CORONAVIRUS:

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Gen Politics
Democrat Presidential hopeful, Mayor Pete, is fundraising in Orlando 
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Democrat Presidential hopeful, Mayor Pete, is fundraising in Orlando 

Democrat Presidential hopeful, Mayor Pete, is fundraising in Orlando 
Photo:Wiki

Democrat Presidential hopeful, Mayor Pete, is fundraising in Orlando 

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg  will be fundraising in Orlando today.

Buttigieg is the South Bend, Ind., Mayor whose soft-spoken, moderate approach has appealed to younger voters, elevating him to the top of the second tier of the crowd of 25 or so Democrats running for president.

His campaign is calling todays visit a “grassroots” fundraiser.

Mayor Pete will appear alongside Parkland Mayor Christine Hunschofsky at a ticketed fundraiser at 5 p.m. this afternoon.

He will then head to the Winter Park home of former U.S. Ambassador Robert “Bobby” Mandell for a more traditional big ticket fundraiser. 

The grassroots event is being advertised on social media and the location is only disclosed after you make a contribution.  

Our sister station WFTV Channel 9 Eyewitness news is reporting that the event will take place at The Plaza Live

425 N Bumby Ave, Orlando. 

Doors will open at 4:30 p.m.

Tickets for the grassroots fundraiser start at $25 for a campaign “friend” and go up to $1,000 for a campaign “sponsor.”

Click here for the link to get tickets. 

Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • What started out as protests in Minneapolis after the death of George Floyd has now spread to several states, including right here in Florida. It started Friday morning after rumors circulated on social media that former officer Derek Chauvin, one of the four involved in the incident, moved to a home in the unincorporated area of Windermere. In response, the Orange County Sheriff's Office released a tweet, saying that they have verified that Chauvin has a home there, but is not there and has no plans to be in that area.  Despite this, protesters have gathered outside the home, holding signs and writing messages on the driveway of the home and the street near the home with chalk. Orange County Sheriff John Mina says that he is proud of the community since the protests have been peaceful and that while they will monitor the situation, there are currently no plans to add security to the home.  Just after 1 p.m., leaders in Minnesota have announced that Chauvin had been taken into custody and charged with third degree murder and manslaughter.
  • More than 5.8 million people worldwide -- including more than 1.7 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Friday, May 29, continue below:  Connecticut colleges and universities to hold in-person classes this fall Update 2:00 p.m. EDT May 29: Mark Ojakian, the president of Connecticut State Colleges and Universities, said the university system plans to reopen campuses this fall. CSCU consists of 17 campuses, including UConn and Yale, and will open Aug. 24, the Hartford Courant reported. The first day of classes will be Aug. 26. Ojakian said there will be safety policies and procedures put in place to keep faculty and students safe. “We still have a lot of planning to do and more questions need to be addressed in the coming weeks and months,' he said. Each school will have to prepare and present plans to reopen that meet state health and safety standards. Many classes will have online portions. According to the Hartford Courant, students will be able to attend in-person classes on campuses until Thanksgiving break. Students will be asked to leave campus for the holiday break and will remain off-campus, completing the rest of their courses and final exams virtually. Coronavirus cases continue to drop in New York; city prepares for phase one of reopening Update 12:20 p.m. EDT May 29: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city is nearing milestones that would allow the city to begin reopening in the next few weeks. “We are confident that we will be able to go to phase one in the first two weeks of June,' he said during a news conference. “This is going to be based, of course, on the tangible indicators and thresholds from the state and the city. So that’s what will lead the decision. We have to have that factual evidence.' De Blasio said officials have not confirmed which day phase one will begin. He said officials are conducting conversations that will help them determine “the exact right date to start.” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the number of hospitalizations due to the coronavirus are down. De Blasio said Thursday that 5% of New York City residents tested positive for COVID-19. “Every day we’ve seen progress in recent weeks, today the lowest we’ve ever seen,” he said. “Congratulations everyone, this is putting us well on the way to our goal of opening in the first half of June. Well done NYC.' Sen. Bob Casey tests positive for COVID-10 antibodies Update 11:55 a.m. EDT May 29: Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey revealed Friday morning that he received a positive test result from a COVID-19 antibody test, which means that he “likely had COVID-19 at some point over the last several months and [has] since developed an antibody response to the virus,” he wrote in a statement. Casey said he experienced a low-grade fever and mild flu-like symptoms for days and he contacted his physician, but he was never tested for the coronavirus. He said he self-isolated and continued to work remotely, as his symptoms were “mild and manageable.” “I will continue to follow the guidance of public health experts by wearing a mask in public and observing social distancing practices, and I hope that others will do the same to help slow the spread of this virus,' Casey wrote in the statement. Doctors sue for mail access to abortion pill during coronavirus pandemic Update 5:55 a.m. EDT May 29: A group of doctors, in concert with the American Civil Liberties Union, filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday, challenging a rule that requires patients to visit medical facilities in order to obtain abortion pills. In the suit, the physicians argue patients should be allowed to have prescriptions for the drug mifepristone filled by mail, avoiding direct contact with potentially contaminated health care settings during the novel coronavirus pandemic. “Of the more than 20,000 drugs regulated by the (U.S. Food and Drug Administration,) mifepristone is the only one that patients must receive in person at a hospital, clinic or medical office, yet may self-administer, unsupervised, at a location of their choosing,” the lawsuit states. Tyson Foods shuts down 7th meatpacking facility amid latest coronavirus outbreak Update 2:53 a.m. EDT May 29: Tyson Foods shut down its Storm Lake, Iowa, pork processing plant temporarily, following the latest novel coronavirus outbreak to infect the company’s operations. Citing a “delay in COVID-19 testing results” as a partial reason for the facility’s idling, the company issued a statement attributing the shutdown to “team member absences related to quarantine and other factors” as well. According to the Des Moines Register, 555 of the Storm Lake plant’s 2,517 employees have tested positive for the virus. The two-day stoppage is intended to allow for deep cleaning and sanitization with plans to reopen for business next week, the company statement said. Since the onset of the global pandemic, Tyson has shuttered six other facilities temporarily, including facilities in Waterloo, Columbus Junction and Perry, Iowa, as well as Dakota City, Nebraska; Logansport, Indiana; and Pasco, Washington, the Register reported. Iowa has confirmed a total of 18,586 novel coronavirus cases, resulting in 506 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. US deaths near 102K, total cases soar past 1.7M Published 12:49 a.m. EDT May 29: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States soared past 1.7 million early Friday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,721,750 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 101,617 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 366,733 cases and 29,529 deaths and New Jersey with 157,185 cases and 11,409 deaths. Massachusetts, with 94,895 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 6,640, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 115,833. Only 16 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 6,000 cases each. Five other states have now confirmed at least 53,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 103,813 cases, resulting in 3,993 deaths • Pennsylvania: 74,220 cases, resulting in 5,373 deaths • Texas: 60,395 cases, resulting in 1,611 deaths • Michigan: 56,014 cases, resulting in 5,732 deaths • Florida: 53,285 cases, resulting in 2,364 deaths Meanwhile, Maryland, Georgia, Connecticut and Virginia each has confirmed at least 41,000 cases; Louisiana, Ohio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 33,000 cases; North Carolina, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee and Washington each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Iowa with 18,586 and Arizona with 17,877; Wisconsin and Alabama each has confirmed at least 16,000 cases; Rhode Island and Mississippi each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases; Nebraska, Missouri and South Carolina each has confirmed at least 10,000 cases; Kansas, Kentucky and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; Utah, the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases, followed by New Mexico with 7,364; Arkansas and Oklahoma each has confirmed at least 6,000 cases. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.
  • Officers with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection on Wednesday seized a shipment of unauthorized pills to treat COVID-19 at the Port of Seattle. According to a news release, officers seized 360 pills. “The use of unauthorized medications can give consumers a false sense of security and prove fatal in some instances,” officials said. “Unauthorized products that claim to cure, treat or prevent serious illnesses such as COVID-19 may cause individuals to delay or stop appropriate medical treatment, leading to serious harm.” CBP is working with the Food and Drug Administration to protect U.S. consumers from fake or harmful medications. “We show vigilance in carrying out our mission to protect the American public, whether it be terrorist weapons or dangerous medications,” Seattle Area Port Director Clay Thomas said. “The men and women of CBP value our enforcement partnerships and are proud to work with the dedicated FDA team to further protect the public.”
  • A former Minneapolis club owner has said that both George Floyd and the fired police officer in whose custody Floyd died Monday used to work security at her club, opening up the question of whether the two men knew one another. Maya Santamaria told KSTP in Minneapolis that Floyd and Derek Chauvin worked security at El Nuevo Rodeo up to the end of last year. Santamaria said she sold the building, which she owned for 20 years, a few months ago. “Chauvin was our off-duty police for almost the entirety of the 17 years that we were open,” Santamaria told the news station. “They were working together at the same time, it’s just that Chauvin worked outside and the security guards were inside.” Andrea Jenkins, vice president of the Minneapolis City Council, confirmed the men’s employment at El Nuevo Rodeo in an interview with MSNBC. “They were co-workers for a very long time,” Jenkins said. Santamaria said she was unsure if the men knew one another because there were often more than a dozen security officers working at the same time on busy nights. The former club owner, who operates La Raza 95.7 FM radio, said she initially did not recognize either Chauvin or Floyd in the now-infamous video that shows Chauvin holding Floyd to the pavement with a knee to the black man’s neck. “My friend sent me (the video) and said, ‘This is your guy who used to work for you,’ and I said, ‘It’s not him.’ And then they did the close-up, and that’s when I said, ‘Oh my God, that’s him,’” Santamaria said. “I didn’t recognize George as one of our security guys because he looked really different lying there like that.” The video shows Chauvin holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd and bystanders beg him to stop. Floyd, 46, became unresponsive and died. Law enforcement officials, including the FBI, are investigating Floyd’s death. Chauvin and the three other officers involved in detaining Floyd, who had been accused of forgery, were subsequently fired. Floyd’s death has provoked days of fires and violent protest in Minneapolis and beyond as activists demand the former officers be charged with murder. One person was shot and killed near the protest site Wednesday night and on Thursday night, protesters set fire to a Minneapolis police precinct. Those calling for an arrest in the case include Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, who on Wednesday urged the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office to charge Chauvin. “I’ve wrestled with, more than anything else over the last 36 hours, one fundamental question: Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail?” Frey said in a news conference. “If you had done it, or I had, we would be behind bars right now.”
  • Think 2020 can't get any crazier? The monkeys have just stolen the coronavirus. It happened Friday morning at Meerut Medical College in Uttar Pradesh, India. A group of monkeys entered the facility and attacked a lab worker before running off with three COVID-19 blood samples. The monkeys were later spotted sitting in a tree chewing on the sample boxes.  The samples were eventually recovered and fortunately were not damaged. It's not known if monkeys are capable of contracting the coronavirus, or if it can be spread from contact with blood. Monkey attacks have become more and more common in India, possibly due to the destruction of their natural habitat. A monkey recently made headlines after being videoed riding a motorbike down a street then grabbing and dragging a toddler. Mobile users, see that video here.

Washington Insider

  • The feud between Twitter and President Donald Trump escalated on Friday after the President used the social media platform to threaten the use of force against rioters in Minneapolis, as Twitter slapped a warning label on the President's tweet, saying Mr. Trump had violated rules on 'glorifying violence.' 'These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd,' the President wrote, referring to the black man who was suffocated to death when a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his head and neck for an extended period of time earlier this week. The President then spoke of sending in National Guard troops to restore order, warning that 'when the looting starts, the shooting starts.' That was evidently too much for Twitter, which placed a warning on the President's tweet. In the President's mind, the warning label from Twitter was the latest indignity against him by the social media giant, as Mr. Trump tore into Twitter early on Friday morning. 'Twitter is doing nothing about all of the lies & propaganda being put out by China or the Radical Left Democrat Party,' the President tweeted soon after 7 am. 'They have targeted Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States.' Earlier this week, Twitter added a link to a couple of the President's tweets about mail-in voting, giving a link for more information about the issue. The President was incensed, leading to his executive order on Thursday, and a direct threat to close down the company, which experts said he had no power to do. On Capitol Hill, the two parties saw the developing events on Twitter much differently. 'Twitter is censoring the President of the United States,' said Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ). Democrats in Congress said the President was overreacting, and acting like an authoritarian. “Trump’s behavior is growing increasingly unhinged, authoritarian, and outright violent and is designed to inflame and divide America further,” said Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-NJ). “This is vile behavior,” said Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ).  “The President should not be encouraging violence.” “(T)he President’s executive order is a shameless attempt to use the power of his office to silence his critics and intimidate his perceived enemies,” said Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA).