ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
83°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 93° L 75°
  • clear-day
    83°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    88°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    81°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 90° L 75°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National Govt & Politics

    President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders in Congress agreed on Monday to a two-year budget plan which will increase spending in 2020 and 2021, and allow the national debt to go up for a two year period, while including little in the way of budget savings, continuing a trend of higher government spending and larger deficits under the Trump Administration. 'If this deal passes, President Trump will have increased discretionary spending by as much as 22 percent over his first term, and enshrine trillion-dollar deficits into law,' said Maya MacGuineas, head of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, who labeled the deal a 'total abdication of fiscal responsibility.' The agreement includes only $77.4 billion in budget offsets to pay for an estimated $320 billion in extra spending over two years. While the President tweeted his support, joined by Congressional leaders in both parties, a handful of lawmakers said the deal made no sense, because it guaranteed more deficit spending. With the White House already forecasting deficits above $1 trillion for the next four years, this agreement would do nothing to ease that tide of red ink, which had dropped to $438 billion in 2015 - but has steadily increased over the past three years. 'With more than $22 trillion in debt, we simply cannot afford deals like this one,' said Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA), the head of the conservative Republican Study Committee. 'It’s not too late to reject the Pelosi-Mnuchin spending deal and strike a better deal for all Americans that cuts spending,' argued Jessica Anderson, a former Trump budget official. But those voices have faded into the wilderness in recent years in the GOP, as deficits have steadily increased under President Trump. “It’s pretty clear that both houses of Congress and both parties have become big spenders, and Congress is no longer concerned about the extent of the budget deficits or the debt they add,” said the Club For Growth, which has seen its influence on Capitol Hill dwindle in recent years.
  • Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand (KEER'-sten JIHL'-uh-brand) says that she doesn't regret calling for Al Franken's resignation from the Senate and that female senators are being blamed for his departure in a way their male colleagues aren't. Speaking at a Bustle Digital Group event in Manhattan on Monday, the New York senator was asked about a New Yorker article questioning some of the sexual misconduct allegations against Franken. Gillibrand offered her strongest defense yet of her actions, saying the story focused only on the first allegation made by Leeann Tweeden and not on seven others against Franken. She added that, before his resignation, female senators were asked repeatedly about Franken. She said Monday: 'Who is being held accountable for Al Franken's decision to resign? Women senators, including me. It's outrageous.
  • President Donald Trump met with executives from several of the nation's leading chip and computer part makers Monday and discussed restrictions his administration has imposed on the sale of components to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, the White House said. Huawei is embroiled in a trade dispute between China and the U.S. The Trump administration in May sanctioned Huawei, which it has deemed a threat to national security, and curbed sales of U.S. equipment to the Chinese company. The move was widely seen as intended to persuade resistant U.S. allies in Europe to exclude Huawei equipment from their next-generation wireless networks, known as 5G. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross recently announced a partial reprieve: His department will issue export licenses to companies to sell technology to prohibited foreign companies such as Huawei only when it's determined there is no threat to national security. The White House said the tech CEOs requested Monday that the Commerce Department make timely decisions on equipment sales, and the president agreed. The executives also expressed optimism about the deployment of 5G networks in the U.S. Trump's executive order in May empowered the government to ban the technology and services of 'foreign adversaries' deemed to pose 'unacceptable risks' to national security. It didn't name specific countries or companies but followed months of U.S. pressure on Huawei, the world's biggest supplier of network gear. Meanwhile, Trump has been escalating tariffs on Chinese imports. The CEOs of chipmakers Micron, Qualcomm, Intel and Broadcom attended the White House meeting, as well as the chief executives of Western Digital, which makes data storage devices and cloud storage, and Cisco, which sells routers, switches and software. The companies' business has been hurt by the restrictions over Huawei. Also attending was Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Google supports Huawei's smartphones with its Android operating system. The tech giant announced in May it would comply with the U.S. restrictions meant to punish Huawei. Google said it would continue to support existing Huawei smartphones but future devices would not have its flagship apps and services, including maps, Gmail and search. Only basic services would be available for future versions. Huawei's smartphone sales in the U.S. are tiny, and the Chinese company's footprint in telecom networks is limited to smaller wireless and internet providers. That means any impact on U.S. consumers of a Google services cutoff would be slight. Spokesmen for Google and Intel declined to comment Monday. Qualcomm spokespeople didn't return a message seeking comment, and representatives of Micron, Broadcom, Western Digital and Cisco couldn't immediately be reached.
  • Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke is announcing his first campaign staff hires in the early voting state of Nevada. The five staffers announced Monday by the former Texas congressman come months after other candidates in the packed Democratic presidential field announced their first hires in the Western state, with most of the top-tier campaigns boasting at least 30 paid staff. O'Rourke, who has struggled to break out following his much-hyped debut in the field of White House hopefuls, has been relying on volunteers and traveling staff on recent campaign visits to Nevada, which has a nearly 30% Latino population and is seen as the first test of a candidate's appeal before a diverse electorate. To serve as his state director in Nevada, O'Rourke has hired Marina Negroponte, who helped organize the Hispanic community for We Are All Human Foundation, a civil rights nonprofit, and who spent a decade working in international development for the United Nations. O'Rourke's early states director is Abe Rakov, who recently served as president and executive director of voting rights group Let America Vote. The organization ran a 2018 volunteer campaign in Nevada and four other states on behalf of Democratic candidates. O'Rourke's Nevada organizing director will be Sean Hoey, who worked on Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign and at the consulting firm co-founded by veteran Democratic strategist Jen O'Malley Dillon, who is O'Rourke's campaign manager. Cameron Miller, who worked on several Nevada state legislative campaigns, has been hired as O'Rourke's Nevada political director, and Aman Afsah, who has been working for the Democratic Party of New Mexico, will be the regional organizing director in Nevada.
  • The Latest on the debt and budget agreement between the White House and Congress (all times local): 6:35 p.m. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is promising the Senate will vote on the budget deal agreed to by congressional leaders and the White House before senators leave town for the August recess. The Republican leader said Monday he's 'very encouraged' by the agreement reached by President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. McConnell says the 'reality of divided government means this is not exactly the deal Republicans would have written on our own.' But he says all sides have made 'enormous strides' funding national defense recently and the deal 'is what we need to keep building on that progress.' The deal sets federal funding levels for the next two years and allows continued borrowing. The House is expected to vote first, with the Senate voting before recessing next week. __ 6:15 p.m. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer say they have reached a budget deal with President Donald Trump and Republican leaders in Congress. The Democratic leaders say in a joint statement released Monday that the agreement 'will enhance our national security and invest in middle-class priorities.' It will set spending limits for the next two fiscal years, and raise the nation's debt limit to allow borrowing, through July 31, 2021. Pelosi and Schumer say the House will move 'swiftly' to bring the package up for a vote. The Senate is expected to follow. They hope to send it to the president 'as soon as possible.' They say the deal will avert a debt default and another federal government shutdown. __ 6 p.m. President Donald Trump says a deal has been struck with congressional leaders on the budget and debt ceiling, mostly eliminating the threat of a repeat government shutdown this fall. Trump tweets that the agreement is 'a real compromise' and a victory for the nation's military and veterans. Aides say the deal would allow the government to continue to pay its bills and build upon recent budget gains for the Pentagon and domestic agencies. Lawmakers were working to avert a first-ever default on U.S. payments and to set overall spending limits and prevent automatic spending cuts. Trump says the deal contains no 'poison pills.' But it comes as budget deficits are rising to $1 trillion levels. __ 3 p.m. The Trump administration and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are on the cusp of a critical debt and budget agreement, a deal that would amount to an against-the-odds victory for Washington pragmatists seeking to avoid politically dangerous tumult over fiscal deadlines. Aides on both sides of the talks say the tentative deal would restore the government's ability to borrow to pay its bills past next year's elections and build upon recent large budget gains for both the Pentagon and domestic agencies. It would mostly eliminate the risk of a repeat government shutdown this fall. The agreement is on a broad outline for $1.37 trillion in agency spending next year and would represent a win for lawmakers eager to return Washington to a more predictable path.
  • Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is endorsing former Vice President Joe Biden in the race to challenge Donald Trump in the 2020 race for the White House. As vice president under Barack Obama, Biden 'was just a great friend of Detroit,' Duggan told The Associated Press on Monday. 'He visited multiple times,' Duggan said of Biden. 'He cares deeply about the city and auto industry and auto workers. Joe Biden has a whole career of watching out for the working class in this country.' Biden welcomed the endorsement, saying he was 'incredibly honored' to have Duggan's backing. 'Michigan, and Detroit in particular, will be crucial to defeating Donald Trump and restoring the soul of our nation, and I look forward to meeting firsthand with voters over the coming months to make the case,' Biden said in a statement. Duggan endorsed and campaigned for Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. He also plans to campaign for Biden. 'I'm going to do whatever he asks me to do,' said Duggan, who is in his second term and Detroit's first white mayor since the 1970s. Detroit is about 80% African American. Michigan gave Trump his closest winning margin of any state, with the Republican finishing 10,704 votes ahead of Clinton. Biden and a number of Democratic candidates are expected to address the NAACP national convention in Detroit this week. He also is among 20 candidates taking part in the party's second set of presidential debates next week in Detroit. Duggan said he has been in contact with Biden's staff and will spend Wednesday with him in Detroit. 'We have a lot of talent in the Democratic Party and I know it's going to be a vigorous nomination process,' Duggan said.
  • It is, arguably, the most sweeping step that President Donald Trump's administration has taken to try to stop the flow of migrants at the border — the kind of thing he might have been expected to promote on Twitter and brandish in front of news cameras as proof he is taking hardline steps to crack down on illegal immigration. Under proposed new rules, Trump would effectively end asylum, barring claims from migrants who'd traveled through Mexico from other countries and closing the door to tens of thousands of individuals and families fleeing violence and economic duress in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Instead, the move one week ago has been followed by relative silence about the policy change. Trump has yet to tweet about the effort or discuss it publicly, even when prompted. Asked specifically about the move by a reporter last week, Trump took the conversation elsewhere. His most prominent anti-immigration adviser, Stephen Miller, failed to mention the effort during a Sunday talk show appearance. And a senior Department of Homeland Security official tried to play down its significance before issuing a quiet retraction. The approach has been met with surprise by some who have spent more than two years fighting Trump's attempted immigration changes. 'I think we were all surprised that the administration has conceded that the policy may be quickly enjoined and even suggested that it wasn't as broad as everyone assumed,' said American Civil Liberties Union attorney Lee Gelernt, who was traveling to California on Monday to argue against the changes in court. 'Normally,' he said, the administration has 'tried to paint their policies as broad and unprecedented as possible.' The White House did not respond to multiple requests for comment about the strategy, but several senior administration officials seemed to have paid the measure and its rollout little attention themselves. Observers offered several potential explanations, including possible fatigue over an endless stream of immigration orders, rules and changes that seem to blur together — including another Monday that would expand the authority of immigration officers to deport migrants without requiring them to appear before judges. In addition, the announcement came during an especially crowded news cycle, with Trump's racist tweets and comments targeting four Democratic congresswoman of color commanding most of the attention in Washington over the past week. When Miller appeared on 'Fox News Sunday,' for instance, he did not field a single question on immigration policy and instead spent his segment defending the tweets. And lawmakers didn't bring it up when Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan appeared before a House committee last week to discuss family separations. Others cited the fact that both activists and administration officials seem certain the asylum change will be blocked by the courts, as have so many of Trump's previous immigration efforts. 'If we thought this really was going to be the new policy of the land, we would be lying down in front of ICE buses and taking over DHS facilities,' said Frank Sharry, executive director of America's Voice, a liberal immigration reform group. But, he said, 'just about everybody expects it to be enjoined by the court and the preparation for the implementation of the strategy has been almost non-existent.' Sharry said the administration appeared more interested in producing a headline to scare off potential migrants than actually following through with policy changes. 'They're trying to use cruelty as a deterrent and tough talk as a deterrent. And so this was, 'Let's get a headline that says we're stopping asylum,'' Sharry said. But the threat of court action didn't stop the administration from stirring up attention for past efforts that have either been quickly blocked by judges or abandoned at the last minute — including the first iterations of Trump's proposed 'Muslim ban' and his threat to shut down the entire southern border. This time, however, the effort was announced with little fanfare — published quietly in the Federal Register — with a joint statement hours later from the attorney general and McAleenan, but no explanation of how it would work practically at the border. Some Homeland Security officials said they were caught off guard by the regulations' introduction and unsure about how to implement the new process alongside the administration's other efforts to curb asylum, including the so-called 'remain in Mexico' program. That program forces asylum-seekers to wait out their cases in Mexico. There also appears to be confusion within the department's highest ranks. Mark Morgan, the new acting head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, tried to downplay the effort in an NPR interview last week, saying the administration would only be testing the new rules in a pilot program along one small stretch of the border. He also said he doubted the courts would allow the rule to move forward, citing two federal lawsuits seeking to block it. 'We're actually anticipating that probably the regulation will be enjoined,' he said. But no mention of a piecemeal approach had been made previously and Morgan walked back the comment hours later. The rule 'speaks to asylum eligibility and applies to all amenable individuals,' he said. A judge on Monday said he'd decide as soon as possible whether to block the rules temporarily while the case played out. The judge cited Morgan's comments in his questioning, wondering why the government would have a problem with halting the new rules if they anticipated it anyway. Trump, meanwhile, was busy tweeting about the self-described 'squad' of Democratic congresswomen, calling their views on immigration 'So bad for our Country!' ___ Associated Press writer Colleen Long contributed to this report.
  • India is disputing President Donald Trump's comment that it asked him to mediate the long-running dispute over Kashmir. India's Ministry of External Affairs says 'no such request' has been made by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. It said in a statement issued Monday on Twitter that it will deal directly with Pakistan on any issues related to the disputed region. Trump made the statement in the Oval Office as he spoke to reporters before a meeting with Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan. The U.S. president made the comment after Khan said he hoped Trump could help resolve the dispute. India and Pakistan fought two wars over the Himalayan territory they both claim and have frequently accused each other of violating a 2003 cease-fire agreement in Kashmir.
  • Former Democratic U.S. Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota told The New Yorker magazine in a story published Monday that he 'absolutely' regrets resigning from the Senate after several women accused him of unwanted kissing or touching. In the same article, seven current or former senators say they regret calling for Franken's resignation in December 2017. Franken resigned his seat after conservative talk radio host Leeann Tweeden and seven other women accused him of sexual harassment. The article, Franken's first interview since leaving the Senate, calls into question some of the assertions against Franken and quotes several female former staff members and close friends who described him as physically clumsy but not predatory. Franken said at the time that the allegations were false, and he repeats that in The New Yorker article. A former comedian who made his name on 'Saturday Night Live,' Franken resigned amid a national wave of sexual harassment allegations against men in powerful positions as the #MeToo movement was gaining momentum. Both Franken and Tweeden had called for an independent investigation at the time, but none was conducted before fellow Democrats forced Franken to resign three weeks after Tweeden made her claims. Asked by The New Yorker whether he regretted stepping down, Franken said: 'Oh, yeah. Absolutely.' 'I can't go anywhere without people reminding me of this, usually with some version of 'You shouldn't have resigned,'' he told the magazine. Tweeden alleged in 2017 that Franken told her during a USO tour to entertain soldiers in 2006 that he had written a comedy skit with her in mind that required her to kiss him. She said Franken forcibly kissed her and stuck his tongue in her mouth during a rehearsal of the sketch before they performed it in Afghanistan. The New Yorker cited two actresses, Karri Turner and Traylor Portman, who had played the same role as Tweeden on earlier USO tours with Franken. Both told the magazine that they had performed the same role as Tweeden on earlier tours with Franken and that there was nothing inappropriate about his behavior. Tweeden also released a photo showing Franken, who was then a comedian, reaching out toward her breasts, as if to grope her, as she slept in a flak jacket while on a military aircraft during the USO tour. The New Yorker reported that the pose echoed another USO skit in which a 'Dr. Franken' approaches Tweeden's character with his hands aiming at her breasts. Tweeden, during her KABC-AM radio show in California on Monday, briefly reacted to The New Yorker article by saying she wishes she had been among the women who performed the kissing skit with Franken and didn't feel like they had been harassed. 'I wish I was in that group,' she said. Seven senators who had called for Franken's resignation said they'd been wrong to do so. They are Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, now-former Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, independent Sen. Angus King of Maine, Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, Democratic Sen. Tom Udall of New Mexico and now-former Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida. Leahy said that seeking Franken's resignation without first getting all the facts was 'one of the biggest mistakes I've made' in his 45-year Senate career. U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York was among the first to call for Franken's resignation. Some Democratic donors have turned away from Gillibrand because of that, hurting her 2020 bid for the presidency. 'I'd do it again today,' Gillibrand said in the article. 'If a few wealthy donors are angry about that, it's on them.' Asked at an event in New York late Monday if she regretted calling for Franken's resignation, Gillibrand said she 'could have told' any of the senators who are now expressing remorse that 'there is no prize for someone who tries to hold accountable a powerful man who is good at his day job. But we should have the courage to do it anyway.' 'So no,' Gillibrand added. 'I do not have any regrets.' She also noted that female senators like herself were hounded every day about whether they would call for Franken's resignation while their male colleagues were not. 'Let's be clear, there is absolutely a double standard,' Gillibrand said. 'Women are asked to hold accountable their colleagues; the men are not. Who is being held accountable for Al Franken's decision to resign? Women senators, including me. It's outrageous. It's absurd.' Franken was replaced in the Senate by Tina Smith, a Democrat appointed by Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton who had been serving as his lieutenant governor. Smith won a special election in 2018 and is running in 2020 for a full six-year term. Several Republicans are weighing bids to challenge her.
  • A former candidate for the Florida Legislature acknowledged to state investigators that she lied when she said she was a medical doctor who had removed 77 bullets from 32 victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting in 2016. The Florida Department of Health last week issued a cease and desist order against Catherine 'Elizabeth' McCarthy, ordering her to stop holding herself out to be a medical doctor. In a report accompanying the order, McCarthy apologized to a state health department investigator, saying she 'wanted to be somebody in the community.' 'I'm sorry that I gave any impersonation,' McCarthy said in the report. 'I knew it was wrong and I should have stopped.' Earlier this month, McCarthy withdrew from the 2020 Democratic primary for a Florida House seat that covers suburban Orlando. In a letter to elections officials, she cited 'professional obligations' as her reason for withdrawing. The seat currently is held by a Republican and state records show McCarthy had raised only $1,500 by the time she withdrew. Reached by telephone on Monday, McCarthy said she couldn't talk because of the cease and desist order. Online state records show she had led two businesses in the past decade, C.A.R.E. For Women Foundation Inc. and Encore Events, but both enterprises were dissolved. McCarthy had represented herself as a medical doctor at two political forums this year and was confronted about her credentials by a reporter for Florida Politics website after one of those events, according to the Department of Health report. At a gun safety forum in March attended by U.S. Rep. Darren Soto, along with a sheriff and a Pulse survivor, McCarthy introduced herself as a former nurse who had gone to medical school in her 40s. She described the Pulse nightclub shooting as 'probably one of the hardest things in my career' and unfolded a handkerchief with bullets that she said had been extracted from shooting victims, though not the Pulse victims. Gunman Omar Mateen killed 49 patrons and seriously wounded dozens more at the gay nightclub in 2016. Most of the victims were sent to the hospital McCarthy claimed to work at, just blocks from the nightclub, during a massive police and emergency response. McCarthy is facing Department of Health civil charges of intentionally misrepresenting herself as a medical doctor and could face a fine and costs of nearly $3,100. ___ Follow Mike Schneider on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MikeSchneiderAP