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National

    A woman in San Bernardino, California, told CBSLA agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detained her husband as they drove to the hospital to deliver their child. >> Read more trending news Maria del Carmen Venegas said that her husband, Joel Arrona-Lara, was driving her to the hospital for a planned Cesarean section Wednesday when ICE agents surrounded their car at a gas station. Venegas, a mother of five, told CBSLA she showed officers her identification, but her husband did not have his ID with him. She said they lived nearby and offered to drive back to the house to get his ID, but officers placed Arrona-Lara into custody, leaving Venegas alone at the gas station, images from the store’s surveillance video showed. She said she drove herself to the hospital to deliver their child. “My husband needs to be here,” Venegas said. “He had to wait for his son for so long, and someone just took him away.” Venegas told CBSLA that her husband has never been in trouble with the law, and they are currently working on finding an attorney to help secure his release. ICE confirmed to the local Univision and Telemundo stations that Arrona-Lara is in custody. “Mr. Arrona-Lara is currently in the custody of ICE pending deportation procedures before the Executive Office of Immigration Review,” a spokesperson said. “All those who violate immigration laws would be subject to an immigration arrest and, if a final order determines their removal, be deported from the United States.”
  • A body was found in a burned car in the parking lot of a mini-golf course at Walt Disney World in Florida Saturday morning, officials said.  >> Read more trending news Orange County deputies began investigating the body in the Fantasia Gardens mini-golf course parking lot on Epcot Resorts Boulevard around 4 a.m. after the Reedy Creek Fire Department called for assistance, WFTV reported. Once firefighters extinguished the car, officials found a body inside, officials said.  Officials did not identify the body or the vehicle’s owner. The fire marshal, homicide detectives and Sector 6 investigators are on scene conducting an investigation, according to the sheriff’s office.  
  • Years ago, orthopedic surgeon John Barrasso gave regular health advice on the evening television news, Wyoming-wide exposure that established a reputation as a mild, level-headed caregiver and helped launch his political career. Through 16 years in office, including two elections for the Wyoming Senate and two for the U.S. Senate, Barrasso never faced significant opposition — until now. Dave Dodson, a political newcomer and businessman little known in Wyoming, has made a bold Republican primary bid to tap anger over Barrasso's corporate donations and Washington ties. Dodson has little in common with Donald Trump but it's a Trump-like effort in the state that gave the president his widest margin of victory over Hillary Clinton in 2016. On Tuesday, Wyoming voters will decide whether they're angry enough to bring home a man whose supporters refer to as 'Wyoming's doctor,' or are still happy to have Barrasso, a rising star in the Senate, represent them. 'I'm involved in politics right now because I'm mad and fired up to do something. I never envisioned ever being in political office at all. But I do think that when this country was founded it was envisioned that regular citizens would from time to time raise their hand and say 'I'd like to go to Washington, D.C., and represent my neighborhood,'' Dodson told The Associated Press. 'I actually think that I am doing, if you will, what the Founding Fathers had envisioned.' Dodson has invested in a range of industries, from auto parts to telecommunications, since the 1980s. He teaches part time at the Stanford business school but said he has lived full-time in Jackson Hole since 2011. Barrasso has refused to debate Dodson but isn't taking the threat sitting down. One Barrasso ad says Dodson gave $2,300 to Barack Obama and $1,000 to Bernie Sanders, donations reflected in Federal Election Commission records online. 'So ask David Dodson, who does he really put first?' says the voice-over. In an online statement, Dodson said he donated to Sanders to oppose Clinton, a contribution he later regretted, and that in 2007 he gave $2,300 to Mitt Romney's campaign before his ex-wife gave the same amount to 'her candidate' in his name. Dodson lived in Massachusetts at the time. Less than a week before the primary, Barrasso filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission claiming that several of Dodson's television ads did not meet certain requirements for appearing on screen while stating his approval of them. Dodson responded by pointing out he talks in person in the ads and nobody would seriously doubt that he approved them. Dodson pledged early to spend $1 million of his own money, and as of Aug. 1 had lent his campaign that amount. In addition, he raised $376,000 from individuals, the vast majority from outside Wyoming. He has spent almost all of the $1.4 million. Barrasso has raised almost $5 million in contributions this year and last, the bulk of it from out-of-state individuals and political action committees. He has spent about half. Dodson, 56, launched his campaign as an independent in February, but switched to Republican just before the filing deadline in May. Since then Dodson has crisscrossed the state to campaign and plastered the airwaves and internet with ads pitching his 'Plan to Put Wyoming First.' The 44-page booklet calls for opposing wholesale transfer of federal lands to states and private interests, promoting overseas exports of Wyoming coal, encouraging health care industry competition and boosting career and technical training. Dodson also advocates term limits and reducing the influence of money in politics. 'We need a new way of doing business,' Dodson writes in the booklet mailed to voters. Barrasso, 66, chairs the Senate Republican Policy Committee, making him the fourth-ranking member of GOP leadership in the Senate. He chairs the Environment and Public Works Committee and serves on the Energy and Natural Resources, Indian Affairs and Foreign Relations committees. For years, Barrasso has been one of the most outspoken advocates of repealing the Affordable Care Act. He has key endorsements from the National Rifle Association and Trump. 'As a doctor, I help people get healthy again. Now, a senator, I fight to protect our state and to make our country stronger,' Barrasso says in one ad. Democratic Gov. Dave Freudenthal appointed Barrasso to the U.S. Senate in 2007 after the death of Republican Sen. Craig Thomas. Running against little-known Democrats, Barrasso got 73 percent in a 2008 election to decide who would complete the remaining four years of Thomas' term, and in 2012, he was re-elected with 76 percent of the vote. Barrasso ran unopposed for the Wyoming Senate in 2002 and 2006. Three other Republicans are in the race, most notably former Roman Catholic priest Charlie Hardy, of Cheyenne, who as a Democrat got 17 percent of the vote against Sen. Mike Enzi in 2014. The others, Anthony L. Van Risseghem, of Cheyenne; John Holtz, of Laramie; and Roque 'Rocky' De La Fuente, of San Diego, California; are political unknowns who have campaigned little if at all. The winner will face Wilson businessman Gary Trauner, 59, the lone Democrat seeking the Senate seat. ___ Follow Mead Gruver at https://twitter.com/meadgruver
  • Within weeks of a South Georgia teacher’s disappearance, two of her former students told friends at a party they had killed Tara Grinstead and burned her body, according to documents filed this week in Irwin County Superior Court, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  >> Read more trending news  Grinstead’s case was featured on the popular true crime podcast, “Up and Vanished.” >>Related: Georgia irresistible to true-crime podcasts Grinstead was reported missing in October 2005, and the following month, Ryan Alexander Duke and Bo Dukes told others they were responsible for her death and it was reported to police, court documents state. But the case remained cold until early 2017, when both Duke and Dukes were arrested.  So did investigators drop the ball? Yes, according to Duke’s attorneys. And because it took so long to arrest the suspects, most of the charges should be dropped due to the statute of limitations, the motion states.  >>Related: Who was Tara Grinstead? “It is undisputed that Irwin County law enforcement knew of these crimes within months of the disappearance of Tara Grinstead,” a court motion states. “In fact, a search of the area where Ms. Grinstead’s body was allegedly burned was conducted...” Grinstead, 30, an Irwin County High School teacher and former beauty queen, was last seen on Oct. 22, 2005, when she left a cookout and said she was going straight home. Two days later, she was reported missing when she didn’t show up to teach history. Ryan Alexander Duke, 33, was arrested and charged with murder in the death of Tara Grinstead. Because Duke and Dukes were identified as suspects later in 2005 but not charged until 2017, all but the murder charge should be dropped, Duke’s public defenders claim in one of two dozen motions filed in the past week.  “Duke and Dukes were identified as suspects and known to law enforcement in 2005,” the motion states. “By a generous application of the statute of limitations of four years, the statute would have run (expired) near December of 2009.” The GBI declined to comment on the allegations in the motion and referred questions to the District Attorney. The District Attorney could not be reached for comment Friday afternoon.  In another motion, Duke’s attorney asks that his indictment be dismissed because the language used is too “vague, ambiguous and indefinite.” In April 2017, a grand jury indicted Duke on six counts, including malice murder, felony murder, aggravated assault, burglary and concealing the death of another. In June 2017, Dukes was indicted on charges including concealing a death, tampering with evidence, and hindering apprehension of a criminal.  Dukes “did unlawfully and knowingly destroy physical evidence by burning the body of Tara Faye Grinstead, a human being, at a location off Bowen’s Mill Highway,” in Fitzgerald, the indictment states.  After Duke and Dukes were arrested, the GBI searched woods behind a pecan farm in the area but have not publicly said what was found. A hearing on the motions has been scheduled for Sept. 20 in Irwin County.
  • Billie Sutton planned to be a world champion saddle bronc rider, but a rodeo accident that claimed his burgeoning career and his ability to walk led instead to a political rise that could make Sutton the first Democrat elected South Dakota governor in over four decades. A horse flipped over on Sutton in 2007, partially paralyzing him and ending a ride that had brought him among the top 30 in the world for professional rodeo. Sutton said the injury awoke in him a 'service over self' mentality. In the ensuing years, he started a family and became the top state Senate Democrat before launching a bid for governor. 'I was faced with a choice: Take the easy way and give up, or live by the values I was raised with. Do it the cowboy way: Never give up and never quit,' Sutton said at a campaign kickoff last year on his family's ranch. Sutton has since taken in more than $1.2 million — the campaign says he's on track to raise more than any previous Democratic candidate for South Dakota governor — running as a 'pro-life and pro-Second Amendment' moderate and anti-corruption champion seeking to bolster his base by attracting Republican and independent voters in heavily conservative South Dakota. The 34-year-old community bank investment executive has much to overcome: a nearly 100,000-voter GOP advantage and a top-tier opponent, U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem, who has won four terms in Congress and easily triumphed in her June primary election to succeed Republican Gov. Dennis Daugaard. Sutton in May reported having about $880,000 in the bank, while Noem had more than $1 million. Sutton has branded Noem 'politics as usual,' contending residents are sick of partisan divisions and that he wants to represent all of South Dakota. Sutton recently chose a Republican businesswoman (she switched parties) to be his running mate. Wearing his cowboy hat and rolling his wheelchair down a line of people at the Sioux Empire Fair, Sutton's standard greeting was, 'Billie Sutton, running for governor.' He quickly encountered a Republican. 'I don't care much about party affiliation,' Sutton said. 'I just think we need to do what's right.' Steve Jarding, a longtime Democratic strategist, said Sutton is making the campaign about his vision, not about his party, and enjoys a strong family name — his grandfather was the Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor in 1978. Jarding said Sutton can appeal to mainstream Republicans, particularly supporters of Noem's primary opponent, Attorney General Marty Jackley, whose loss under a barrage of negative ads from Noem may have left a lingering division in the state GOP. Jarding said Sutton 'could break that drought, and Republicans could feel fine about it.' De Knudson, a moderate Republican and former Sioux Falls city councilor, switched her support to Sutton after Jackley's loss. It was a text message from her son on primary night asking Knudson to back Sutton — cemented later by his pick of former Republican Michelle Lavallee as lieutenant governor — that led Knudson to hold a recent campaign fundraiser at her Sioux Falls home. 'After being a senator for eight years, Billie has created a record that is very, very moderate, like so many of you are, about open government, transparency and really reaching across the aisle,' Lavallee told those who attended. But Sutton's strategy to transcend party labels didn't sway 28-year-old computer programmer Adam Jungers, who asked Sutton at the fair, 'As a pro-life conservative, why should I vote for you?' Afterward, Jungers said he would stick with Noem. Noem — first elected to Congress in 2010 — said her values match South Dakota's, invoking a campaign pledge to not raise taxes nor grow state government, improve transparency and fight federal intrusion. She said Sutton is surrounded by liberal Democrats who support Planned Parenthood and labor unions. 'What Democrat Billie Sutton says and what he really believes and what his supporters believe are two very different things,' Noem said. But Sutton did vote for a 20-week abortion ban in 2016, and his campaign notes his support this year for a resolution endorsing South Dakota's right-to-work status. This legislative session, Sutton focused on government transparency, early-childhood education and economic development, but came out of the Republican-controlled Legislature with few victories. Sutton said he launched the governor campaign over frustration with corruption in South Dakota and the GOP-led repeal of a voter-imposed government ethics overhaul in 2017. Voters will decide a similar 'anti-corruption' ballot measure this year, and Sutton has made government integrity a major focus of his bid. Fellow Democratic Sen. Troy Heinert said Sutton approaches lawmaking with the attitude of someone who rides bucking horses for a living: '110 percent focused.' 'What's been bad for him personally has been good for South Dakota,' Heinert said. 'He could still be riding broncs at the National Finals Rodeo, but ... he didn't let his accident stop him.' ___ Sign up for 'Politics in Focus,' a weekly newsletter showcasing the AP's best political reporting from around the country leading up to the midterm elections: http://apne.ws/3Gzcraw
  • A sign at a Houston elementary and middle school that sparked criticism on social media has been removed. The Houston Independent School District says the sign that read, 'The more you act like a lady, the more he'll act like a gentleman,' was removed Friday night. The wall was patched and repainted. The sign was above a row of lockers in a girls' locker room at Gregory-Lincoln Education Center, a school covering kindergarten through eighth grade. The sign drew attention on social media after a Houston resident posted a picture of it on Twitter . Critics on social media called the sign 'victim-blaming' and misogynistic. Classes have not begun for the semester. According to the district's website , the first day of school is Aug. 27.
  • A 6-year-old girl in Pleasantville, Utah, put online shoppers to shame after ordering over $350 worth of Barbies and other toys on her mom’s Amazon account -- and now, her family has turned the impulsive shopping spree into a lesson about caring for others.  >> Read more trending news  Katelyn Lunt is entering the first grade this year. Her mom, Catherine Lunt, told Cox Media Group she ordered a Barbie doll from Amazon for Katelyn as a reward for doing extra chores around the house. “She wanted to get on and see when it was going to arrive. When I left the room, she went crazy and ordered what she calls a ‘Barbie collection,’” Catherine Lunt said.  By the time Lunt realized what her daughter had done, she said she was able to cancel a few packages but many had already shipped. The next morning, Lunt said the family went for a walk and was surprised by the delivery driver when they returned home. “Right as we arrived back from our walk, the collection of packages showed up,” Lunt said. “It was hilarious so we had to take pictures. Her face pretty much says it all.” A family member sent the photos to a cousin, who tweeted photos of the moment that went viral. When it came time to figure out what to do with the ‘Barbie collection,’ Lunt said the family decided to pay it forward. “We were going to send the packages back to Amazon but we decided to donate them to Primary Children's Hospital where Katelyn spent a week when she was first born,” Lunt said. “Katelyn helped us deliver the packages to the hospital, so I guess we used it more as a teaching moment than a time for punishment.” A spokesperson for Primary Children’s told Cox Media Group the family dropped off the toys earlier this week, and the hospital was “simply the grateful recipient of their kindness.”
  • The past 10 weeks have been a whirl for Ilhan Omar, who suddenly went from being famous for becoming the country's first Somali-American state legislator to being a likely shoo-in for the first Somali-American congresswoman. 'It's been a really interesting rush,' Omar said in an interview with The Associated Press. She and her rivals had to mount instant campaigns when U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison suddenly decided to leave Minneapolis-area seat to run for state attorney general. She quickly organized a team to nail down the Democratic endorsement to succeed him, then won a six-way primary Tuesday with a strong 48 percent plurality. 'You get what you organize for,' she said. Only Democrats have represented the 5th District since 1963, so Omar is expected to easily win the general election. Still, she said she's not taking it for granted, and want to generate heavy turnout in the district to help boost statewide Democratic candidates. For now Omar, 35, is pausing to focus on getting her three children ready to go back to school. She said she'll figure out everything else about going to Washington later. Omar's family fled Somalia's civil war when she was 8. She spent her childhood in a Kenyan refugee camp and immigrated to the United States at age 12. As a progressive activist who was elected to the Minnesota Legislature in the same year that Donald Trump was elected president, she said she has worked since then to organize resistance to 'destructive and divisive' Trump administration policies. 'I think my job now is to instill hope in people so that they have the strength to continue to resist and to continue to believe that there is an opportunity for us, for the first time, to really talk about the kind of nation we should be and the kind of nation that we deserve,' she said. Omar said 5th District voters are young, so funding for education and college affordability will be a priority for her. She wants to get on the Agriculture Committee, even though she comes from an urban district, so she can promote food security for poor communities. Immigration and criminal justice reform will also be priorities. But she also wants to use her legislative experience to work for federal budgets that include investments in people and communities. 'I look forward to being a voice of reason in fighting for transparent and accountable budgets,' she said. Omar said people want congressional leaders with 'moral clarity and courage' to confront not only Trump's administration but Congress itself, to eliminate corporate influence. She would not say whether that means she'll support or oppose Nancy Pelosi for re-election as the House Democratic leader. Several other Democratic candidates have said they won't. Omar and former Michigan state Rep. Rashida Tlaib, a Palestinian-American who recently won a Detroit-area Democratic primary and is running unopposed in November, are expected to become the first two Muslim women in Congress. Omar said she thinks Americans should be excited about this 'because it is a direct response to the politics of fear and scarcity that the president and his administration push.' 'Truly this is a nation that sees itself as one that instills hope and is really about allowing people to pursue their dreams.
  • So-called tort reform has been an easy sell in states controlled by Republicans, and backers of a lawsuit-limiting proposal on the ballot in Arkansas this fall expected little trouble winning passage until they ran into a surprising obstacle from a reliable conservative ally. A Christian group has begun rallying churches and abortion opponents against the measure, saying that limiting damage awards in lawsuits sets an arbitrary value on human life, contrary to anti-abortion beliefs, and conflicts with biblical principles of justice and helping the poor. Proponents of the measure are stunned by the opposition and worried that it could stir dissension among conservatives who must work together on numerous issues. 'The biggest problem is not the damage' to the tort reform proposal, said Republican Rep. Bob Ballinger, a sponsor of that measure. 'The biggest hurdle is the damage to the pro-life cause.' The religious argument also could offer tort reform opponents in other states a new weapon for fighting limits. The legal restrictions have been making headway in recent years as the GOP has won control of roughly two-thirds of state legislatures. Arkansas' measure is an effort by an array of pro-business groups, including the state Chamber of Commerce, to reinstate legal caps that have been chipped away over the years by court rulings. The amendment would cap damages for noneconomic losses, such as pain and psychological distress, to $500,000 and punitive damages to $500,000 or three times the amount of compensatory damages awarded, whichever is higher. It also would cap attorneys' contingency fees at one third of the net amount recovered. The proposal doesn't cap economic damages, which go toward verifiable losses such as medical expenses as well as past and future wages. But the conservative Family Council Action Committee argues that putting a cap on other damages devalues the lives of those with no income, such as the elderly and stay-at-home parents, who would receive little compensation for pain and suffering. The Family Council, which championed Arkansas' ban on gay marriages, is organizing meetings with church leaders to call for the measure's rejection. 'The Bible is full of references to justice, and (the proposal) creates an environment where the powerful can tip the scales of justice against everybody else, but especially the poor,' Jerry Cox, the Family Council's head, said at a recent breakfast meeting with pastors. Pastors were handed informational booklets emblazoned with the words 'Don't Put A Price Tag On Human Life.' Flyers left on each table offered attendees inserts for their church bulletins. Rose Mimms, the head of Arkansas Right to Life, also spoke out against the measure, writing in an editorial on the conservative website townhall.com that it 'erodes our own pro-life efforts in the state.' The organization has not taken an official position on the measure. Industry groups backing the tort reform amendment questioned whether the Family Council's actions were motivated by $150,000 in donations the group received from a Little Rock law firm. Trial lawyers are the leading opponents of the tort reform movement. 'They have sold their brand to trial lawyers to be able to promote this issue,' said Carl Vogelpohl, the campaign manager for Arkansans for Jobs and Justice, which is backing the tort reform proposal. Cox said the donation wasn't a factor and that his group announced its position before receiving the money. Using church meetings to rally opposition especially angered the measure's supporters. 'When you go to church and you hear somebody speak up against something, generally, you're thinking, 'Well, I'm getting a 100 percent clear picture,'' said Republican Rep. Marcus Richmond, the House majority leader. The nearly hourlong presentation to pastors by Cox and two other officials from his group alternated between a seminar and sermon, as they described the types of claims that could be constrained by the measure. 'Can I get an 'amen?'' Cox asked at one point. 'Amen,' the audience repeated back in approval. Stephen Harrison, a pastor who attended the breakfast, said later he wanted to research the proposal before taking a stance. However, Harrison, who pastors the nondenominational Family Church in Pine Bluff, said, 'I don't want to vote for something that will devalue human life or put a price tag on what a life is worth.' Vogelpohl said an equally compelling argument could be made to anti-abortion groups and other Christian conservatives that limiting damages could improve medical care in the state and help attract more doctors. The spending on the effort to rally churches pales in comparison to the more than $3 million both sides of the issue have raised. The measure still faces a lawsuit from a former judge who argues it should be disqualified from the ballot. ___ Follow Andrew DeMillo on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ademillo ___ Sign up for 'Politics in Focus,' a weekly newsletter showcasing the AP's best political reporting from around the country leading up to the midterm elections: http://apne.ws/3Gzcraw
  • A handcuffed man jumped off a bridge after being pulled over for a suspected DUI. But the incident raises the question: What happens when someone crosses over from being a private citizen to being in police custody? >> Read more trending news The Kirkland, Washington, man suspected of DUI died Friday morning after he jumped, while handcuffed, from the 520 bridge east of Seattle. The short answer is the trooper or the arresting officer is responsible. But as happened on the 520 bridge early that morning, even a routine arrest can go horribly wrong. It was dark and just past 1:30 a.m. Friday.  A Washington State trooper pulled over a 31-year-old Kirkland man suspected of driving under the influence on Highway 520 near the west high rise. But WSP says when the trooper arrested the man and placed him in handcuffs, he ran and jumped off the bridge and into Lake Washington. 'Placing a person into custody for a DUI is very different from placing a person into custody for a high level felony,' said Dr. David Makin, Washington State University criminology professor, 'meaning when you have a reason to believe there's a flight risk. ' He was asked whether putting handcuffs on a suspect changes their relationship. 'When you place a person into custody,' said Makin, 'you take on the responsibility to take reasonable steps to protect them from -- and here's the really important thing -- foreseeable risk.' He says with a DUI arrest, the trooper might reasonably not foresee the suspect would try to flee. 'However if you look online you can see hundreds of videos of suspects fleeing police while in handcuffs,' said Makin. 'Unfortunately you can do everything within policy and these unfortunate outcomes occur.' A state patrol spokesman said the trooper tried to grab the man but stopped short of jumping into Lake Washington to go after him. 'It's not as if troopers won't go into the water to make rescues,' said WSP Capt. Ron Mead. 'Listen this is a 65-75 foot drop. We train our troopers for water rescues. But we also train them to know when it's appropriate.' WSP's regulation manual cautions troopers: 'The time between the arrest and incarceration is very critical for officer safety. Facing the loss of freedom,' the manual says, may cause a suspect to 'become extremely desperate and dangerous. Therefore, the transporting officer must be on guard for any eventuality.'  Makin says even if an arresting officer fears the suspect might flee, he or she will have to weigh the risks of using great force to prevent the suspect from getting away. 'Finding the balance is really critical,' said Makin. 'I'm empathetic to the family of the man and the Washington state trooper involved in this incident.' 'Why,' he was asked. 'Because this is a very unfortunate, traumatic event,' he said. 'And I think this is something often that maybe we minimize in terms of officers' fate. That officer tried to do their very best and sometimes you can do everything within policy and you can have an unfortunate outcome.' That was borne out by Capt. Ron Mead regarding the incident on the 520 bridge. 'The trooper involved, as you can imagine, is devastated,' he said. The man suspected of jumping off the 520 bridge has not been identified.  Because this incident involves a Washington state trooper, the investigation has been turned over to Seattle police.