On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-night
66°
Sunny
H 79° L 61°
  • clear-night
    66°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 79° L 61°
  • clear-day
    80°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 79° L 61°
  • cloudy-day
    74°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 83° L 65°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    The much-anticipated trailer for the super heroine sequel “Wonder Woman 1984” was released Sunday at Comic-Con in Brazil. >> Read more trending news  Gal Gadot portrayed the eponymous character in the first film, a commercial success earning more than $800 million worldwide. It also became the most successful live-action movie directed by a woman. This time, Wonder Woman fights villains in 1984. “It was mankind at its best and worst,” director Patty Jenkins told The Associated Press during the production of the movie. “We see Wonder Woman in a period of time that is us at our most extreme. We thought it could go on forever, everything we were doing right then.” Although his return is not yet explained, Chris Pine’s Steve Trevor character is also featured in the 2:30-minute trailer. Trevor seemingly gave his life by flying a bomb away from its intended target in the first movie. The movie is in theaters June 5, 2020. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Renee Zellweger, Brad Pitt and Eddie Murphy are locks. But whether “Cats' has it in the bag, too, we won't know until the 77th annual Golden Globes are announced Monday morning. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association will unveil their nominations in Los Angeles beginning at 8:04 a.m. EST. They will be live-streamed on the Golden Globes' Facebook page and their website, with the second wave of nominees carried live on NBC's “Today” show at 8:15 a.m. Dakota Fanning, Susan Kelechi Watson and Tim Allen will announce the nominations from the Beverly Hilton hotel. The Globes separate their top categories between drama and comedy/musical, giving some movies well outside the awards conversation an opportunity. While movies like Martin Scorsese's “The Irishman,' Quentin Tarantino's “Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood' and Noah Baumbach's “Marriage Story' are widely expected to come away with numerous nods, few would be surprised if the press association — a group known for its sometimes quirky picks, its penchant for A-listers and its fondness for musicals — also included the upcoming, much-memed big-screen adaptation of “Cats.” The HFPA, a group with 87 voting members, was shown an unfinished cut of Tom Hooper's film. More likely are nominations for the likes of Joaquin Phoenix ('Joker'), Jennifer Lopez ('Hustlers'), Murphy ('Dolemite Is My Name'), Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio ('Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood,' slated as a comedy for the Globes), Zellweger ('Judy'), Awkwafina ('The Farewell') and the leads of “Marriage Story”: Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson. In the early going, Netflix has dominated awards season. “The Irishman” last week won best film from the New York Film Critics Circle and the National Board of Review. “Marriage Story” virtually swept the IFP Gotham Awards. On the television side, the Globes often relish being the first awards group where late fall series are eligible, meaning that Netflix's “The Crown' and Apple's “The Morning Show' could have a big morning, along with Emmy winners “Fleabag' and “Game of Thrones.' HBO's “Watchmen' could also be a factor. Ricky Gervais will host the Globes for the fifth time on January 5. Tom Hanks, a possible nominee for his performance as Mister Rogers in “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,' will receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award. The Carol Burnett Award will go to Ellen DeGeneres. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • René Auberjonois, a prolific actor best known for his roles on the television shows “Benson” and “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” and his part in the 1970 film “M.A.S.H.” playing Father Mulcahy, has died. He was 79. The actor died Sunday at his home in Los Angeles of metastatic lung cancer, his son Rèmy-Luc Auberjonois told The Associated Press. René Auberjonois worked constantly as a character actor in several golden ages, from the dynamic theater of the 1960s to the cinema renaissance of the 1970s to the prime period of network television in the 1980s and 1990s — and each generation knew him for something different. For film fans of the 1970s, he was Father John Mulcahy, the military chaplain who played straight man to the doctors’ antics in “M.A.S.H.” It was his first significant film role and the first of several for director Robert Altman. For sitcom watchers of the 1980s, he was Clayton Runnymede Endicott III, the hopelessly highbrow chief of staff at a governor’s mansion on “Benson,” the ABC series whose title character was a butler played by Robert Guillaume. And for sci-fi fans of the 1990s and convention-goers ever since, he was Odo, the shape-shifting Changeling and head of space-station security on “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.” “I am all of those characters, and I love that,” Auberjonois said in a 2011 interview with the “Star Trek” website. “I also run into people, and they think I’m their cousin or their dry cleaner. I love that, too.” Fellow stars from “Star Trek' shows praised the actor on Twitter. William Shatner said that “to sum up his life in a tweet is nearly impossible. To Judith, Tessa & Remy I send you my love & strength. I will keep you in my thoughts and remember a wonderful friendship with René.' George Takei tweeted: “”Star Trek fans knew him as Odo from Deep Space Nine. We knew him as René. He was a wonderful, caring, and intelligent man. He shall be missed. When I look out to the stars, I shall think of you, friend.' Auberjonois was born in New York in 1940, the son of Fernand Auberjonois, Swiss-born foreign correspondent for U.S. newspapers, and the grandson of a Swiss post-impressionist painter also named René Auberjonois. The younger René Auberjonois was raised in New York, Paris, and London, and for a time lived with his family in an artists’ colony in Rockland County, New York, whose residents included the actors John Houseman, Helen Hayes and Burgess Meredith. After graduating from college at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Institute of Technology, now Carnegie Mellon, Auberjonois hopped around the country joining theater companies, eventually landing three roles on Broadway in 1968, including playing the Fool in a long-running version of King Lear. The following year he would play Sebastian Baye opposite Katharine Hepburn in “Coco,” a play on the life of designer Coco Chanel that would earn him a Tony for best actor in a leading role in a musical. He would later see Tony nominations for 1973’s “The Good Doctor,” 1984’s “Big River,” and 1989’s “City of Angels.” In 1970, Auberjonois began his run with Altman, playing Mulcahy in “M.A.S.H.” In his most famous exchange from the movie, Sally Kellerman’s Margaret Houlihan wonders how such a degenerate doctor as Donald Sutherland’s Hawkeye Pierce could reach a position of responsibility in the U.S. Army. A bible-reading Auberjonois responds, deadpan: “He was drafted.” “I actually made that line up when we were rehearsing the scene,” Auberjonois said on the podcast “The Gist” in 2016. “And it became a kind of an iconic line for the whole film.” The same year he played an off-the-wall ornithologist in Altman’s “Brewster McCloud,” played a saloonkeeper alongside Warren Beatty in the director’s western “McCabe & Mrs. Miller” in 1971 and appeared in Altman’s “Images” in 1972. He spent much of the rest of the 1970s doing guest spots on TV shows before joining the cast of “Benson” in its second season in 1980, where he would remain for the rest of the show’s seven seasons, playing the patrician political adviser and chronic hypochondriac Endicott. Much of his later career was spent doing voices for animation, most memorably as the French chef who sings the love song to fish-killing “Les Poissons” in Disney’s 1989 “The Little Mermaid.” He played Odo on “Deep Space Nine” from 1993 until 1999 and became a regular at “Star Trek” conventions, where he raised money for Doctors Without Borders and signed autographs with a drawing of Odo’s bucket, where the character would store himself when he returned to his natural gelatinous state. Auberjonois was also a regular on the ABC law-firm dramedy “Boston Legal” from 2004 to 2008. Late in his career, Auberjonois would work with independent filmmakers including the artful director Kelly Reichardt, for whom he appeared in 2016’s “Certain Women” and 2019's “First Cow,” his final role. In addition to his son, he is survived by his wife of 56 years, writer Judith Auberjonois; sisters Marie-Laure Degener and Anne Auberjonois; daughter Tessa Auberjonois; son-in-law Adrian Latourelle, daughter-in-law Kate Nowlin and three grandchildren. ___ This story has been corrected to say that the “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” show ran until 1999.
  • 3D-printed cocktails, a traffic jam sculpture made of hundreds of tons of sand and more celebrity sightings than a Kardashian Christmas party were all part of over-the-top festivities during the week of Art Basel Miami, but it was a banana that stole the show. The most talked-about artwork of the week was titled “Comedian” — a spotty banana duct-taped to a wall by artist Maurizio Cattelan. According to artnet News, two pieces quickly sold for $120,000. The Paris-based Perrotin gallery raised the price to $150,000 for the third piece, which will be sold to a museum. The bananas were bought at a local grocery store. No instructions were given on what to do as the banana ages. The gallery did not respond to several emails from The Associated Press seeking comment. On Saturday, David Datuna removed the banana from the wall, unpeeled it and took a bite as a large crowd documented it with their phones. “I respect Maurizio but it’s art performance. Hungry artist,” he said. “You have more? $150,000,” he joked. On Friday night, art collector Wayne Boich hosted a lavish dinner at his home that included Dan Marino, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh. The after-party crowd, including Floyd Mayweather, Hannah Bronfman, and Alesso, watched a performance by Wyclef Jean, who did a throwback to the Fugees with “Ready or Not,' and later brought dozens of girls onstage to dance with him before passing the mic to “Country Grammar” singer Nelly. Rapper 2 Chainz closed out the night. Across town, rapper Travis Scott didn't take the stage until 3:30 a.m. at a sold-out performance at 24-hour nightclub E11even. Scott stood on top of the DJ booth tossing dollar bills into the crowd and yelling at partygoers to put away their phones and enjoy the moment. The city of Miami Beach commissioned a million-dollar traffic jam by artist Leandro Erlich. It took 330 tons (300 metric tons) of sand to construct 66 life-sized sculptures of cars and trucks stuck in an imaginary traffic jam on the oceanfront of popular Lincoln Road. The installation alludes to Florida’s fragile position in the large universal canvas, touching on climate crisis and rising sea levels. The Shore Club South Beach also focused on global warming where a 36-foot-long (11-meter-long) floating ice sculpture inside the pool spelled out the words “HOW DARE YOU.” The piece, titled “Climate Meltdown' by artist Rubem Robierb, lasted approximately eight hours. Photographer David Yarrow's picture of real-life “Wolf of Wall Street” Jordan Belfort sold for $200,000. The piece was signed by director Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio. Bulleit's novel 3D-printed bar also drew a curious crowd, where guests watched a robotic arm disperse microscopic drops of liquid into drinks in a pre-set pattern. The whiskey maker has printed more than 7,800 cocktails since partnering with a robotics engineer. On Saturday, G-Eazy performed poolside at the Maxim magazine party, surprising guests when he brought rapper Wale onstage to perform their song, “Fashion Week,” together. Haute Living hosted a party for Fat Joe's new album “Family Ties.” Wearing a baby blue track suit, the rapper entertained guests including DJ Khaled, Fabolous, Jeezy and Too Short. 'We grew up in the projects and now we in a 100 million dollar house rapping about our history,” he told the crowd before pulling Swizz Beatz onstage to perform. At various clubs over the weekend, Lil Wayne, A$AP Rocky, Rick Ross and 2 Chainz performed. Sean Penn and DiCaprio partied late night at Rockwell x 1 Oak, where Gucci Mane took the stage. Brody Jenner, Meek Mill and Too Short hung out at LIV to hear Alesso play. And “Cats” actor Idris Elba, who performs under the name DJ Big Driis, spun tracks along with Diplo at an extremely packed club Basement on Saturday night.
  • Caroll Spinney, who gave Big Bird his warmth and Oscar the Grouch his growl for nearly 50 years on “Sesame Street,” died Sunday at the age of 85 at his home in Connecticut, according to the Sesame Workshop. The legendary puppeteer lived for some time with dystonia, which causes involuntary muscle contractions, the Sesame Workshop said in a statement. Spinney voiced and operated the two major Muppets from their inception in 1969 when he was 36, and performed them almost exclusively into his 80s on the PBS kids’ television show that later moved to HBO. His death comes on the same day that “Sesame Street” is being honored for lifetime achievements in the arts as a Kennedy Center Honors recipient. “Before I came to ‘Sesame Street,’ I didn’t feel like what I was doing was very important,” Spinney said when he announced his retirement in 2018. “Big Bird helped me find my purpose.” Through his two characters, Spinney gained huge fame that brought international tours, books, record albums, movie roles, and visits to the White House. “Caroll was an artistic genius whose kind and loving view of the world helped shape and define Sesame Street from its earliest days in 1969 through five decades, and his legacy here at Sesame Workshop and in the cultural firmament will be unending,” the Sesame Workshop said. But he never became a household name. “I may be the most unknown famous person in America,” Spinney said in his 2003 memoir. “It’s the bird that’s famous.” Spinney gave “Sesame Street” its emotional yin and yang, infusing the 8-foot-2 Big Bird with a childlike sweetness often used to handle sad subjects, and giving the trashcan-dwelling Oscar, whose voice Spinney based on a New York cabbie, a street-wise cynicism that masked a tender core. “I like being miserable. That makes me happy,” Oscar often said. “But I don’t like being happy, so that makes me miserable.” To colleagues there was no question which character the kindly Spinney resembled. “Big Bird is him and he is Big Bird,” former “Sesame Street” head writer Norman Stiles said in a 2014 documentary on Spinney. It wasn’t easy being Big Bird. To play the part, Spinney would strap a TV monitor to his chest as his only eyes to the outside. Then the giant yellow bird body was placed over him. He held his right arm aloft constantly to operate the head, and used his left hand to operate both arms. The bird tended to slouch more as the years took their toll. In 2015, Spinney switched to just providing the characters’ voices. That year, the longtime PBS show inked a five-year pact with HBO that gave the premium cable channel the right to air new episodes nine months before they air on PBS. Big Bird’s builder Kermit Love always insisted that his design was a puppet, not a costume. But to many children, he was neither. He was real. 'Eight-year-olds have discovered to their horror that he's a puppet,' Spinney told The Associated Press in 1987. Born in 1933 in Waltham Massachusetts, Spinney had a deeply supportive mother who built him a puppet theater after he bought his first puppet, a monkey, at age 8. He spent four years in the U.S. Air Force after high school, then returned to Massachusetts and broke into television. He teamed up with fellow puppeteer Judy Valentine for their own daily series, then worked on a Boston version of the clown show “Bozo’s Big Top.” Spinney in this period had three children, Jessica, Melissa and Benjamin, all from his 1960 to 1971 marriage to Janice Spinney. He later married his second wife Debra in 1979, and the two were nearly inseparable for the rest of his life. It was after a disastrous performance at a puppet festival in Utah that Spinney met Muppet master Jim Henson, who came backstage and told him, “I liked what you were trying to do,” Spinney remembered Henson saying, in his memoir. Spinney would join the Muppet crew when “Sesame Street” was about to turn them from popular phenomenon into an American institution. Henson brought his signature character, Kermit the Frog, to the show. His right-hand man Frank Oz would become famous via Grover and Cookie Monster. Together they created Ernie and Bert. But Big Bird would become the show’s biggest star, his name and image synonymous with not just “Sesame Street” but PBS and children’s television. The character was usually used for comedy, but his innocence and questioning was also useful when serious subjects needed addressing. When “Sesame Street” shopkeeper Mr. Hooper died, Big Bird had to get a lesson in accepting death, saying in the memorable 1983 episode that “he’s gotta come back. Who’s gonna take care of the store? Who’s gonna make my birdseed milkshakes, and tell me stories?” When Henson died suddenly in 1990 at age 53, leaving the Muppet world devastated, Big Bird played the same part in real life. At the funeral, Spinney appeared alone on stage in full Big Bird costume and sang “It's Not Easy Bein' Green,' Kermit’s signature song. “It was extraordinarily moving,” Oz said in the Spinney documentary. “It tore people up.” Spinney said he was crying under the feathers but he got through the song, looking at the sky and saying, “Thank you Kermit,” before walking off. Sesame Street co-founder Joan Ganz Cooney said Sunday that Spinney, her longtime colleague and friend, “not only gave us Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch, he gave so much of himself as well.' “We at Sesame Workshop mourn his passing and feel an immense gratitude for all he has given to Sesame Street and to children around the world,” she said. ____ This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Caroll Spinney's first name. It is Caroll, not Carroll.
  • “Frozen 2” blanketed multiplexes for the third straight weekend, continuing its reign at No. 1 with $34.7 million in ticket sales, according to studio estimates Sunday. The Walt Disney Co. animated sequel has already grossed $919.7 million worldwide. It will soon become the sixth Disney release this year to cross $1 billion, a record sure to grow to seven once “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” hits theaters later this month. Early next week, Disney will cross $10 billion at the global box office this year. But the weekend overall at the box office was yet another disappointing one for the movie industry. A handful of under-performing releases and a relatively thin wide-release schedule hasn't helped the 5.6% slide in domestic ticket sales from last year, according to data firm Comscore. This weekend produced an outright flop in “Playmobil: The Movie,' the week's only new wide release. The STX Films release was never expected to do well, but it bombed so thoroughly that it will rank among the worst-performing wide-releases ever. It grossed $668,000 in 2,337 venues, giving it a per-theater average of just $286. A handful of companies combined to produce the $75 million French film, including Wild Bunch and Pathe. The top five films were almost unchanged from last weekend. Rian Johnson's acclaimed, star-studded whodunit “Knives Out' remained in second place with $14.2 million, declining a modest 47% in its second week of release. With $63.5 million cumulatively and $124.1 million worldwide, the Lionsgate release has been one of the season's bright spots. So has James Mangold's “Ford v Ferrari,' which stayed in third place with $6.5 million over its fourth weekend. The racing drama, starring Matt Damon and Christian Bale, has sped to a global take of $168 million for Disney, which acquired the film's original studio, 20th Century Fox, earlier this year. The film cost about $100 million to make. Melina Matsoukas' outlaw romance “Queen & Slim” moved up to fourth in its second week with $6.5 million, swapping places with Marielle Heller's Mister Rogers drama “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood' ($5.2 million in its third weekend). Todd Haynes' true-story legal drama “Dark Waters,” starring Mark Ruffalo as a defense attorney who takes on the DuPont chemical company, expanded nationwide to 2,011 theaters. The Focus Features release made $4.1 million. Celine Sciamma's acclaimed period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” opened at two locations with a very strong $33,552 per-theater average. Neon will release the French film wider in February. Some of the weekend's most widespread movie watching may have been on Netflix, though the streaming service doesn't disclose viewership tallies or box-office receipts. After a three-week theatrical run, Noah Baumbach's “Marriage Story,' one of the year's most critically acclaimed films, began streaming Friday. On Friday, Nielsen said Martin Scorsese's “The Irishman” last weekend drew an average audience of 13.6 million viewers from Nov. 27 to Dec. 1. Netflix has said Nielsen numbers, which only estimate U.S. viewership, reflect an incomplete picture. Amazon likewise didn't release ticket sales for “The Aeronauts,' which opened in 52 theaters over the weekend. Tom Harper's film, which cost $40 million to make, stars Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones as 19th century balloonists. A week before it opens in North America, Sony's 'Jumanji: The Next Level' debuted in 18 international countries where it made $52.5 million. The sequel to 2017's 'Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,' which grossed $962 million worldwide, is expected to lead the box office next weekend. Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. 1. “Frozen 2,” $34.7 million ($90.2 million international). 2. “Knives Out,” $14.2 million ($18 million international). 3. “Ford v Ferrari,” $6.5 million ($8.3 million international). 4. “Queen & Slim,' $6.5 million. 5. “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,' $5.2 million. 6. “Dark Waters,” $4.1 million. 7. “21 Bridges,' $2.9 million. 8. “Playing With Fire,' $2 million. 9. “Midway,' $1.9 million. 10. “Joker,' $1 million. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Rapper Juice WRLD, who launched his career on SoundCloud before becoming a streaming juggernaut and rose to the top of the charts with the Sting-sampled hit “Lucid Dreams,” died early Sunday after a “medical emergency” at Chicago's Midway International Airport. The rapper, whose legal name was Jarad A. Higgins, was 21. Authorities have not released details about his cause of death. He was pronounced dead at a hospital around 3:15 a.m. and taken to the Cook County medical examiner's office several hours later, according to office spokeswoman Natalia Derevyanny, who said an autopsy would take place Monday. Chicago police launched a death investigation after a 21-year-old male experiencing a “medical emergency” was transported from Midway to an area hospital. Police said there were no signs of foul play and those aboard the aircraft were cooperating with authorities. Chicago Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford said the man experienced cardiac arrest and was taken to a hospital from a hangar operated by Atlantic Aviation at Midway, away from the main terminal, where private planes land. Atlantic didn't return a message Sunday. The rapper, who was named top new artist at the 2019 Billboard Music Awards in May, lived in the Chicago suburb of Homewood where he stood out as a musician early on. Juice WRLD turned 21 only days earlier. He was only two years out of high school. Like a good number of young hip-hop performers, Juice WRLD blended rapping and singing on his songs, sometimes mumbling words and focusing more on melody. His hit “Lucid Dreams,” which heavily samples Sting’s 1993 song “Shape of My Heart,” was a six-times platinum success and reached No. 2 on the all-genre Hot 100 chart. It reached No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs and Hot Rap Songs charts. “I was very impressed by what he put on top of (my version),” Sting told The Associated Press this year. “It’s a really good song.” Juice WRLD got his start on the music sharing platform SoundCloud before signing to a record label and finding major success on streaming services. His major-label debut album, “Goodbye & Good Riddance,” was a platinum success. It featured the hit “All Girls Are the Same,” which gained platinum status, alongside seven more platinum hits including “Armed & Dangerous,” “Robbery,” “Fine China” and “Legends,” which features the lyrics: “What's the 27 Club?/We ain't making it past 21.” He’s had 10 songs reach gold status and also had success with 2018’s “Wrld on Drugs,” a collaborative album with rapper-singer-producer Future. His second album, “Death Race for Love,” debuted on top of the Billboard charts this year and his most recent single, “Bandit” with YoungBoy Never Broke Again, reached the Top 10 of the pop charts in October. Juice WRLD graduated in 2017 from Homewood-Flossmoor Community High School outside Chicago, where he gained a reputation as a talented musician among the nearly 3,000 students. School officials said Sunday that they would offer counseling services for students affected by his death. “He is remembered by his teachers and staff as being a brilliant and creative student. Jared was extraordinarily talented in music and played many instruments,” said school spokeswoman Jodi Bryant. “He was a caring and outgoing person who always tried to reach out to others while at the same time he was introspective and had a great sense of humor.” ___ Fekadu reported from New York.
  • Actress Sally Field, singer Linda Ronstadt and the disco-funk band Earth Wind and Fire shared the spotlight Sunday night as part of the latest group of recipients of the Kennedy Center Honors for lifetime achievement in the arts. Also in this year's class were conductor Michael Tilson Thomas and long-running children’s TV show “Sesame Street.” Sunday's event featured a genuinely unique event for the Kennedy Center as Big Bird walked the red carpet along with fellow “Sesame Street' characters Bert and Ernie, Abby and Cookie Monster, accompanied by their respective humans. The massive yellow avian's appearance held a particular resonance as Caroll Spinney, Big Bird's original puppeteer, died earlier Sunday at age 85. “I'm heartbroken that this happened on this particular day,” said Sonia Manzano, who played Maria for decades on “Sesame Street.' “But I'm glad we're all together.” As she entered the building, Field, who has won two Academy Awards and three Emmys, reflected on the unique nature of the Kennedy Center Honors medallion. “It's not about one performance. It's not about being the flavor of the month,” she said. “it recognizes artists whose body of work has resonated over the years.” Once again, the attendance of President Donald Trump was a topic of speculation until the White House said Friday that neither he nor first lady Melania Trump would attend. Trump skipped the past two celebrations; in 2017, multiple recipients threatened to boycott the event if he attended. Tom Hanks, as the entered the building, pointed out that this annual tension seems unique to the Trump administration. “We've been here for Republican presidents and we've been here for Democratic presidents,” he said. “We were all celebrating the arts in America.” Last year’s ceremony contained very few overt political references. But this year, several signs of the country’s divisive political mood bubbled to the surface. During the annual Saturday night gala dinner for honorees at the State Department, Ronstadt, a longtime liberal activist, reportedly had a testy exchange with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Pompeo introduced Ronstadt by referencing one of her signature hits — “When Will I Be Loved” — and wondered aloud when he would be loved. Ronstadt, according to multiple attendees who posted on social media, responded, “When you stop enabling Donald Trump.” On Sunday night, Kennedy Center Chairman David Rubenstein noted that half a dozen members of Trump’s Cabinet were in attendance, and the camera focused on Pompeo to polite applause. Then he introduced House Speaker, who received a spontaneous, extended standing ovation. Each recipient is honored with a personalized presentation that in the past has in included surprise guests. Last year, Cher was shocked to find her friend Cyndi Lauper walking onstage to deliver a tribute; Lauper had told Cher she would be out of town. Don Henley, who received his own Kennedy Center Honor in 2016 as a member of the Eagles, praised Ronstadt’s “curiosity about multiple music styles” that led her to explore early country-rock, mainstream pop, Broadway and Mexican folk ballads. “And Linda owned each and every genre she explored,” Henley said. Carrie Underwood, Aaron Neville, Trisha Yearwood and Flor de Toloache, an all-female mariachi band, performed. No less an authority than Emmylou Harris described Ronstadt’s voice as “the most stunningly beautiful of our generation.” Ronstadt, who retired from performing in 2011 due to the effects of Parkinson’s disease, wept openly in the honorees box as Harris spoke. Hanks and Steven Spielberg, both previous Kennedy Center Honorees, paid tribute to Field. Hanks, who memorably played Field's son in 'Forrest Gump,' drew a laugh when he walked onstage by donning a familiar southern accent and drawling, “Hi Momma.” Maura Tierney recalled working on the television show “ER,” where Fields' played her unstable mother. “Watching how she works had a profound effect on me as a human and as an artist,” Tierney said. “Thank you for being one of the most righteous kick-ass women I have ever had the pleasure to work with.” The co-founders of “Sesame Street,” Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett, accepted the honor on behalf of the show, but the presentation included familiar cast members. For starters, Big Bird strolled down the aisle and basically sat in Hanks' lap. Actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt had an extended chat with Cookie Monster and the segment ended with a mass rendition of the show’s signature tune, “Sing a Song.” Tilson Thomas, widely known simply as MTT, was repeatedly praised for pushing musical boundaries while serving as music director of the San Francisco Symphony for the past 24 years. Lars Ulrich, drummer for the venerable Bay Area metal band Metallica, recalled working on a joint project with Thomas’ orchestra, calling it “one of the most exhilarating and creatively rewarding experiences of my career.” Actress Debra Winger praised Thomas’ “contagious child-like exuberance” and willingness to forge unusual collaborations. “Taking his friends to unusual musical places is who Michael is and what he does,” Winger said. Earth, Wind and Fire's segment largely consisted of an extended all-star tribute concert. John Legend, Cynthia Erivo, Ne-Yo and the Jonas Brothers all performed the band's hits and illusionist David Copperfield recalled how the band recruited him to introduce illusions into their famously flashy stage show. The night ended with a packed stage performing “September” with the entire audience on their feet and Hanks leaping from his seat, arms waving, to lead his whole section in dancing. The event will be broadcast on CBS on Dec. 15.
  • Nobel Literature Prize winner Olga Tokarczuk says she thinks a new sort of fiction may be needed to counteract the modern era's tendency to isolate and divide people. In her Saturday lecture in Stockholm ahead of receiving the prize next week, the Polish author complained of the “exhausting white noise of oceans of information” in the internet era. ''It has turned out that we are not capable of bearing this enormity of information, which instead of uniting, generalizing and freeing, has differentiated, divided and enclosed us in individual little bubbles,' she said. Tokarczuk suggested this discourages people from understanding how actions are interconnected, thus contributing to climate crisis and political tensions. She said she dreams of a new kind of “fourth-person” narrator in fiction who could encompass the views of each character in a novel. “We can regard this figure of a mysterious, tender narrator as miraculous and significant. This is a point of view, a perspective, from which everything can be seen. Seeing everything means recognizing the ultimate fact that all things that exist are mutually connected into a single whole, even if the connections between them are not yet known to us,” she said. Tokarczuk is the 2018 literature laureate. Her prize was announced only two months ago because the Swedish Academy postponed naming a winner last year due to internal turmoil connected with a sex abuse scandal. The 2019 Nobel Literature winner, Peter Handke, has also brought controversy to the body because of widespread criticism of him as an apologist for Serbian war crimes during the 1990s. One Swedish Academy member said he is boycotting Nobel ceremonies this year in protest of Handke's selection and a member of the literature nominating committee has announced his resignation. Handke jousted with journalists who were questioning his views at a Friday news conference, saying he preferred receiving soiled toilet paper to answering their questions. But his lecture on Saturday was contemplative, telling how his writing was first inspired by religious litanies he heard from a village church. He concluded by reciting a poem by the late Swedish Nobel laureate Tomas Transtomer in which an angel whispers 'do not be afraid of being human.' The Nobel prizes in physics, chemistry, medicine, economic and literature are being presented Tuesday in the Swedish capital. Earlier Saturday, several Nobel laureates in science spoke about climate change at their news conferences in Stockholm. Didier Queloz, an astronomer who shares this year’s Nobel physics prize for discovering a planet outside the Earth’s solar system, said people who shrug off climate change on the grounds that humans will eventually leave for distant planets are wrong. “The stars are so far away I think we should not have any serious hope to escape the Earth,” Queloz said. ”We’re not built to survive on any other planet than this one ... we’d better spend our time and energy trying to fix it.” ___ Heintz reported from Moscow.
  • The gala season premiere of Puccini’s “Tosca” starring Russian soprano Anna Netrebko and conducted by Riccardo Chailly received 15 minutes of applause from an audience of Milanese elite, in an evening that celebrated culture as a bulwark against political extremism. For the second year, the performance opened with long applause for Italy’s president, Sergio Mattarella, sitting in the royal box with four government ministers. As last year, the Italian government is struggling, and the long applause was seen as a show of support for Italian institutions, which Mattarella represents in a non-partisan role. After five minutes of clapping, Mattarella signaled for the audience to turn to the stage for the Italian anthem and the start of “Tosca.” ‘’When there is so much applause for Mattarella, like last year, it is to say that we believe in our constitution, that we believe in a single, indivisible Italy, and that we are a community that needs to grow and be open,’’ said stage director Davide Livermore, who also directed last year’s ‘’Attila.” “There are too many strange things. There are too few politicians who have the courage to say fascism is against the law,’’ Livermore said. The audience of Italian business, fashion, cultural and political VIPs included senator-for-life Liliana Segre, an Auschwitz survivor who was recently placed under armed escort due to anti-Semitic threats. The Milan native recalled coming to La Scala as a 16-year-old and said she has been a season-ticket holder for 30 years. She said she loves “Tosca” for its passion, adding, “I wasn’t always 90 years old.” “Culture helps everything,’’ Segre said before the performance. “As Primo Levi said, knowing is absolutely necessary,” she said, referring to another Italian Holocaust survivor who recounted his experience in a series of celebrated books. American poet Patti Smith, who recently received an honorary degree from the University of Padova, was back at La Scala, after attending the season-opening for “Giovanna d’Arco” in 2015. She lauded an Italian grass-roots movement against right-wing populism, dubbed the Sardines, as she arrived at the theater, saying “The Sardines have power.” Netrebko starred in the role of Floria Tosca, the object of unwanted sexual attention from a powerful authority figure, Baron Scarpia, sung by Luca Salsi. The plot — part thriller, part drama — evokes #MeToo for the modern ear, as Tosca feels forced to succumb to Scarpia in a bid to save her lover Mario Cavaradossi, performed by Francesco Meli. She rebels, killing Scarpia, but is out maneuvered by Scarpia, who ensures that her lover is executed despite her concessions. All three were showered with flowers and glitter from an appreciative crowd. Salsi kissed the stage in gratitude. “It was written in 1900, but it gives a glimpse of the future of everything that comes more than a century later,’’ said Chantilly, La Scala’s musical director. “The modernity of the subject, the greatness of Puccini’s music, makes ‘Tosca’ very contemporary, very credible and very similar to a reality that is very raw and harsh in our society.’’ Vittorino Andreoli, an Italian psychiatrist and writer who attended the performance, said Tosca's example serves as an antidote to contemporary woes. 'In this moment we are consuming our own feelings. Affection doesn't exist any more. Great loves don't exist any more,'' Andreoli said backstage. “'This is a woman who drives this story, with these stupendous arias. I think it is a great example that women need to take control, because society is built on affection, which doesn't exist any more. Everyone looks at money.” Netrebko doesn't necessarily agree. The soprano said she initially found Tosca, a role she debuted last year in New York, unsympathetic as a character, and says she sees nothing to emulate. “Don't take an example from the woman who is killing men,'' she said backstage. One of the world’s most staged operas, “Tosca” was performed for the first time ever for the Dec. 7 gala premiere, one of Europe’s most anticipated cultural events held each year on the feast day for Milan's patron St. Ambrose. “Tosca” continued Chailly’s emphasis on Italian Belcanto and Verismo operas as La Scala reinforces its famed Italian repertoire, where Puccini in particularly had been neglected. Chailly chose to execute Puccini’s original score, which includes musical passages that the composer himself decided to cut before the opera was performed at La Scala for the first time just two months after its Rome world premiere in January 1900. “This is an opportunity to get to know the opera better,’’ Chailly said. “I don’t mean that this is better than the one we are used to. I simply want to make known all of the music that Puccini wrote for this opera.” This premiere also was the final one for outgoing general manager Alexander Pereira, who is being replaced by Frenchman Dominique Meyer of the Vienna State Opera. During his five-year term, Pereira increased private sponsorship of the theater, which also relies on government funding, and increased ticket sales while also opening up performance series to children. But his tenure was also troubled by political run-ins that nearly cost him the job before it began. He leaves to take over as general manager for Florence’s Maggio Musicale theater. “One book closes, another opens,’’ Pereira told reporters this week.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Police in Titusville, Florida, said a man was arrested after a 9-year-old girl was accidentally shot Saturday afternoon. >> Read more trending news  Police said Titusville resident Dustin Adkins, 34, was arrested and is now facing charges including aggravated child neglect with great bodily harm and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Adkins is on probation for manslaughter involving the shooting death of a child, police said. The shooting occurred as four young juveniles were with an adult relative target shooting in the woods near State Road 407 and I-95, authorities said. Police said that at some point, the adult left the children unsupervised, and the 9-year-old girl was shot by a sibling accidentally while the sibling was shooting at a target. 'It is outrageous that this adult provided firearms and ammunition to these young children,' said Deputy Chief Todd Hutchinson. 'Especially given his past arrest and conviction.' Police said the family transported the child to the hospital. The child was critically injured and is in stable condition, officers said. After a lengthy search, officers found several firearms on a trail hidden under a disposed tire in the wooded area, officials said. No other details were made available.
  • An Arkansas officer was killed in a shooting outside the Fayetteville Police Department on Saturday night, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  Update, 11:22 a.m. EST Dec. 8: Fayetteville police Chief Mike Reynolds identified the officer who was shot and killed outside the Fayetteville Police Department on Saturday night and also identified the shooter, KFSM reported. Reynolds said Officer Stephen Carr was alone in the parking lot waiting for his partner when the suspect, London T. Phillips, 35, approached and fatally shot him, the television station reported. Original story: According to a Fayetteville police news release, the shooting occurred just after 9:40 p.m. in the parking lot behind the police station. Officers in the building heard gunfire and rushed outside to find their colleague down and the suspected shooter fleeing, the release said. Police then chased the suspect, who exchanged fire with officers in a nearby alley, KTHV reported. The suspect was shot, authorities said. The officer and suspect both died from their injuries, according to the news release. Officials have not released the name of the slain officer or suspected shooter. No further information was immediately available. Read more here or here.
  • A suspect died Friday morning after opening fire at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, killing at least three people and injuring seven others. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said the shooting was reported just before 7 a.m. local time in a classroom building at NAS Pensacola. Responding deputies with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office exchanged gunfire with the suspected shooter, killing him, officials said. Here are the latest updates: Update 3:42 p.m. EST Dec. 8: Officials are still trying to determine whether Ahmed Mohammed al-Shamrani acted alone or was part of a terrorist group Friday when he opened fire at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, The Washington Post reported. Rachel Rojas, the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Jacksonville division, said at a news conference that the agency’s main goal is to determine whether the Saudi air force lieutenant worked as “part of a larger network,” the newspaper reported. Rojas said Shamrani’s weapon, a 9mm Glock, was purchased legally, but she did not describe how Shamrani obtained it and brought it onto the base, according to the Post. Update 10:38 p.m. EST Dec. 7: The third victim of the Naval Air Station Pensacola shooting was identified as Cameron Scott Walters, 21, of Richmond Hill Georgia. “The Sailors that lost their lives in the line of duty and showed exceptional heroism and bravery in the face of evil,” Capt. Tim Kinsella, commanding officer at the installation, said in a release. 'When confronted, they didn’t run from danger; they ran towards it and saved lives. If not for their actions, and the actions of the Naval Security Force that were the first responders on the scene, this incident could have been far worse.” Update 9:58 p.m. EST Dec. 7: Two of the three victims in the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola were identified. Mohammed “Mo” Haitham, of St. Petersburg, Florida, was killed as he tried to stop the shooter, The Tampa Bay Times reported. Haitham, 19, joined the Navy after graduating high school last year. He was assigned to flight crew training and was expected to graduate later this month. “He said he was going to get his flight jacket for Christmas,” his mother, Evelyn Brady, who also served in the Navy, told the Times. Update 3:08 p.m. EST Dec. 7: Authorities said Mohammed Saeed Ashamrani, the Saudi student who fatally shot three people at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola hosted a dinner party earlier in the week, and he and three other people watched videos of mass shootings, The Associated Press reported Saturday. The official was briefed by federal investigators, according to the AP. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Florida, whose district includes the Pensacola area, tweeted he received condolences from Saudi Ambassador Reema Al-Saud, WEAR-TV reported. Update 11:05 a.m. EST Dec. 7: Family members identified one of the victims fatally shot at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, the Pensacola News Journal reported Saturday. Joshua Kaleb Watson, 23, a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who reported to Pensacola two weeks ago, was one of the three people killed during Friday’s shooting, the newspaper reported. Watson’s brother, Adam Johnson, confirmed the death in a Facebook post, the News Journal reported “Joshua Kaleb Watson saved countless lives today with his own,” Adam Johnson wrote Friday night. ”After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable. 'He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled.” Watson’s father, Benjamin Watson, told the News Journal his son was the officer on deck at the time of the shooting. Joshua Watson was shot at least five times, his father told the newspaper. Update 11:05 a.m. EST Dec. 7: Family members identified one of the victims fatally shot at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, the Pensacola News Journal reported Saturday. Joshua Kaleb Watson, 23, a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who reported to Pensacola two weeks ago, was one of the three people killed during Friday’s shooting, the newspaper reported. Watson’s brother, Adam Johnson, confirmed the death in a Facebook post, the News Journal reported. Update 9:30 p.m. EST Dec. 6: The shooter has been identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani according to WKRG. He is one of hundreds of international military members who are receiving training there. In a news conference Friday night, the FBI declined to comment on his possible motivations. “There are many reports circulating, but the FBI deals only in facts,” said Rachel L. Rojas, the FBI’s special agent in charge of the Jacksonville Field Office. “This is still very much an active and ongoing investigation.” Update 2:25 p.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities declined to confirm the identity of the person who shot several people Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola, killing three people before being shot and killed by deputies. “I think there’s obviously going to be a lot of questions about this indivdual being a foreign national, being a part of the Saudi Air Force and then to be here training on our soil and to do this,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Friday morning at a news conference. “The FBI is working with (the Department of Defense), they’re working with (the Florida Department of Law Enforcement), they’re working with Escambia County sheriff’s to answer those questions.” DeSantis said he spoke earlier Friday with President Donald Trump. “One of the things that I talked to the president about is given that this was a foreign national in the employ of a foreign service ... obviously the government of Saudi Arabia needs to make things better for the victims,' DeSantis said. 'I think that they, they are going to owe a debt here, given that this was one of their individuals.” Authorities confirmed at a news conference that the suspect used a handgun in Friday’s shooting. Capt. Tim Kinsella, commanding officer of NAS Pensacola, said the suspect was at NAS Pensacola for aviation training. Earlier in the day, deputies said the suspect opened fire just before 7 a.m. local time in a classroom building at NAS Pensacola. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 1:45 p.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities in Pensacola are expected to provide an update Friday afternoon on the investigation into the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola that left four people dead. Update 1:20 p.m. EST Dec. 6: President Donald Trump said Friday afternoon that he’s spoken to Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and received a full briefing on the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola. “My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families during this difficult time,” Trump said. “We are continuing to monitor the situation as the investigation is ongoing.” Update 12:50 p.m. EST Dec. 6: An official told The Associated Press that the person who opened fire Friday at Naval Air Station Pensacola, killing three people and wounding several others before being shot and killed by authorities, was an aviation student from Saudi Arabia. Authorities are investigating to determine whether the shooting was terrorism-related, according to the AP. Military from around the globe attend the Naval Air Station in Pensacola. Authorities are expected to hold a news conference at 12:30 p.m. local time Friday to update the public on the investigation. Update 11:50 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities expect to hold a news conference at 12 p.m. local time Friday to provide more updates on the shooting that left four people dead at Naval Air Station Pensacola.  Update 11:05 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities said a total of 11 people were injured or killed in Friday morning’s shooting, including the suspected shooter. The injured included two responding deputies with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office, Sheriff David Morgan said Friday at a news conference. One deputy was shot in the arm and the other was shot in the knee, Morgan said. They were both expected to survive. Morgan described walking through the scene left by Friday’s attack as being similar to “being in a movie.” “You just don’t expect this to happen here at home,” he said. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 10:45 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials are holding a news conference to update the public on Friday morning’s deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Update 10:25 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Vice President Mike Pence said he’s monitoring the situation in Florida after a shooting left two victims and a suspect dead at Naval Air Station Pensacola. “Praying for the victims & their families,” Pence wrote Friday morning in a Twitter post. “We commend the first responders for their swift action in taking down the shooter & getting those on base to safety.”  Update 10:20 a.m. EST Dec. 6: White House officials said President Donald Trump has been briefed on the deadly shooting reported Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola.  Update 10:15 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials with Naval Air Station Pensacola said the base will closed for the day Friday after a shooting left three people dead earlier in the day. Authorities said at least three people, including the suspected shooter, were killed in the incident. Reports indicated at least eight other people were wounded in the shooting. The incident happened two days after authorities said a U.S. sailor shot and killed two civilian employees before turning the gun on himself at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. One other person was injured in that shooting. Naval Air Station Pensacola employs more than 16,000 military and 7,400 civilian personnel, according to officials. Update 10:10 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, said his office has been in “close contact with all the relevant officials & closely monitoring events” after a shooter opened fire at Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday morning, killing two people. Authorities said the shooter also died. “Please pray for everyone impacted by this horrible situation,” Rubio said in a Twitter post. Update 10 a.m. EST Dec. 6: A spokesman at Ascension Sacred Heart Hospital told CNN that hospital officials expected to get three patients who had been injured in Friday morning’s shooting, down from the six expected earlier in the day. Hospital spokesman Mike Burke told the news network most victims were taken to Baptist Hospital because of its proximity to the base. Kathy Bowers, a spokeswoman for Baptist Hospital, earlier told the Pensacola News Journal that the hospital had received five patients wounded in Friday’s shooting. Update 9:45 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials with the U.S. Navy have confirmed that a second person has died after a shooter opened fire Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola.  Update 9:35 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials told the Pensacola News Journal two people were confirmed dead after Friday morning’s shooting, in addition to the shooter. Naval officials previously said at least one person had been killed. Update 9:20 a.m. EST Dec. 6: At least 11 people were hospitalized in the immediate aftermath of Friday’s deadly shooting, according to The Associated Press. Ascension Sacred Heart spokesman Mike Burke told the AP six people were taken to the hospital after a shooter opened fire at Naval Air Station Pensacola early Friday. The Pensacola News Journal previously reported five other people were taken to Baptist Hospital with injuries. Naval officials said at least one victim was killed in Friday’s shooting. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 9:10 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials with the U.S. Navy said at least one person died Friday morning in a shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida. Authorities said the suspected shooter was also dead Friday morning. Update 9 a.m. EST Dec. 6: An official with Baptist Hospital told the Pensacola News Journal five patients were taken to the hospital after Friday morning’s reported shooting. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 8:55 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office said a suspected shooter was dead Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Original report: Authorities are responding Friday morning to reports of shots fired at Naval Air Station Pensacola, according to base officials. Authorities at NAS Pensacola said both gates to the base were closed Friday morning as authorities investigated. Officials with the U.S. Navy said the base was on lockdown around 7:45 a.m. local time. A spokeswoman for ECSO told the Pensacola News Journal deputies were working to “take down” what was described as an active shooter around 7:30 a.m. local time. Officials with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office told WEAR-TV injuries were reported. Details on the number of people wounded and the extent of their injuries was not immediately available. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • Bill Nye the Science Guy has now been given the go ahead by a judge with his lawsuit against The Walt Disney Company. According to AV Club, the complaint stems from when his show was produced by Buena Vista Television. The agreement reportedly entitled Nye to 16.5% of the net profits from sales and distribution of the show. Back in April 2008, he received a payment of $585,123, but then it was retracted by Disney three months later, with them claiming it was an accounting error, and they asked for a payment back of $496,111 and that he would not get any more money until he paid that back.  In the complaint, Nye says he hired an auditor to review Buena Vista's records, which he claims Disney dodged until May of 2016, which showed that he was owed more than $9 million in under-reported royalty payments.  After making certain changes to his complaint, the judge ruled that he may proceed with his $28 million lawsuit, which not only covers what he is owed, but also includes legal fees and damages. In a statement from Nye's legal team, they told Fox Business that 'it is our hope that this case, which Disney has fought so hard to stall, will finally shine some light upon the improper accounting practices that Disney utilizes to unjustly deprive profit participants, like our clients, of their fair share of revenues from the programming that they work so hard to create.'  While Disney has sold a select amount of episodes of Bill Nye the Science Guy to Netflix( which has since been removed in May of this year), the show cannot be found on Disney+.
  • Despite it being a week since a 73 year old Sanford man has been missing, his family and members of the community are not giving up. Police in Sanford say Robert Ford left his home on November 29th on the 300 block of Fern Drive and has not been back since. They say Ford is a Navy veteran who suffers from post traumatic stress disorder and is on medication for depression.  While police continue their search, his daughter has put up flyers around the community and has even set up a Facebook page so that volunteers can help look for him.  Ford is 5 feet, 7 inches weighing 160 pounds and was last seen wearing a dark colored shirt and a jacket. Police say he may act confused and might not know his own name. Anyone who knows where he is is asked to contact the Sanford Police Department at 407-688-5070.

Washington Insider

  • Even as Democrats press ahead with a historic effort to impeach President Donald Trump in the House, lawmakers in both parties are on the cusp of possibly producing series of major, bipartisan legislative deals, covering everything from a crackdown on surprise medical bills to a compromise establishing the President's plan for a 'Space Force' at the Pentagon in exchange for a big benefits change for federal workers. The calendar doesn't offer much time for action in either the House or Senate, as lawmakers hope to leave town by the weekend before Christmas - which would give the House and Senate until around December 20-23. Here are some of the big issues which might get resolved in Congress at the same time as Democrats force a vote on impeachment. 1. Lawmakers cut deal on surprise medical bills. Sunday brought news that a group of key lawmakers - in both parties from the House and Senate - had reached agreement on a plan to rein surprise bills which consumers often face, especially after emergency care. Backers stressed the bipartisan nature of the agreement. 'The legislation includes proposals from 80 Senators, 46 Democrats and 34 Republicans,' said Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) in a Sunday statement. That does not necessarily mean this deal gets voted on in the next two weeks. 2. New minimum age to buy tobacco products. The deal on the issue of surprise medical bills also has some other items involved in it, including a provision which would raise the minimum age to buy tobacco products to 21 years. The idea of raising the legal age for buying cigarettes and tobacco has been supported in recent months by the Senate's top Republican - Majority Leader Mitch McConnell - but it's not clear if McConnell would rush such a bill to the Senate floor over the next two weeks. 3. 'Space Force' might be ready for launch. Lawmakers in both parties were trying to finalize a major defense policy bill early this week, and the details are expected to finally give President Trump his plan to set up a 'Space Force' inside the Pentagon. The plan - which has been resisted by lawmakers in both parties - would not set up a brand new branch of the military, as sought by President Trump. Instead, the Space Force would operate out of the Air Force, sort of like the Marines are considered part of the Navy. Critics argued a plan to set up a separate new branch of the military would have been too expensive, and would create an unnecessary new bureaucracy. 4. Paid family leave benefit for federal workers? The President won't get his Space Force for nothing in this major defense policy bill, as reportedly the deal with the White House will give around 2.7 million federal workers a new benefit - paid family leave. The plan would reportedly include up to 12 weeks of such leave for federal civilian workers. While no final bill language has been released, a tweet from over the weekend by President Trump's daughter shows this exchange could well be part of the defense bill. Stay tuned. 5. USMCA trade deal still a late year possibility. With a flurry of late negotiations involving U.S., Mexican, and Canadian trade officials, it's still possible that the final touches could be put on a new trade deal among the three nations, and have it voted on by the House and Senate. The White House has been quietly working with Mexico and Canada in recent weeks to work out tweaks to the agreement, mainly dealing with labor and environmental enforcement, trade dispute resolution, and issues dealing with some medical drugs. While the President and his allies keep saying the plan has been sent to Congress already for a vote - that is simply not true. 6. Government funding plan remains in limbo. While there were seemingly agreement on surprise medical billing, the Space Force, and more, lawmakers still have not finalized a giant package of bills to fund the operations of the federal government for 2020. The current temporary funding bill runs out on December 20. While there is obviously the threat of a government shutdown, lawmakers in both parties hope they can either reach a deal now - or extend that temporary spending plan into the New Year. So, this could also be part of a late rush of big legislation.