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    Seniors from a Colorado high school where a student was killed trying to stop a shooting nearly two weeks ago graduated Monday. STEM School Highlands Ranch held its commencement ceremony at a Denver Broncos training facility in suburban Denver and honored 18-year-old Kendrick Castillo, who was fatally shot when he and two classmates tackled one of the two gunmen May 7. The shooting came during the last week of classes for Castillo and his fellow seniors. Valedictorian Emma Goodwill said Monday the attack does not define the school, although she will take the events with her through life. 'It was an attack on so many things, but it was also an attack on this common ideological foundation that was fundamentally the center of our school: mutual respect for our peers' individuality. A love for each student's personal and particular nature,' she said. 'However, Kendrick's personal nature was not shaken. He continued to love and to protect just as he had. Kendrick died as he lived.' Goodwill asked her classmates to 'love so fully and fundamentally like Kendrick,' who she described as a 'gracious, kind, funny and genuinely joyful kid.' 'Kendrick's identity does not lie in the fact that he died protecting our school and our classmates, but rather that it was so fundamentally him to love that much,' she said. Castillo and classmates Brendan Bialy and Joshua Jones were credited with helping minimize the bloodshed by charging at one of the suspects in a classroom. According to Bialy, Castillo sprang into action against the shooter 'and immediately was on top of him with complete disregard for his own safety.' Jones, 18, said he was shot twice in the leg before Bialy was able to take the attacker's handgun. Two students, ages 18 and 16, were arrested at the school and are facing dozens of charges, including murder, attempted murder, arson and theft. Besides Castillo, eight students were shot during the attack. They have since been released from the hospital.
  • Three-time Formula One world champion Niki Lauda, who won two of his titles after a horrific crash that left him with serious burns and went on to become a prominent figure in the aviation industry, has died. He was 70. The Austria Press Agency reported that Lauda's family said in a statement he 'passed away peacefully' on Monday. Walter Klepetko, a doctor who performed a lung transplant on Lauda last year, said Tuesday: 'Niki Lauda has died. I have to confirm that.' Lauda won the F1 drivers' championship in 1975 and 1977 with Ferrari and again in 1984 with McLaren. In 1976, he was badly burned when he crashed during the German Grand Prix but made an astonishingly fast return to racing just six weeks later. Lauda remained closely involved with the Formula One circuit after retiring as a driver in 1985, and in recent years served as the non-executive chairman of the Mercedes team. Born on Feb. 22, 1949 into a wealthy Vienna industrial family, Nikolaus Andreas Lauda was expected to follow his father's footsteps into the paper-manufacturing industry, but instead concentrated his business talents and determination on his dreams of becoming a racing driver. Lauda financed his early career with the help of a string of loans, working his way through the ranks of Formula 3 and Formula 2. He made his Formula 1 debut for the March team at the 1971 Austrian Grand Prix and picked up his first points in 1973 with a fifth-place finish for BRM in Belgium. Lauda joined Ferrari in 1974, winning a Grand Prix for the first time that year in Spain and his first drivers' title with five victories the following season. Facing tough competition from McLaren's James Hunt, he appeared on course to defend his title in 1976 when he crashed at the Nuerburgring during the German Grand Prix. Several drivers stopped to help pull him from the burning car, but the accident would scar him for life. The baseball cap Lauda almost always wore in public became a personal trademark. 'The main damage, I think to myself, was lung damage from inhaling all the flames and fumes while I was sitting in the car for about 50 seconds,' he recalled nearly a decade later. 'It was something like 800 degrees.' Lauda fell into a coma for a time. He said that 'for three or four days it was touch and go.' 'Then my lungs recovered and I got my skin grafts done, then basically there was nothing left,' he added. 'I was really lucky in a way that I didn't do any (other) damage to myself. So the real question was then will I be able to drive again, because certainly it was not easy to come back after a race like that.' Lauda made his comeback just six weeks after the crash, finishing fourth at Monza after overcoming his initial fears. He recalled 'shaking with fear' as he changed into second gear on the first day of practice and thinking, 'I can't drive.' The next day, Lauda said he 'started very slowly trying to get all the feelings back, especially the confidence that I'm capable of driving these cars again.' The result, he said, boosted his confidence and after four or five races 'I had basically overcome the problem of having an accident and everything went back to normal.' He won his second championship in 1977 before switching to Brabham and then retiring in 1979 to concentrate on setting up his airline, Lauda Air, declaring that he 'didn't want to drive around in circles any more.' Lauda came out of retirement in 1982 after a big-money offer from McLaren, reportedly about $3 million a year. He finished fifth his first year back and 10th in 1983, but came back to win five races and edge out teammate Alain Prost for his third title in 1984. He retired for good the following year, saying he needed more time to devote to his airline business. Initially a charter airline, Lauda Air expanded in the 1980s to offer flights to Asia and Australia. In May 1991, a Lauda Air Boeing 767 crashed in Thailand after one of its engine thrust reversers accidentally deployed during a climb, killing all 213 passengers and 10 crew. Lauda occasionally took the controls of the airline's jets himself over the years. In 1997, longtime rival Austrian Airlines took a minority stake and in 2000, with the company making losses, he resigned as board chairman after an external audit criticized a lack of internal financial control over business conducted in foreign currency. Austrian Airlines later took full control. Lauda founded a new airline, Niki, in 2003. Germany's Air Berlin took a minority stake and later full control of that airline, which Lauda bought back in early 2018 after it fell victim to its parent's financial woes. He partnered with budget carrier Ryanair on Niki's successor, LaudaMotion. On the Formula One circuit, Lauda later formed a close bond with Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton, who joined the team in 2013. He often backed Hamilton in public and provided advice and counsel to the British driver. Lauda also intervened as a Mercedes mediator when Hamilton and his former Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg feuded, argued and traded barbs as they fought for the title between 2014-16 Lauda twice underwent kidney transplants, receiving an organ donated by his brother in 1997 and, when that stopped functioning well, a kidney donated by his girlfriend in 2005. In August 2018, he underwent a lung transplant that the Vienna General Hospital said was made necessary by a 'serious lung illness.' It didn't give details. Lauda is survived by his second wife, Birgit, and their twin children Max and Mia. He had two adult sons, Lukas and Mathias, from his first marriage.
  • Former University of Oregon football star Keanon Lowe said he had just entered a classroom at the Portland high school where he works as a coach and security guard when a student armed with a black shotgun appeared in the doorway. Lowe had just seconds Friday to react. He lunged at the gunman and wrestled with him for the weapon as other students ran screaming out a back door, Lowe told reporters Monday at a news conference. Lowe said he managed to get the gun away from the student and pass it to a teacher while Lowe held down the student with his other hand. Lowe wrapped the student in a bear hug until police arrived, he said. No one was injured. Police are still trying to determine if any shots were fired. 'I saw the look on his face, the look in his eyes, I looked at the gun, I realized it was a real gun and then my instincts just took over,' Lowe, 27, said. 'I lunged for the gun, put two hands on the gun and he had his two hands on the gun and obviously the students are running out of the classroom.' Lowe, who is head football and track coach at Parkrose High School, said he had a few moments with the teenager, who was distraught, before police arrived. 'It was emotional for him, it was emotional for me. In that time, I felt compassion for him. A lot of times, especially when you're young, you don't realize what you're doing until it's over,' Lowe said. 'I told him I was there to save him, I was there for a reason and this was a life worth living.' The suspect, 19-year-old Angel Granados-Diaz, pleaded not guilty Monday during a brief court hearing to a felony count of possessing a weapon in a public building and three misdemeanors. His public defender, Grant Hartley, declined to comment. Granados-Diaz turned 19 in jail on Monday, the same day students at Parkrose High returned to class after an emotional weekend that included their prom. Parkrose School District Superintendent Michael Lopes-Serrao said two students had previously informed a staff member of 'concerning behavior' by the student before the incident. He said school security personnel were responding to those concerns when Granados-Diaz arrived at the classroom. A police report says the incident was a 'suicide attempt with a gun' and someone added in bold handwriting 'enhanced bail/suicidal.' Granados-Diaz was being held on $500,000 bail and has another court appearance next week, according to court papers. Lowe said he was called on a radio to go to a classroom in the fine arts building and get a student. When he got there, the substitute teacher told him the student wasn't in class. Lowe said he was about to leave when Granados-Diaz entered the room. 'The universe works in crazy ways so I just happened to be in that same classroom,' he said. 'I was within arm's length of him so it happened fast and I was able to get to him,' he said. 'I'm lucky in that way.' Lowe was a star wide receiver at the University of Oregon, playing from 2011 to 2014. He caught 10 touchdown passes and had nearly 900 receiving yards. After college, he worked as an offensive analyst for the San Francisco 49ers and as an analyst for the Philadelphia Eagles. Lowe began working at Parkrose last year as the football and track coach, his LinkedIn profile says. Before that, he worked for his high school alma mater, Jesuit High, where he had earned state defensive player of the year as a defensive back and was a standout sprinter. ____ Follow Gillian Flaccus at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus
  • The Latest on the House intelligence committee's transcripts of interviews with President Donald Trump's former lawyer, Michael Cohen (all times local): 9:05 p.m. President Donald Trump's former fixer told Congress it was Trump's personal attorney who suggested he tell lawmakers that the negotiations for Trump Tower Moscow ended months before they actually did. The House intelligence committee on Monday released two transcripts of closed-door interviews with Michael Cohen. Its decision to release the hundreds of pages of transcripts came two weeks after Cohen reported to federal prison for a three-year sentence. Cohen provided no direct proof that Jay Sekulow knew the end date of the Trump Tower Moscow negotiations was false, but he claims that Sekulow should've known because he had access to emails and other communications. Sekulow's attorneys say Cohen's testimony isn't credible. ___ 6:35 p.m. The House intelligence committee has released two transcripts of closed-door interviews with President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer, along with some exhibits from the testimony. The committee's decision to release the transcripts came two weeks after Michael Cohen reported to federal prison for a three-year sentence. Cohen pleaded guilty last year to campaign finance violations, lying to Congress and other crimes. He is the only person charged with a crime in connection with the hush-money payments made to women who allege affairs with Trump. The president denies their allegations. The transcripts are from interviews the panel conducted with Cohen in February and March. The vote to release them was 12-7.
  • President Donald Trump voiced confidence Monday in his ability to win Pennsylvania in 2020 and took a new swipe at one of his leading Democratic rivals, telling rallygoers in the state that native son Joe Biden had abandoned them by representing Delaware in the Senate. The president's visit to Pennsylvania, intended to boost Republican congressional candidate Fred Keller's prospects over Democrat Marc Friedenberg in a Tuesday special election for an open seat, had as much to do with helping his own chance for reelection as it did with pushing Keller over the finish line. 'We've got to win tomorrow, Fred,' Trump told a cheering rally crowd at a private hangar at Williamsport Regional Airport. Trump's visit to the key battleground state also came two days after Biden held a campaign rally in Philadelphia, and the former vice president wasn't far from Trump's mind. The president accused Biden, who was born in Pennsylvania and has long ties there, of deserting his state by representing Delaware in the Senate. Biden moved to neighboring Delaware with his family as a boy. 'He left you for another state, and he didn't take care of you,' Trump said. He also referred to the former vice president by the nickname he had coined for him: 'Sleepy Joe.' 'Sleepy Joe said that he's running to, quote, 'save the world,'' Trump said. 'Well, he was. He was going to save every country but ours.' Biden said Monday in Nashville, Tennessee, that he was running on a pledge to restore the soul of the country. He has frequently talked on the campaign trail about the president's divisive rhetoric and said another four years of Trump would 'fundamentally change the character of this nation.' Trump, who spoke in the open air with Air Force One behind him, highlighted the economy's performance under his leadership and suggested those numbers would make him virtually unbeatable. 'Politics is a crazy world, but when you have the best employment numbers in history, when you have the best unemployment numbers in history ... I don't know, how the hell do you lose this election, right?' Trump said. The current unemployment rate of 3.6% is actually the lowest since 1969, when it stood at 3.5%. Unemployment was even lower than that in the early 1950s, and much lower, under 2%, during three years of World War II. Keller himself offered a rousing endorsement of Trump, saying he wants to go to Congress to be a vote for Trump. Keller told Trump the people of this region of Pennsylvania 'have been behind you since Day One, and, Mr. President, our support for you is as strong today as it ever was.' 'In 2016, Pennsylvania put Donald Trump over the top. And in 2020, we're going to do it again,' Keller said. Trump uses his campaign rallies to disparage various Democratic candidates for president, but he has been heavily focused on Biden, suggesting he may be worried about the possibility of facing off next year against the longtime politician. ___ Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • President Donald Trump's former fixer, Michael Cohen, told Congress it was Trump's personal attorney, Jay Sekulow, who suggested he tell lawmakers that the negotiations for Trump Tower Moscow ended in January 2016, even though they continued for months after that. The House Intelligence Committee on Monday released two transcripts of closed-door interviews with Cohen from earlier this year, along with some exhibits from the testimony. Cohen, who is serving a three-year prison sentence, pleaded guilty last year and admitted that he misled Congress by saying he had abandoned the Trump Tower Moscow project months earlier than he actually did. During the interviews, legislators repeatedly pressed Cohen for details on his false statement to Congress and tried to nail down whether he was directly told by Trump's legal team to mislead the committee, but the transcripts provide no slam-dunk evidence. Cohen offered no direct proof that Sekulow knew the January 2016 date we false, but Cohen claims Sekulow should have known because he had access to relevant emails and other communications as part of an agreement between defense attorneys to share documents. Attorneys for Sekulow said Cohen's testimony is not credible. 'Michael Cohen's alleged statements are more of the same from him and confirm the observations of prosecutors in the Southern District of New York that Cohen's 'instinct to blame others is strong,'' Sekulow's lawyers, Jane Serene Raskin and Patrick Strawbridge, said in a statement. 'That this or any Committee would rely on the word of Michael Cohen for any purpose - much less to try and pierce the attorney-client privilege and discover confidential communications of four respected lawyers - defies logic, well-established law and common sense.' Cohen said Trump also knew the negotiations had continued far beyond January 2016 and that Sekulow had seen his testimony in advance of submission. He also claimed that Sekulow edited the statement and that both Sekulow and Trump approved it. Cohen also provided documents to the intelligence panel that showed the editing process for the statement. When asked whether Trump had read his 'false written testimony,' Cohen replied: 'Mr. Sekulow said that he spoke to the client and that, you know, the client likes it and that it's good.' In addition to the questioning about his false testimony, much of the discussion during Cohen's interviews related to pardons and whether Trump or his lawyers were dangling them in front of Cohen as the government began to investigate him. Cohen told the intelligence committee that he was discussing the possibility of a pardon with Sekulow, up until Cohen abandoned their joint-defense agreement and publicly broke from the president in mid-2018. He said Sekulow was representing him, not the president, when he brought up the idea of a pardon during a May 2017 Oval Office meeting with Trump. The discussions continued after Sekulow became Trump's lawyer and Cohen retained other counsel, Cohen said. Sekulow was 'dangling the concept of pardons' to keep people in Trump's inner circle in line, Cohen testified. 'Mr. Sekulow stated that the President loves you, don't worry, everything is going to be fine, nothing is going to happen,' Cohen testified. Cohen said he only discussed the idea of a pardon with Sekulow, not Trump or anyone at the White House, but that he believes the discussions were done with Trump's knowledge and authority. He said Sekulow had brought up the possibility of a pardon to 'shut down the inquiries and to shut the investigation down.' Cohen became a key figure in congressional investigations after turning on his former boss and cooperating with special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe. Mueller's final report, released in April, examined conduct related to Cohen as one of several possible instances of obstruction of justice by the president. Cohen was also convicted in federal court in New York of campaign finance violations for his role in buying the silence of two women who alleged they had affairs with Trump, as well as other crimes. He began serving a prison sentence earlier this month. House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said in a statement last week that Cohen's testimony this year, along with materials in the committee's possession, raises 'serious, unresolved concerns about the obstruction of our committee's investigation that we would be negligent not to pursue.' In an apparent attempt to deflect attention away from Cohen's testimony and its implication for Trump, the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Doug Collins, released transcripts of interviews with former Attorney General Loretta Lynch and several other current or former Justice Department officials, including many who played key roles in the Hillary Clinton email investigation. The Intelligence committee is also seeking more information about Cohen's 2017 testimony from four lawyers for the Trump family. The lawyers who received the requests from the committee are Sekulow; Abbe Lowell, lawyer for Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter, and her husband, Jared Kushner; Alan Futerfas, lawyer for Donald Trump Jr.; and Alan Garten, lawyer for the Trump Organization. ___ Associated Press writers Michael R. Sisak and Jim Mustian in New York and Eric Tucker in Washington contributed to this report.
  • Lilian Serrano's mother-in-law had lots of stomach problems, but she always blamed food. Doctors at a San Diego-area clinic suspected Genoveva Angeles might have cancer, but they could not say for sure because they did not have the equipment to test for it and Angeles, who had been in the country illegally for 20 years, could not afford to see a specialist and did not qualify for state assistance because of her immigration status. In September, Angeles finally learned she had gallbladder cancer. Serrano said she was in the hospital room when Angeles, in her late 60s, died about two weeks later. 'We don't know if she would have survived treatment, but she was not even able to access it,' said Serrano, chairwoman of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium. 'She never had a chance to fight cancer.' Stories like that have prompted California lawmakers to consider proposals that would make the state the first in the nation to offer government-funded health care to adult immigrants living in the country illegally. But the decision on who to cover may come down to cost. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom wants to spend about $98 million a year to cover low-income immigrants between the ages of 19 and 25 who are living in the country illegally. The state Assembly has a bill that would cover all immigrants in California living in the country illegally over the age of 19. But Newsom has balked at that plan because of its estimated $3.4 billion price. 'There's 3.4 billion reasons why it is a challenge,' he said. The state Senate wants to cover adults ages 19 to 25, plus seniors 65 and older. That bill's sponsor, Sen. Maria Elana Durazo, scoffed at cost concerns, noting the state has a projected $21.5 billion budget surplus. 'When we have, you know, a good budget, then what's the reason for not addressing it?' she said. The Senate and Assembly will finalize their budget proposals this week before beginning negotiations with the governor. State law says a budget has to be passed by June 15 or lawmaker forfeit their pay. At stake, according to legislative staffers, are the 3 million people left in California who don't have health insurance. About 1.8 million of them are immigrants in the country illegally. Of those, about 1.26 million have incomes low enough to qualify them for the Medi-Cal program. 'Symbolically, this is quite significant. This would be establishing California as a counter to federal policies, both around health care and immigration,' said Larry Levitt, senior vice president for health reform at the Kaiser Family Foundation. If enacted, it could prompt yet another collision with the Trump administration, which has proposed a rule that could hinder immigrants' residency applications if they rely on public assistance programs such as Medicaid. The proposed rule from the Department of Homeland Security says the goal is to make sure 'foreign nationals do not become dependent on public benefits for support.' California is also considering a measure requiring everyone in the state to purchase health insurance. People who refuse would have to pay a penalty, and the money would go toward helping middle-income residents purchase private health insurance plans. 'We're going to penalize the citizens of this state that have followed the rules, but we're going to let somebody who has not followed the rules come in here and get the services for free. I just think that's wrong,' Republican state Sen. Jeff Stone said about coverage of people in the U.S. illegally. Many immigrants who are in the country illegally are already enrolled for some government-funded programs, but they only cover emergencies and pregnancies. Serrano was one of hundreds of immigrant activists who came to the Capitol on Monday for 'Immigrant Day of Action.' She and her husband spent the day meeting with lawmakers, sharing the story of Angeles. 'The conversation that I have is about the cost,' she said, describing her interactions with lawmakers. 'The conversation we want to have is about our families.
  • The official count from last month's Indonesian presidential election shows President Joko Widodo won 55.5% of the vote, the Election Commission said Tuesday, securing him a second term. The formal result from the April 17 election was almost the same as the preliminary 'quick count' results drawn from a sample of polling stations on election day. Widodo's challenger for a second time, former general Prabowo Subianto, has refused to accept defeat and declared himself the winner last month. Thousands of police and soldiers are on high alert in the capital Jakarta, anticipating protests from Subianto's supporters. Subianto has alleged massive election fraud in the world's third-largest democracy but hasn't provided any credible evidence. Votes are counted publicly and the commission posts the tabulation form from each polling station on its website, allowing for independent verification. Counting was completed just before midnight and the Election Commission announced the results early Tuesday before official witnesses from both campaigns. 'We reject the results of the presidential election,' said Azis Subekti, one of the witnesses for Subianto. 'This refusal is a moral responsibility for us to not give up the fight against injustice, fraud, arbitrariness, lies, and any actions that will harm democracy.' Under Indonesia's election law, Subianto can dispute the results at the Constitutional Court. He and members of his campaign team have said they will mobilize 'people power' for days of street protests rather than appeal to the court because they don't believe it will provide justice. In a video released after results were announced, Subianto again refused to concede defeat but called on supporters to refrain from violence. Police this month have arrested 31 Islamic militants they say planned to set off bombs during expected street protests against the election result.
  • Lori Lightfoot told aldermen and other city powerbrokers assembled at her inauguration Monday as Chicago's first black woman mayor that she meant what she said on the campaign trail about top-to-bottom reforms in the nation's third largest city. 'For years, they've said Chicago ain't ready for reform,' said Lightfoot, speaking minutes after her swearing-in at the Wintrust Arena. 'Well, get ready, because reform is here.' She spoke about curtailing some powers of city council members to lessen temptations for corruption and that structural changes to reduce gun violence would be among her top priorities. Hours later, she signed an executive order limiting aldermanic prerogative, a custom that allows each alderman to direct zoning and period decisions in their ward. Among her toughest challenges — and perhaps the one most scrutinized by those outside the city — will be overhauling the beleaguered Chicago Police Department. Lightfoot isn't the first incoming Chicago mayor to have pledged to overhaul a department accused for decades of abuses. But with a court-monitored plan, or consent decree, recently approved by U.S. District Judge Robert Dow, she has the best chance of actually getting it done. Lightfoot, who made history in April when she defeated a longtime political insider to become the first black woman and openly gay person elected to lead Chicago, signaled days before her inauguration that she's serious about transforming the 13,000-officer force by appointing top staffers with histories as strong police-reform advocates. Even with court backing, Lightfoot faces obstacles to enacting the meaningful changes that protesters sought after the 2015 release of video of a white officer shooting black teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times. 'I believe she's a true reformer,' said Phil Turner, who like Lightfoot, is a former federal prosecutor in Chicago. 'But there's a difference between trying to reform police and reality. She is up against a lot of entrenched forces.' The fiercest resistance will come from rank-and-file officers and the union that represents them, which has been openly hostile to key provisions, arguing that many will tie officers' hands and make it impossible for them to do their jobs right. One requirement that the union singles out for criticism — and that Lightfoot has heralded — is that officers document each time they point their weapons at someone, even if they don't shoot. The union says it will cause police to hesitate, potentially putting them at risk. There's also no guarantee officers will fully comply with any new policies. Dow's ability to hold people in contempt if they don't adhere to reforms only goes so far, Turner said. 'You can't hold entire entities, like officers on the street, in contempt,' he said. 'The person nominally in charge and who a judge can charge with contempt is the mayor. But she's a proponent of reforms.' The plan that Dow approved in January was a culmination of the scandal surrounding McDonald's death and came after a Justice Department investigation concluded that racial bias and poor training contributed to a pattern of abuse by police. Illinois' attorney general sued the city to force the court's supervision after years of inaction by the City Council, which dealt with systemic police misconduct in recent years by approving millions of dollars in lawsuit settlements. Lightfoot is likely to fill top posts in her administration with people who support the changes. Her chief of staff, named Wednesday, is Maurice Classen, a former prosecutor in Seattle, where he lobbied for 'systemic and deep reform' of city police. He later helped develop anti-violence and policing strategies in cities nationwide. He told the Chicago Sun-Times that Lightfoot's administration will be focused from her first days on the job on better management of city costs and ensuring that 'compliance with the consent decree is a high priority for the Police Department.' Money will be an issue. City officials recently said Chicago's 2020 budget shortfall was around $740 million, worse than previously thought. Some changes, including to police training, will require funds. But the consent decree doesn't spell out how much the city should spend — something Lightfoot has criticized. Lightfoot's campaign platform called for changes that go beyond the consent decree, including the adoption of a policy in place in New York requiring that newly hired officers spend two weeks meeting residents in the neighborhood they will police. Among her other priorities is improving the percentage of homicide cases detectives solve from the current 20%. A specific proposal is for a mobile lab that can cut the time it takes to process ballistics evidence from days to just a few hours. During her Monday speech, Lightfoot repeatedly returned to the issue of violence, saying 'there is no higher calling than restoring safety and peace in our neighborhoods.' 'People cannot and should not live in neighborhoods that resemble a war zone,' she said, adding later that 'Public safety must not be a commodity that is only available to the wealthy.
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump's campaign rally in Pennsylvania (all times local): 8:45 p.m. President Donald Trump is claiming that former Vice President Joe Biden 'deserted' Pennsylvania. Trump and Biden have made Pennsylvania front and center in the efforts to win the presidency in 2020. Biden kicked off his campaign in Harrisburg and located his campaign headquarters in Philadelphia. He was born in Scranton and served as a U.S. senator from Delaware. Trump repeatedly went after Biden during a campaign rally Monday night in Montoursville. 'I guess he was born here, but he left you folks,' Trump claimed. 'He left you for another state. Remember that please. I meant to say that.' Biden has said that if the 'American people want a president to add to our division, to lead with a clenched fist, closed hand and a hard heart,' they can vote for Trump. __ 7:45 p.m. President Donald Trump is telling rallygoers in Pennsylvania that 'we have a big race tomorrow' as he campaigns for a Republican candidate seeking to fill an open congressional seat. Trump campaigned Monday in Montoursville (mahn-TOORZ'-vihl) on behalf of Republican Fred Keller, who faces Democrat Marc Friedenberg in a Tuesday special election. Trump describes Keller as a 'great gentleman, a very successful businessman.' He also stresses that Keller 'is not letting anything happen to your Second Amendment.' Keller sought to assure Trump about his prospects in Pennsylvania in 2020, saying, 'In 2016, Pennsylvania put Donald Trump over the top, and in 2020, we're going to do it again.' Republicans are attempting to recapture the House seat left open when Republican Rep. Tom Marino resigned in January. ___ 6:20 p.m. President Donald Trump is heading to Pennsylvania to campaign for a Republican congressional candidate — and himself. Trump's appearance Monday in the key battleground state comes two days after 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden held a campaign rally in Philadelphia. The president is traveling to Montoursville (mahn-TOORZ'-vihl) on behalf of Republican Fred Keller, who faces Democrat Marc Friedenberg in Tuesday's election to fill the U.S. House seat formerly held by Republican Rep. Tom Marino, who resigned in January. Voters in the heavily GOP district overwhelmingly backed Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Trump narrowly defeated Clinton in Pennsylvania in 2016. Biden, the former vice president and Pennsylvania native who leads his Democratic presidential rivals, is mounting a strong push in the state.