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The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    The venerated Times Square concert venue The Town Hall has created a new award to honor arts and activism, a prize to be named after Lena Horne. The Lena Horne Prize for Artists Creating Social Impact will recognize those who 'promote awareness and create social change.' The inaugural winner will be honored in February. The prize's advisory board includes Horne's daughter, Gail Lumet Buckley, as well as Harry Belafonte, Billy Porter, Judy Collins, Deesha Dyer, Roxane Gay, Bob Santelli, Bruce Cohen, Jose Antonio Vargas. Lumet Buckley says her Tony- and Grammy-winning mother didn't chase fame. 'It was about advocating for equality and justice and I am so proud that her legacy will continue through the Lena Horne Prize.' Prize was created by Michael Matuza, Jeb Gutelius and The Town Hall.
  • Plácido Domingo is scheduled to sing two concert performances in Verdi's 'I Vespri Siciliani (The Sicilian Vespers)' next summer as part of the 100th anniversary Salzburg Festival, which features 221 performances over 44 days and includes seven staged operas. Domingo, who turns 79 in January, has withdrawn from all his U.S. performances since reports by The Associated Press in August and September detailed accusations against him of sexual harassment or other inappropriate, sexually charged conduct. He received standing ovations in Salzburg at performances of Verdi's 'Luisa Miller' last August and is welcome back pending investigations by the LA Opera, where he resigned as general director last month, and the American Guild of Musical Artists. Helga Rabl-Stadler, president of the Salzburg Festival, said Domingo was engaged two years ago to sing the baritone role of Guido di Montforte on Aug. 16 and 19. European houses have maintained Domingo's contracts. 'We do not see any reason why we should change our opinion if there are no new facts,' Rabl-Stadler said in a telephone interview, adding the situation could change depending on what is uncovered by the investigations. 'We have to follow the rules of our law.' Staged operas announced Wednesday for next summer's festival include Strauss' 'Elektra' directed by Krzysztof Warlikowski, Mozart's 'Don Giovanni' directed by Romeo Castellucci and conducted by Teodor Currentzis, Mozart's 'Die Zauberfloete (The Magic Flute)' directed by Lydia Steier, Puccini's 'Tosca' directed by Michael Sturminger and starring Anna Netrebko, Luigi Nono's 'Intolleranza 1960' directed and choreographed by Jan Lauwers, and Mussorgsky's 'Boris Godunov,' directed by Johannes Leiacker. Donizetti's 'Don Pasquale' with mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli will return after premiering May 29 at the Whitsun Festival. The first Salzburg Festival opened on Aug. 22, 1920, with a performance of Hofmannsthal's 'Jedermann' on the steps of Salzburg Cathedral. Its first opera, two years later, was 'Don Giovanni.' Next summer's festival runs from July 18 through Aug. 30. 'The history of Salzburg Festival is extremely rich. It could be a burden,' said pianist Markus Hinterhäuser, who became artistic director in October 2016 and has a contract running until September 2026. 'But for me it's really a very inspiring, very vitalizing thing to look at the history. But looking back needs also to make clear that we are always trying to lead the festival in a new presence.' Concerts include eight programs of Beethoven piano sonatas with Igor Levit; five performances by the Vienna Philharmonic led by Riccardo Muti, Gustavo Dudamel, Christian Thielmann, Mariss Jansons and Andris Nelsons; and two performances of the Berlin Philharmonic and new chief conductor Kirill Petrenko. The only U.S. orchestra is the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Manfred Honeck. 'I'm often asked, is Salzburg here to keep the tradition or is it here to set the trends?' Rabl-Stadler said. 'I think both. It's wonderful to have Mozart in our town, but on the other hand we have to think how can we explain the topics of works to people nowadays.
  • Country music singer, songwriter and actor Dwight Yoakam was honored by performing rights organization BMI for his trailblazing and highly unique style of California country rock. The organization gave the Grammy-winner the President's Award on Tuesday, as well as honored many of country's top songwriters and artists, during a ceremony in Nashville, Tennessee. For Yoakam, there wasn't any choice other than creating his own sound. 'I never thought about doing it another way,' he said during an interview on the red carpet prior to the ceremony. 'I kind of just did what I felt was honest.' Born in Kentucky, Yoakam bypassed the Nashville scene and moved to California, where the Bakersfield-style of country music became one of his big influences. He's had hits with 'A Thousand Miles From Nowhere' and 'Fast As You,' and several platinum-selling albums. 'I was always a little stunned that things have been played 2, 3 million times in the case of some of the albums, you know, some of the songs that are tracks off albums,' Yoakam said. 'So tonight, this is kind of a culmination of the 34 years of receiving those individual awards.' Country singers Jon Pardi, Margo Price and the group The Highwomen with Jason Isbell performed some of Yoakam's songs during the ceremony. Other top country songwriters were also honored, including Nicolle Galyon and Ross Copperman. Galyon became the first female songwriter to win BMI's country songwriter of the year since Taylor Swift in 2010. Galyon co-wrote Lee Brice's 'Boy,' Keith Urban's 'Coming Home,' Lady Antebellum's 'Heartbreak' and Dan + Shay's 'Tequila.' Copperman co-wrote Kenny Chesney's 'Get Along,' Blake Shelton's 'I Lived It,' Justin Moore's 'Kinda Don't Care' and Dierks Bentley's 'Woman, Amen.
  • R&B crooner John Legend has been named the Sexiest Man Alive by People magazine. The Grammy-winning singer known for his silky-smooth vocals was revealed as this year's winner Tuesday night on NBC's 'The Voice.' He serves as a coach on the singing competition series with Gwen Stefani, Kelly Clarkson and Blake Shelton. Shelton, who was named Sexiest Man Alive in 2017, announced Legend's honor on 'The Voice.' The country singer then handed Legend some short shorts with bedazzled letters 'EGOTSMA' to signify the singer's many honors: an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony and now, Sexiest Man Alive. Legend tells the magazine in an issue out Friday the honor comes with some pressure after following Idris Elba, who was last year's winner. He jokes it 'is not fair and is not nice to me!' The 40-year-old Legend is a 10-time Grammy winner. He scored an Oscar in 2015 for co-writing the song 'Glory' from the film 'Selma.' He won a Tony Award for his co-producer work on 'Jitney' and took home an Emmy as a producer on NBC's live version of 'Jesus Christ Superstar,' a project in which he also played the role of Jesus. Legend has two children with model-television host-cookbook author Chrissy Teigen. Other recent winners include Dwayne Johnson, Chris Hemsworth, Adam Levine, Channing Tatum and David Beckham. 'I want to thank Blake Shelton,' Legend said. 'I observed every move he made, every utterance that came from his mouth and I think some of it rubbed off on me.' Legend said his wife is proud of him. 'I've finally impressed her,' he said. The couple's children? Not so much. Teigen posted a video of the reveal of their daughter asking to turn off 'The Voice' and go back to a movie. Teigen titled the post 'The kids ... do not care.
  • Television viewers flocked to the showdown between LSU and Alabama over the weekend, making it the top-rated regular season college football game in eight years. The Nielsen company said 16.6 million people watched the game late Saturday afternoon, as LSU held off the Tide's late charge. At 7 p.m. Eastern, just before its conclusion, the audience topped 20 million people. Similarly, the 6.7 million people who watched Minnesota beat Penn State earlier in the day was a winner for ABC. It was the network's biggest audience for a noon college football game in three years. It was particularly appealing to Minnesota fans; the rating for the game was the highest in Minneapolis of any college game since at least 2000, when the market ratings became available, Nielsen said. A different form of combat helped ABC's 'The View' this week. The shout fest that ensued when Donald Trump Jr. came on the show to promote his new book gave the show its biggest audience in six months when former Vice President Joe Biden appeared. Behind the dominant force of 'Sunday Night Football,' NBC won the week in prime-time, averaging 7.1 million viewers. Fox averaged 6.7 million, CBS had 5.8 million, ABC had 4.3 million, Telemundo had 1.27 million, ION Television had 1.25 million, Univision had 1.2 million and the CW had 720,000. ESPN was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 3.06 million viewers in prime time. Fox News Channel had 2.59 million, MSNBC had 1.89 million, Hallmark had 1.54 million and History had 1.01 million. ABC's 'World News Tonight' topped the evening newscasts with an average of 9 million viewers. NBC's 'Nightly News' was second with 8.2 million and the 'CBS Evening News' had 5.7 million viewers. For the week of Nov. 4-11, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: NFL Football: Minnesota at Dallas, NBC, 22.99 million; 'NFL Sunday Night Pre-Kick,' NBC, 16.72 million; 'NFL Sunday Post-Game,' Fox, 15.71 million; NFL Football: Dallas at N.Y. Giants, ESPN, 14.72 million; NFL Football: L.A. Chargers at Oakland, Fox, 13.85 million; 'NCIS,' CBS, 10.89 million; 'Little Mermaid Live,' ABC, 9 million; 'Football Night in America, Part 3,' NBC, 8.89 million; 'Young Sheldon,' CBS, 8.84 million; 'FBI,' CBS, 8.55 million. ___ ABC and ESPN are owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by Fox Corp. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks. ___ Online: http://www.nielsen.com
  • Between a household with four children, the release of a new single and his debut as host of the Latin Grammys, Ricky Martin hasn't gotten much sleep lately. But it's all good. The Puerto Rican star is excited to perform his latest song 'Cántalo' with Residente and Bad Bunny at Thursday's awards show, as well as having fun as its master of ceremonies along with actresses Roselyn Sánchez and Paz Vega. He is also getting ready to release a new album and go on tour in 2020. All with a newborn (Renn), a 10-month-old baby (Lucía) and his 11-year-old twins (Matteo and Valentino.) And as a hands-on dad, he tells The Associated Press he can do it all as long as he's with his family: 'Everyone travels to Las Vegas and everyone goes on tour.' The 20th annual Latin Grammys will be televised live on Univision from the MGM Grand Garden Arena.
  • Robert De Niro will receive the Screen Actors Guild's life achievement award. The guild announced that De Niro will be the 56th recipient of its highest honor at its SAG Awards on Jan. 19, 2020. SAG cited De Niro's extraordinary accomplishments in film and television, including two Academy Awards, a Presidential Medal of Freedom and numerous other honors. It also noted his co-founding and championing of New York City's Tribeca Film Festival. De Niro's latest film is 'The Irishman,' which is playing in theaters in limited release before arriving on Netflix at the end of the month. The actor says in a statement that he's honored to receive the award from a union that he's been a part of for more than 50 years.
  • Jeopardy!' host Alex Trebek got choked up when he read the final response from a Brown University student who wanted to show support as he battles pancreatic cancer. The emotional moment came in Monday's episode when Trebek read Dhruv Gaur's final answer. Instead of writing a correct response, Gaur wrote 'We love you, Alex!' He substituted a heart in place of the word love. Trebek's voice cracked slightly as he thanked Gaur, telling him, 'That's very kind.' Gaur was eliminated in the semifinals for the Tournament of Champions. He tweeted that Trebek had just 'shared with us that he was reenteering treatment' and 'we were all hurting for him so badly.' Trebek announced in September he had resumed chemotherapy. The Final Jeopardy clue had sought the title of a groundbreaking 1890 expose of poverty in New York City slums.
  • When John Cena was offered an audio series about a former college football star chasing an NFL dream, he felt a personal connection to it right away. 'The project really resonated with me because I played college football and didn't know what I was going to do after my career ended,' Cena said. 'When I read the script, I wanted to do it right away.' That project, '64th Man,' makes its debut on Audible on Thursday. Cena's character in the 10-part series works at a grocery store and as a trainer at a gym while pursuing anything to get an NFL tryout. Cena starred on the offensive line at Division III Springfield College, where he was a captain and led the school to its first NCAA postseason appearance in 1998. He pursued a career as a bodybuilder and worked as a limousine driver before training in professional wrestling. He was eventually signed by World Wrestling Entertainment, and of course, became a superstar with the WWE and also a movie star. Besides Cena, the series also features Anna Chlumsky ('Veep'), 'Saturday Night Live' alums Jane Curtin and Leslie Jones, and current 'SNL' stars Chris Redd and Alex Moffat. Cena said the recording process was similar to doing voiceover work for an animated film or series. However, it is unique because it is sketch comedy for the ears. 'You are able to encapsulate yourself in a world of imagination. It is being able to imagine things and come to your own conclusions,' he said. The series was written by Bryan Tucker, senior writer at 'Saturday Night Live', and Zack Phillips, former head writer at Above Average and its sports site The Kicker. Tucker said that Cena was the perfect choice after he saw him showcase his skills on 'SNL.' 'When we remember our favorite moments in sports, often the first things that come to mind are sounds: the announcers, the crowd, the buzzer,' Tucker said. 'We hope to use audio to give the listener that same feeling, while also being a funny character comedy,' Cena, who also has the movie 'Playing With Fire' in theaters, said the series was 'a blast to record and I hope to do it again. 'Hopefully they can have me back or have another concept that comes at the perfect time.
  • Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli is staunchly defending opera legend Placido Domingo, calling it 'absurd' that opera houses have canceled the star's performances over sexual harassment allegations before they are fully investigated. 'I am still appalled at what happened to this incredible artist,' Bocelli said. 'I don't understand this. Tomorrow a lady can just come up and say Andrea Bocelli molested me 10 years ago, and from that day on, no one wants to sing with me anymore; the opera houses won't call me anymore. This is absurd.' Bocelli spoke to The Associated Press through an Italian translator during an interview at his Miami-area home. Bocelli, one of the world's most famous classical singers, is preparing for a U.S. tour that begins next month in San Francisco and closes with two nights at New York City's Madison Square Garden. Three U.S. music companies canceled Domingo appearances following allegations of sexual harassment made by multiple women in twoAP stories earlier this year and he withdrew from a slate of performances at New York's Metropolitan Opera. The AP spoke to more than 20 women, many of whom said Domingo tried to pressure them into sexual relationships and sometimes punished them professionally if they rejected him. One soprano said he grabbed her bare breast under her robe. Domingo has disputed the allegations, calling them 'in many ways, simply incorrect.' Bocelli is the most prominent artist to speak out on the Spanish opera star's behalf, taking issue with the 'call-out culture' and arguing that people should differentiate between public figures' morality and their artistry and skills. If criminal accusations are brought forward, Bocelli said, people should not make a judgment until the accused person is convicted and sentenced. 'Whenever that happens, then the moral judgment against this person would of course change on my end, but not the artistic judgment, because they are two different things,' he said. 'There have been in the past many artists who have dubious morality,' Bocelli said, adding that there are two aspects to judging an artist. 'One is the moral one, which must be dealt with in courts and here on Earth and by our good Lord up in the skies. Then there is an artistic judgment, which is subjective, and up to each one of us.' Domingo has continued to perform in Europe. On Friday, the Tokyo Olympics organizing committee said Domingo decided not to perform at a pre-Olympics event, citing the 'complexity of the project.' He has resigned as general director for the Los Angeles Opera, where an internal investigation into the allegations against him is ongoing. Bocelli and Domingo are credited with injecting new energy into opera during times when its popularity had dwindled. Bocelli, especially, has overlapped with pop music genres and is widely known for the iconic 'Time to Say Goodbye,' which has been used in several sporting events and Hollywood films. The blind singer has partnered with pop sensations such as Ed Sheeran, Ariana Grande and Jennifer Lopez. Bocelli sat down for an interview with the AP to speak about his new collaborations with '13 Going on 30' actress Jennifer Garner and pop singer Ellie Goulding. The tracks are part of a special edition of his album 'Si,' which launched last week. He said opera is alive but needs to shift back to a form of entertainment for everyone, and not just affluent spectators. 'We could do a lot more so that it could go back to the origins, go back to being popular for a wider audience,' he said. 'Today, it risks being an elite phenomenon, and this is a pity because opera was born for the people.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Break out the sweaters and possibly the scarves, cool windy conditions have moved into Central Florida and showers are possible all morning. WFTV Meterologist Brian Shields says this is our “Florida Fall and many of us won’t get out of the 60s!” Here is the basic information Brian says you need to know:  A cold front moves over Central Florirda and low temperatures will mark into the upper 50s Wednesday morning. Isolated showers are possible through the morning hours, and then mainly along the coast on Wednesday afternoon. Cool Wednesday: The high temperatures on Wednesday won’t make it out of the 70s. Temperatures will feel colder because of the strong wind from the north. Pleasant rest of the week: Temperatures are set to stay in the 70s and 60s to close out the week only low chances of rain until Friday when another front is set to blow through.
  • Law enforcement officials said a Florida mother and two children who were abducted at gunpoint in Titusville have been found safe as of 5:50 a.m. Wednesday. >> Read more trending news  Here are the latest updates: Update 7:02 a.m. EST Nov. 13: The Florida Department of Law Enforcement canceled the Amber Alert issued for the children, and the Titusville Police Department confirmed that their mother, Melanie Martin, 30, was also found safe. Original report: An Amber Alert was issued Wednesday morning after police said a Florida woman and her two young children were abducted at gunpoint by the children's father in Titusville. Titusville police said Melanie Martin, 30, and her children Angel Burson, 5, and Lloyd Burson Jr., 3, were kidnapped by Lloyd Burson, 35, around 11:30 p.m. Tuesday in the area of the 1000 block of Third Avenue. Police said Martin and the children were last seen in a blue SUV driven by Burson headed north on I-95 toward Volusia County. Investigators said Burson is considered armed and dangerous. Anyone with information about this crime is urged to call the Titusville Police Department at 321-264-7800, or they can remain anonymous and be eligible for a reward by contacting CrimeLine at 1-800-423-TIPS. – Visit WFTV.com for the latest on this developing story.
  • Officials with the Orlando Fire Department announced late Tuesday evening that they arrested John Huff for arson in connection to the fire early that same morning at the Beefy King Restaurant. Huff was transported to the Orange County Jail. Investigators suspected arson when the saw the fire started outside the building near the back of the building rather than inside.  Additionally, surveillance footage from a nearby business shows a car in the parking lot of Beefy King at the time the fire started. In the meantime, firefighters said the damage to the building on Bumby Avenue is “fixable” and the owner of the iconic establishment known for its sandwiches says the will re-open as soon as possible.  The good news is there was minimal damage and no one was hurt. 
  • A Pennsylvania man whose baby boy suffered critical injuries in an October shooting purposely brought the infant along during drug deals to deter others from opening fire, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  According to the Philadelphia Inquirer and WPVI-TV, police arrested Nafes Monroe, 25, on Saturday, three weeks after his 11-month-old son, Yazeem Jenkins, was shot multiple times in north Philadelphia. Prosecutors said Monroe was trying to use counterfeit money to purchase drugs Oct. 19 when the suspected gunman, 29-year-old Francisco Ortiz, began shooting, the Inquirer reported. Yazeem, who was in a car with Monroe, his girlfriend and a second man, was hit in the chest, head and buttocks, authorities said. Afterward, Monroe took Yazeem to a home, then dropped the baby off at a nearby hospital, according to Anthony Voci of the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. The boy's condition is still listed as critical, KYW-TV reported. Voci said Monroe had brought Yazeem with him during other drug purchases, as well, 'with the idea or belief that if someone saw that he had a child in the car, that they would not fire upon him,' the Inquirer reported. 'A 'human shield' is probably the term that I would use,' Voci said, according to the newspaper. Monroe now faces charges of endangering a child's welfare and reckless endangerment, WPVI reported. Ortiz remains jailed on attempted murder, aggravated assault and other charges, the Inquirer reported.
  • The Tampa Bay Ray’s baseball field is being transformed into a 90,000 sq foot maze of Christmas magic. Tropicana Field will be home to the World’s Largest Christmas Light Maze this holiday season and the lights will be on November 22 through December 29.  The main attraction will be the maze which is called “The Great Search.” The interactive adventure asks you to search for all nine of Santa’s reindeer after a mischievous elf set them free.  Enchant Christmas says on its website that the adventure is like a living storybook that features larger than life light sculptures and decadent delights with snow falling everywhere.  At the center of the temporary attraction is an 80-foot Christmas tree.  App users click here to watch the video. Visitors will also have a chance to ice skate through the lights and visit with Mr.Claus himself and pick up some gifts at a Christmas Market.  Additionally on December 1 and 16  you can bring your pooch to the attraction, but you will have to purchase a dog ticket. Tickets start at $20 for adults and $15 for children ages 4 and up, 3 and under are free.   There is a military and senior discount.  Tickets are limited, click here for more information. 

Washington Insider

  • The first day of impeachment hearings against President Donald Trump will feature two State Department witnesses who raised questions about actions in Ukraine by the President's personal lawyer, with one alarmed by Rudy Giuliani's efforts to undermine the former U.S. Ambassador in Ukraine, and another who saw Giuliani leading an effort to press for investigations desired by Mr. Trump. 'Mr. Giuliani was almost unmissable starting in mid-March,' Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent testified, saying Giuliani conducted a 'campaign of slander' against former Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. 'I worried about what I had heard concerning the role of Rudolph Giuliani,' said William Taylor, now the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, who said he was worried about entering a 'snake pit' involving Giuliani. Here is some of what we might expect from these two witnesses in the first day of impeachment hearings. DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE GEORGE KENT - After working at the U.S. embassy in Ukraine, Kent returned to the State Department in the second half of 2018, taking on a post where he was responsible for Ukraine and five other eastern European nations often targeted by Russia. It was in that position where Kent said he witnessed the media attack which unfolded, spurred by Giuliani and conservative news media organs. In his impeachment deposition, Kent said an article by conservative journalist John Solomon spurred a sudden attack on Ambassador Yovanovitch and the U.S. embassy in Ukraine in general, which was then amplified by Fox News hosts Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham. Kent said much of what was alleged, that Yovanovitch was bad mouthing President Trump, that she was working against Ukraine prosecutors, was simply false. 'It was, if not entirely made up in full cloth,' Kent testified, 'it was primarily non-truths and non-sequiturs.' Kent described how U.S. diplomats were blindsided by what was clearly a concerted campaign against the U.S. Ambassador and the U.S. embassy in Ukraine, spread over four days in March of 2019. It started first with arrows aimed at Ambassador Yovanovitch, but then spread to accusations against former Vice President Biden and his son Hunter, along with other charges mentioning conservative bogeyman George Soros - all of it given a push by President Trump, his son, conservative websites, and Fox News. The attacks on Yovanovitch came two weeks after she had been asked by the State Department to stay on in Ukraine until 2020 - but her extension would not survive the conservative media attacks against her. 'I was then abruptly told in late April to come back to Washington from Ukraine 'on the next plane,'' Yovanovitch told Congressional investigators. She will testify on Friday. + WILLIAM TAYLOR, U.S. Chargé d'Affaires IN UKRAINE. With the recall of Ambassador Yovanovitch, Taylor is the top-ranking U.S. diplomat in Ukraine - basically the acting Ambassador. Several months after Yovanovitch had been ousted, Taylor described how the work of Giuliani had seemingly led to a situation where U.S. military aid for Ukraine was being withheld - in an effort to gain a quid pro quo - where the government of Ukraine would launch investigations sought by President Trump. 'By mid-Ju1y, it was becoming clear to me that the meeting President Zelensky wanted was conditioned on investigations of Burisma and alleged Ukrainian influence in the 2016 elections,' Taylor said, referring to a focus on the Bidens, and the debunked theory that Ukraine - and not Russia - was behind the hacks of Democrats in 2016. Taylor said the impetus for the situation was obvious. 'It was also clear that this condition was driven by the irregular policy channel I had come to understand was guided by Mr. Giuliani,' Taylor said in his closed door deposition. Mr. Taylor said he had determined that link in 'mid-July' - it was on July 25 that President Trump spoke with the leader of Ukraine, and spelled out the need for Ukraine to launch investigations into the Bidens, and the Ukraine-2016 elections theory, which included the evidence-free allegation that the hacked computer server from the Democratic National Committee was being hidden in Ukraine. Some Republicans have mocked the choice of Taylor as an opening witness, saying he has no firsthand knowledge of why the President would want investigations conducted related to the Bidens or the 2016 elections. 'No, I've never talked to the President,' Taylor said in his deposition. Look for Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY) to bring this up during the first day of questioning with Taylor. Three hearings have also been set for next Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, with eight different witnesses.