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Earth Day in the Park

When: April 15th 
Time: 11am-3pm
Where: Central Park in Winter Park 

The event is free to the public.
Earth Day in the Park is a day of awareness and appreciation of the environment.  Festivities include a kid’s zone with games, tie-dying T-shirts, live music, yoga in the park, an outdoor art competition, composting and recycling education, bike rodeo, electric car display and much more.  Certified arborists from the city’s Urban Forestry department will be available to answer questions and give away an assortment of one-gallon trees to city residents to plant at home.

Here are the names of the trees that will be given away by Urban Forestry: Tulip Poplars, Red Cedar, and Dahoon Holly.

For more information check out the Earth Day in the Park website and Facebook pages.

 

Central Park

 

Stage Schedule:

 

11:00am-11:05am Mayor Welcome 1:00pm -1:10pm Announcements

11:05am-11:30am   Presentation of Green School Grants by Mayor

1:10pm-1:55pm Jabari Clay first set

11:30am-11:50am  STUFF Appearance  1:55pm-2:00pm Announcements

11:45am-12:20pm Uke-A-Ladies first set 

2:00pm-2:45pm Jabari Clay second set

12:20-12:30pm

Presentation of Gold and Silver KWPB Sponsors by City Staff 

2:45-3pm Quick Draw Awards, Closing Announcements

12:30pm-1:00pm Uke-A-Ladies second set

 

 

 

 Sponsors

Gold Community Partner

Silver Community Partner

 
      

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A man reportedly was shot and killed Sunday night outside an Arkansas Walmart as bystanders, including kids, looked on. >> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified According to KAIT, police said the slaying began as a domestic dispute at the front of the store in Trumann about 9:15 p.m. CDT. Police arrived and negotiated with an armed man who walked out of the store with a woman. The man then shot and killed a second man who 'tried to intervene,' KAIT reported. The armed man eventually surrendered to police and was arrested. Police did not release the names of the people involved in the incident, but officers said the slain man was likely connected to the woman and armed man. >> Read more trending news  Dozens of shoppers were nearby when the man was shot, police said. 'A lot of people witnessed something tonight that they should have never seen,' Trumann police Chief Chad Henson told KAIT. 'We're going to have to go through a lot of healing from here on out. It was just a terrible day.' Read more here.
  • Faced with hundreds of demonstrators rallying against a crowd of neo-Nazis in Newnan, Georgia, authorities turned to a little-known Georgia law adopted in 1951 to combat the Ku Klux Klan. >> Tension, arrests at neo-Nazi rally in metro Atlanta The law, which makes it illegal to wear a mask at most public events, was cited in several of the arrests of counterdemonstrators who joined a protest Saturday against white supremacists. And the irony was not lost upon the organizers of the counterdemonstration, who were fuming Sunday that a law aimed at weakening white supremacists was used to arrest protesters who opposed a neo-Nazi rally. “They were trying to stop us, and we were trying to dial down the racist stuff,” said Jeremy Ortega, a 19-year-old who was among the counterprotesters charged with a misdemeanor for wearing a mask. He said many of the demonstrators wore masks to avoid being identified and threatened by white power groups. “We were peacefully protesting, yet they put guns in our faces and told us to take our masks off,” said Ortega, who added that he is considering filing a civil lawsuit. “It made no sense.” State and local authorities did not comment on specific allegations of abuse on Sunday. But Georgia Bureau of Investigation Director Vernon Keenan said the overwhelming security – nearly 700 law enforcement officers were on hand – helped prevent the clashes from escalating. “Making arrests in a volatile situation is never going to be pretty,” Keenan said. No one from the white supremacist group was arrested on Saturday, and they largely avoided confrontations with police or the counterdemonstration group. The two dozen white supremacists who attended the rally were separated from the group by an 8-foot fence – and hundreds of armed officers. ‘Remove your mask’ On Sunday, a coalition of counterprotest groups planned a vigil at the Coweta County Jail to criticize what they said was excessive violence by police. The Huffington Post reported that a contingent of officers approached a group of 50 counterdemonstrators before the rally and demanded they remove their masks or face arrests. The news outlet wrote that officers then “grabbed those who were still masked, tossing them to the ground and handcuffing them.” A video posted on social media by freelance journalist Daniel Shular appeared to show authorities scuffling with counterdemonstrators. Authorities demanded that the counterprotesters remove their masks, and the footage showed an officer raising his rifle at demonstrators. “Remove your mask, or you will be arrested,” said an officer in the video, which shows a ring of demonstrators standing with their hands raised aloft. Several are chanting “hands up, don’t shoot.” An Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter who attempted to report on the confrontation during the rally was obstructed by authorities. Several other counterdemonstrators faced violations that have nothing to do with the anti-mask law. Daniel Hanley was charged with obstruction of a pedestrian roadway after he said he nonviolently resisted a police officer who confronted him. He said he believes he was arrested because he was wielding a megaphone and leading chants against the white supremacists. “They were trying to find any pretext to shut us down,” Hanley, 36, said of the authorities. “The moment we stepped foot there, they intimated us and strategically tried to target people.” ‘Absolutely satisfied’ State law bans the wearing of masks, hoods or other devices that conceal a person’s identity if they’re on public property or on private property where the owner has not consented. It includes exceptions for holidays, theatrical productions, civil emergencies and sporting events. The laws have been adopted by about a dozen states, most aimed at weakening the KKK in the middle of the 20th century. The Georgia Supreme Court in 1990 upheld the state’s ban after a Klansman donned a hood on the Lawrenceville Square, citing his First Amendment rights. The law has mostly been used to target KKK demonstrations, though it has also been employed before to arrest demonstrators who are objecting to white power groups. At a 2016 rally, the law was used to arrest eight demonstrators protesting a white supremacist rally at Stone Mountain Park. In a strange turn, it also was invoked ahead of a press conference last year at the Gold Dome, when supporters of Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle threatened to hire performers in circus masks to interrupt a rival’s event. The clowns never showed up. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said they were intent on enforcing that law and others as they studied how law enforcement officials handled white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 to prepare for the Newnan event. In Charlottesville, officers remained largely passive as bloody clashes raged around them, and the event soon spiraled out of control. One person was killed and dozens more were injured in the violence. “You have to have adequate resources and the intent to enforce the law,” Keenan said. “We had both.” He said officers made clear to both groups that masks and some weapons were not allowed. He said authorities found an abandoned backpack with smoke bombs at one checkpoint. State law allows demonstrators to carry firearms if they are licensed; on Saturday, several were spotted sporting firearms. “We maintained security. We would not let there be disorder. We didn’t have civil disorder, property damage. And we had just a few arrests,” Keenan said. “We are absolutely satisfied.” MORE COVERAGE FROM AJC.COM:  >> Reports from Newnan as the rally and counterprotest were underway >> How social media reacted >> In-depth look at how protest was contained 
  • UPDATE, 10 a.m. April 22: The two brothers who went missing Friday have been found, police said.  Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, have been located. Pittsburgh police thanked all involved for their assistance in finding the boys.  ORIGINAL STORY: Pittsburgh police are seeking assistance in finding two brothers.  >> Watch the news report here Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, went missing about 5 p.m. Friday. >> Read more trending news  According to a news release, the two brothers are known to frequent the Brookline area.  Anyone with information regarding their whereabouts is asked to call police at 412-323-7800. 
  • A massive hunt to capture the man wanted in connection with the shooting deaths of four people at a Waffle House in Antioch, Tennessee, outside Nashville, continues. >> Watch the news report here >> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified Travis Reinking, 29, is now on the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted List, and law enforcement said he is armed, dangerous and hiding, WHBQ's Greg Coy reports.  >> Who is Travis Reinking, the person of interest in the Waffle House shooting? Police said Reinking returned to his apartment after opening fire at the Waffle House. Reinking, who reportedly was nude at the time of the shooting, put on pants and then ran into the woods, police said. >> Waffle House 'hero' disarmed shooter, tossed rifle over counter Neighbor Johnny Green said another neighbor noticed Reinking and called police.  >> Who is James Shaw Jr., the man who disarmed the Waffle House shooter? 'My mom saw him,' Green added. Coy asked, 'What did she say about him?' 'He just seemed weird,' Green replied.  >> Read more trending news  Police said they hope the rain and cooler temperatures will draw Reinking out of hiding. Police said Reinking's options are limited because the crime and social media attention have made him an international fugitive. >> Please visit Fox13Memphis.com for the latest on this developing story
  • As an intensive manhunt continued Monday for a half-naked man suspected in the slayings of four people at a Waffle House restaurant, authorities shared reports of previous efforts to contain the gun-loving man with paranoid delusions. More than 80 Nashville police officers continued to search for Travis Reinking early Monday, authorities said. Agents with the FBI, the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and troopers with the Tennessee Highway Patrol joined the manhunt. He was also added to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted list. Reinking was nearly naked, wearing only a green jacket and brandishing an assault-style rifle when he opened fire in the parking lot and then stormed the restaurant, police say. Four people were killed and four others were injured before a quick-thinking customer wrestled the gun away, preventing more bloodshed. Metropolitan Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson said at a news conference that Reinking, 29, was last seen Sunday around a wooded area near an apartment complex where he lived, wearing only pants and no shirt or shoes. Anderson said it's not clear why Reinking opened fire on restaurant patrons with an assault weapon, though he may have 'mental issues.' He may still be armed, Anderson said, because he was known to have owned a handgun authorities have not recovered. 'He's on foot,' Anderson said. 'Unless he's been picked up by a car, he would be fairly close. We don't want to alarm people, but certainly, everybody should take precautions. It could be he's in an unoccupied house. We want everybody to be concerned. Neighbors should check on each other.' Nashville public schools will go into 'lock-out' mode if Reinking isn't found in time for class Monday, officials said. That means students will be free to move about the building, but no guests or visitors will be allowed to enter. As the search continued, authorities in Illinois shared past reports suggesting multiple red flags about a disturbed young man with paranoid delusions who liked firearms. In May 2016, Reinking told deputies from Tazewell County, Illinois, that music superstar Taylor Swift was stalking him and hacking his phone, and that his family was also involved, according to a report released Sunday. Another sheriff's report said Reinking barged into a community pool in Tremont, Illinois, last June, and jumped into the water wearing a pink woman's coat over his underwear. Investigators believed he had an AR-15 rifle in his car trunk, but it was never displayed. No charges were filed. Last July, Reinking was arrested by the U.S. Secret Service after he crossed into a restricted area near the White House and refused to leave, saying he wanted to meet President Donald Trump. Reinking was not armed at the time, but at the FBI's request, state police in Illinois revoked his state firearms card and seized four guns from him, authorities said. The AR-15 used in the shootings was among the firearms seized. Then, in August, Reinking told police he wanted to file a report about 20 to 30 people tapping into his computer and phone and people 'barking like dogs' outside his residence, according to a report. Reinking agreed to go to a local hospital for an evaluation after repeatedly resisting the request, the report said. 'There's certainly evidence that there's some sort of mental health issues involved,' Tazwell County Sheriff Robert Huston said. But he said deputies returned the guns to Reinking's father on the promise that he would 'keep the weapons secure and out of the possession of Travis.' Nashville Police spokesman Don Aaron said that Reinking's father 'has now acknowledged giving them back' to his son. After the shooting, police recovered three of the four guns originally taken from Reinking, officials said. They believe he still has at least one handgun. Phone calls to a number listed for the father, Jeffrey Reinking, went unanswered. It is not clear why Reinking moved recently from Morton, Illinois, to Nashville and if it had anything to do with being near Swift. Police say he was employed in construction for a while, and there would have been enough work in the booming city for him. Police say Reinking drove into the Waffle House parking lot in his gold Chevy Silverado pickup early Sunday and sat there for about four minutes before opening fire outside the restaurant. The victims fatally shot in the parking have been identified as Taurean Sanderlin, 29, of Goodlettsville, and Joe Perez, 20, of Nashville. Sanderlin was an employee at the restaurant. Perez's mother posted a picture of her son on Facebook and asked for prayers, saying it was the hardest day of her life. 'Me, my husband and sons are broken right now with this loss,' Trisha Perez said in the post. 'Our lives are shattered.' Reinking then went inside the restaurant and opened fire, police said. One of the fatally wounded inside was DeEbony Groves, a 21-year student at Nashville's Belmont University. She was remembered as an exceptional student who made the Dean's list, and a tenacious basketball player. 'She was a brilliant young lady, very, very intelligent and a very hard worker,' Gallatin High School basketball coach Kim Kendrick told The Tennessean. Akilah Dasilva was also killed inside the restaurant. The 23-year-old from Antioch was a rap artist and music video producer who had such skills behind the camera that he was a favorite among many of Music City's independent musicians and recording labels, The Tennessean reported. 'Music is my life and I will never stop until I achieve my dreams,' Dasilva said on his Twitter account. Dasilva's mother told CBS News that her son was a student at Middle Tennessee State University and aspired to be a music engineer. He was at the restaurant with his girlfriend, 21-year-old Tia Waggoner, the paper reported. Waggoner was wounded and is being treated at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dasilva's family said she underwent surgery and doctors were trying to save her leg. Police say Sharita Henderson, 24, of Antioch, was wounded and is being treated at VUMC. Also wounded was James Shaw Jr., a 29-year-old restaurant patron who burned his hand grabbing the hot muzzle of the assault weapon as he wrestled the gun away. A Nashville native who works as a wireless technician for AT&T, Shaw said he was no hero — despite being hailed as one by Nashville Mayor David Briley. Shaw said he pounced on the suspect out of self-preservation, after making up his mind that 'he was going to have to work to kill me.' ___ Associated Press writers John Raby in Charleston, West Virginia; Ed White in Detroit; and Justin Pritchard in Los Angeles contributed to this report.