ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
83°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 93° L 75°
  • clear-day
    83°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    88°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    81°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 90° L 75°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    Marvel's push for more women and people of color in its immensely popular film franchise is extending to behind the camera as it launches its next round of films after the massive success of 'Avengers: Endgame.' Of the five films the superhero studio announced at Comic-Con on Saturday, only one is set to be directed by a white man. 'It's about fresh voices and new voices and great filmmakers who can continue to steer the (Marvel Cinematic Universe) into new places,' Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige said in an interview after the studio's explosive Hall H panel. 'And I am as proud of that lineup of directors as you saw today as any.' In addition to a slew of women and people of color at the helm of the upcoming Marvel films, the weekend's announcements promised more diversity on screen. First up for release is the long-awaited solo film starring Scarlett Johansson as the Black Widow, the lethal assassin she has played for nearly a decade. The film is set for release in May 2020. Johansson said the search for 'Black Widow' director Cate Shortland wasn't easy. 'It's really interesting because when we were looking for a director, you start to see some of the systemic problems,' Johansson said. 'Even looking for a female director who has had enough experience — who has had the opportunity to have the experience to sit at the helm of something huge like this, you know, choices are limited because of that. And it sucks.' The actress added that she was proud to see the diversity on stage during Marvel's Hall H panel. 'Looking out on that stage tonight, it was incredible. It was really moving, also just to see how incredibly diverse the universe is — and reflects what we see all around us. It's incredible,' she said. In terms of more diversity, 'Black Widow' is just the beginning. 'The Eternals' will feature a cast full of actors of color, including Kumail Nanjiani, Brian Tyree Henry, and Salma Hayek. Simu Liu will become Marvel's first big screen Asian American superhero when 'Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings' is released in February 2021. Natalie Portman will play a female Thor in the new 'Thor: Love and Thunder,' which will also feature Tessa Thompson's character, Valkyrie, as the MCU's first LGBTQ superhero. 'First of all, as new King (of Asgard), she needs to find her queen, so that will be her first order of business. She has some ideas. Keep you posted,' Thompson said during the panel. Feige later confirmed the news in an interview with the website io9. The studio is also reviving one of Marvel's most iconic black characters, Blade (previously played by Wesley Snipes), with the help of Academy Award winner Mahershala Ali. Feige told The Associated Press that right after winning his second Academy Award for 'Green Book' earlier this year, Ali set up a meeting. 'Within 10 minutes, he basically was like, 'What's happening with 'Blade'? I want to do it.' And we went, that's what happening with 'Blade.' Let's do it,' Feige said. 'Captain Marvel,' released in March, was the first of Marvel Studios film to be centered entirely on a female character. It earned $427 million domestically, and along with the DC Comics film 'Wonder Woman' has created momentum for more films with female heroes leading the way. 'Marvel is really focused on having very strong female characters at the forefront of their stories,' said actress Rachel Weisz, who also stars in 'Black Widow.' ''And I think that's great. This film has got three. It's Scarlett, Florence Pugh, myself. So I think yeah, they are doing wonderful work to represent women, people of color, and tell different kinds of stories.' The sliver of Hollywood still on the outside of the Marvel's cinematic empire was paying close attention to the news. Actress, writer and director Lena Waithe tweeted Sunday: 'Captain America is black. Thor is a woman. the new Blade got two Oscars. 007 is a black woman. And The Little Mermaid bout to have locs. (Expletive). Just. Got. Real.
  • Woodstock 50 organizers have again been denied a permit to hold a three-day festival at an upstate New York horse track. Town of Vernon officials say Monday the permit application for a festival Aug. 16-18 at the Vernon Downs racetrack and casino was filed too late and was rife with problems. Vernon became a possible alternative site for Woodstock 50 after the original venue, Watkins Glen International, pulled out. But local officials have repeatedly denied permit applications amid concerns about planning for up to 65,000 people coming to this largely rural area on short notice. A spokeswoman for Woodstock 50 said they had no comment. The festival has faced a series of setbacks, including the losses of a financial partner and a production company.
  • David Hedison, who starred in the original sci-fi classic 'The Fly' and appeared in two James Bond films, has died. He was 92. He died Thursday in Los Angeles with his daughters at his side, a representative for the family, Jennifer Allen, said in an email Monday. Hedison portrayed Capt. Lee Crane in the long-running sci-fi television series 'Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea' and Spencer Harrison on the daytime series 'Another World.' 'Even in our deep sadness, we are comforted by the memory of our wonderful father,' his daughters Alexandra and Serena said in a statement. 'He loved us all dearly and expressed that love every day. He was adored by so many, all of whom benefited from his warm and generous heart. Our dad brought joy and humor wherever he went and did so with great style.' Hedison played scientist Andre Delambre who turned into an insect in the 1958 film 'The Fly.' He played CIA agent Felix Leiter in Bond films 'To Live and Let Die' and 'License to Kill.' The Providence, Rhode Island-native began his career under the name Al Hedison. In 1959, he took his middle name David after signing a contract with Twentieth Century Fox. Hedison's family said the actor entertained friends and family with a positive attitude and 'wicked' sense of humor.
  • A man has been indicted in the home invasion of a former 'Real Housewives of New Jersey' cast member. James Mainello also faces robbery, aggravated assault and other charges in the indictment handed up Monday by a Monmouth County grand jury. Prosecutors say the 51-year-old Bayonne resident and another man were waiting when Dina Manzo and her then-fiancé David Cantin entered their Holmdel home in May 2017. Cantin was beaten with a baseball bat, and Manzo was repeatedly kicked. They were bound with zip ties before the intruders made off with Manzo's engagement ring and cash. Prosecutors say DNA on a zip tie matched Mainello's. Mainello's lawyer says he denies the charges. Manzo and Cantin have since married.
  • An MSNBC contributor apologized and deleted a tweet that appeared to confuse readers about Fox News Channel's plans to cover special prosecutor Robert Mueller's testimony before Congress this week. Joyce Vance, a former federal prosecutor, said Sunday on Twitter that Fox isn't airing Mueller's testimony because President Donald Trump is afraid of what will happen to his supporters if they heard Mueller. But Fox is airing the testimony Wednesday, along with ABC, CBS , NBC and the cable news networks. Vance tweeted later Sunday that while she meant it ironically, 'my apologies to anyone I confused.' MSNBC had no comment Monday. Fox noted it had been running promos of its Mueller coverage since Friday. Vance's original message had been retweeted nearly 10,000 times.
  • Prosecutors have asked a New York judge to prevent the con artist Anna Sorokin from cashing in on a Netflix production expected to highlight the extravagant ruse that landed the woman who posed as a German heiress in state prison. The New York Attorney General's Office recently challenged the contract Sorokin signed last year for the rights to her now-infamous life story, invoking a state law that bans criminals from profiting off their own notoriety. State prosecutors wrote in court filings that the $70,000 and royalties Sorokin is owed from her Netflix deal should be awarded as restitution to the Manhattan banks and hotels she defrauded by providing phony financial records and a forged identity. The court filings, first reported by The New York Post, show Sorokin received an initial $30,000 from Netflix that went to her defense attorney, Todd Spodek. Spodek didn't immediately return messages from The Associated Press seeking comment. Sorokin passed herself off as a wealthy heiress known as Anna Delvey, convincing banks and celebrities that she had a fortune of $67 million (60 million euros) overseas that could cover her jet-setting lifestyle. Following a trial that drew international media attention, she was convicted of grand larceny and theft of services and sentenced in May to four to 12 years in prison. She faces deportation to Germany following her release. Prosecutors said Sorokin 'had not a cent to her name when she was taken into custody.' But a judge ordered her to pay nearly $200,000 restitution following her conviction, including a $100,000 loan she failed to repay to City National Bank. New York's so-called Son of Sam law derives its name from the nickname given to David Berkowitz, a serial killer who fatally shot six people and wounded seven others in New York City in the 1970s. New York was the first state to enact such a law following his capture. ___ Associated Press writer Ryan Tarinelli in Albany, New York, contributed to this report.
  • Art Neville, a member of a storied New Orleans musical family who performed with his siblings in The Neville Brothers band and founded the groundbreaking funk group The Meters, died Monday. The artist nicknamed 'Poppa Funk' was 81. Neville's manager, Kent Sorrell, said Neville died at his home. 'Art 'Poppa Funk' Neville passed away peacefully this morning at home with his adoring wife, Lorraine, by his side,' Sorrell said in an email. The cause of death was not immediately available but Neville had battled a number of health issues including complications from back surgery. 'Louisiana lost an icon today,' Gov. John Bel Edwards said in a news release. The Neville Brothers spent some of their childhood in the now demolished Calliope housing project in New Orleans and some at a family home in uptown New Orleans. In a 2003 interview with Offbeat magazine, Art Neville described going to a Methodist church as a child where he had his first encounter with a keyboard. 'My grandmother used to clean the pulpit. She was in there cleaning it one day and I guess she was babysitting me 'cause I was in there with her. She went to one side and all of a sudden I was on the side where the organ was,' he said. 'Something told me to turn it on. I reached up and pressed a bass note and it scared the daylights out of me!' That experience helped kick off a lifelong career as a keyboardist and vocalist. The Neville Brothers — Art, Charles, Cyril and Aaron — started singing as kids but then went their separate ways in the 1950s and '60s. In 1954 Art Neville was in high school when he sang the lead on the Hawketts' remake of a country song called 'Mardi Gras Mambo.' He told the public radio show 'American Routes' how he was recruited by the Hawketts. 'I don't know how they found out where I lived,' he said in the interview. 'But they needed a piano player. And they came up to the house and they asked my mother and father could I go.' More than 60 years later, the song remains a staple of the Carnival season, but that longevity never translated into financial success for Art Neville who received no money for it. 'It made me a big shot around school,' Art said with a laugh during a 1993 interview with The Associated Press. In the late '60s, Art Neville was a founding member of The Meters, a pioneering American funk band that also included Cyril Neville, Leo Nocentelli (guitar), George Porter Jr. (bass) and Joseph 'Zigaboo' Modeliste (drums). The Meters were the house band for Allen Toussaint's New Orleans soul classics and opened for the Rolling Stones' tour of the Americas in 1975 and of Europe in 1976. They also became known for their session work with Paul McCartney, Robert Palmer and Patti LaBelle and recordings with Dr. John. The Meters broke up in 1977, but members of the band have played together in groups such as the Funky Meters and the Meter Men. And in more recent years The Meters have reunited for various performances and have often been cited as an inspiration for other groups. Flea, the bass player for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, paid homage to The Meters when he invited members of the group onstage to perform with the Chili Peppers during a 2016 performance at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. 'We are their students,' Flea said. As The Meters were breaking up, The Neville Brothers were coming together. In 1978 they recorded their first Neville Brothers album. Charles died in 2018. For years, The Neville Brothers were the closing act at Jazz Fest. After 2005's Hurricane Katrina, the four brothers — like many New Orleanians — were scattered across the country while the city struggled to recover. They returned to anchor the festival in 2007. 'This is how it should be,' Art Neville said during a news conference with festival organizers announcing their return to the annual event. 'We're a part of Jazz Fest.' He shared in three Grammy awards: with The Neville Brothers for 'Healing Chant,' in 1989; with a group of musicians on the Stevie Ray Vaughn tribute 'SRV Shuffle in 1996; and with The Meters when they got a lifetime achievement in 2018. 'Art will be deeply missed by many, but remembered for imaginatively bringing New Orleans funk to life,' the Recording Academy, which awards the Grammys, said in a news release. Neville announced his retirement in December. ___ This corrects previous versions of this story by deleting reference to Aaron Neville having been a member of the Meters.
  • Swedish prosecutors have dropped their investigation of a man they say was involved in a fight with American rapper A$AP Rocky. Magnus Stromberg represents the alleged victim and said Monday they are happy but not surprised by the decision. Rocky, a platinum-selling, Grammy-nominated artist whose real name is Rakim Mayers, has been behind bars since early this month as police investigate the fight in Stockholm . It was not clear who else was involved, but videos published on social media appear to show a person being violently thrown onto the ground by Rocky. Prosecutors have until Thursday to make a decision on the investigation. Rocky's lawyer says they will not comment until Thursday, but his lawyer has said the rapper was acting in self defense. The case has drawn attention of celebrities including Sean 'Diddy' Combs, Nicki Minaj, Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West. President Donald Trump spoke with Sweden's prime minister Saturday about the detained rapper.
  • In 2016, Iowa State University accused an employee of fraud and theft in a dispute over the unusual but lucrative campus assets she managed: popular outdoor sculptures made of thousands of Lego bricks. Three years later, the school has withdrawn its allegations against Teresa McLaughlin under a settlement reached last month. The university paid McLaughlin $225,000 in wages and attorneys' fees, will offer her health insurance until 2022 and has given her a glowing letter of recommendation from its president calling her an honest employee who made major contributions over 17 years. Iowa State will also dedicate a bench for McLaughlin in Reiman Gardens, the campus landmark that she spent much of her career building as its director. Those steps end a dispute that derailed the Lego art program conceived by McLaughlin, called Nature Connects. The traveling exhibits featured sculptures of plants and animals, were displayed at zoos and gardens nationwide and brought in revenue for Iowa State. McLaughlin said she wants to restore her reputation, which she believes was unfairly sullied by her alma mater. She said the university made claims of wrongdoing against her without evidence and while in possession of records that exonerated her. She said the dispute hurt her finances and 'took a great toll on me and my family.' 'I did not think Iowa State would do this to me,' she said in an interview in Coralville, where she lives. She called the experience 'confusing, unfair and unfortunate.' The university does not admit wrongdoing in the settlement, which avoided a June trial. McLaughlin envisioned the sculptures as a way to draw visitors to Reiman Gardens, a 17-acre (7-hectare) space on the Ames campus. McLaughlin began working there in 1999 and built one of the 'finest and most unique public gardens in the country,' according to university President Wendy Wintersteen's recommendation letter. Iowa State hired Brooklyn artist Sean Kenney to build the sculptures, which went on display at Reiman Gardens in 2012. Seeing demand to market them nationwide, the school reached agreements with Kenney to build four more. McLaughlin stepped down as gardens director in 2014 to become director of Nature Connects. Dozens of institutions from Hawaii to Chicago agreed to pay between $70,000 and $150,000 to display the exhibits for several weeks. Directors of zoos and gardens raved about how they boosted attendance. But by 2016, an aide to Roy Reiman, a top university donor who helped fund the exhibits and for whom the gardens are named, was questioning the costs, including payments to Kenney and McLaughlin, who received a 10% commission on exhibit sales under her university contract. Emails show that a top aide to then-President Steven Leath pushed to change the formula for splitting the profits with the artist so the school could get a larger 'administrative fee.' McLaughlin objected to the request, noting the contracts had been signed after reviews by Iowa State officials and could not be changed unilaterally. A school-ordered restructuring then laid off McLaughlin's assistant and transferred oversight of the program's finances to the administration. Kenney began complaining that the university took away support that was critical to making the exhibits successful and wasn't paying him what he was promised. A frustrated McLaughlin announced she would take an early retirement but agreed to stay a few months to finalize several pending sales. Things soon got worse. She received a surprise letter from a law firm hired by Iowa State. The letter ordered her to stop working and telling her she was under investigation for alleged conflicts of interest related to her outside work with Kenney's company. Iowa State stopped paying commissions McLaughlin was owed, and she filed a lawsuit seeking payment. The university filed counterclaims accusing McLaughlin of breaching her fiduciary duty and committing fraud and unjust enrichment. It alleged that she was profiting at the university's expense by secretly helping Kenney market competing exhibits. McLaughlin said the claims were false, noting that Iowa State approved her limited work for Kenney's company. She denied ever putting Kenney's interests ahead of Iowa State's and she earned little from the arrangement. Iowa State settled its dispute with Kenney in 2017. McLaughlin, 62, said she doesn't understand why the school fought her for two more years. On the bench honoring her, McLaughlin has asked the school to enshrine a Dalai Lama quote: 'Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.
  • Lil Nas X has taken his horse to the old town road and ridden it to the top of the Billboard charts for 16 weeks, tying a record set by Mariah Carey and Luis Fonsi. 'Old Town Road' logs its 16th week at No. 1 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart this week, matching the success that Carey and Boyz II Men's 'One Sweet Day' achieved in 1995-1996. Fonsi, Daddy Yankee and Justin Bieber's 'Despacito' accomplished the feat in 2017. No song has spent more than 16 weeks at No. 1 on the all-genre Hot 100 chart in the 61-year history of the Billboard charts. The country-rap 'Old Town Road' was originally a solo song, but 20-year-old Lil Nas X added Billy Ray Cyrus to the track and it topped the charts, achieving most of its success through audio streaming. Lil Nas X is looking forward to setting a new Billboard record next week. He posted a video Monday on social media of the 'SpongeBob SquarePants' character Squidward Tentacles saying, 'Please stream 'Old Town Road.'' 'Me on the internet this whole week tryna break the billboard record,' he wrote in the caption. 'Old Town Road' initially was in a bit of controversy in March when Billboard removed it from its country charts, deeming it not country enough (it peaked at No. 19 on the country charts). But the drama didn't hurt the song; it only propelled it. 'This song has been a uniter not a divider,' Cyrus said in a statement Monday. 'I'm giving God the glory now for allowing me the gift to be part of such a special song. It's a unique moment in time where people from all over the world and all walks of life find they have more in common than they do different. It's a moment we've all shared and I'm grateful for it.' 'Old Town Road' appears on Lil Nas X's debut EP '7,' which peaked at No. 2 on Billboard's 200 albums chart earlier this month. The EP also features the Top 40 hits 'Panini' and 'Rodeo' with Cardi B. 'Old Town Road' is also spending its 16th week on top of both the R&B/Hip-Hop and rap songs charts. The song has several versions, including remixes featuring Diplo, Young Thug and Mason Ramsey; Billboard counts the original song and its remix versions as one when calculating chart position, thus helping 'Old Town Road' stay on top. A number of songs have debuted at No. 2 on the Hot 100 chart, unable to push 'Old Town Road' out of its top position, including two tunes from Taylor Swift ('You Need to Calm Down,' ''ME!'); Ed Sheeran and Bieber's 'I Don't Care'; and two songs from Shawn Mendes ('If I Can't Have You,' ''Senorita' with Camila Cabello). Swift's 'Look What You Made Me Do' stopped 'Despacito' from reaching a 17th week at No. 1 when the pop smash jumped from No. 77 to No. 1 in 2017. Celine Dion's 'Because You Loved Me' ended Carey and Boyz II Men's epic run in 1996.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Oviedo Mayor Dominic Persampiere announced that he will not seek reelection today, after more than 20 years in city government. Persampiere said the decision is because he wants to spend more time with his family, and work on growing his business. Previously, he had served as an Oviedo city councilman before running for mayor. He’s been serving as Mayor since 2011.  Two months ago, Persampiere was involved in a dispute with a neighbor that led to police involvement, but a judge dismissed an injunction filed against him.
  • Disney World is hiring part-time workers to operate it's Disney Skyliner, set to debut in late September. The new transportation system will connect Epcot, Disney's Hollywood Studios and four nearby resort hotels.  Skyliner workers will be responsible for greeting guests, loading and unloading the gondolas, as well as, monitoring the gondola system and providing audience control, according to a job posting.  The starting pay will be $12 an hour according to the posting, but Skyliner workers will be eligible for Disney's new starting rate of $13 as of September 29, 2019  Click here to apply
  • Aaron Carreto was enjoying his 10th birthday, playing outside his Compton home on July 6 when two neighbors tossed a lit, homemade firework at him, his family said. The boy reflexively grabbed the illegal firework, which exploded in his left hand, destroying four fingers and most of his palm, the Los Angeles Times reported. Aaron also lost a finger on his right hand and suffered burns on both hands, his face and his torso. One of the neighbors, Walter David Revolorio, 27, was arrested and charged with felony child cruelty and possession of a destructive device, the Times reported. The investigation is ongoing, but no charges had been filed against a second neighbor as of Monday. Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department officials had no immediate comment on the status of the investigation. Aaron told Fox 11 in Los Angeles he was playing outside in his neighborhood when he walked over to the neighbors to say hello. At one point, the men called out his name. “They said my name, and then I turned and my hand flipped over, so that’s when they handed the firework to me,” Aaron said. “I was about to throw it and it exploded in my hand.” The explosion was so great, it rocked nearby cars, Fox 11 reported. >> Read more trending news The Times reported that Aaron was immediately taken to Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, where he underwent a series of emergency surgeries. Doctors at UC Irvine Medical Center attached his left arm to his stomach to hopefully preserve nerve and skin tissue they can use to reconstruct his hand. Aaron’s older sister, Adriana Carreto, said doctors also reattached the finger her brother lost on his right hand. Carreto wrote on a GoFundMe page set up to help with Aaron’s medical expenses that he has a long recovery ahead, including at least two additional surgeries. Photos and video of the boy on the fundraising page, as well as on social media, show him with burns on his face and his left arm hidden under a hospital gown. Pain is etched on the boy’s face. “This incident changed his life, (his) way of living, but not his spirits,” Carreto wrote. “Everyone knows him as a social butterfly, always friendly to his teammates on the soccer team. He’s very caring and aware of other people’s needs.” Carreto wrote that her brother loves riding his bike with neighborhood friends and playing the popular online video game 'Fortnite' with classmates over their summer break. “Now with his new disability, he’ll find it difficult to adjust to his day to day lifestyle,” Carreto wrote. As of Monday afternoon, donors had raised more than $47,000 of the page's $50,000 goal to help Aaron and his family. Carreto said along with the physical pain her brother is in, he is also psychologically scarred. “He tells his family how he feels betrayed by those people around us and wants to start a new life far away from where he grew up,” Carreto wrote on the GoFundMe page. As of Monday, Aaron had been released from the hospital to continue his recovery at home. “I been reading all the positive and kind words to Aaron from his donors and he said he appreciates all the help and support,” Carreto wrote. “He said he feels happy with each and every one of you guys.” The distraught sister told ABC 7 she, however, is angry. “I’m angry because those two guys are adults and one of them has kids,” Carreto told the news station. “I’m pretty sure if it was his kid, he wouldn’t have let that happen.” Aaron told KTLA he wants to see both men punished for what they did to him. “Those guys who did this, I don’t want to see them no more,” Aaron told the news station. “I just wish that they could be in jail.” Revolorio remained Monday at the Los Angeles County Jail, where records show he is being held in lieu of $630,000 bond. The second neighbor accused in the incident has not been publicly identified.
  • President Trump continues his public criticism of House democrats Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar. He tweets, “The “Squad” is a very Racist group of troublemakers who are young, inexperienced, and not very smart. They are pulling the once great Democrat Party far left, and were against humanitarian aid at the Border...And are now against ICE and Homeland Security. So bad for our Country!” These comments come after President Trump last week said those four freshman House Democrats should 'go back to the crime infested places' from which they came. This also comes after a crowd at a Trump campaign rally in North Carolina chanted 'send her back.
  • A California woman and her boyfriend have been charged in connection with their newborn son’s death after investigators learned they strangled the boy at the hospital shortly after he was born, authorities said. Andrea Torralba, 20, and David Villa, 21, both of Oxnard, are being held in the Ventura County Jail on suspicion of felony assault on a child causing death, Oxnard Police Department officials said. Jail records show Villa, who is described as a field worker, is being held in lieu of $5 million. ABC 7 in Los Angeles reported that Torralba’s bail was set at $1 million. >> Read more trending news  Oxnard police investigators said officers were called just before 8 a.m. Friday to St. John’s Medical Center, where they learned a newborn boy was in critical condition with serious injuries. The boy was found unresponsive and despite all medical efforts, he died of his injuries. Detectives from the department’s Family Protection Unit learned that Torralba and Villa strangled the newborn until he lost consciousness, police officials said. Oxnard police Sgt. Brandon Ordelheide told ABC 7 that the couple, when questioned by detectives, admitted they did not want the baby. Both were arrested and charged in the boy’s death.

Washington Insider

  • President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders in Congress agreed on Monday to a two-year budget plan which will increase spending in 2020 and 2021, and allow the national debt to go up for a two year period, while including little in the way of budget savings, continuing a trend of higher government spending and larger deficits under the Trump Administration. 'If this deal passes, President Trump will have increased discretionary spending by as much as 22 percent over his first term, and enshrine trillion-dollar deficits into law,' said Maya MacGuineas, head of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, who labeled the deal a 'total abdication of fiscal responsibility.' The agreement includes only $77.4 billion in budget offsets to pay for an estimated $320 billion in extra spending over two years. While the President tweeted his support, joined by Congressional leaders in both parties, a handful of lawmakers said the deal made no sense, because it guaranteed more deficit spending. With the White House already forecasting deficits above $1 trillion for the next four years, this agreement would do nothing to ease that tide of red ink, which had dropped to $438 billion in 2015 - but has steadily increased over the past three years. 'With more than $22 trillion in debt, we simply cannot afford deals like this one,' said Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA), the head of the conservative Republican Study Committee. 'It’s not too late to reject the Pelosi-Mnuchin spending deal and strike a better deal for all Americans that cuts spending,' argued Jessica Anderson, a former Trump budget official. But those voices have faded into the wilderness in recent years in the GOP, as deficits have steadily increased under President Trump. “It’s pretty clear that both houses of Congress and both parties have become big spenders, and Congress is no longer concerned about the extent of the budget deficits or the debt they add,” said the Club For Growth, which has seen its influence on Capitol Hill dwindle in recent years.