ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
80°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 92° L 76°
  • clear-night
    80°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 92° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    89°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 92° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    84°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 91° L 75°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Entertainment Headlines

    A lawyer for Harvey Weinstein has asked that the disgraced movie mogul's upcoming criminal trial be moved out of New York City, saying he can't get a fair trial. In a longshot motion filed with the New York State appellate court on Friday, attorney Arthur Aidala suggested the trial be moved to upstate Albany County or Suffolk County on Long Island. The motion cited the intense media coverage and circuslike atmosphere surrounding Weinstein's past court appearances in Manhattan, even noting that Weinstein's name was mentioned online on the New York Post's gossip column Page Six more than 11,000 times. 'It is safe to say that New York City is the least likely place on earth where Mr. Weinstein could receive a fair trial, where jurors could hear evidence, deliberate, and render a verdict in an atmosphere free of intimidation from pressure to deliver a result that the politicians, the activists, the celebrities and the media demand,' Aidala wrote. The court papers also argued that Manhattan is the epicenter of the global #metoo movement, which took off after numerous women accused Weinstein of wrongdoing. 'It is difficult to conceive of a similar case in recent memory that has generated more inflammatory press coverage,' Aidala wrote. A message left with the Manhattan district attorney's office was not immediately returned. The 67-year-old Weinstein is charged with raping a woman in 2013 and performing a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006. He has pleaded not guilty and has denied all allegations of nonconsensual sex. Weinstein is free on $1 million bail. The trial is scheduled to start Sept. 9.
  • With great success comes great re-negotiation. In the wake of the announcement that 'Spider-Man: Far From Home' is now the highest-grossing film ever in Sony Pictures' history, reports surfaced that Marvel Studios may be stepping away from the cross-studio partnership. The Hollywood trade Deadline reported Tuesday that there was a disagreement over the profit-sharing structure. According to a person close to the deal who was unauthorized to speak publicly, negotiations are not yet final. But the suggestion that Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige may not produce future live-action 'Spider-Man' movies and that the character itself might not appear in any more Marvel Cinematic Universe films quickly turned into a trending topic. Sony has held the rights to the Marvel character since 1985, but in 2015, announced a partnership with Disney and Marvel that would allow Spider-Man to be used in MCU films like 'Avengers: Endgame.' It also allowed for Feige to serve as a producer on stand-alone 'Spider-Man' movies like 'Far From Home.' The crossovers have been well-received by audiences and critics. And the teenage web-slinger has been made into a central component in the MCU with a close relationship to Tony Stark that drove the story lines in both 'Endgame' and 'Far From Home.' But as Marvel enters its 'Phase 4,' Spider-Man also has no official MCU appearances planned. Two standalone 'Spider-Man' movies are, however, reportedly in the works from Sony which would bring back director Jon Watts and star Tom Holland. Sony has also created its own web of Spider-Man spinoffs, including the Oscar-winning animated feature 'Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,' and 'Venom.' Representatives from the two studios did not respond to requests for comment.
  • Los Angeles Opera said Tuesday it will immediately open a 'thorough and independent investigation' into allegations of sexual harassment against the opera star Placido Domingo, the company's general director. In a brief statement Tuesday, the opera company said it has hired Debra Wong Yang from the law firm of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher to lead the investigation. LA Opera did not respond to questions about how the investigation would be carried out and its expected duration. Yang is a former U.S. attorney and Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who is chair of her firm's Crisis Management Practice Group, according to the firm's website. She has been involved in several high-profile cases and was hired by USC in 2017 to investigate the conduct of a former medical school dean. The investigation into Domingo's behavior follows an Associated Press report last week detailing multiple accusations against the 78-year-old opera star. Three of the nine women who accused the singer of harassment and abuse of power said the encounters took place while they worked with Domingo at the LA organization. The nine women and dozens of others interviewed said Domingo's behavior was an open secret in the industry and that he pursued younger women with impunity. Domingo did not respond to detailed questions from the AP about specific incidents, but issued a statement saying he believed all the encounters to be consensual and calling the allegations 'deeply troubling, and as presented, inaccurate.' The singer is widely credited with raising the profile of LA Opera, where he served as an artistic consultant from 1984 to 2000, artistic director from 2000 to 2003 and, finally, general director from 2003 until now. His current contract runs through the 2021-22 season. Yang is an experienced investigator who was hired by the University of Southern California two years ago to look into the conduct of the school's former medical school dean, who admitted using methamphetamines, and the university's response to his behavior. At the time, her independence was questioned because she has taught at the USC law school and defended the university in court. Yang also was criticized after an internal investigation she participated in cleared former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the 2013 'Bridgegate' scandal, in which two of Christie's former associates were convicted of orchestrating traffic jams near the George Washington Bridge, which connects New York City to New Jersey, allegedly to punish a mayor who wouldn't endorse Christie. Christie, who is a personal friend of Yang's, wasn't charged. __ Associated Press writer Brian Melley contributed to this story from Los Angeles.
  • Larry King is seeking a divorce from his seventh wife, Shawn King, after 22 years. The 85-year-old talk show host filed a petition to end the marriage Tuesday in Los Angeles Superior Court. Larry King and Shawn King, then a singer and TV host, married in 1997 and have two adult sons, Chance and Cannon. They both filed for divorce in 2010 but later reconciled. Larry King has been married eight times to seven different women and has five children. He married and divorced Alene Akins twice. He has overcome several serious health issues in recent years, including a bout with lung cancer two years ago.
  • Keanu Reeves and Lana Wachowski are returning to the world of 'The Matrix.' Warner Bros. Pictures Group chairman Toby Emmerich says Tuesday that a fourth 'Matrix' is in the works. Reeves will be reprising his role as Neo and Carrie-Anne Moss will return as Trinity in the film that will be co-written, directed and produced by Wachowski, who co-created 'The Matrix' with Lilly Wachowski. Lana Wachowski says in a statement that the ideas of 'The Matrix' are more relevant than ever now and she's happy to have the characters back in her life. Emmerich says Wachowski is a true visionary. The first film hit theaters 20 years ago and spawned two sequels that cumulatively made more than $1.6 billion at the global box office. No release date has been set.
  • America's Got Talent' wasn't content with just the top spot in the Nielsen company's rankings of the most popular television programs last week. This time it took the top two. First place is familiar territory for NBC's talent competition. It has been the most-watched summer series for six straight years and the No. 1 alternative summer series for all 14 years that it has been on the air. The dominance continues even though the show is slipping in popularity, which is typical of most TV series these days. 'AGT' averages 11.4 million viewers live and within a week of an episode's premiere, down 18% from last year, Nielsen said. Still, that's almost 4 million viewers more than the second-ranked show of the summer, ABC's 'Bachelorette,' which had 7.5 million viewers within a week of its premiere this summer. 'America's Got Talent' still has the capacity to create big moments online, too. A clip of contestant Kodi Lee singing a version of 'A Song For You' has been viewed nearly 432 million times online, NBC said. The summer's ratings illustrate how scripted series are fading as a factor, after a couple of years where networks tried to attract viewers with a handful of new shows. Last summer the second-ranked show was the CBS drama 'Code Black,' with 8.8 million viewers. The most-watched scripted series this summer has been reruns of CBS' 'NCIS,' at 5.6 million, Nielsen said. NBC won the week in prime time, averaging 3.6 million viewers. CBS had 3.4 million, ABC had 2.9 million, Fox had 2.4 million, ION Television had 1.4 million, Univision had 980,000, Univision had 950,000 and the CW had 580,000. Fox News Channel was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 2.36 million viewers in prime time. MSNBC had 1.54 million, HGTV had 1.2 million, USA had 1.13 million and Hallmark had 1.11 million. ABC's 'World News Tonight' topped the evening newscasts with an average of 8 million viewers. NBC's 'Nightly News' was second with 7.2 million and the 'CBS Evening News' had 5 million viewers. For the week of Aug. 12-18, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: 'America's Got Talent' (Tuesday), NBC, 9.1 million; 'America's Got Talent' (Wednesday), NBC, 7.9 million; '60 Minutes,' CBS, 7.11 million; NFL Exhibition Football: Seattle at Minnesota, Fox, 5.3 million; 'Celebrity Family Feud,' ABC, 5.06 million; 'American Ninja Warrior,' NBC, 4.76 million; 'Big Brother' (Sunday), CBS, 4.72 million; 'The $100,000 Pyramid,' ABC, 4.42 million; 'NCIS,' CBS, 4.4 million; 'America's Funniest Home Videos,' ABC, 4.37 million. ___ ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks. ___ Online: http://www.nielsen.com
  • Prosecutors on Tuesday dropped the case against a man charged with stealing Frances McDormand's Oscar statuette from a 2018 Academy Awards after-party. Terry Bryant's felony grand theft trial was to begin Tuesday, but Los Angeles prosecutors said in court that they were unable to proceed with the case against the 58-year-old. Superior Court Judge Sam Ohta then granted a defense motion to dismiss it. The district attorney's office gave no explanation for the decision, and Bryant's attorney wasn't immediately available for comment. McDormand won the award for best actress in 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' on March 4, 2018, and lost the statuette after having it engraved at the Governors Ball, the official Academy Awards after-party, held in the same Hollywood complex as the Dolby Theatre where the show takes place. Associated Press video shows Bryant, wearing a tuxedo, leaving the party holding an Oscar and saying, '''We did it! We did it.' A film academy worker who was escorting a photographer at the party testified at a preliminary hearing last year that he heard over a walkie-talkie that McDormand's Oscar was missing, and he quickly spotted Bryant, and recovered the statuette. It was immediately returned to McDormand, who could be seen holding it at the Vanity Fair post-Oscar party hours later. Bryant's attorney, Daniel Brookman, argued in court last year that Bryant didn't try to hide that he had McDormand's Oscar, and the charge should be dismissed. 'There was never any intent to deprive the owner of the property on a permanent basis,' Brookman said. The attorney also said McDormand did not want Bryant to be prosecuted and displayed a police detective's report that said the actress was 'not desirous of prosecution.' McDormand declined comment Tuesday through a representative. The case, and the charge of grand theft, showed how murky the value of an Oscar can be. Winners since 1951 have accepted the award on the condition that they or their heirs must offer it back to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for $1 before selling it elsewhere. Last year in a rare auction of a pre-1951 Oscar, Gregory Peck's statuette for the 1947 film 'Gentleman's Agreement' brought in nearly $500,000, and in 1999, Michael Jackson paid $1.5 million for producer David O. Selznick's 1940 'Gone With The Wind' Oscar. A lawyer for the academy argued in Bryant's preliminary hearing that the statuettes cost the organization between $2,300 and $2,500, and said they are probably priceless to most winners. ___ Follow AP Entertainment Writer Andrew Dalton on Twitter: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton .
  • The 25th James Bond movie has a title: 'No Time to Die.' Producers announced the moniker Tuesday for the film that has long been referred to simply as 'Bond 25.' 'No Time to Die' returns Daniel Craig to the role of 007. Lea Seydoux, Naomie Harris, Ben Whishaw and Ralph Fiennes return as cast members. Rami Malek plays the villain. 'No Time to Die,' directed by Cary Fukunaga, is to be released in the U.K. on April 3, 2020, and in the United States on April 8. A few setbacks have marked the production. An explosion during shooting at Pinewood Studios in June injured a crew member and damaged the sound stage. Craig hurt his foot in May while performing a stunt in Jamaica that required minor ankle surgery.
  • A federal judge hearing the city of Chicago's lawsuit against Jussie Smollett says she'll rule on the actor's request to toss the suit in October. The 10-minute status hearing Tuesday was the first since the civil case was moved to federal court from state court. The former 'Empire' actor didn't attend the hearing in Chicago. The city accuses Smollett of staging a racist and anti-gay attack against himself in January. It sued to force Smollett to pay $130,000 in police overtime and other expenses after state prosecutors dropped charges accusing him of filing a false report. The defense motion to dismiss earlier this month calls the bid to recoup costs a 'perverse tactic' since charges were dismissed. They maintain the attack was real. The next status hearing is Oct. 22.
  • Sorry, 'Old Town Road' fans: A new song has finally climbed to the top of the charts. >> Read more trending news  According to Billboard, singer-songwriter Billie Eilish's 'Bad Guy' took the No. 1 spot this week from Lil Nas X and Billy Ray Cyrus, whose hit 'Old Town Road' topped the Billboard Hot 100 for a record 19 weeks. Billboard tweeted that the 17-year-old Eilish, whose song was No. 2 for nine weeks, 'is the first artist born in the 2000s to have a No. 1 song on the #Hot100.' Lil Nas X, whose real name is Montero Lamar Hill, took to Twitter to congratulate Eilish. 'U deserve this!!' he wrote. Cyrus echoed the sentiment. 'Well deserved,' he tweeted. 'Your persistence paid off. Thanks everybody. It was a hell of a ride.' Read more here.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • The trial of Everett Miller, the ex- U.S. Marine accused of murdering two Kissimmee police officers began Monday. Miller is facing first-degree murder charges in the 2017 shooting deaths of Officer Matthew Baxter and Sgt. Sam Howard.  The judge said he expects it will take a week to a week and a half to seat a jury in the high-profile case.  The court continues to work through the first set of 76 potential jurors who were called in Monday morning, another 76 potential jurors will be called in after that.  Miller was dressed in civilian clothes as he sat in front of potential jurors, after the judge last week denied his request to wear his military uniform at trial.  It will be up to the judge and attorneys on both sides to find 12 jurors and four alternates who will decide Miller's fate.
  • Police were searching for the man they dubbed the “Foul Mouth Bandit.” Detectives in Portland, Oregon, were trying to identify the man responsible for four bank and credit union robberies and the robbery of a bar in April 2017 when the name Tyrone Lamont Allen came across their radar. There was a problem with Allen as the suspect, however. Allen, 50, has multiple elaborate, prominent tattoos on his forehead, cheeks and neck, as seen in April 18, 2017, booking photos shot following his arrest on unrelated warrants. The tattoos include several clearly readable names on his forehead. >> Read more trending news  Only two of the four bank tellers who encountered the robber earlier that month recalled seeing tattoos, court records show. One mentioned tattoos on the man's hands and the other mentioned faded tattoos on the man's neck. None of the four witnesses noted tattoos on the robber's forehead or cheeks, which according to surveillance images of the man, were clearly visible -- and clearly bare of ink. A police forensic criminalist testified last week about how investigators solved the problem. They turned to Photoshop. 'I basically painted over the tattoos,'' Mark Weber testified, according to The Oregonian. 'Almost like applying electronic makeup.' Only then did investigators present Allen's photo to the witnesses in a photo lineup, the newspaper reported. None of the witnesses were told the photos had been altered -- which the newspaper reported is a violation of U.S. Department of Justice and other law enforcement agencies' protocols on how to handle photo lineups. According to court records, two of the four witnesses picked Allen out of the array. One said he did not see the robber in the six photos he was shown and another picked a different man's photo. Allen was subsequently charged with three counts of robbery and one count of attempted robbery. Because the targets were banks and credit unions, he is charged with federal crimes. The Innocence Project, an organization dedicated to helping exonerate wrongly convicted inmates, reports that mistaken witness identifications have contributed to about 71 percent of the more than 360 wrongful convictions in the U.S. overturned by post-conviction DNA analysis. Allen’s defense attorney, who last month filed a motion asking a judge to suppress the witness identifications at trial, argued in federal court last week that the police were trying to “rig the outcome” of the lineups by making his client look more like the man who robbed the banks and credit unions, The Oregonian reported. “This is a very, very slippery slope given the advent of technology,’’ attorney Mark Ahlemeyer said. “We don’t know where this may end.” The prosecutor in the case, Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul Maloney, defended the actions of police. “The whole idea was to make Mr. Allen blend in so his photo wouldn’t stand out,’’ Maloney argued, according to the newspaper. “These procedures were prudent. They were appropriate.’’ Maloney said the mugshot was altered to make Allen’s photo look like the disguises the robber wore, The Oregonian said. The affidavit of Brett Hawkinson, the Portland Police Bureau detective on the robbery case, states that investigators found several items of clothing in Allen’s 1998 Dodge Intrepid that looked similar to items worn by the robber depicted in surveillance footage from the crime scenes. Nowhere does Hawkinson say authorities found makeup or other tools Allen may have used to cover up his facial tattoos. Hawkinson noted the absence of the tattoos when he first looked at Allen’s booking photos and compared them to the surveillance images, his affidavit says. “The robber and Allen looked like the same person, minus the presence of Allen’s facial tattoos,” Hawkinson wrote. Nevertheless, after meeting with Allen in person at the Multnomah County Jail, Hawkinson wrote that he was certain Allen was his suspect. “After having the chance to see Allen in person and interact with him close up, I have no doubt in my mind that he is the same person depicted in the surveillance images as the robbery suspect from the OnPoint Community Credit Union, Wells Fargo Bank, Bank of the West and Advantis Credit Union robberies as described above,” Hawkinson’s affidavit states. Three days after that meeting, on May 20, Hawkinson released images from the bank robberies to the public in an effort to identify the “Foul Mouth Bandit,” who got the name from the language he used while holding up the tellers. Read Allen's motion to suppress the witness identifications below.  Tyrone Lamont Allen Motion to Suppress by National Content Desk on Scribd According to the charges against Allen, he is accused of going to OnPoint Credit Union in Portland the afternoon of April 3, 2017, and approaching a teller. The alleged robber handed the teller a $20 and asked for change, a pattern that later emerged in other robberies, as well. As the teller chatted with the man, the man leaned forward and opened a white plastic shopping bag. “Give me your (expletive) money! I have a gun! I will blow your head off,” the man said, according to court documents. The robber got away with about $6,000 that day. Similar robberies, in which the surveillance footage from each appeared to show the same man, took place the following day at a Wells Fargo branch and on April 7, 2017, an attempted robbery at Bank of the West and a successful robbery at Advantis Credit Union. In total, the man walked away with about $14,000 from the four robberies, court records show. According to Hawkinson’s affidavit, the teller in the first incident noticed tattoos on the robber’s hands. The Wells Fargo teller told detectives the man in that case had faded tattoos on his neck. There is no mention of any tattoos on the robber in either the Bank of the West or Advantis Credit Union heist. In none of the bank or credit union robberies did witnesses see a weapon. During the investigation, Hawkinson spoke with another Portland detective who was working a separate series of armed robberies in north Portland. The suspect in that case, a black man with tattoos, went to a Subway, a Papa Murphy's pizza shop, a Walgreens and a 7-Eleven and robbed each using a semi-automatic pistol. The detective, William Winters, was also investigating the robbery of Sting Tavern in Portland. Winters told Hawkinson the video surveillance from the tavern showed the robber wearing a red sweatshirt similar to the one worn by the man who robbed the Advantis Credit Union. The weight, height and build of each robber was also similar. Winters led Hawkinson to an unnamed informant who came forward and told police about a person he suspected in a series of robberies. That person was Allen. The man, identified only as the 'known person' in court records, told investigators that he met Allen through a mutual friend, who showed him Allen's April 18, 2017, mugshot alongside the robbery surveillance images later broadcast on the TV news. He said both he and the mutual friend suspected it was Allen, who they said had a violent past. 'When asked how he knew the surveillance picture on Channel 12 was Allen, the known person stated he did not know, but then he immediately changed his statement and said he knew it was Allen because it looked just like him except for no tattoos.' Hawkinson wrote that the victim in the OnPoint Community Credit Union robbery was shown a photo lineup including Allen’s photo, but said he did not see the man who robbed him. The same day, the Bank of the West victim picked a different photo from the array, but said she was unsure of her selection. The victim from Advantis Credit Union picked Allen’s photo that same day, as did the Wells Fargo victim the following day, May 3. Ahlemeyer’s motion to suppress the identifications of his client argue that none of the police reports document now the lineups were put together. Nowhere does Hawkinson’s affidavit mention that Allen’s mugshot was altered prior to it being shown to the witnesses. “The novel question in this case is whether the government can materially alter a suspect’s photograph in a way that makes him look more like the perpetrator, then secure an eyewitness identification based on that manipulated photo, and ultimately present that positive identification to a jury,” Ahlemeyer’s motion states. “The court should reject this type of fabricated evidence either as a violation of due process or under the court’s inherent supervisory power to ensure the integrity of the judicial process.” The defense attorney also argues that the identifications were “unconstitutionally suggestive” and, therefore, unreliable. “The Fifth Amendment right to due process bars the introduction of identification evidence where it was procured or tainted by unnecessarily suggestive law enforcement procedures that created a substantial likelihood of misidentification,” the motion states. The Oregonian reported that it was Ahlemeyer who first discovered his client’s mugshot had been altered. Though no police reports referenced the change, Ahlemeyer spotted the anomaly in the photo array after it was handed over as part of the discovery process. Testimony in court last week showed the order to remove the tattoos from Allen’s mugshot came from Hawkinson, an 18-year police veteran assigned to the FBI’s task force on bank heists. It was in that role that he was assigned the case. Hawkinson testified that Allen could have worn makeup during the robberies to mask the tattoos. According to The Oregonian, he said he sought to rule Allen in or out as the suspect and to determine if people who contacted investigators with information were credible. Read the criminal complaint against Tyrone Allen below. Warning: The document contains graphic language.  Tyrone Lamont Allen Criminal Complaint by National Content Desk on Scribd Hawkinson also testified that the victims were shown the photos in a double-blind lineup -- a lineup in which an officer unaware of who the suspect might be shows the photos to a witness one at a time. The technique is a way to help ensure a lack of suggestibility on the part of investigators. The double-blind lineup is one of a number of reforms the Innocence Project has endorsed to help improve eyewitness accuracy. Oregon is one of 24 states that have implemented those reforms. Finding ways for the suspect to not stand out from the “fillers,” or the people whose photos are shown alongside that the of the suspect, is another. Prosecutor Maloney argued last week that the tattoos were removed from Allen’s photo for that purpose. The Oregonian reported that Justice Department rules adopted in January 2017, just a few months before Allen’s arrest, suggest finding “filler” photos of people with attributes similar to those of the suspect. If the unique attribute cannot be replicated, investigators should black out the attribute and put similar black marks on the filler photos. On cross-examination, Hawkinson admitted that altering a suspect’s photo is not part of the bureau’s protocol, but said it is “standard practice among investigators,” the newspaper reported. “The purpose of any alteration is not to change the physical attributes but to mask things that would stand out,” Hawkinson said. “You don’t consider tattoos to be physical attributes?’’ Ahlemeyer asked. Weber, the forensic criminalist, told the court he did not write a report about the alterations he made to the photo because it wasn’t part of the bureau’s operating procedures. He admitted that he’s changed suspects’ photos in connection with past investigations. “It is hard to fathom any photo array conduct that is more ‘suggestive’ than altering a source photograph for the sole purpose of making the investigation target look more like the perpetrator,” Allen’s attorney told the court. U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez told parties in the case he would issue his written ruling soon, The Oregonian reported.
  • An airport security screener was fired after handing a traveler a note with a rude message scrawled on it. >> Read more trending news  Neal Strassner was going through the Greater Rochester International Airport when the security guard handed him a torn piece of paper with the words “you ugly” written on it. 'I got handed something. I really didn't look at the thing, I kept going,” Strassner told WHAM. 'She called back to me a few times, asked me if I was going to read the note or open it or something. I look at it, look at her and kind of shrug my shoulders ... and she laughed.' The incident took place in late June. Strassner waited more than a month for the video after filing a Freedom of Information request for it, WROC reported.  The employee works for VMD Corp. a security company based in Virginia, contracted through the TSA. VMD did not comment. TSA confirmed the employee was fired, WROC reported.  “TSA holds contractors to the highest ethical standards and has zero tolerance for this type of behavior,” the agency said in a statement. “This instance, which involved a contract employee, was investigated immediately upon receiving the complaint by the traveler. The employee has since been terminated by the contractor.” Strassner was not bothered by the note, but he did notice at the end of the video the woman appears to write another one.  “I’m really curious what the other notes said,” Strassner told WROC. “I travel a lot, and the airport normally is spectacular. This was a totally weird event that they (VMD Corp.) seemed to handle properly. I travel a lot and just want to make sure they get some credit to their organization and don’t let one lady trash their whole reputation.”
  • Police asked for the public's help Tuesday identifying a suspect wanted after a retired administrator was stabbed to death Monday on a college campus in Southern California. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said they found the victim, identified as Steven Shek Keung Chan, 57, with several stab wounds in a parking lot on the California State University, Fullerton, campus just before 8:30 a.m. Monday. Police said he was pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators asked for help locating the suspect, described as an Asian man with black hair in his mid-20s. Police said he wore a black windbreaker and black pants at the time of the attack. Update 12:55 p.m. EDT Aug. 20: Police released a sketch Tuesday of the man suspected of stabbing 57-year-old Steven Shek Keung Chan to death one day earlier in a parking lot at Cal State Fullerton. Authorities said the man was last seen running northbound on Langsdorf Drive and then eastbound on Nutwood Avenue. Police believe he might have been injured in the attack and might have lacerations to one or both of his hands. Police said officers recovered a backpack which they believe belonged to the suspect during their investigation. It was found under Chen's vehicle and contained 'an incendiary device along with numerous items that were consistent with a kidnapping attempt or plot, including zip ties, wigs and other disguise materials,' police said. The bag also contained a knife separate from the one used in Monday's attack, according to authorities. Police believe Chan, who recently returned to the school as a special consultant after retiring as an administrator in 2017, was specifically targeted in the attack, according to authorities and the Los Angeles Times. Police continue to investigate. Original report: Authorities are searching for a suspect after a retired administrator was stabbed and killed Monday on a Southern California college campus. According to the Los Angeles Times, authorities said Steven Shek Keung Chan, 57, of Hacienda Heights, had several stab wounds when police found him in his car, which was parked in a lot on California State University's Fullerton campus, about 8:30 a.m. Monday. Police also discovered an 'incendiary device,' which did not go off, nearby, the newspaper reported. Police believe the assailant specifically targeted Chan, who recently returned as a special consultant after retiring as director of budget and finance and student services for extended education in 2017, the Times reported. In a tweet, university police described the suspect, who reportedly fled the scene and was still on the run late Monday, as an Asian man in his mid-20s with black hair. He was wearing black pants and a black shirt, authorities said. No further information was immediately available. In a letter to students, faculty and staff, university President Framroze Virjee called the attack 'tragic and senseless.' 'As the investigation into Steven’s death is ongoing, we are unable to provide information beyond what the Fullerton Police share publicly,' the letter read. 'What I can do, however, is join all of you in adding to the tremendous outreach of love and support that has already embraced our Titan Family during this tragic and difficult time. That begins with pausing in thought and prayer for Steven, his family, and all Titans who are grieving and grappling with the reality of such an unspeakable act and tragic loss in our community.' >> Read the full letter here Read more here.
  • A North Carolina man is accused of strangling his 15-year-old daughter before slitting her throat during a weekend visit at his home, sheriff’s deputies said. Joshua Lee Burgess, 32, of Monroe, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Zaria Joshalyn Burgess. Zaria was visiting her father when she was slain. Union County Jail records show Burgess is also facing one count each of statutory rape of a person 15 years old or younger, first-degree statutory sexual offense, first-degree kidnapping and first-degree sexual exploitation of a minor. “The details of this murder are indescribable,” Union County Sheriff Eddie Cathey told WSOC in Charlotte. “Every officer and detective involved in this case is feeling the effects of what happened to this child. There is no logical answer to explain why this man did what he is accused of doing. Our hearts and prayers are with Zaria’s mom and her family.” Union County Sheriff’s Office officials said in a news release that Burgess walked into the agency’s lobby just before 9:30 a.m. Sunday and told a dispatcher he was there to turn himself in. The dispatcher began searching for warrants in Burgess’ name. “He stopped her. He said, ‘You’re not going to find my name. I just killed someone,’” Tony Underwood, chief communications officer for the Union County Sheriff’s Office, told WSOC. “At that point, the red flags started to go off.” After Burgess gave details of the killing and told them where to find Zaria’s body, deputies went to Burgess’ home at 5102 Hampton Meadows Road, near Wesley Chapel. Inside, they found the slain teen, authorities said. A reporter with WSOC was in the courtroom Monday for Burgess’ first court appearance, where authorities offered gruesome details of the girl’s death, including how her father reportedly killed her. Reporter Tina Terry said there was a “collective gasp” when the details were revealed, according to the news station. “It’s just pure evil,” Underwood said. Cathey on Tuesday told the news station the medical examiner found that Zaria died of a “sharp force injury to the neck.” No motive for the slaying was given. Burgess' Facebook page is filled with photos of his daughter, who he called his “mini-me.” “I love this little angel more than anything. Nothing beats quality time with my daughter,” he wrote on a post from 2015. >> Read more trending news  Zaria’s cousin, Dytaysha Wadsworth, told WSOC the victim was a sweet girl who loved her family. She was about to start her freshman year at Monroe High School. “She was just the type of kid that would come in a room or come in a house and say, ‘Hey everybody’ -- just wanting to make everybody smile,” Wadsworth said. “She was so young, and nobody deserves to leave this world like that, especially by someone they thought was gonna protect them and be there for them.” Burgess is being held without bond in the Union County Jail.

Washington Insider

  • With the Prime Minister of Denmark making it clear that she was not interested in selling Greenland to the United States, labeling the idea 'absurd,' President Donald Trump said Tuesday night that he would cancel his scheduled visit to the NATO ally in early September. 'Denmark is a very special country with incredible people, but based on Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen’s comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of Greenland, I will be postponing our meeting,' the President tweeted on Tuesday evening. In interviews this week, Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen had made clear that Greenland was not for sale, even as she welcomed the idea of closer relations between Denmark and the United States. But that wasn't enough for President Trump. On Sunday, President Trump had downplayed the issue as he returned to the White House. 'It’s not number one on the burner, I can tell you that,' the President told reporters when asked about the idea of buying Greenland. The decision obviously came as a surprise to U.S. diplomats in Denmark, as the U.S. Ambassador had put out a tweet a few hours earlier about the President's scheduled state visit. The President and First Lady had been invited by the Queen of Denmark earlier this summer for a two day state visit. Democrats mocked the President for canceling his stop in Denmark. “Embarrassing,” said Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA). 'What a shame when Greenland could be covered with sand traps, water holes and lots of beautiful putting greens,' said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-VA), referring to the President's golfing.