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The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    The Crown' star Matt Smith says he supports fellow actor Claire Foy over the revelation that Foy was paid less than her male co-star in the Netflix drama. A producer disclosed last month that Foy, who starred as Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, was paid less than Smith, who played Prince Philip, because Smith was better known. Smith told The Hollywood Reporter he believes they should be paid 'equally and fairly.' He says he's pleased 'it was resolved and they made amends.' Smith did not explain what he meant. The gender pay gap has become a big issue in Hollywood after revelations that many female stars have been paid less than their male counterparts. Foy and Smith are being replaced by older performers in the next season of the show.
  • The Duchess of Cambridge entered a London hospital Monday in labor, Britain's royal palace said. The baby will be a third child for her and husband Prince William and fifth in line to the throne. The 36-year-old duchess and her husband traveled by car from their Kensington Palace home to the private Lindo Wing of St. Mary's Hospital in central London. The palace said Kate was in 'the early stages of labor.' William and Kate married in 2011 and have two other children: Prince George, 4, and Princess Charlotte, who turns 3 next month. Both were born at the same hospital, as were William and his younger brother Prince Harry. The baby, whose gender has not been announced, will be Queen Elizabeth II's sixth great-grandchild and fifth in line to the throne, after grandfather Prince Charles, father Prince William and the two older siblings. The new arrival will bump Prince Harry to sixth place in the line of succession. The 36-year-old duchess, formerly Kate Middleton, carried out her last official engagement on March 22 before going on maternity leave. No exact due date has been given, with officials saying only that the baby was due in April. As in her previous pregnancies, Kate suffered from hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of morning sickness. Officials announced both her previous pregnancies before the traditional 12-week mark because she was too unwell to attend public engagements. Television crews, journalists and royal fans have set up camp outside the hospital for the 'royal baby watch' since early April in anticipation of the arrival. In a mix of royal tradition and modernity, the birth will be announced with a notice placed on an easel in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace — and on royal social media accounts. Many are betting on a traditional royal name for the baby, with bookmakers saying Mary, Alice, Arthur and James are the most popular guesses. Monday is St. George's Day, England's national day, but the name is already taken by the baby's big brother. Like its older siblings, the baby's full title will be Her (or His) Royal Highness, Princess (or Prince), followed by several given names. Jill Lawless contributed to this story.
  • Jurors weren't allowed to hear testimony that Bill Cosby's chief accuser was once hooked on hallucinogenic mushrooms or had her sights set on becoming a millionaire, but that hasn't stopped the defense from airing the explosive claims about Andrea Constand in the court of public opinion. With Cosby's sexual assault retrial heading for deliberations this week, the 80-year-old comedian's lawyers and publicists are increasingly playing to an audience of millions, not just the 12 people deciding his fate. They're hitting at Constand's credibility in the media with attacks that Judge Steven O'Neill is deeming too prejudicial or irrelevant for court, and they're holding daily press briefings portraying Cosby as the victim of an overzealous prosecutor and an unjust legal system. Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt has decried Constand's allegations of drugging and molestation as 'fantastical stories' and deemed District Attorney Kevin Steele an 'extortionist' for spending taxpayer money on the case. Lawyer Dennis McAndrews, who's been in court following the retrial, said prominent defendants like Cosby almost always play to the court of public opinion when there's no gag order, but that his team's approach hasn't been 'particularly effective or convincing.' 'It is so strident, and it is so hyperbolic, I think most people will turn it off,' said McAndrews, who prosecuted chemical heir John E. du Pont for murder in 1997 and is not associated with either side in the Cosby case. O'Neill is expected to rule Monday on what could be the Cosby team's last line of attack in the courtroom: whether jurors can hear deposition testimony that Cosby's lawyers say could have insights into what led Constand to accuse him. Constand's confidante, Sheri Williams, gave the testimony as part of Constand's 2005 lawsuit against Cosby, which he wound up settling for nearly $3.4 million. Cosby's lawyers said that testimony is vital because Williams is not responding to subpoena attempts. Cosby's lawyers are expected to call an agent and an aviation consultant to the witness stand on Monday as they continue to make the case that he never visited his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004 — the month Constand says he knocked her out with pills and molested her there. The date is important because Cosby was not charged until December 2015, just before the 12-year statute of limitations was set to expire. Cosby's lead attorney, Tom Mesereau, opened the retrial by calling Constand a 'con artist' who framed Cosby for a big payday. Her former Temple University colleague Marguerite Jackson testified that Constand once mused about setting up a high-profile person. Mesereau raised Constand's alleged drug use on Friday in a courtroom full of reporters, but no jurors, saying bus driver Robert Russell's testimony would contradict her claims of living a healthy, holistic life. Wyatt repeated the allegations to the TV cameras outside the courthouse. Constand's lawyer, Dolores Troiani, said in an interview that she had serious doubts about Russell's claims that Constand made extensive use of mushrooms and marijuana when they were friends in Toronto in 2001. 'This lady is a health nut,' said Troiani. In court, Mesereau argued that Russell's testimony would crack Constand's 'false aura' that she's the 'purest person' and undercut the prosecution's suggestion that she's 'some innocent babe in the woods.' 'According to her close friend for a number of years, that's nonsense,' Mesereau said. O'Neill swiftly rejected the drug testimony, saying Constand's behavior three years before the alleged assault was irrelevant. He also prevented Russell from testifying that Constand went to the U.S. with a goal of becoming a millionaire, saying it was too broad a claim to have any relevance to the assertion that she framed Cosby for money. Some damage was already done, Troiani said. 'It is absolutely part of their strategy to smear her reputation,' Troiani said. 'They know they have judicial immunity, so they can say these things whether or not there's a basis in fact.' The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done. ___ Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak . ___ For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial .
  • Shania Twain has apologized for saying if she were American she would have voted for Donald Trump for president, even though he's offensive. Twain made the comments in an interview with The Guardian that was published over the weekend. She told the British newspaper 'Do you want straight or polite? . I would have voted for a feeling that is transparent.' After receiving backlash, Twain took to Twitter to explain herself. The Canadian says she wasn't prepared for the question and was trying to express how Trump had connected with a certain segment of the U.S population. Twain also says she's against discrimination of any kind and hopes it's clear from her public stances that she doesn't share any moral beliefs with Trump.
  • Jurors weren't allowed to hear testimony that Bill Cosby's chief accuser was once hooked on hallucinogenic mushrooms or had her sights set on becoming a millionaire, but that hasn't stopped the defense from airing the explosive claims about Andrea Constand in the court of public opinion. With Cosby's sexual assault retrial heading for deliberations this week, the 80-year-old comedian's lawyers and publicists are increasingly playing to an audience of millions, not just the 12 people deciding his fate. They're hitting at Constand's credibility in the media with attacks that Judge Steven O'Neill is deeming too prejudicial or irrelevant for court, and they're holding daily press briefings portraying Cosby as the victim of an overzealous prosecutor and an unjust legal system. Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt has decried Constand's allegations of drugging and molestation as 'fantastical stories' and deemed District Attorney Kevin Steele an 'extortionist' for spending taxpayer money on the case. Lawyer Dennis McAndrews, who's been in court following the retrial, said prominent defendants like Cosby almost always play to the court of public opinion when there's no gag order, but that his team's approach hasn't been 'particularly effective or convincing.' 'It is so strident, and it is so hyperbolic, I think most people will turn it off,' said McAndrews, who prosecuted chemical heir John E. du Pont for murder in 1997 and is not associated with either side in the Cosby case. O'Neill is expected to rule Monday on what could be the Cosby team's last line of attack in the courtroom: whether jurors can hear deposition testimony that Cosby's lawyers say could have insights into what led Constand to accuse him. Constand's confidante, Sheri Williams, gave the testimony as part of Constand's 2005 lawsuit against Cosby, which he wound up settling for nearly $3.4 million. Cosby's lawyers said that testimony is vital because Williams is not responding to subpoena attempts. Cosby's lawyers are expected to call an agent and an aviation consultant to the witness stand on Monday as they continue to make the case that he never visited his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004 — the month Constand says he knocked her out with pills and molested her there. The date is important because Cosby was not charged until December 2015, just before the 12-year statute of limitations was set to expire. Cosby's lead attorney, Tom Mesereau, opened the retrial by calling Constand a 'con artist' who framed Cosby for a big payday. Her former Temple University colleague Marguerite Jackson testified that Constand once mused about setting up a high-profile person. Mesereau raised Constand's alleged drug use on Friday in a courtroom full of reporters, but no jurors, saying bus driver Robert Russell's testimony would contradict her claims of living a healthy, holistic life. Wyatt repeated the allegations to the TV cameras outside the courthouse. Constand's lawyer, Dolores Troiani, said in an interview that she had serious doubts about Russell's claims that Constand made extensive use of mushrooms and marijuana when they were friends in Toronto in 2001. 'This lady is a health nut,' said Troiani. In court, Mesereau argued that Russell's testimony would crack Constand's 'false aura' that she's the 'purest person' and undercut the prosecution's suggestion that she's 'some innocent babe in the woods.' 'According to her close friend for a number of years, that's nonsense,' Mesereau said. O'Neill swiftly rejected the drug testimony, saying Constand's behavior three years before the alleged assault was irrelevant. He also prevented Russell from testifying that Constand went to the U.S. with a goal of becoming a millionaire, saying it was too broad a claim to have any relevance to the assertion that she framed Cosby for money. Some damage was already done, Troiani said. 'It is absolutely part of their strategy to smear her reputation,' Troiani said. 'They know they have judicial immunity, so they can say these things whether or not there's a basis in fact.' The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done. ___ Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak. ___ For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial.
  • Sweden's public broadcaster says police in Oman have conducted two autopsies on the body of Grammy-nominated electronic dance DJ Avicii, who died Friday at age 28. Public broadcaster SVT, citing information from an anonymous police official in Oman, reported Sunday that the autopsies revealed nothing suspicious and foul play has been ruled out in the performer's death. The broadcaster says the body has been cleared to be taken back to Avicii's native Sweden, where he was born as Tim Bergling. Fans in Stockholm observed a minute of silence in his honor on Saturday. Swedish tabloid Expressen says Avicii stayed at the Muscat Hills Resort while vacationing in Oman. Expressen says he spent time with friends, went kitesurfing and enjoyed the country so much was planning to stay a few extra days.
  • It's another weekend of buzz versus pure star power at the box office as the word of mouth sensation 'A Quiet Place' finds itself neck-and-neck again with Dwayne Johnson's 'Rampage.' This time buzz had the slight advantage. Studio estimates on Sunday have placed 'A Quiet Place,' with $22 million, in first, and 'Rampage' in second with $21 million, but it's possible those numbers may shift when final results are tallied on Monday. Still, John Krasinski's 'A Quiet Place' continues to be a mini phenomenon. With a $17 million production budget, 'A Quiet Place' has grossed $132.4 million from North American theaters in three weeks. 'Rampage,' too, is down only 41 percent domestically in its second weekend and continues to rake in the dollars globally. The film boasts a worldwide tally of $283 million, and Johnson has continued using his social media accounts to hype the film and thank audiences. 'I never take success like this for granted. Global success like this means so much,' Johnson posted on his Instagram account Saturday night. 'I'm not a Marvel movie. It's not Star Wars. 'Rampage' may as well have been called 'Dwayne Johnson and his albino gorilla friend' because it's such an obscure video game ... Thank you guys so much.' The staying power of both somewhat overshadowed the newcomers, like Amy Schumer's 'I Feel Pretty' and the sequel to the 2001 cult comedy 'Super Troopers,' both of which nevertheless managed to find their own niche audiences despite largely negative reviews. 'I Feel Pretty,' released by STX Entertainment, grossed an estimated $16.2 million — a little less than half of what Schumer's 'Trainwreck' opened to in July 2015. Unlike 'Trainwreck,' Schumer did not write 'I Feel Pretty,' which is about an insecure woman who gets a life-changing confidence boost after a head injury. The concept became somewhat divisive and the subject of a fair amount of scrutiny. 'She's a force and that's not going to change,' notes comScore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian. 'She's always going to push the envelope. Sometimes that will bring big box office, sometimes it won't.' The partially crowd-funded 'Super Troopers 2,' meanwhile, leaned into its April 20 opening and scored a fourth place, $14.7 million opening weekend for Broken Lizards and distributor 20th Century Fox. Fifth place went to the Blumhouse horror 'Truth or Dare' with $7.9 million in its second weekend, while Lionsgate's thriller 'Traffik,' with Paula Patton, launched in ninth with $3.9 million. The box office for the year remains down about 2.4 percent from last year, but that will change next week. 'We're going to see a huge turnaround later this week in the box office fortunes with 'Avengers: Infinity War,'' Dergarabedian said. The film is tracking to make over $200 million in its first weekend in theaters, leading some experts to wonder whether the superhero pic could have the highest opening of all time, beating out even 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens.' Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday. 1.'A Quiet Place,' $22 million ($15 million international). 2.'Rampage,' $21 million ($57 million international). 3.'I Feel Pretty,' $16.2 million ($2.4 million international). 4.'Super Troopers 2,' $14.7 million. 5.'Truth or Dare,' $7.9 million ($4.1 million international). 6.'Ready Player One,' $7.5 million ($23 million international). 7.'Blockers,' $7 million ($2.6 million international). 8.'Black Panther,' $4.6 million ($1.2 million international). 9.'Traffik,' $3.9 million. 10.'Isle of Dogs,' $3.4 million ($5.6 million international). ___ Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore: 1. 'Rampage,' $57 million. 2. 'Ready Player One,' $23 million. 3. 'A Quiet Place,' $15 million. 4. '21 Karat,' $10.1 million. 5. 'Peter Rabbit,' $6.4 million. 6. 'Isle of Dogs,' $5.6 million. 7. 'The Coach,' $4.8 million. 8. 'Truth or Dare,' $4.1 million. 9. 'Taxi 5,' $3.8 million. 10. 'Dude's Manual,' $3.7 million. ___ Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ldbahr
  • Verne Troyer, who played Dr. Evil's small, silent sidekick 'Mini-Me' in the 'Austin Powers' movie franchise, has died. He was 49. A statement provided by Troyer's representatives that was also posted to his Instagram and Facebook accounts said the actor died Saturday. No cause of death was given, but the statement describes Troyer as a 'fighter' who was unable to overcome a recent bout of adversity then goes on to discuss depression and suicide. 'Over the years he's struggled and won, struggled and won, struggled and fought some more, but unfortunately this time was too much,' the statement said. 'Depression and suicide are very serious issues. You never know what kind of battle someone is going through inside. Be kind to one another. And always know, it's never too late to reach out to someone for help.' Troyer became a celebrity and pop-culture phenomenon after starring alongside Mike Myers as 'Mini-Me,' the tiny, hairless clone of villain Dr. Evil in two of the three 'Austin Powers' films. 'Verne was the consummate professional and a beacon of positivity for those of us who had the honor of working with him,' Myers said in a statement. 'It is a sad day, but I hope he is in a better place. He will be greatly missed.' Troyer appeared in 1999's 'Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me' and 2002's 'Austin Powers in Goldmember,' in which 'Mini-Me' switches sides and becomes a miniature version of Powers. Both hero and villain were played by Myers, who also put Troyer in his 2008 film 'The Love Guru.' He also played the banker goblin Griphook in 2001's 'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' and appeared on dozens of TV shows including 'Boston Public,' ''Sabrina the Teenage Witch' and 'MADtv.' Troyer was born in 1969 in Sturgis, Michigan with achondroplasia, a genetic condition that kept him less than 3 feet tall. 'Even though his stature was small and his parents often wondered if he'd be able to reach up and open doors on his own in his life, he went on to open more doors for himself and others than anyone could have imagined,' the statement said. 'He inspired people around the world with his drive, determination, and attitude. . . He also touched more people's hearts than he will ever know.' Troyer was baptized surrounded by his family during his recent struggles, the statement said. No place of death was given, but he lived in Los Angeles. Actress Marlee Matlin was among those who paid tribute on Twitter, posting a picture of him and saying he worked with her to raise money for free hearing aids for the deaf and hard-of-hearing. 'So sad to read of the passing of Verne Troyer,' Matlin tweeted, saying Troyer had a 'lovely smile with a caring and big heart.
  • Singer-songwriter Roberta Flack was under observation at a Manhattan hospital Saturday after suddenly feeling ill before her appearance at Harlem's Apollo Theater. The 81-year-old Grammy award-winner was taken to Harlem Hospital in an ambulance Friday evening, TMZ reported . Flack apparently became very dizzy as she was about to receive a lifetime achievement award from The Jazz Foundation of America. She was in the theater's green room, waiting to go onstage, when she suffered some kind of 'episode' those around her feared might have been related to a stroke she suffered two years ago, said Jazz Foundation spokeswoman Bobbi Marcus. On Saturday, Marcus said she spoke to Flack's manager 'and am happy to report that she's doing well.' Flack has been transferred from the Harlem hospital to another Manhattan hospital where she's under the care of her private doctors, Marcus said. 'They are keeping her for observation and expect she'll be released in the next couple of days.' Earlier Friday evening, Flack arrived at the Apollo in a wheelchair for red carpet photos, looking 'beautiful with hair and makeup,' Marcus said. She was being honored at the foundation's annual benefit concert, called 'A Great Night In Harlem.' The show still went on, including a tribute segment to the singer who had gained fame in the 1970s and 1980s with such hit songs as 'Killing Me Softly' and 'The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face.' Featured performers at the benefit included Cassandra Wilson, Nona Hendryx, and Alabama Shakes' lead singer, Brittany Howard. Flack's manager, Suzanne Koga, was not immediately available on Saturday. The mission of the Jazz Foundation of America is to provide emergency support to great jazz and blues musicians who fall on hard times and to preserve their musical legacy.
  • If a picture tells a thousand words, the Library of Congress is bringing 440,000 of them to Los Angeles with a free-wheeling photo exhibition that seeks to define America's zeitgeist in a way people have never seen. 'Not An Ostrich: And Other Images From America's Library,' which opened Saturday at the Annenberg Space For Photography, takes visitors on a picturesque journey across the country beginning with the birth of photography and continuing to the present day. But don't expect just amber waves of grain and purple mountain majesties, although there are a few of those included in the 440 photographs. Instead, look for civil rights icon Rosa Parks sitting not in the back of the bus but in the front passenger seat in 1956 after the yearlong battle that she, Martin Luther King Jr. and others led to end segregation on public transportation succeeded. See baseball immortal Babe Ruth lying in his coffin in 1948, while not far away, in a photo taken seven years later, a young Hank Aaron is seen speaking with a reporter decades before he would break Ruth's home-run record. Other photos show how day-to-day American life has evolved from the 19th century, when horse-drawn wagons hauled ice to homes, to 2005 when thousands lined up outside a Mojave Desert airplane hangar to see the launch of the X-Box 360 game. 'I'll be disappointed if somebody can come into this space and not find at least one picture that they love,' exhibition curator Anne Wilkes Tucker said during a recent pre-opening tour. Tucker worked for nearly two years with Library of Congress photo curator Beverly Brannan and others, culling through an estimated 1 million of the library's 14 million photos. Some of the selections are laugh-out-loud funny as in a man holding a sign on a frigid Wisconsin winter day in 2001 asking, 'What? You Couldn't Have Pulled This Crap In Warm Weather,' as he and others protest Gov. Scott Walker's efforts to roll back union bargaining rights. Others are menacing, like the image of a 1920s-era Ku Klux Klan rally two miles from Washington, D.C., that includes a Klan member glaring at the photographer. There's also that reliable photo standby, the funny cat picture. This one, taken in 1936, features an annoyed-looking feline dressed to resemble the female warrior Brunhilde. 'Around the turn of the century, in the early 19-somethings, people liked to make pictures of cats and dogs, putting them at tea tables with dolls, putting clothes on them,' said Brannan, revealing that at least one aspect of photography hasn't changed much in 150 years. Nor has another: One of the first photos visitors see is a daguerreotype Robert Cornelius snapped of himself outside his family's Philadelphia lamp shop in 1839. 'The first selfie we're calling it,' Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said with a chuckle. It is included on the exhibition's 'Icons Wall.' Two others on the wall, placed side-by-side, are the first known photo of Abraham Lincoln, taken years before his assassination, and the first of legendary abolitionist Harriet Tubman, taken in 1868. Others include the Wright Brothers' first flight in 1903 and the deadly crash of the German dirigible Hindenburg in New Jersey in 1937. (Those who want can don headsets and hear radio broadcaster Herbert Morrison's anguished description of the crash in which he shouts, 'Oh, the humanity.') A rebroadcast of race horse Seabiscuit's stunning upset of War Admiral at Baltimore's Pimlico Race Course in 1938 can also be heard as visitors gaze at a photo of the thoroughbred crossing the finish line four lengths ahead. Alexander Graham Bell has the distinction of being featured in more than one gallery, as he flies a kite in the leisure section and uses his invention, the telephone, to make one of the first long-distance calls in another. Celebrities are represented but not in the type of photos one might expect. There's a candid family shot of Elizabeth Taylor, for example, showing her stretched across her bed in 1957 with her infant children as her husband Mike Todd leans over them. She was said to have liked it so much that she sent copies to friends at Christmas. Not far away is 'Migrant Mother,' Dorothea Lange's moving portrait of a destitute farmworker photographed in 1936 at a pea-pickers camp near Nipomo, California. Still others show photographers themselves at work, including a stunning image of Margaret Bourke White perched precariously on a gargoyle sculpture outside the 61st floor of New York's Chrysler building in 1930 as she shoots the skyline below. In still another, a smiling Malcolm X is photographing a smiling Muhammad Ali. 'Everybody who walks in should find a picture that resonates with them in some way, that challenges them or makes them laugh or inspires them, informs them,' said Tucker. 'All the levels on which photographers can engage people.' The exhibition, which is free, runs until Sept. 9.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A man reportedly was shot and killed Sunday night outside an Arkansas Walmart as bystanders, including kids, looked on. >> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified According to KAIT, police said the slaying began as a domestic dispute at the front of the store in Trumann about 9:15 p.m. CDT. Police arrived and negotiated with an armed man who walked out of the store with a woman. The man then shot and killed a second man who 'tried to intervene,' KAIT reported. The armed man eventually surrendered to police and was arrested. Police did not release the names of the people involved in the incident, but officers said the slain man was likely connected to the woman and armed man. >> Read more trending news  Dozens of shoppers were nearby when the man was shot, police said. 'A lot of people witnessed something tonight that they should have never seen,' Trumann police Chief Chad Henson told KAIT. 'We're going to have to go through a lot of healing from here on out. It was just a terrible day.' Read more here.
  • Faced with hundreds of demonstrators rallying against a crowd of neo-Nazis in Newnan, Georgia, authorities turned to a little-known Georgia law adopted in 1951 to combat the Ku Klux Klan. >> Tension, arrests at neo-Nazi rally in metro Atlanta The law, which makes it illegal to wear a mask at most public events, was cited in several of the arrests of counterdemonstrators who joined a protest Saturday against white supremacists. And the irony was not lost upon the organizers of the counterdemonstration, who were fuming Sunday that a law aimed at weakening white supremacists was used to arrest protesters who opposed a neo-Nazi rally. “They were trying to stop us, and we were trying to dial down the racist stuff,” said Jeremy Ortega, a 19-year-old who was among the counterprotesters charged with a misdemeanor for wearing a mask. He said many of the demonstrators wore masks to avoid being identified and threatened by white power groups. “We were peacefully protesting, yet they put guns in our faces and told us to take our masks off,” said Ortega, who added that he is considering filing a civil lawsuit. “It made no sense.” State and local authorities did not comment on specific allegations of abuse on Sunday. But Georgia Bureau of Investigation Director Vernon Keenan said the overwhelming security – nearly 700 law enforcement officers were on hand – helped prevent the clashes from escalating. “Making arrests in a volatile situation is never going to be pretty,” Keenan said. No one from the white supremacist group was arrested on Saturday, and they largely avoided confrontations with police or the counterdemonstration group. The two dozen white supremacists who attended the rally were separated from the group by an 8-foot fence – and hundreds of armed officers. ‘Remove your mask’ On Sunday, a coalition of counterprotest groups planned a vigil at the Coweta County Jail to criticize what they said was excessive violence by police. The Huffington Post reported that a contingent of officers approached a group of 50 counterdemonstrators before the rally and demanded they remove their masks or face arrests. The news outlet wrote that officers then “grabbed those who were still masked, tossing them to the ground and handcuffing them.” A video posted on social media by freelance journalist Daniel Shular appeared to show authorities scuffling with counterdemonstrators. Authorities demanded that the counterprotesters remove their masks, and the footage showed an officer raising his rifle at demonstrators. “Remove your mask, or you will be arrested,” said an officer in the video, which shows a ring of demonstrators standing with their hands raised aloft. Several are chanting “hands up, don’t shoot.” An Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter who attempted to report on the confrontation during the rally was obstructed by authorities. Several other counterdemonstrators faced violations that have nothing to do with the anti-mask law. Daniel Hanley was charged with obstruction of a pedestrian roadway after he said he nonviolently resisted a police officer who confronted him. He said he believes he was arrested because he was wielding a megaphone and leading chants against the white supremacists. “They were trying to find any pretext to shut us down,” Hanley, 36, said of the authorities. “The moment we stepped foot there, they intimated us and strategically tried to target people.” ‘Absolutely satisfied’ State law bans the wearing of masks, hoods or other devices that conceal a person’s identity if they’re on public property or on private property where the owner has not consented. It includes exceptions for holidays, theatrical productions, civil emergencies and sporting events. The laws have been adopted by about a dozen states, most aimed at weakening the KKK in the middle of the 20th century. The Georgia Supreme Court in 1990 upheld the state’s ban after a Klansman donned a hood on the Lawrenceville Square, citing his First Amendment rights. The law has mostly been used to target KKK demonstrations, though it has also been employed before to arrest demonstrators who are objecting to white power groups. At a 2016 rally, the law was used to arrest eight demonstrators protesting a white supremacist rally at Stone Mountain Park. In a strange turn, it also was invoked ahead of a press conference last year at the Gold Dome, when supporters of Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle threatened to hire performers in circus masks to interrupt a rival’s event. The clowns never showed up. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said they were intent on enforcing that law and others as they studied how law enforcement officials handled white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 to prepare for the Newnan event. In Charlottesville, officers remained largely passive as bloody clashes raged around them, and the event soon spiraled out of control. One person was killed and dozens more were injured in the violence. “You have to have adequate resources and the intent to enforce the law,” Keenan said. “We had both.” He said officers made clear to both groups that masks and some weapons were not allowed. He said authorities found an abandoned backpack with smoke bombs at one checkpoint. State law allows demonstrators to carry firearms if they are licensed; on Saturday, several were spotted sporting firearms. “We maintained security. We would not let there be disorder. We didn’t have civil disorder, property damage. And we had just a few arrests,” Keenan said. “We are absolutely satisfied.” MORE COVERAGE FROM AJC.COM:  >> Reports from Newnan as the rally and counterprotest were underway >> How social media reacted >> In-depth look at how protest was contained 
  • UPDATE, 10 a.m. April 22: The two brothers who went missing Friday have been found, police said.  Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, have been located. Pittsburgh police thanked all involved for their assistance in finding the boys.  ORIGINAL STORY: Pittsburgh police are seeking assistance in finding two brothers.  >> Watch the news report here Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, went missing about 5 p.m. Friday. >> Read more trending news  According to a news release, the two brothers are known to frequent the Brookline area.  Anyone with information regarding their whereabouts is asked to call police at 412-323-7800. 
  • A massive hunt to capture the man wanted in connection with the shooting deaths of four people at a Waffle House in Antioch, Tennessee, outside Nashville, continues. >> Watch the news report here >> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified Travis Reinking, 29, is now on the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted List, and law enforcement said he is armed, dangerous and hiding, WHBQ's Greg Coy reports.  >> Who is Travis Reinking, the person of interest in the Waffle House shooting? Police said Reinking returned to his apartment after opening fire at the Waffle House. Reinking, who reportedly was nude at the time of the shooting, put on pants and then ran into the woods, police said. >> Waffle House 'hero' disarmed shooter, tossed rifle over counter Neighbor Johnny Green said another neighbor noticed Reinking and called police.  >> Who is James Shaw Jr., the man who disarmed the Waffle House shooter? 'My mom saw him,' Green added. Coy asked, 'What did she say about him?' 'He just seemed weird,' Green replied.  >> Read more trending news  Police said they hope the rain and cooler temperatures will draw Reinking out of hiding. Police said Reinking's options are limited because the crime and social media attention have made him an international fugitive. >> Please visit Fox13Memphis.com for the latest on this developing story
  • As an intensive manhunt continued Monday for a half-naked man suspected in the slayings of four people at a Waffle House restaurant, authorities shared reports of previous efforts to contain the gun-loving man with paranoid delusions. More than 80 Nashville police officers continued to search for Travis Reinking early Monday, authorities said. Agents with the FBI, the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and troopers with the Tennessee Highway Patrol joined the manhunt. He was also added to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted list. Reinking was nearly naked, wearing only a green jacket and brandishing an assault-style rifle when he opened fire in the parking lot and then stormed the restaurant, police say. Four people were killed and four others were injured before a quick-thinking customer wrestled the gun away, preventing more bloodshed. Metropolitan Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson said at a news conference that Reinking, 29, was last seen Sunday around a wooded area near an apartment complex where he lived, wearing only pants and no shirt or shoes. Anderson said it's not clear why Reinking opened fire on restaurant patrons with an assault weapon, though he may have 'mental issues.' He may still be armed, Anderson said, because he was known to have owned a handgun authorities have not recovered. 'He's on foot,' Anderson said. 'Unless he's been picked up by a car, he would be fairly close. We don't want to alarm people, but certainly, everybody should take precautions. It could be he's in an unoccupied house. We want everybody to be concerned. Neighbors should check on each other.' Nashville public schools will go into 'lock-out' mode if Reinking isn't found in time for class Monday, officials said. That means students will be free to move about the building, but no guests or visitors will be allowed to enter. As the search continued, authorities in Illinois shared past reports suggesting multiple red flags about a disturbed young man with paranoid delusions who liked firearms. In May 2016, Reinking told deputies from Tazewell County, Illinois, that music superstar Taylor Swift was stalking him and hacking his phone, and that his family was also involved, according to a report released Sunday. Another sheriff's report said Reinking barged into a community pool in Tremont, Illinois, last June, and jumped into the water wearing a pink woman's coat over his underwear. Investigators believed he had an AR-15 rifle in his car trunk, but it was never displayed. No charges were filed. Last July, Reinking was arrested by the U.S. Secret Service after he crossed into a restricted area near the White House and refused to leave, saying he wanted to meet President Donald Trump. Reinking was not armed at the time, but at the FBI's request, state police in Illinois revoked his state firearms card and seized four guns from him, authorities said. The AR-15 used in the shootings was among the firearms seized. Then, in August, Reinking told police he wanted to file a report about 20 to 30 people tapping into his computer and phone and people 'barking like dogs' outside his residence, according to a report. Reinking agreed to go to a local hospital for an evaluation after repeatedly resisting the request, the report said. 'There's certainly evidence that there's some sort of mental health issues involved,' Tazwell County Sheriff Robert Huston said. But he said deputies returned the guns to Reinking's father on the promise that he would 'keep the weapons secure and out of the possession of Travis.' Nashville Police spokesman Don Aaron said that Reinking's father 'has now acknowledged giving them back' to his son. After the shooting, police recovered three of the four guns originally taken from Reinking, officials said. They believe he still has at least one handgun. Phone calls to a number listed for the father, Jeffrey Reinking, went unanswered. It is not clear why Reinking moved recently from Morton, Illinois, to Nashville and if it had anything to do with being near Swift. Police say he was employed in construction for a while, and there would have been enough work in the booming city for him. Police say Reinking drove into the Waffle House parking lot in his gold Chevy Silverado pickup early Sunday and sat there for about four minutes before opening fire outside the restaurant. The victims fatally shot in the parking have been identified as Taurean Sanderlin, 29, of Goodlettsville, and Joe Perez, 20, of Nashville. Sanderlin was an employee at the restaurant. Perez's mother posted a picture of her son on Facebook and asked for prayers, saying it was the hardest day of her life. 'Me, my husband and sons are broken right now with this loss,' Trisha Perez said in the post. 'Our lives are shattered.' Reinking then went inside the restaurant and opened fire, police said. One of the fatally wounded inside was DeEbony Groves, a 21-year student at Nashville's Belmont University. She was remembered as an exceptional student who made the Dean's list, and a tenacious basketball player. 'She was a brilliant young lady, very, very intelligent and a very hard worker,' Gallatin High School basketball coach Kim Kendrick told The Tennessean. Akilah Dasilva was also killed inside the restaurant. The 23-year-old from Antioch was a rap artist and music video producer who had such skills behind the camera that he was a favorite among many of Music City's independent musicians and recording labels, The Tennessean reported. 'Music is my life and I will never stop until I achieve my dreams,' Dasilva said on his Twitter account. Dasilva's mother told CBS News that her son was a student at Middle Tennessee State University and aspired to be a music engineer. He was at the restaurant with his girlfriend, 21-year-old Tia Waggoner, the paper reported. Waggoner was wounded and is being treated at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dasilva's family said she underwent surgery and doctors were trying to save her leg. Police say Sharita Henderson, 24, of Antioch, was wounded and is being treated at VUMC. Also wounded was James Shaw Jr., a 29-year-old restaurant patron who burned his hand grabbing the hot muzzle of the assault weapon as he wrestled the gun away. A Nashville native who works as a wireless technician for AT&T, Shaw said he was no hero — despite being hailed as one by Nashville Mayor David Briley. Shaw said he pounced on the suspect out of self-preservation, after making up his mind that 'he was going to have to work to kill me.' ___ Associated Press writers John Raby in Charleston, West Virginia; Ed White in Detroit; and Justin Pritchard in Los Angeles contributed to this report.