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The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    Alec Baldwin is due in court in New York City for a hearing on charges that he slugged a man during a dispute over a parking spot in last fall. The 60-year-old actor is scheduled to appear in a Manhattan courtroom Wednesday morning. He's charged with misdemeanor attempted assault and harassment, a violation. Baldwin has denied punching anyone in the Nov. 2 clash . The former '30 Rock' star's lawyer says he'll be vindicated by 'incontrovertible video evidence .' Police say the two started arguing and pushing each other after the man parked in a spot that Baldwin said a family member was holding for him. Baldwin, who portrays President Donald Trump on 'Saturday Night Live,' has gotten into several public confrontations over the years. Some have led to legal trouble.
  • Russell Baker, the genial, but sharp-witted writer who won Pulitzer Prizes for his humorous columns in The New York Times and a moving autobiography of his impoverished Baltimore childhood and later hosted television's 'Masterpiece Theatre,' has died. He was 93. Allen Baker told The Associated Press that his father died on Monday from complications after a fall. Baker in his later years, he lived in Leesburg, Virginia, not far from the rural community of his native Morrisonville. Amiable and approachable, but also clear-eyed and street smart, Baker enjoyed a decades-long career as reporter, columnist, critic and on-air personality. He won Pulitzers in 1979 for the 'Observer,' the Times column he wrote for 35 years, and in 1983 for his autobiography 'Growing Up.' The Great Depression and World War II shaped Baker's early life. He began his career as a reporter in 1947 and rose to become a national New York Times reporter in Washington, D.C., in 1954. He covered Congress, the military and State Department during the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations before tiring, he would recall, of waiting for politicians to come out of meeting rooms and lie to him. He drew upon those experiences for his column, writing as a curious and wide-eyed outsider who could leave an adversary buried under the weight of common sense. 'On television we see President Reagan in a cave. It is the Mammoth Cave, one of America's great caves. The TV news reader says the President has come there to create 'a photo opportunity.' Here is President Reagan on television again. He is looking at a bald eagle. The President and the eagle are in the same room enjoying 'a photo opportunity,' according to the TV news voice,' Baker wrote in 1984. 'His environmental policy has been characterized by a reluctance to do anything that would create difficulty for the business community. It is entirely possible to defend this position with persuasive argument. The President of the cave and the eagle, however, is not defending a sensibly thought-out policy; he is being used to deceive us into thinking that he is what he, in fact, is not.' Baker didn't ask to be called a humorist. During a 1994 speech in Hartford, Connecticut, he said his goal for the 'Observer' was to render the federal government, politics and diplomacy accessible through plain, easy-to-read language. It was to be more widely appealing than the 'High-Church, polysyllabic' writing common in The New York Times. 'Well, as I soon discovered, in those days if you wrote short sentences and plain English in the Times, everybody naturally assumed you were being funny,' he said in the speech. Baker's targets included his own profession. 'Those who expected me to have something to say had obviously never heard the classic definition of a newspaper man: 'A man with nothing on his mind and the power to express it,'' he said during the Hartford speech. He wrote a second autobiography, 'The Good Times,' to follow 'Growing Up.' The first focused on his childhood, the second on his early journalistic career. Baker would eventually write, edit or contribute to more than 15 other books, collections and assorted works — including a musical play and children's book. Baker was born in 1925 to stonemason Benjamin Baker and schoolteacher Lucy Elizabeth Baker. He married Miriam Emily Nash in 1950 and had three children: Kathleen, Allen and Michael. Benjamin Baker died of untreated diabetes when his son was 5. Lucy Baker struggled through the Great Depression as a single mother living in Baltimore. Russell Baker remembered his mother as a key influence driving him to succeed. 'She would make me make something of myself whether I wanted to or not,' he wrote in 'Growing Up.' Baker served in the U.S. Naval Reserve from 1943 to 1945 and was trained as a pilot during World War II. He graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1947 and began his journalism career that year as a police reporter with The Baltimore Sun. He became the newspaper's London bureau chief in 1953. Baker took over as 'Masterpiece Theatre's' host in 1993, succeeding Alistair Cooke, and remained until 2004. Baker's on-air commentary for public television focused on providing critical perspectives on featured works along with historical context. He also provided insights into the original authors' approaches and detailed liberties taken to adapt the literature for television. He wrote long-form reviews and other articles for The New York Review of Books during his years following the Times. He told a reporter for the Times Union, located in Albany, New York, in 2002 that the assignments were more rewarding during his retirement than the 'hyped-up' work of column writing, when 'you're sweating it out worrying if they'll read past the second paragraph.' His final column ran on Christmas Day, 1998. An Associated Press story at the time described it as a quiet adieu. 'He apologized for talking about himself,' the story read, 'remembered warmly a pope, a couple of presidents and his Uncle Allen, and concluded he had said enough for the time being.
  • The Chinese model in widely derided advertisements for Italian fashion line Dolce & Gabbana has apologized for her appearance in the campaign. Zuo Ye said on her Weibo microblog that as a recent college graduate, she hadn't had time to consider the effect of the ads, in which she was filmed trying to eat pizza, spaghetti and a giant version of a cannoli pastry using chopsticks. 'I will grow from this experience and will better display the character of a Chinese citizen,' Zuo wrote in the posting dated Monday. Following the criticism of the ads, the Milan designers canceled a Shanghai runway show last year meant as a tribute to China, as their guest list of Asian celebrities joined protests. Many Chinese social media users called the advertisements racist and based on outdated stereotypes. As retailers began pulling their wares, co-founders Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana went on camera to apologize. The pair appeared in a nearly 1 ½ minute video posted on Weibo, saying they hoped to be forgiven and will do their best to better understand and respect Chinese culture. The advertisement controversy was aggravated by insulting remarks made on the Instagram accounts of both the company and Gabbana against China and Chinese people. The company blamed hackers for the Instagram comments.
  • Chelsea Clinton revealed on social media Tuesday that she and her husband, Marc Mezvinsky, are expecting their third child. >> Read more trending news  The couple has two children together -- Charlotte 4, and Aidan, 2. “Marc and I have loved watching Charlotte be such a wonderful big sister and we’re excited to watch Aidan become a big brother!” Clinton, the daughter of former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton, said in a post on Twitter. “We cannot wait to meet our newest edition later this summer,” she wrote. >> Trending: Actress Alyssa Milano calls red Trump MAGA hats ‘the new white hoods’ Clinton has authored several children’s books, and her latest, “Start Now! You Can Make a Difference,” explains to children how they can help make the world a better place through helping with issues such as hunger, bullying and climate change.
  • A college student who has not touched a hockey stick since her high school gym class made the shot of a lifetime Friday. >> Read more trending news  Morgan Ward, 20, a junior at Minnesota State at Mankato, won a promotion at the college when she buried the puck into a slot at the goal line from 115 feet away to win a $30,000 prize, KARE reported. 'There was was honestly no strategy, I just wanted to make it down the ice,' Ward told the television station.  Ward, from St. Clair, Minnesota, received free tickets to the Mavericks’ men’s hockey at the Verizon Center and texted a promotional code for the chance to take the shot, the Star Tribune reported. “I was there with my boyfriend (Brody Hanson) and he made me text in, it texted me back saying 'congratulations, you gotta go shoot this puck,'' Ward, who is majoring in business management, told KEYC. 'I didn't want to be down there as center of attention. So I (told my boyfriend) 'you gotta go do this, I can't do this, I'm gonna go hide in the bathroom.' He's like 'Morgan, there's 30 grand on the line, what do you got to lose?'' The contest involved shooting a puck from the far blue line into a tiny opening on the goal line, an opening barely bigger than the width of a puck, KARE reported.  Ward took the shot and saw the puck headed for the opening, but didn't see it go through, the television station reported.  'The only thing going through my head is like 'Don't fall,' and I just wanted to hit it hard enough that it would make it across the ice and not like halfway down,' Ward told KEYC. 'And then all of a sudden it's like this is actually really close.' Then the puck went through the slot. 'I still don't believe it. It's unreal,' Ward told the television station. Ward said the plans to put her winnings into a savings account or an investment plan, as she 'still lives with her parents and wants to get out of there someday,” KARE reported. 
  • Mariano Rivera’s election to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Tuesday was never in doubt. The right-hander was the major leagues’ all-time saves leader with 652 during the regular season and 43 during the playoffs and World Series. >> Read more trending news  The only mystery was whether Rivera would become the first player unanimously elected to baseball’s shrine, and that question was solved Tuesday night when he gained 100 percent of the vote. Call it Mo-nanimous. Rivera pitched 19 seasons in the major leagues and had an 82-60 record and a 2.21 ERA. He pitched in seven World Series, 16 American League Divisional Series and nine A.L. Championship Series, going 8-1 with an 0.70 ERA. Here are some things to know about “Mo”: Highest percentages: Rivera is among an elite class of Hall of Famers in terms of votes received. Outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. came the closest to receiving 100 percent of the votes among Hall of Fame voters. Griffey, elected in 1996, received 437 out of 440 votes cast – a 99.32 percentage. Griffey broke the record set in 1992 by pitcher Tom Seaver, who was listed on 425 of 430 ballots – a 98.84 percentage. Rounding out the top five before this year were pitcher Nolan Ryan, with 98.79 percent in 1999 (491 out 497 ballots cast); infielder Cal Ripken Jr., with 98.53 percent in 2007 (537 out 545 ballots); and outfielder Ty Cobb, elected in the inaugural class of 1936, who pulled 98.23 percent of the votes (222 out of 226 cast). What an investment: The New York Yankees signed Rivera, then 20, as an amateur free agent on Feb. 17, 1990, for $2,000. Born in Panama, Rivera spoke no English and had never been on a plane or away from his home country. In his 2014 book, “The Closer,” Rivera writes that before he signed a professional baseball contract, the longest trip he had ever made was a six-hour drive to the border of Costa Rica.  Family days: Rivera was born Nov. 29, 1969, in Panama City, Panama. His childhood nickname was Pili, given to him by his sister, Delia, when he was a baby. “Nobody knows why,” Rivera writes in his book. Rivera dropped out of school when he was in the ninth grade at Pedro Pablo Sanchez High School in La Chorrera, Panama. Rivera’s father, Mariano Rivera Sr., was a captain on a commercial fishing boat in Puerto Caimito, on which the younger Mariano worked six days a week, Sports Illustrated reported. Rivera’s father bought him his first glove when he was 12, the magazine reported. He did not start pitching until he was 19.  Theme song: When Rivera entered a game at Yankee Stadium, the public address announcer would play Metallica’s 1991 song “Enter Sandman” as his theme song. In a video interview Friday with MLB.com, Rivera told his former teammate and manager, Joe Girardi, that he would have never chosen that song from the heavy metal group as his introduction. “If that was me, I would have never picked that song,” Rivera said. “It would’ve been Christian music. It would have been something that put people to sleep.” In “The Closer,” Rivera writes that he would have preferred “Onward Christian Soldiers,” but “I don’t think that would’ve flown.” Guns N’ Roses’ “Welcome to the Jungle” was used for a while, but then Mike Luzzi, a Yankee Stadium operations worker, came up with the Metallica song and began playing it during the 1999 season. 'We needed something cooler, more ominous,' Luzzi told MLB.com in 2011. 'Our job was to try and get the building rocking. The gist of it worked, beginning to put the other club to sleep.” By the way, Rivera has never been to a Metallica concert. Good teacher: Rivera’s first pitching coach in the minor leagues, with the Gulf Coast League Yankees in 1990, was Hoyt Wilhelm, Sports Illustrated reported. In 1985, Wilhelm was the first relief pitcher elected to the Hall of Fame and was the first official all-time saves leader with 228.  Under Wilhelm’s tutelage, Rivera had a 5-1 record and 0.17 ERA for the GCL Yankees, allowing one earned run in 52 innings of work. He struck out 58 batters and walked seven. Shaky debut: Rivera made his major-league debut on May 23, 1995, starting against the Angels in Anaheim, California, according to Retrosheet. Rivera opened the game by striking out the first two batters he faced, Tony Phillips and Jim Edmonds. It went downhill from there, as Rivera allowed eight hits and earned five runs in 3 1/3 innings before being replaced by Bob Macdonald in the fourth inning. The Angels won the game 10-0. Out of the bullpen: Rivera made his first career relief appearance on Aug. 1, 1995, at Yankee Stadium, according to Retrosheet. He entered the game in the sixth inning against the Milwaukee Brewers, with New York leading 3-2. The first batter he faced was catcher Mike Matheny, who grounded the ball back to Rivera for an easy out. It got more difficult, as Rivera lost the lead and allowed three hits and three runs. However, Rivera earned the victory after the Yankees scored three runs to regain the lead in the seventh inning, winning 7-5. First save: For a guy who is the all-time saves leader, Rivera did not earn his first save until May 17, 1996, against the Angels, according to Retrosheet. That was because the Yankees had John Wetteland as their closer, and the right-hander had 31 saves in 1995 and 43 in 1996 as the team’s top reliever. Against the Angels, Rivera pitched the ninth inning of the Yankees’ 8-5 victory, allowing one hit and striking out one batter. He got Garret Anderson to ground into a game-ending double play to nail down the save. The last 42: Rivera was the last major-leaguer to wear No. 42, according to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Major League Baseball retired the number on April 15, 1997, to honor the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Commissioner Bud Selig ruled that any players wearing the number at the time of the announcement could continue to wear it. Rivera wore the number until he retired after the 2013 season. That cutter: Rivera’s cut fastball was his bread-and-butter pitch. Batters knew what was coming but could rarely do anything with it. “He had other pitches, too, but the cutter was his bread and butter,” Jason Giambi told Fox Sports in 2011. “He was throwing saw blades up there, chewing up bats.” 'I don't use the same bat that I've been playing good with because chances are real high' it's going to get broken, Carl Crawford told the Los Angeles Times in 2013. 'So, I just take an old, cheap bat that I don't really care about (to the plate).” 'Hitters know what's coming and still they can't put a good (swing) on the ball,” Rivera told the Times in 2013. “Thank God for that.
  • Black Panther' broke through an Oscar category wall for superheroes. The Marvel blockbuster hit became the first comic book-based film to earn a best picture nomination from the Academy Awards on Tuesday. It was a major step for comic book movies, which had previously been shunned from film's top honor. The most notable snub was 2008's 'The Dark Knight,' prompting the academy to expand the best picture category from five to up to 10 nominees. It took a decade, but 'Black Panther' cracked the category after becoming a box-office hit domestically and a cultural phenomenon. The film earned $700 million domestically during its theatrical run. Overall, 'Black Panther' was rewarded a total of seven nominations including Hannah Beachler and Jay Hart's production design, Ruth E. Carter's costume design and Kendrick Lamar and SZA's song 'All the Stars.' The film was also nominated for best sound editing, sound mixing and original score. Beachler became the first African-American nominee for production design. 'To break down a wall like that, to be your ancestors' wildest dreams, to show other young women of color and boys and girls that you can do whatever you want no matter what struggles you have in your life — all of that. That's what it means to me,' said Beachler, talking by phone from the Cincinnati set of Todd Haynes' latest film. Ludwig Goransson, who scored the film, gave a lot of credit to the film's overall success to director Ryan Coogler, who was shut out of the directing category. 'He's an exceptional leader,' said Goransson of Coogler, who he's known since college. The Grammy-nominated producer said his rapport with the director put together 'memorable music' for the film. 'We're not doing anything different than what we did 10 years ago,' said Goransson, a longtime producer of Childish Gambino. 'I just tried to make the best music as I could to serve Ryan's vision. When working with him, I try to make the best possible music as I can.' Carter said she feels proud to be a part of a film like 'Black Panther.' 'With this film, I felt like there was a paradigm shift,' said Carter, who was previously nominated for her designs for Spike Lee's 'Malcolm X' and Steven Spielberg's 'Amistad.' ''The nominations let me know that not only Marvel fans, people of Africa and African-Americans felt really happy about this film, and loved the costume designs.
  • The Moose is finally loose in Cooperstown. >> Read more trending news  Mike Mussina had a career record of 270-153 during his 18-year career. He only won 20 games once, and that came in 2008, his final season. Mussina was a five-time All-Star selection and placed in the top five in voting for the American League Cy Young Award six times, finishing as high as second place in 1999. The only time he did not win at least 11 games in a season was 1991, his rookie season. Here are some things to know about Mussina. Famous birthplace: Mussina was born Dec. 8, 1968, in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, the birthplace of the Little League World Series. In 1968 -- known as the Year of the Pitcher in the majors -- Osaka, Japan, defeated Richmond, Virginia, 1-0 in the title game. All three of Richmond’s hits were collected by cleanup hitter Jim Pankovitz, who would play six years in the major leagues. Former NFL quarterback Turk Schonert, who died Friday two days after his 62nd birthday, played infield for the Garden Grove, California, squad that reached the LLWS. Golden Glove: Mussina was not only effective as a pitcher, he also was a nimble fielder. He won seven Gold Gloves during his career -- four with the Baltimore Orioles from 1996 to 1999, and three with the New York Yankees (2001, 2003 and 2008). That ties him for fifth all-time; fellow Hall of Famer Greg Maddux won the award a record 18 times. Tough numbers: Since Nolan Ryan was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1999, only three starting pitchers with less than 300 career victories have been enshrined in Cooperstown -- Bert Blyleven (287 wins), Pedro Martinez (219) and John Smoltz (213), MLB.com reported. Mussina is now the fourth. Great control: Tom Verducci of Sports Illustrated wrote in 1994 that “What's most impressive is that from 60 feet, 6 inches, Mussina can dot the i in his autograph with any one of six pitches. He has three fastballs (a cutter, a sinker and a riser), two curveballs (a slow curve and the knuckle curve) and an astonishingly deceptive changeup that is his best pitch.” Great mind: Mussina’s senior thesis at Stanford University was “The Economics of Signing out of High School as Opposed to College,” Sports Illustrated reported. He wrote it in one night and received a B+. With the Orioles, he was the team’s player representative during the 1990s. 'He buys books I'd never be interested in,' catcher Chris Hoiles told Sports Illustrated. 'If I went to a bookstore.”
  • Mariano Rivera, the greatest closer in major league baseball history, locked down a spot in the Hall of Fame by a unanimous vote Tuesday, leading a class that also includes the late pitcher Roy Halladay, former designated hitter Edgar Martinez and former pitcher Mike Mussina. >> Read more trending news  Rivera became the first player to be unanimously elected since Hall of Fame balloting began in 1936. Ken Griffey Jr. held the previous record, falling three votes shy of a unanimous election in 2016. The Hall of Fame election is conducted by the Baseball Writers Association of America. A candidate must appear on 75 percent of all ballots turned in to gain induction.  A total of 425 ballots were cast, with 319 needed for election. Players will be inducted July 21 in Cooperstown, New York, at the National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum. Halladay and Martinez each received 85.4 percent of the vote, while Mussina drew 76.4 percent of the vote. Rivera, 49, who compiled 652 saves during the regular season and 42 more in the postseason, was elected in his first year of eligibility. He had an 82-60 record and a 2.21 ERA during a 19-year career that ended in 2013. In the postseason, Rivera was nearly untouchable with a 0.70 ERA. Halladay, who was killed in an airplane crash off the west coast of Florida in November 2017, won 203 games during his 16-season career. This was also his first year on the Hall of Fame ballot. In 2010, he became the second pitcher in major league history to throw a postseason no-hitter, blanking the Cincinnati Reds to join Don Larsen, who threw a perfect game in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series. Martinez, 56, becomes the first player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame who was primarily a designated hitter. Martinez, who played his entire 18-year career with the Seattle Mariners, was elected in his 10th and final year of eligibility. Mussina, 50, was elected in his sixth year of eligibility. He won 270 games during an 18-year career he split between the Baltimore Orioles and New York Yankees. Mussina won 11 or more games in every season except his rookie year, 1991.
  • At first glance, the election of Roy Halladay to the Baseball Hall of Fame on Tuesday seems like a sentimental choice. His life was cut short at 40 when the plane he was piloting crashed into the Gulf of Mexico off the west coast of Florida on Nov. 17, 2017. >> Read more trending news  An autopsy showed Halladay had amphetamines, morphine and a sleep aid in his system when the plane crashed. >> Halladay had drugs in system when plane crashed Sentiment goes out the window when reviewing Halladay’s career. His numbers justified election: 205 career victories, a postseason no-hitter, three 20-victory seasons and 67 complete games in an era where the relief pitcher has taken over closing out ballgames. Here are some things to know about Halladay. Two leagues, two awards: Halladay became the third of six major league pitchers to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues, according to MLB.com. winning the American League version in 2003 with the Toronto Blue Jays and the National League seven years later with the Philadelphia Phillies. The others are Gaylord Perry, Pedro Martinez, Randy Johnson, Roger Clemens and Max Scherzer. Postseason magic: Halladay appeared in only five postseason games and had a 3-2 record. However, his playoff debut on Oct. 6, 2010, was memorable and historic, as Halladay threw the second no-hit game in postseason history. Halladay blanked the Reds 4-0, retiring the first 14 batters he faced before walking Jay Bruce with two outs in the fifth inning. It was the first -- and only -- no-hitter in postseason history since Don Larsen of the New York Yankees threw a perfect game against the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series. Common bond: In addition to joining Larsen in postseason lore, Halladay matched Larsen’s perfect game effort with a gem of his own, also during the 2010 season. On May 27, 2010, in Miami’s Sun Life Stadium, Halladay was perfect against the Florida Marlins, striking out 11 batters in a 1-0 victory. Near no-hitter: Halladay came within one out of pitching a no-hitter in his second major league start. On Sept. 27, 1998 at Toronto’s SkyDome, Halladay did not allow a hit until Detroit Tigers pinch-hitter Bobby Higginson homered, according to Retrosheet. Halladay lost the no-hitter but locked up his first career victory, a 2-1 win against the Tigers, when he retired Frank Catalanotto on a line drive to shortstop. Never beat them: The only team Halladay never defeated during his 16-year career was the team he finished his career with, the Philadelphia Phillies. In fact, he never started against the Phillies, even when he was with Toronto and the Blue Jays faced Philadelphia in interleague play, according to Bleacher Report. Biggest save: Although not known for pitching in relief, Halladay helped pull off a big save in the Amazon rainforest. Halladay and his friends were on a fishing trip when they encountered a man who had been attacked by an anaconda. Original reports exaggerated Halladay’s role in the rescue, and he set the record straight in a February 2012 interview with The Washington Times. “I was not wrestling snakes. I was nowhere near snakes,” Halladay told the newspaper. “We were just driving back. We had been fishing all day and we were on the boat driving back and we happened to see a guy sitting on the shore line without clothes. We couldn’t talk to him. The guides had to talk to him. They were speaking Portuguese. He had been attacked by a snake and escaped, but it had ripped the engine off the boat and left all his stuff out in the middle of the river. So we picked up his stuff and drove him back to his tribe, I guess you would call it.”

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Nine people were hurt, two critically, in a military vehicle crash in New Mexico, authorities said Tuesday night. According to KDBC and KFOX, the wreck, which involved two Stryker vehicles, occurred about 7:30 p.m. on U.S. Highway 54 in Otero County.  >> Read more trending news  The nine victims, all military personnel, were taken to a nearby hospital for treatment. Read more here or here.
  • A New York man was arrested Friday in connection with the fatal hit-and-run of a well-known and beloved gas station manager who investigators said was trying to stop him from leaving without paying for $22 worth of gas.   Joshua E. Roston, 33, of Baldwin, was arrested in Philadelphia on a vehicular homicide warrant out of Nassau County, according to Nassau County police officials. Though he was in the process of being extradited, he remained in the Philadelphia Jail Tuesday morning.  Roston is accused of running over Cemal “John” Dagdeviren, 59, of Levittown, the morning of Jan. 14 after Dagdeviren, who managed the Pit Stop Repair Shop in Baldwin, confronted him over payment for gas that had been pumped into the 1999 GMC Suburban Roston was driving. The slaying of the Turkish immigrant, who moved his family to the United States 25 years ago, has made international news.  The entire incident was recorded by surveillance cameras at the Pit Stop, which is a combination gas station and repair shop. Dagdeviren was also a mechanic there.  Police officials said the incident began shortly before 7:30 a.m. that morning, when the driver of the Suburban asked that an attendant fill up his SUV’s gas tank at the full-service island. According to NBC News, Nassau County Detective Lt. Stephen Fitzpatrick told reporters at a news conference that the attendant became suspicious because the truck had no license plates and the driver was acting oddly.  “They stopped at $22 and asked him to pay at that time,” Fitzpatrick told reporters, according to the news network. “The attendant said to pull over to the side.” The driver, who was dressed in an orange knit hat and gray sweatshirt, went inside the store to pay, but gave the clerk a fake credit card that was declined, Fitzpatrick said. He then went back into the parking lot, where Dagdeviren stepped in and confronted him. The surveillance video, a portion of which was released by police officials, shows Dagdeviren talking with the driver as he goes back to the SUV and climbs inside. Dagdeviren appears to realize the man plans to drive off without paying and goes to the driver’s side door and knocks on the window.  See raw footage of the final moments of Cemal Dagdeviren’s life below, courtesy of Fox News.  When the man doesn’t roll the window down, Dagdeviren tries to open the door, but it appears to be locked. He hurries behind the vehicle and stands behind it as the driver begins to back up. The SUV bumps into his body.  Dagdeviren returns to the front of the vehicle after standing behind it does not stop the driver and, as the driver begins to inch forward across the parking lot, he stands directly in front of the SUV.  Dagdeviren is standing in front of the vehicle with his hands on the hood when the vehicle appears to accelerate into him. The video released by police officials ends at that point, but investigators said Dagdeviren was run over, suffering a severe head injury.  The driver then fled the scene, investigators said, leaving Dagdeviren lying mortally wounded in the roadway. Dagdeviren was taken to South Nassau Communities Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police officials said.  Parminder Singh, who works at a neighboring gas station, told CBS New York that he saw Dagdeviren lying on the ground and went to see what had happened.  “Does anybody’s life cost $22?” Singh said. “No. It’s really bad. People don’t think before they commit something.” Dagdeviren’s son, Ali Dagdeviren, called his father’s killer a monster. “If you do that to anybody for $22, you can do anything,” Ali Dagdeviren, 35, told the news station.  Cemal Dagdeviren came to the United States nearly 25 years ago to provide a better future for his family, according to a GoFundMe page set up to help the Dagdeviren family lay the patriarch to rest. He and his wife have two grown sons, Ali Dagdeviren, who was recently married, and Ceyhun “Jay” Dagdeviren, who is in the academy to become a New York City firefighter. Jay Dagdeviren, 25, also volunteers as a firefighter and emergency medical technician with the Bethpage Fire Department.  “Cemal was a hardworking and kind man who will be dearly missed by his friends and family,” reads the fundraising page, which exceeded its $20,000 goal by $4,000 in just seven days.  “My father worked hard for his family and never got into trouble, never even got a parking ticket,” Ali Dagdeviren told Newsday. “We are in a lot of pain. This is really hard for us.” Cemal Dagdeviren’s customers paid their respects in a steady stream the day after his death. They also held a candlelight vigil in his honor that night at the station, which was closed for business.  According to Newsday, crime scene tape surrounded the station and blood stained the street where Dagdeviren died. Flowers and candles fashioned a makeshift memorial on the sidewalk, built by distraught patrons who described Dagdeviren as a good, trustworthy mechanic with a quick smile and a tendency to wave off payment for minor repairs he’d made for his customers.  “It is very sad,” Yvonne Holloway said. “He was a very hardworking man and one of the nicest people you could ever meet.” “He would say, ‘Have a good day,’ and he meant it,” longtime customer Liz Boylan told Newsday as she dropped off flowers. “I am upset because he was just so sweet.” A funeral was held Wednesday for Dagdeviren in the U.S., Newsday reported. Turkish news media reported a second service was held in Istanbul, where the family returned his body for burial.  Homicide detectives announced Thursday that they had tracked down the Suburban and identified Roston as the man in the orange ski hat. The SUV was impounded as evidence.  Detectives began a manhunt for Roston, who they suspected had fled the New York area. A $10,000 reward was offered for his capture, the details of which were not immediately available Tuesday.  “He knew what he was doing when he stepped on the gas and crushed that man’s life and his family’s life,” a police official told NBC New York.  Roston has a criminal history that includes stealing gas, shoplifting and stripping vehicles for parts, the news station reported. 
  • After just over two years in office, President Donald Trump’s White House has clearly decided that the televised White House briefing – a regular staple since Bill Clinton came into office – is no longer needed, as Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has not formally taken questions from reporters at the podium in the Brady Briefing Room in over a month. “I told her not to bother, the word gets out anyway!” President Trump tweeted on Tuesday. Before the briefings became a daily televised event in the Clinton Administration, White House briefings were mainly what’s known as ‘pen and pad’ gatherings – that is, no television, no radio recording, a throwback to the days when newspaper and magazine reporters dominated those covering the White House. The reason Sarah Sanders does not go to the “podium” much anymore is that the press covers her so rudely & inaccurately, in particular certain members of the press. I told her not to bother, the word gets out anyway! Most will never cover us fairly & hence, the term, Fake News! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 22, 2019 The number of briefings dwindled throughout 2018 – for example, Sanders held only three in July, only once in both November and December. The last formal briefing was on December 18. Critics of the briefings say it’s become a place for reporters to grandstand – the President in his tweet today said reporters acted ‘rudely’ – but it’s also been an important venue over the years for a President, in order to get out the message of that administration. Before the Clinton White House – with Communications Director George Stephanopoulos and Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers – made the briefing into a daily televised event which kept the focus on the White House, standard procedure allowed for only a few minutes of televised proceedings at the start of a briefing. After about five minutes, the TV lights would be turned off, the microphone would go silent, and the briefing would continue to be on the record, but not for broadcast. The White House Correspondents Association on Tuesday urged the President to reconsider. Statement on White House news briefings from WHCA President Olivier Knox. pic.twitter.com/jhQjVrz1bC — WHCA (@whca) January 22, 2019 While Sanders has not been on television much in recent months, the President has made himself available repeatedly, often entertaining questions as he departs the White House, or in photo opportunities with reporters. Mr. Trump has held only two formal, solo news conferences; the last one – the day after the November elections – included a verbal showdown with CNN reporter Jim Acosta.
  • Officials in Kentucky said a Catholic school at the center of a controversial encounter among white teenagers, Native American protesters and others was closed Tuesday after officials learned of a planned protest at the school. >> Read more trending news In a statement, officials with the Diocese of Covington and Covington Catholic High School said police warned them of the planned protest in the days after video surfaced online that appeared to show teenagers from the school surrounding a Native American man outside the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. “Due to threats of violence and the possibility of large crowds the Diocese was advised to close Covington Catholic High School, the Diocesan Curia and neighboring Covington Latin School,” officials said in the statement. >> Teen wearing MAGA hat in protest video speaks out A video surfaced online last week of a student, who identified himself in a statement as Covington Catholic High School junior Nick Sandmann, smirking as a Native American elder beat a ceremonial drum near his face. The video sparked outrage nationwide, though longer videos from wider perspectives later revealed that the drummer -- Omaha Nation elder Nathan Phillips -- had intervened between the boys and members of a black religious sect, according to The Associated Press. Phillips appeared to intervene at a time when the teens seemed to be getting rowdier and the black street preacher who had been shouting racist statements against both groups was escalating his rhetoric, the AP reported. >> Trump says Catholic students ‘treated unfairly’ after encounter at National Mall The incident drew the attention of President Donald Trump, who said Monday on Twitter that Sandmann and his classmates “were treated unfairly with early judgement s proving out to be false – smeared by media.” Officials with the Diocese of Covington and Covington Catholic High School said a third-party investigation of the incident at the Lincoln Memorial will be launched this week. “This is a very serious matter that has already permanently altered the lives of many people,” officials said. “It is important for us to gather the facts that will allow us to determine what corrective actions, if any, are appropriate. We pray that we may come to the truth and that this unfortunate situation may be resolved peacefully and amicably and ask others to join us in this prayer.” The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Atlanta police are investigating a sexual assault at Opera nightclub after video of the incident was posted on Facebook.  >> Read more trending news Officer Jarius Daugherty said the Atlanta Police Department began receiving calls from people who had seen the assault on a Facebook Live video early Sunday morning. The police department has opened an investigation into the incident at the club on Crescent Avenue in Midtown. The video “appears to show a woman being sexually assaulted in a local nightclub,” Daugherty told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  Police have not released details on the alleged assault, but the woman filed a police report on the crime. It is the policy of the AJC to not name victims of sexual crimes. According to WSB-TV, the victim was celebrating her birthday Saturday at the popular Midtown nightclub when she was sexually assaulted. The woman told police someone put drugs in her drink and then sexually assaulted her on the dance floor, WSB-TV reported. The victim, who was already streaming her celebration on Facebook Live, captured the attack as it happened and continued to stream the video. According to media reports, the woman is heard in the video screaming for help. Video of the sexual assault has since been removed from Facebook. The woman later posted a video saying she is OK, WSB-TV reported.  In a statement posted to Facebook and Twitter, Opera nightclub managers said they are cooperating with the investigation.  “At this time we have met with the Atlanta Police Department and have provided them with everything they have requested,” read the statement posted Sunday. “We will continue to aid and support their investigation in any way we can.”