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World

    A van has run into a small group of pop fans at a festival in the Netherlands, killing one and injuring three, before fleeing the scene. Police in the province of Limburg say that authorities are still looking for the white van, hours after Monday's pre-dawn crash near a camping site close to the famous Pinkpop festival in the southeastern municipality of Landgraaf. The three-day concert is traditionally attended by tens of thousands of music fans and ended late Sunday with a performance by Bruno Mars.
  • Syrian state media reported Monday that an airstrike against pro-government forces in the far east of the country caused casualties, while Iraqi officials said 20 Shiite paramilitaries were killed just across the border. The Syrian state TV report said the airstrike occurred around midnight in the village of al-Hari, to the southeast of the border town of Boukamal, and was carried out by the U.S.-led coalition battling the Islamic State group. But a coalition spokesman said it had not carried out any strikes in the area. The state TV report, quoting an unnamed military official, gave no breakdown of the casualties other than saying there 'were several martyrs and others were wounded.' In Baghdad, Iraqi officials said Popular Mobilization Forces — the mostly Shiite state-sanctioned paramilitaries — came under attack south of the town of Qaim, just across the border from Boukamal. They said 20 fighters were killed and dozens were wounded, adding that the cause of the attack was not immediately clear. The Iraqi officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. U.S. military spokesman Col. Sean Ryan said the coalition was looking into the reports. 'We are aware of the strike near Boukamal, however there have been no strikes by U.S. or coalition forces in that area,' he said. 'We're looking into who that could possibly be but it wasn't the U.S. or the coalition.' Syrian and Iraqi forces have driven IS from virtually all the territory it once held in both countries, but the militants still control some remote areas along the border. Syrian troops and allied militias, backed by Russian airstrikes, have been conducting operations west of the Euphrates River, while the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led militia, is operating on the eastern banks. The U.S.-led coalition has struck pro-government forces in the past when they have tried to cross the river. The overnight attacks took place on the western side. ___ Abdul-Zahra reported from Baghdad.
  • Chancellor Angela Merkel's Bavarian allies were expected Monday to decide how far to push in a dispute with the German leader over migration, a conflict that has escalated into a threat to her government. Interior Minister Horst Seehofer is calling for Germany to turn back at its border migrants previously registered as asylum-seekers in other European countries. Merkel opposes unilateral action, arguing that it would weaken the 28-nation European Union. Seehofer heads the Bavaria-only Christian Social Union, the sister party to Merkel's Christian Democratic Union. The CSU is determined to show that it's tough on migration as it faces a challenging October state election in Bavaria, and argues that that is the best way to cut support for the far-right Alternative for Germany. A CSU leadership meeting Monday in Munich is likely to authorize Seehofer to go ahead with his plan — but it's unclear at what point leaders want it to take effect. If Seehofer actually goes ahead and implements it unilaterally in defiance of Merkel, it could set off a chain of events that would bring down Germany's coalition government. A top CSU official deflected questions ahead of Monday's meeting as to whether the CSU will give Merkel two weeks to seek a European solution to the issue, which would lower the political temperature. She has meetings planned this week with the leaders of Italy and France, and an EU summit is scheduled June 28-29. 'We as the CSU leadership will certainly give Horst Seehofer full support for what he plans, what he considers necessary,' the party's general secretary, Markus Blume, told ZDF television. In an op-ed piece for the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Seehofer said he 'must have the right to turn back' people who aren't entitled to enter. But he said the aim should be a 'consensual solution' and wrote that it was 'of decisive significance that the EU summit at the end of June finally makes decisions that recognize Germany's burdens in migrant policy.' Merkel's CDU was holding a separate leadership meeting Monday in Berlin. However it ends, the spat has laid bare deep tensions in a fractious government that took office only in March, after nearly six months of postelection haggling, and exposed the limits of Merkel's authority. The two conservative parties govern with the center-left Social Democrats. Seehofer and Merkel have long had an awkward relationship. In his previous job as Bavarian governor, Seehofer was one of the leading critics of Merkel's decision in 2015 to leave Germany's borders open as migrants streamed across the Balkans. Most first arrived in Bavaria, which borders Austria.
  • Dozens of Afghans have arrived in Kabul after trekking across the country on foot calling for an end to the 17-year war. The Helmand Peace Convoy reached the capital on Monday after traveling more than 500 kilometers (300 miles) over nearly 40 days. The march began in the southern city of Lashkar Gah, in the Helmand province, an area largely under Taliban control. The protest march began with a group of nine men and picked up supporters during the long journey. They arrived in Kabul after a three-day holiday cease-fire brought rare calm to most of the country. The government had offered to extend the cease-fire, but the Taliban announced Sunday that they would resume their attacks.
  • Syrian state TV is reporting that the U.S.-led coalition has struck a military position in the country's east, leaving several troops dead and wounded. The report early Monday says the airstrike occurred around midnight in the village of al-Hari near the town of Boukamal. It gave no breakdown of the casualties. Syrian troops and their allies have been conducting operations against the Islamic State group east of the Euphrates river while the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces are on the offensive against IS on the east banks. The U.S.-led coalition has struck in the past pro-government forces when they tried to cross to the Euphrates' east bank but it was not immediately clear if they did this time. IS still holds small areas in eastern Syria close to the Iraqi border
  • President-elect Ivan Duque appealed for unity after winning a runoff election over a leftist firebrand whose ascent shook Colombia's political establishment and laid bare deep divisions over the nation's peace process. The conservative Duque, the protege of a powerful former president, was elected Sunday with 54 percent of the vote. He finished more than 12 points ahead of former guerrilla Gustavo Petro, though the runner-up's performance at the ballot box was the best ever for the left in one of Latin America's most conservative nations. When Duque takes office in August at age 42, he will be Colombia's youngest president in more than a century and in his first remarks as president-elect he vowed to work tirelessly to heal divisions and govern on behalf of all Colombians. He also promised a frontal attack on corruption while addressing a surge in cocaine production that he called a threat to national security. 'This is the opportunity that we have been waiting for — to turn the page on the politics of polarization, insults and venom,' Duque told jubilant supporters Sunday night, joined by his young family. The election was the first since outgoing President Juan Manuel Santos signed the 2016 peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia and the race ultimately ended up being defined by the divisive accord. Duque's promise to heal the scars from five decades of bloody conflict will demand a quick response. The FARC rebels who demobilized under the accord are struggling to reinsert themselves into civilian life in a nation where many people are hesitant to forgive. Vast swaths of remote territory remain under the control of violent drug mafias and residual rebel bands. Duque, who only entered politics in 2014 after being lured back to Colombia by former President Alvaro Uribe from a cozy life in Washington, in his victory speech repeated pledges made on the campaign trail to roll back benefits in the peace accord for top rebel commanders behind atrocities. He and running mate Marta Lucia Ramirez, who will become Colombia's first female vice president, have promised to make changes in the accord but Duque also has vowed not to 'shred it to pieces' as some of his hawkish allies have urged. 'Undoubtedly, for the peace process, this is an important test,' said Patricia Munoz, a professor of political science at Javeriana University in Bogota. Petro energized young voters and drew millions to public plazas with fiery speeches vowing to improve the lives of poor Colombians long neglected by the political elite. His more than 8 million votes marked the biggest success for a leftist presidential contender ever in Colombia, where politicians on the left have long been stigmatized because of the civil conflict. 'Perhaps as time passes people will be less scared about voting for left-wing politicians,' said Jorge Gallego, a professor at Bogota's Rosario University. 'Although with this result, it's proven that Colombia is still a right-wing country.' Petro took his loss in stride, refusing to call it a defeat. In a concession speech that at times sounded celebratory, he challenged Duque to break with his hard-line allies, and Uribe in particular. He also promised to mobilize his considerable following into a combative opposition that will fight for social reforms and defend the peace accord. 'Those eight million Colombians are not going to let Colombia return to war,' Petro said to a thunderous applause from supporters chanting 'Resistance!' Colombia's peace process to end a conflict that caused more than 250,000 deaths is considered largely irreversible. Most of the more than 7,000 rebels who have surrendered their weapons have started new lives as farmers, community leaders and journalists. Last year the rebels launched a new political party and will soon occupy 10 seats in congress. But the accord remains contentious and Duque pledged throughout his campaign to make changes that would deliver 'peace with justice.' Through constitutional reform or by decree, he could proceed with proposals such as not allowing ex-combatants behind grave human rights abuses to take political office until they have confessed their war crimes and compensated victims. The current agreement allows most rebels to avoid jail, a sore point for many. Duque's detractors warn that his victory could throw an already delicate peace process into disarray. 'I think it will set up a big constitutional battle,' said Cynthia Arnson, director of the Latin America program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. Duque is the son of a former governor and energy minister who friends say has harbored presidential aspirations since he was a child. The father of three entered public service almost two decades ago as an adviser to the man he will succeed a president, Santos, who was then Colombia's finance minister. He later moved to Washington, where he spent more than a decade at the Inter-American Development Bank, first as an adviser for three Andean countries and later as chief of the cultural division. It was during that time that Duque forged a close relationship with Uribe, the torchbearer of conservatives who is both adored and detested by legions of Colombians. With Uribe's backing, Duque was elected to Colombia's Senate in 2014. He earned a reputation as a like-minded security hawk who did his homework and earned the respect of colleagues across the political spectrum. Throughout his campaign, Duque was dogged by accusations he would be little more than a puppet for Uribe, who is constitutionally barred from seeking a third term. Though praised for weakening the FARC and drawing record foreign investment, Uribe has also been blamed for the military's killing of thousands of civilians who were falsely portrayed as rebels to inflate body counts. Toward the end of his victory speech, Duque thanked Uribe but said he would strive to bridge Colombia's divisions. He said he wants to see rank-and-file guerrilla members succeed in civilian life and become part of a growing Colombian economy. 'I'm not going to govern with hatred,' he said. 'Neither in my mind nor my heart is there a desire for revenge and retaliation.' ___ Associated Press writers Cesar Garcia and Manuel Rueda contributed to this report.
  • The Latest on the earthquake in Japan (all times local): 3 p.m. Authorities in western Japan say the number of people treated for injuries suffered in a strong earthquake Monday morning now exceeds 210. The magnitude 6.1 earthquake near the major city of Osaka killed three people, toppled concrete walls and store shelves and temporarily knocked out some power and water supplies. The Fire and Disaster Management Agency said 214 people have been treated at hospitals in five prefectures. Most of the injured were in Osaka, which did not give details, but the injuries reported in Kyoto and three other neighboring prefectures were all minor. ___ 11:45 a.m. A 9-year-old girl and two men in their 80s have been killed by a strong earthquake in the western Japan metropolis of Osaka. The Osaka prefectural government reported two deaths, and an Ibaraki city official confirmed a third. The magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck north of Osaka city Monday shortly after 8 a.m. It set off multiple building fires and toppled walls. Train service was suspended across a wide area during the morning commute. ___ 10:45 a.m. Japanese disaster authorities say two people have been found without vital signs and 41 others injured by an earthquake in western Japan. The magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck the city of Osaka and the surrounding area Monday about 8 a.m. The Fire and Disaster Management Agency said one person had no heartbeat and wasn't breathing and a second person also had no vital signs. Japanese media reported one of the likely victims is a 9-year-old girl found at a school. Japanese authorities don't confirm death until after an examination at a hospital. The Japan Meteorological Agency has updated the magnitude of the quake to 6.1, stronger than the initial 5.9 magnitude. ___ 9:10 a.m. A strong earthquake has shaken the city of Osaka in western Japan. There are reports of scattered damage including broken glass and concrete. The Japan Meteorological Agency says a quake with preliminary magnitude of 5.9 struck Monday around 8 a.m. The inland earthquake poses no tsunami risk. Japanese government spokesman Yoshihide Suga says there were no reports of major damage as of 8:30 a.m. No injuries have been reported. Train and subway service including the bullet train have been suspended to check for damage to equipment.
  • A strong earthquake knocked over walls and set off scattered fires around metropolitan Osaka in western Japan on Monday, killing at least three people and injuring more than 210. A 9-year-old girl was killed by a falling concrete wall at her school, and the two other fatalities were men in their 80s. The Fire and Disaster Management Agency said 214 people were treated for injuries at hospitals. Most of the injured were in Osaka — Japan's No. 2 city bustling with businesses. Osaka officials did not give details, but the injuries reported in Kyoto and three other neighboring prefectures were all minor. The Osaka prefectural government's disaster management department confirmed the girl's death and the death of an older man. The third victim died in the nearby city of Ibaraki. A falling concrete wall knocked down Rina Miyake as she walked by at her elementary school in Takatsuki. NHK public television aired footage showing the collapsed upper half of the high wall, which was cheerfully painted with trees, flowers and blue sky and surrounded the school swimming pool. Takatsuki Mayor Takeshi Hamada apologized over her death because of the wall's collapse. The structure was old and made of concrete blocks — a known risk in earthquakes. A man in his 80s died in the collapse of a concrete wall in Osaka city. An 84-year-old man in nearby Ibaraki died after a bookshelf fell on top of him at home, according to city officials. Many homes and buildings, including a major hospital, were temporarily without power, though electricity was restored at most places by midafternoon. The magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck shortly after 8 a.m. north of Osaka at a depth of about 13 kilometers (8 miles), the Japan Meteorological Agency said. The strongest shaking was north of Osaka, but the quake rattled large parts of western Japan, including Kyoto, the agency said. The quake knocked over walls, broke windows and set off scattered building fires. It toppled book shelves in homes and scattered goods on shop floors. It also cracked roads and broke water pipes, leaving homes without water. The morning commute was disrupted, as dozens of domestic flights in and out of Osaka were grounded, while train and subway service in the Osaka area including the bullet train were suspended to check for damage. Passengers were seen exiting trains on the tracks between stations. Some subway services started to resume in the afternoon. The earthquake reminded many in Japan of the magnitude 7.3 Hanshin-Kobe quake in 1995 that killed more than 6,000 in the region. Monday's quake also followed a series of smaller quakes near Tokyo in recent weeks. A 30-year-old lawyer Jun Kawasaki said the quake reminded him of the Kobe quake 23 years ago, and started packing up immediately to run away. 'It was not as bad as the Kobe quake,' he told the Associated Press from Osaka. His girlfriend ducked down under the table. Elevators in his office building were out of operation. 'I used the stairs but I was out of breath by the time I arrived at my office on the 20th floor.' ___ Hiromi Tanoue in Osaka contributed to this report.
  • A Cambodian prince who was a candidate in upcoming general elections was transferred early Monday to a hospital in neighboring Thailand after being injured in a road crash that killed his wife, said a fellow politician and a Cambodian news agency. Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 74, was in a convoy along with senior members of his FUNCINPEC party heading toward Sihanoukville in southwest Cambodia on Sunday morning when a taxi traveling in the opposite direction slammed into his SUV, said a senior party member in the group. Ranariddh's wife also was standing as a candidate in Cambodia's general election next month. His 39-year-old wife, Ouk Phalla, died in a hospital after the crash, and Ranariddh suffered head injuries and was transferred to Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital, for urgent treatment, Sihanoukville police chief Gen. Chuon Narin said. Ranariddh, who was originally reported severely injured, suffered broken ribs, a politician familiar with his situation told The Associated Press. The politician, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to release information, said Ranariddh was flown to Bangkok at 1 a.m. Monday for medical care on request from the country's Royal Palace. Cambodia's King Norodom Sihamoni is Ranariddh's half-brother. Fresh News, a news agency close to the government, also reported that Ranariddh had been taken to Thailand. Nhep Bun Chin, a FUNCINPEC spokesman, said Ranariddh's condition had improved, but declined to confirm his evacuation to Bangkok. Health care in Cambodia has a poor reputation, and senior officials, including Prime Minister Hun Sen, as well as the well-to-do, often go abroad for serious medical problems. Ranariddh was Cambodia's co-prime minister for four years in an uneasy power-sharing arrangement with Hun Sen after his party won a United Nations-organized election in 1993. His party's popularity was largely due to its royalist credentials, although Ranariddh's personal relations with his popular father, late King Norodom Sihanouk, were often strained. He was ousted in July 1997 and fled abroad when long-simmering tensions between him and Hun Sen exploded into two days of bitter fighting in Phnom Penh between his forces and those loyal to Hun Sen. Ranariddh was allowed to return to contest elections the following year but failed to repeat his success at the ballot. He slid into political irrelevancy, as FUNCINPEC became co-opted by Hun Sen, a much savvier and tougher politician than Ranariddh. Ranariddh is currently president of FUNCINPEC. It holds 41 seats in the National Assembly, but only because seats held by the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party were redistributed after CNRP was dissolved. The dissolution was widely seen as a maneuver to ensure an easy victory for Hun Sen in the general election, with parties contesting the polls generally seen as hopelessly weak or fronting for the ruling Cambodian People's Party so it can claim it ran a fair race by allowing opposition candidates. Ranariddh is also president of the Supreme Privy Advisory Council to King Norodom Sihamoni. Ouk Phalla, a classical Cambodian dancer reported to be descended from a separate royal family branch, was Ranariddh's second wife.
  • Turkey's state broadcaster aired a campaign speech by a jailed presidential candidate Sunday, a week before snap parliamentary and presidential elections. Selahattin Demirtas asked voters in the June 24 elections to prevent the 'one-man regime' of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. He called Turkey's current climate a 'teaser' and warned that 'the actual scary part of the movie has not yet begun.' Broadcaster TRT recorded the 10-minute speech at a prison in western Turkey where Demirtas is being held on charges of alleged terrorism. He can run for office because he hasn't been convicted of any crime. The 45-year-old candidate for the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party, or HDP, says he was detained 'illegally' 20 months ago because the government fears him. The government has clamped down on the HDP, alleging it has links to outlawed Kurdish rebels, which Turkey deems terrorists. The HDP denies involvement in any illegal activities and says the crackdown is really meant to suppress opposition. Nine lawmakers and nearly 4,700 party administrators and activists have been jailed. The crackdown followed the collapse of a peace process with Kurdish insurgents in the summer of 2015, leading to the resumption of a three-decade-long conflict that has claimed tens of thousands of lives. Demirtas said a vote for Erdogan and the ruling party would leave 'the fate of 81 million to one person's mercy.' He warned that no institution would be able to oversee or limit Erdogan if the president wins the election. By law, each presidential candidate is entitled to 20 minutes of free airtime on public TV. The next round of speeches will take place a day before the elections. The elections, moved up by more than a year, will usher in an executive presidency for Turkey. Under the new system of governance abolishing the prime minister's post, the president will be able to appoint ministers, issue decrees, prepare the budget and decide on security policies. News coverage of the election campaigns has been lopsided in favor of Erdogan, with mainstream television channels broadcasting his daily speeches live. His opponents, especially Demirtas in prison, have been struggling to have their voices heard. Demirtas said a vote for him as president and the HDP for parliament would be a chance for peace. 'Don't forget, everything changes with you,' he said. He urged people to vote and protect the ballot boxes. Demirtas, a human rights lawyer, ran against Erdogan in Turkey's first direct presidential election in 2014, getting just under 10 percent of the votes. He and HDP co-leader Figen Yuksekdag, who is jailed, led their left-leaning party to parliament in two general elections during 2015. Demirtas told supporters: 'As long as you are free, I will be free.