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The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    It's true, Pete Davidson says: He and Ariana Grande are engaged. The 'Saturday Night Live' cast member confirmed their rumored engagement to Jimmy Fallon on NBC's 'Tonight Show.' Fallon put Davidson on the spot Wednesday, telling him he didn't have to get engaged to the pop star to come on the talk show. Replied Davidson: 'But I did, though.' When Fallon congratulated him and shook his hand, Davidson said he felt like he'd won a contest. He's getting nods of approval on the street from other men, the comedian said, with one telling him, 'Whoa, man, you gave me hope.' Robert Pattinson also was on the show, smiling as the host and Davidson bantered. Grande and Davidson reportedly began dating in May after Grande's breakup with Mac Miller. Davidson and girlfriend Cazzie David also split around the same time. NBC released a pre-air clip of the 'Tonight Show' exchange between Davidson and Fallon.
  • For the second straight week, a thriller co-written by former President Bill Clinton is NPD BookScan's top seller. 'The President is Missing,' co-written by James Patterson, tells of a president trying to prevent a devastating cyberattack. BookScan announced Wednesday that it sold 121,300 copies last week, just a slight drop from its opening week of 152,000. BookScan tracks around 85 percent of the print market. Published June 4, 'The President is Missing' is Clinton's first novel. It has now sold more than 350,000 combined print, e-book and audio copies despite mixed reviews and some awkward interviews as Clinton responded to questions about the #MeToo movement. Last week's second most popular book, with 66,400 sales, was Anthony Bourdain's 'Kitchen Confidential.' Bourdain was found dead June 8 of an apparent suicide.
  • The son of actors Sean Penn and Robin Wright has pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor in his Nebraska drug case. Twenty-four-year-old Hopper Penn and his girlfriend, 26-year-old Uma Von Wittkamp, were arrested during a traffic stop on April 4 on Interstate 80 in southeastern Nebraska. The Nebraska State Patrol says a search of their vehicle turned up 14 grams of marijuana, four amphetamine pills and 3 grams of psychedelic mushrooms. Both were initially charged with felony drug possession. Court records show they later pleaded no contest to the misdemeanor charge of attempt of a felony. Each was ordered to pay $1,000. A no-contest plea allows a defendant to not admit guilt but acknowledge that there's enough evidence for a conviction.
  • Peter Fonda apologized Wednesday for a late-night Twitter rant in which he suggested 12-year-old Barron Trump should be ripped from 'his mother's arms and put in a cage with pedophiles.' The all-capitals tweet in the wee hours went on to call President Donald Trump an expletive. The actor later deleted the tweet and drew sharp rebukes from first lady Melania Trump and Donald Trump Jr. The two-time Oscar nominee, brother of Jane Fonda and son of Hollywood legend Henry Fonda said in a statement hours later that he was upset over children separated from their parents on the U.S.-Mexico border. 'I tweeted something highly inappropriate and vulgar about the president and his family in response to the devastating images I was seeing on television,' Fonda said in the statement, released by both his manager and his publicist. 'Like many Americans, I am very impassioned and distraught over the situation with children separated from their families at the border, but I went way too far. It was wrong and I should not have done it. I immediately regretted it and sincerely apologize to the family for what I said and any hurt my words have caused.' In another tweet, Fonda suggested people opposed to the border policy should track down the addresses of federal agents and 'surround their homes in protest,' adding: 'We should find out what schools their children go to and surround the schools in protest.' Stephanie Grisham, the first lady's spokeswoman, said via email regarding the Barron remarks: 'The tweet is sick and irresponsible.' She said the U.S. Secret Service was notified. A spokesman for the agency said via email the Secret Service is aware of Fonda's tweets but 'as a matter of practice' would have no additional comment. Donald Trump Jr., meanwhile, did some tweeting of his own, addressing Fonda: 'You're clearly a sick individual' who behaved 'like a bully and a coward.' Trump Jr. called on Sony Pictures Classics to stop the release of its film 'Boundaries,' in which Fonda has a small role. The company condemned Fonda's tweets as 'abhorrent' but said the film would be released as planned. ___ Darlene Superville in Washington contributed to this report.
  • Somehow it doesn't seem right for Jerry Springer to exit quietly. There should be one last thrown chair or a bleep-filled tirade, at the very least. Instead, it was announced with no fanfare this week that he will stop making new episodes of his memorably raucous talk show, and neither Springer nor his bosses will talk about it. 'The Jerry Springer Show' won't fully disappear; NBC Universal said this week that the CW and other networks that have bought the show in syndication will air reruns of the slugfest. Producers said 'there is a possibility' that more original episodes could be ordered sometime in the future but, since they wouldn't answer questions, it's not known how serious that possibility is. At its heyday in the 1990s, Springer's show challenged Oprah Winfrey for daytime television supremacy with TV studios filled with seething spurned lovers, gender fluid guests before that was a term and pretty much anyone who was spoiling for a fight. It even provoked serious end-of-civilization-as-we-know-it talk. Springer, a former Cincinnati mayor who realized he had to do something to distinguish himself in a competitive market, was the low-key ringmaster who didn't take himself too seriously and let you know he was in on the joke. During an interview with The Associated Press at his show's 25th anniversary three years ago, Springer said that anyone could do his job if they learned three phrases: 'You did what?' ''Come on out!' and 'We'll be right back.' He presided over 4,000 episodes. Some of his shows last month illustrated that the formula hadn't changed much: 'Stripper Sex Turned Me Straight,' ''Stop Pimpin' My Twin Sister,' ''My Bestie is Stalkin' You,' ''Hooking Up With My Therapist' and 'Babes with Baguettes.' After more than 4,000 episodes, it's hard for things to register on the outrage meter. Between reality television and the verbal slugfests of cable television news, there are plenty of places viewers can turn for experiences that fill the role that Springer once did. 'He was lapped not only by other programs but by real life,' said David Bianculli, a television historian and professor at Monmouth University. At this point, asking to talk about Springer's legacy is a little like commenting on an obituary for someone you forgot was alive, he said. Only very dedicated viewers may be able to tell next fall that they're not watching an original episode. 'There was a time that Jerry Springer was running at a minimum of two times a day,' said Bill Carroll, a veteran analyst of the syndication market. 'Realistically, I don't think the audience is able to look at the show and say, 'that's one from this year, or two years ago or four years ago.' It has become so homogenous.
  • Jimmy Fallon is opening up about the personal anguish he felt following the backlash to his now-infamous hair mussing appearance with Donald Trump. The host of 'The Tonight Show' tells The Hollywood Reporter he 'made a mistake' and apologized 'if I made anyone mad.' He adds that he 'would do it differently' looking back on the Sept. 15, 2016 episode. Trump opponents criticized Fallon for a cringeworthy interview only weeks before the election where Fallon playfully stroked Trump's hair. Fallon's show eventually lost more than one-fifth of its audience and its late-night crown to Stephen Colbert's new and more political 'The Late Show' for CBS. Fallon said in a Hollywood Reporter podcast that he wasn't approving of Trump or his beliefs just because he joked with him: 'I did not do it to 'normalize' him or to say I believe in his political beliefs or any of that stuff.' The talk show host has discussed the episode before, explaining in a 2017 interview with Vanity Fair that he was just 'trying to have fun' with Trump, but revealed that he was 'devastated' to learn that people had a negative reaction. He also told The New York Times: 'If I let anyone down, it hurt my feelings that they didn't like it. I got it.' But in the podcast, Fallon reveals the backstage fallout to the criticism that he had been too soft on Trump. 'It's tough for morale,' he said. 'You go, 'Alright, we get it. I heard you. You made me feel bad. So now what? Are you happy? I'm depressed. Do you want to push me more? What do you want me to do? You want me to kill myself? What would make you happy? Get over it.'' He said he works hard and is one of the 'good people,' but faced a 'gang-mentality' online. 'People just jump on the train, and some people don't even want to hear anything else. They're like, 'No, you did that!' You go, 'Well, just calm down and just look at the whole thing and actually see my body of work.'
  • The funeral for fashion designer Kate Spade will be held in her hometown of Kansas City, Missouri. The Kansas City Star reported that a funeral Mass will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Redemptorist Church. >> Read more trending news  According to Spade’s father, Frank Brosnahan, the funeral will be in the same church where her grandparents were married. Spade, who co-founded the fashion brand Kate Spade New York with her husband, Andy Spade, died by suicide at age 55 in New York.  People reported that Spade’s family has asked for donations be made to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or Wayside Waifs, a no-kill animal shelter in Kansas City, in lieu of flowers.
  • After 80 years of being a male-only organization, the Barbershop Harmony Society has announced that women will be allowed to join the a capella singing organization. The organization, which is based in Nashville, Tennessee, said in a statement Wednesday on its website that membership to the society is open to everyone, effective immediately. But the statement also says that its local chapters will get to decide how to, or whether to integrate their chapters, such as keeping male-only groups, or having female-only groups or mixed groups. Chapters can start accepting women in January 2019. In 2009, women were allowed to participate in the organization as associates, but couldn't join chapters or quartets. CEO Skipp Kropp said in a statement Wednesday that preserving male singing groups and welcoming women into the organization were 'compatible ideas.' 'Everyone means EVERYONE — people of every age, of every background, every gender identity, every race, every sexual orientation, every political opinion or spiritual belief,' Kropp's statement said. 'Every person who loves to harmonize has a place in our family.' The singing style has evolved over the years, gaining more recognition in recent due to due to the 'Pitch Perfect' films and the new-found popularity of school glee clubs, who have adapted current music to the singing style. They have convention and international competitions with singers coming from all over the world. __ Online: http://www.barbershop.org/everyoneinharmony/
  • New Jersey is honoring native son and award-winning celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain with a “food trail” of his favorite New Jersey restaurants. >> Read more trending news  Although the popular writer, storyteller and host of CNN’s Emmy-winning “Parts Unknown” was born in New York, according to his biography, Bourdain grew up in Leonia, New Jersey, and spent his summers at the Jersey shore. Bourdain, 61, was found dead almost two weeks ago in his luxury hotel room in Kaysersberg, France, while working on an episode of “Parts Unknown.” The medical examiner ruled his death a suicide. Fans around the world were grief-stricken with news of his death, including those in New Jersey.  Camden Assemblyman Paul Moriarty wanted to find a way to honor the renowned globetrotter and proposed an official Anthony Bourdain Food Trail that would include the 10 restaurants he visited during a 2015 episode of “Parts Unknown,” according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. >> Related: Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain cremated in France, remains returning to U.S. The proposed trail, which the state’s Division of Travel and Tourism would need to establish, would include “Kubel’s in Barnegat Light, Hiram’s Roadstand in Fort Lee, Knife & Fork, Dock’s Oyster House, Tony’s Baltimore Grill, and James’ Salt Water Taffy in Atlantic City, Tony and Ruth Steaks and Donkey’s Place in Camden, Lucille’s Country Cooking in Barnegat, and Frank’s Deli in Asbury Park,” the Inquirer reported. Moriarty called Bourdain a New Jersey food icon and said the state should create a food trail as a way to honor him. “There’s no question that Anthony’s road to fame was not an easy one,” Moriarty said in a statement, according to the newspaper.  “Even after international fame, he never forgot his Jersey roots. Each episode, Bourdain brought his homegrown wit, charm, and sense of humanity to his viewers,” he said. >> Related: Chef, author, TV star Anthony Bourdain dead at 61 Bourdain rose to fame in the late 1990s with an article that became a bestselling, tell-all book called “Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly,” which was as much a memoir as a gritty, unfiltered description of life in New York restaurant kitchens.
  • AMC Theatres has announced it will offer a movie subscription service that will compete with MoviePass. Variety reported that the service will allow guests to see up to three movies a week for $19.95 a month through AMC’s loyalty program. Called AMC Stubs A-List, the price point is higher than MoviePass’s $9.99 plan. On the MoviePass service, customers can see one movie a day. >> Read more trending news  'We believe that our current and future loyal guests will be interested in this type of program, as AMC Stubs A-List rewards guests with something that no one else offers: the very best of AMC, including IMAX, Dolby Cinema and RealD 3D up to 3 times per week, for one simple, sustainable price,' AMC Theatres CEO and president Adam Aron said in a statement, likely referring to MoviePass. AMC Stubs A-List subscribers can also see all three movies in one day, see the same film more than once and get tickets in advance. MoviePass subscribers must be within a certain range of the theater to book tickets to 2D movies and cannot buy tickets for the same film. However, they can see a movie anywhere Mastercard is accepted. The company provides the service through a MoviePass-enabled Mastercard. Related: MoviePass brings back movie-a-day monthly plan 'AMC Stubs A-List is being taken to market at more than double the price of that charged by some of our competitors,' Aron said in a conference call with investors, according to The Associated Press. 'A good deal to consumers to be sure, but being done at a sustainable price point where we can be very confident that we will be profitable across the membership base and in turn, that we can share that increased profitability with our studio and premium format partners.'  'Other discounters, by contrast, will continue to be hemorrhaging cash.' The latter comment is likely another dig at MoviePass, which was the subject of an April Business Insider report. In the report, an independent auditor for the company’s owner expressed doubt that MoviePass could stay in business. CNN reported that, according to AMC, MoviePass will still be accepted at all its locations.  MoviePass responded to the news in a couple of tweets, saying, 'Heard AMC Theaters jumped on board the movie subscription train. Twice the price for 1/4 the theater network and 60% fewer movies. Thanks for making us look good AMC! 'AMC has repeatedly disparaged our model as a way to discourage our growth because all along they wanted to launch their own, more expensive plan. We want to make movies more accessible, they want more profit.' AMC’s AMC Stubs A-List program starts June 26.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Officer identified the teenager as Antwon Rose of Rankin. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year. Update 5:30 p.m. ET:  The mayor of East Pittsburgh confirmed that the officer involved in the shooting Tuesday night was sworn in to their department a few hours before. He has been an officer with other departments in the area for seven years. He still has not been identified. Update 4 p.m. ET:  The family of Antwon Rose has hired civil rights Attorney Lee Merritt to represent them. Merritt has previously represented the victims of violence in Charlottesville and several cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement. Update 2:53 p.m. ET:  Rose was shot three times while running from police, said Coleman McDonough, superintendent of the Allegheny County Police Department. McDonough said two guns were found in the car after the traffic stop, but Rose was not armed at the time of the shooting. The driver of the vehicle was initially detained by police. He has since been released, police said. A third person who was in the vehicle and fled has not been located. The East Pittsburgh police officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto released the following statement: “Any loss of life is tragic, and especially the loss of life of a child. This is a devastating situation and I am saddened for Antwon Rose and his family.  “While Tuesday's shooting was not within the city's official borders it impacts all of us in the Pittsburgh region, and particularly those in the African American community. In my reactions to the incident I should have acknowledged that these shootings affect all of us, no matter where we live, and for that I am sorry.  “Tuesday night I was receiving numerous calls and messages asking me to respond to the involvement of police in a shooting in East Pittsburgh borough, and at the time I was attempting to clarify for the national public that the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, which I ultimately oversee, were not involved.”   Original Story:  According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock. >> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street. An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials. Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in 'so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred.' The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center. The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 
  • Florida Gov. Rick Scott has joined other leaders to urge the federal government to stop separating children from their parents when they enter the U.S. illegally. Scott sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Tuesday. Read: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen taunted by protesters as she eats at Mexican restaurant U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a cover-up after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived at the country illegally. Read: Sen. Nelson, other lawmakers denied entry to facility housing immigrant children in Florida Nelson said on the Senate floor Wednesday that he wanted to check to see if the facility was clean and wanted to see where the children were sleeping. .@SenBillNelson: “I wanted to see for myself. I wanted to see, is the facility clean? Are the children sleeping in beds? I also wanted to be able to talk to the young children, the ones who had been separated.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Nelson said the deputy HHS secretary told him it was the department's policy that he would have to fill out a form and wait two weeks before a visit. Nelson told the Senate floor he filled out the form. 'Why do they not want the senator from Florida to get into this detention facility where there are children that have been separated from their parents?' Nelson asked. 'It must be that not only is this department policy, this is being directed from the president in the White House, and they don't want me to see it because they don't want us to know what is going on in there.' Read: Trump announces plan to keep migrant families together Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, ages 13 to 17 -- most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. At some point, the facility had been closed, but it reopened in February, officials said. Martin Levine was one of several protesters who demonstrated outside the Homestead Detention Facility Wednesday. 'The kids were totally innocent. Why not put them together with their parents, which is what the policy used to be?' he said. 'It's never too late to do the right thing. So I would praise him to do the right thing.' President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order, which requires authorities to stop separating immigrant families. 'I didn't like the sight or the feeling of families being separated,' Trump said. 'I consider this to be a very important executive order. It's about keeping families together.' The order doesn't outline a plan for reuniting the 2,300 children who have already been separated from their parents. It's unknown when they'll be released. Immigration attorney Nayef Mubarak told Channel 9 the order is not a simple fix. 'What this does end is perhaps separating a mother and a child, each being in separate cells. But now these children will be in cells indefinitely until their court case has been concluded,' he said. 'It's clear here that these children are not getting out of these facilities, and there's no clear end as to when they're going to be getting out.' The order doesn't change the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy of prosecuting anyone who tries to cross the border illegally. Attorneys expect the order to be challenged in court. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Download: WFTV news and weather apps .@SenBillNelson: “The power to end this painful chapter in American history lies with the President and his pen.” #WFTV — Field Sutton (@FSuttonWFTV) June 20, 2018 Watch below: Sen. Nelson speaks to Senate floor about denied entry to Homestead facility
  • Award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore said he knew he had managed to capture the emotional impact of the Trump administration’s immigration policy just moments after photographing a young Honduran girl crying at her mother’s feet last week. >> Read more trending news The image appeared on television sets, computer screens and newspaper front pages around the globe. The photo spurred a California couple to start a fundraiser that has since raised millions of dollars to help migrants detained on suspicion of illegally crossing the border. It spurred public outrage over the immigration policy that led to the separation of thousands of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Couple raises more than $4.7 million to help reunite migrant children, parents Moore told The Washington Post that he noticed the girl when her mother stopped to breastfeed her in the middle of the road on June 12. She and dozens of other migrants, nearly all women and children, were stopped by the Border Patrol agents just after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas. “There was no place for privacy,” Moore told the Post. “(The mother) said they’d been on the road for a month, and they were from Honduras. I can only imagine what dangers she’d passed through, alone with the girl.” The woman gave Moore permission to follow her and her 2-year-old daughter as Border Patrol agents processed them, the Post reported. It was after agents confiscated their personal items, when the girl’s mother put her on the ground to allow an agent to search her, that the girl started to wail. The moment passed quickly. “I took a knee and had very few frames of that moment before it was over,” Moore told NPR. “And I knew at that moment that this point in their journey, which was very emotional for me to see them being detained, for them was just part of a very, very long journey.” Moore told the Post that the feeling he had after photographing the girl was similar to emotions he felt while covering war zones and Ebola wards abroad. 'Ever since I took those pictures, I think about that moment often. And it's emotional for me every time,' he told NPR. “I do not know what happened to them. I would very much like to know.” >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. According to CNN, a spokesman later told them that the girl and mother in the viral photo were not separated. President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice.
  • A woman said she was robbed at gunpoint in her own driveway after driving 80 miles home from a shopping trip. Police believe the robbers may have followed her from the shopping center in Atlanta to her home in Dalton. Brittany McEntire told WSB that two men robbed her at gunpoint about three weeks ago. Her mother, husband and three children were also in the driveway.  >> Read more trending news  McEntire said the two men ran up the driveway and took her two Louis Vuitton diaper bags and demanded all of her jewelry, including her late father’s ring that she cherishes. She said the whole robbery took less than a minute, but she has not regained her peace of mind. “I could’ve lost my whole family if they had started shooting,” McEntire told WSB. The suspects allegedly followed McEntire from Buckhead for about two hours in an unidentified white car, police said. McEntire said she is unsure why she was targeted because she did not take home many bags from the store.  “It was not a shopping spree,” McEntire said. Police believe the men will try to follow and rob more people.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border amid global criticism of the practice. Update 10:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Democrats took a stand on the floor of the U.S. Senate against President Donald Trump’s immigration plan just hours after the president signed an executive order revoking his policy of separating migrant children from their parents during illegal border crossings. Democrats, who spoke from the Senate floor for two hours, warned that the executive order will worsen the crisis along the U.S.-Mexico border, The Hill reported. 'If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ... Does anybody really believe that we should be imprisoning for an indefinite period of time little children,' Sanders said. Update 6:45 p.m. EDT June 20: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order overturning his administration’s own policy of separating migrant families at the border. “I am glad the president took this step today,” McConnell tweeted. “When families with children breach our border, we should keep those families together whenever possible while our legal system fairly and promptly evaluates their status,” McConnell said. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT June 20: Some Republican senators have expressed relief that President Donald Trump rescinded the policy separating migrant families at the border. Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who introduced legislation to address the family separation issue at the border, said Trump’s executive order was a good move, but that Congress needs to act. “I’m pleased the administration has agreed to keep families apprehended at the border together. We can have strong border security without separating parents from their children,” he said on Twitter. Update 6 p.m. EDT June 20: Democratic senators are weighing in on President Donald Trump’s decision to end the practice of separating children from their families during illegal border crossings. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said Trump is actually “doubling down” on his zero tolerance policy with his signing of the executive order. “His new executive order criminalizes asylum-seekers and seeks to indefinitely detain their children,” Durbin said in a tweet. Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) also tweeted that Trump’s executive order does not end the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. “ In fact, the President now wants to detain parents and children together indefinitely, and contemplates DoD building internment camps to house them. This is no solution to a problem Trump created,” Markey said. Update 4 p.m. EDT June 20: White House officials on Wednesday afternoon released the full text of the executive order signed by the president. >> Trump ends migrant family separations: Read the executive order In it, Trump directed officials to detain migrant families together. Officials have come under fire in recent months after reports surfaced that migrant children were being taken from their parents at the border. The order did not address what will happen to children and parents who are currently separated and in government custody. Update 3:20 p.m. EDT June 20: Trump signed the order, which will keep families together but continue the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, on Wednesday afternoon. >> From Jamie Dupree: President Trump to reverse course on immigrant family separations “We're keeping families together and this will solve that problem,” Trump said. “At the same time we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a ‘zero tolerance,’ we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally.” Original report: Trump told reporters Wednesday that he will “be signing something in a little while” to address family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Read more trending news “We want to keep families together, it’s very important,” Trump said. 'I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”  It was not immediately clear what the president planned to sign. Trump has repeatedly called on Congress to change laws that he says mandates the family separations. There is no law that requires children be separated from parents at the border. He blamed Democrats for the continued separations in a Wednesday morning tweet, but he added that he was “working on something.” The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was drafting an executive action for Trump that would allow the Department of Homeland Security to keep migrant families together at the border. Nielsen does not believe Congress will act to resolve the issue of migrant family separations, the AP reported, citing two unidentified sources familiar with the matter. She’s working with officials from other agencies, including the Justice Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, to draft the executive action.  The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The executive action Nielson is drafting “wouldn’t end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families,” according to the AP.