand in his pocket as if he had a gun, so Bivines grabbed his gun, fired four shots at Thornton then drove away, he said. “I felt harmed,” Bivines said. “I thought he was going to shoot me.”  >> Trending: Homemade silencer last piece of evidence in arrest of 4 family members in 8 murders But prosecutors disputed Bivine’s story noting that no weapon was found on Thornton and he didn’t make a move like he had one, they said. And if Bivines were truly afraid for his life, they said, he had other options, including calling police or 911 for help. “Words alone are not sufficient to justify killing someone,” Fulton County Senior Assistant District Attorney Lauren Travis said in court Thursday during closing arguments in the case.  Attorney Jackie Patterson said his client panicked. Surveillance video from that night shows Thorton getting the food and exchanging some words with Bivines.  Bivines admitted to firing four shots, two of which Fulton County prosecutors said were fired after Thornton was already on the ground. He then drove off.  “Anyone involved in a situation like that isn’t going to wait around,” Patterson said about Bivines’ action that night. Instead of calling the police or 911 for help, prosecutors said Bivines chose to sit at his girlfriend’s job for six hours after the shooting.  Bivines testified he immediately drove to the Cumberland Mall area where his girlfriend worked, and sat there waiting for her shift as a security guard to end. Bivines was expected to pick her up from work and drive them back to their Alpharetta home.  That was 6 a.m. During those hours waiting, he said he made some phone calls, including one to her, but didn’t tell anyone about the shooting.  >> Trending: Ballerina found dead in Missouri lake; investigators looking for clues in death And as night turned to day, Bivines said he still hadn’t told anyone. He wouldn’t talk to anyone about the shooting until he received a call from Atlanta police Detective Andre Lowe asking to come to police headquarters to tell his side of the story.  That night, Bivines said he searched “uber eats driver” and “uber eats driver news” to see what had been reported about the shooting. When he came across an online article identifying him as a potential suspect, he decided to call a lawyer.  Bivines would turn himself in to authorities the Monday after the Saturday shooting.  During testimony this week, Thornton’s fiancee, Jerica Jones, who was at the condo with him, described heaing the shots that killed him, WSB-TV reported. After the shooting, Thornton called his fiancee. “I hear Ryan’s voice crackling, saying ‘Don’t panic. I’ve been shot,’ and that’s the last time I ever spoke to him,” Jones testified. During closing arguments, Travis said Bivines aggressively baited Thornton in to coming back to the car and intentionally fired shots at him. Travis criticized Bivines for not remembering details from that night and claimed his conscious kicked in when he was worried about being caught.  >> Trending: Guns seized at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson checkpoints sets national record Patterson insisted his client stood his ground, but acknowledged the pain of Thornton’s family.  “There are no winners in these kinds of cases,” he said.  Judge Jerry Baxter dismissed jurors home for the day after reading them their instructions. They will begin deliberations at 9:30 a.m. Bivines faces charges of malice murder, felony murder, aggravated assault and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony.
  • On Thanksgiving, News 96.5 WDBO will preempt regular programming to bring you Thanksgiving NFL games. Our pregame coverage starts at 12 PM, and then kickoff begins at 12:30 PM with the Chicago Bears vs. Detroit Lions in an NFC North match up. At 4:30 PM, the Washington Redskins will take on the Dallas Cowboys in a key NFC contest. The final game of the night will feature the Atlanta Falcons taking on the New Orleans Saints at 8:20 PM.