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State & Regional

  • Bills have been piling up for months for millions across the country during the coronavirus pandemic. In Florida, a temporary ban on evictions and foreclosures was set to expire Tuesday, but Gov. Ron DeSantis signed an executive order Monday extending the mortgage foreclosure and eviction relief for residents. The extension will now run through July 1. Read: Gov. DeSantis extends mortgage foreclosure and eviction relief in Florida Many renters can breath a little easier because just when rent came due again for many, the governor stepped up and extended the time they have to avoid eviction. This is the second time the governor issued a last minute moratorium extension as a lifeline for tenants and homeowners. The moratorium isn’t keeping all landlords from at least filing for evictions. Channel 9 found 100 eviction petitions that were filed since the moratorium was put in place. “My prediction is we’re going to see a massive amount of evictions filed,” real estate attorney Barry Miller said.
  • It’s the first of the month, and for many Floridians, it’s another due date for rent or mortgage payments  that they still cannot afford due to the COVID-19 crisis. Gov. Ron DeSantis signed an executive order Monday extending the mortgage foreclosure and eviction relief in Florida.  The original order had been set to expire Tuesday, but will now be extended until July 1.  The pandemic caused record-breaking unemployment in the state, leaving many renters unable to pay their landlords and home owners unable to pay their mortgage.  Clerks of courts in some counties stopped processing eviction filings after the governor's initial order, but others did not.
  • Legoland has officially reopened its grounds after closing down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Along with the park and waterpark’s reopening, the all-new LEGOLAND Pirate Island Hotel will debut Monday. LEGOLAND Theme Park will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and LEGOLAND Waterpark will be open daily from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Read: Orange County mayor endorses Universal Orlando’s reopening plan, Legoland set for June 1 reopening The park has put a variety of safety measures in place in compliance with health guidelines, such as encouraging guests to wear masks and maintaining spacing from others. Park officials also said temperature of every guest will be taken. Anyone with a fever of 100.4 degrees or high won’t be allowed in. The park would also leave empty rows on rides and empty seats between guests in ride vehicles. For more additional on the reopening, click here.
  • The spring semester is over, but the fall semester at the University of Central Florida and across the colleges across the region is around the corner. Last week, UCF released its plan for students to return to campus, which includes requiring all faculty and students to wear a face mask. Officials also shared diagrams of what social distancing in lecture halls and classrooms would look like. “It will be much different of a feeling than the 300 people. But hey, maybe you get a row to yourself,” UCF student Caleb Hage said. UCF falls under the Board of Governors, which oversees the state public university system. On Thursday, the board approved a broad blueprint for how to reopen several public universities in the fall. LIVE UPDATES: Testing sites heading to Florida Publix, Home Depots Here’s a breakdown of where Central Florida colleges stand: Seminole State College: Finalizing its plan, and will present an update to its board of trustees on June 15. Rollins College: The first day of in-person classes will be Sept. 14. It is also working on a phased-return approach. Stetson University: They are analyzing what it looks like to have in-person classes in a safe way, and how to build in the flexibility necessary for quarantined students of faculty. Coronavirus live updates: Virus protection adds new wrinkle to Southwest heat relief Florida Tech: Will return to “normal operations” in August, but will continue with extra sanitation steps and modified social distancing. Bethune Cookman: Hopes to resume as much in-person education as possible. Hage said he hopes to go back to in-person education, but to do it safely. “You complain about being in school while you’re in school,' he said. 'And then when you leave it’s like, oh my god, I want to go back.”