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National

    Police in Oklahoma are investigating after a fatal triple shooting Saturday afternoon in Jenks. Investigators told KOKI-TV that a man and his two sons are dead after what they believe is a case of murder-suicide. Police said the children’s mother was at work at the time. The shooting happened in the Country Woods neighborhood near West 106th Street South and South Madison Street South. Officers responded to a call around 12:50 p.m. regarding a domestic incident at the home. Police said others living in the home called 911. No one else in the home was injured.
  • Taylor Hawkins was in the right place at the right time when she was able to record a bear jumping on a car near Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park in California. In a video provided to KFSN, Hawkins used her phone to capture a bear crossing in front of her vehicle and climbing on top of the car ahead. Moments later, the bear seemed to be frightened and ran off the side of the road from where it had come. No one was hurt in the encounter. According to the National Park Service, black bears forage for food in both Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. The park service says that when human food becomes available, they will peer into a car for food. The park service has a human-bear management program to mitigate human-bear interactions. Read more about the program here.
  • On the seventh anniversary of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School the Newtown High School football team overshadowed the event by winning the state championship for the first time in over 26 years. With a last-minute touchdown pass, the Newtown Nighthawks beat Darien in the Class LL state championship 13-7. The title was the first for Newtown since 1992. Ben Pinto, whose brother Jack was among those killed in the shooting seven years ago, played linebacker for Newtown. “The whole town showed out on this special night,” senior Jared Dunn told The Hartford Courant. “We knew we had to bring it home for our town.” Twenty first-graders and six educators were killed at the elementary school Dec. 14, 2012. According to Connecticut Against Gun Violence, which helped to organize vigils held in the state Saturday, more than 700,000 Americans have been killed or injured in acts of gun violence since the Sandy Hook shooting. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Hoschton Mayor Theresa Kenerly resigned Saturday during a specially called meeting in the Jackson County, Georgia, town. The City Council accepted her resignation effective 1 p.m. Sunday. The resignation came just days after Councilman Jim Cleveland resigned, saying he‘d rather leave office on his own terms than face voters in a recall election next month. Both follow an AJC investigation launched seven months ago into claims that an African American candidate for city administrator was sidetracked by Kenerly because of his race. According to interviews and subsequent court testimony, Kenerly held back the resume of the only black finalist for the job. She later told a council member she did so because “the city isn’t ready for this.” Before his resignation, Cleveland defended the mayor’s conduct. “I understood where she was coming from,” he said. “I understand Theresa saying that, simply because we’re not Atlanta. Things are different here than they are 50 miles down the road.” Members of both the Jackson County Republican and Democratic parties called for both officials to leave office. When it became clear that neither Cleveland nor Kenerly would resign, residents organized a recall campaign to force them from office. Earlier this month, that campaign cleared its final legal hurdle when the Jackson County Board of Elections called a recall election for Jan. 14, 2020. Kenerly has not commented on her future plans but had appealed the recall campaign to the Georgia Supreme Court. The court declined to hear her petition. Another resignation was on the agenda for discussion Saturday: Dale Hall, the city’s current city administrator. However, the council voted to remove Hall instead of accepting his resignation. This article was written by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • Officials announced Saturday that no data was held for ransom and that a recovery operation is getting underway after a cyberattack a day earlier triggered a shutdown of city government computers in New Orleans. Chief Information Officer Kim LaGrue, speaking at a news conference with Mayor LaToya Cantrell and others, said the city hadn't heard from any hackers or received any demands. NOLA.com reported that LaGrue described the cyberattack as “minimal' and that officials expect to move quickly to bring computers fully back online. The exact nature and extent of the attack were unclear, NOLA.com reported. It added that the mayor said about 4,000 computers will need to be scrubbed as a precaution and that 400 servers were affected. Crucial public safety services continued running normally Saturday as they did during Friday's cyberattack, officials stressed. But City Hall offices had to fall back Friday on pen and paper to keep doing business as computers were taken offline and certain offices closed. The city's website was down in what officials described as a precautionary move after Friday's cyberattack. Officials, meanwhile, had posted news of the shutdown on social media. “Out of an abundance of caution, all employees were immediately alerted to power down computers, unplug devices & disconnect from WiFi,' the city said Friday on its NOLA Ready Facebook page. Officials had stressed that city financial records are backed up through a cloud-based system. LaGrue said Saturday that authorities were now moving into recovery. “We're looking to provide more information about city services and how quickly we can bring them back online very soon,' LaGrue said, without elaborating. The cyberattack was the second in a matter of days: One was reported in the city of Pensacola, Florida, last week. The Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicle operations also was hobbled by a cyberattack in mid-November.
  • Under pressure from a conservative advocacy group, The Hallmark Channel has pulled ads for a wedding-planning website that featured two brides kissing at the altar. The family-friendly network, which is in the midst of its heavily watched holiday programming, removed the ads because the controversy was a distraction, a spokesperson said in an interview Saturday. “The debate surrounding these commercials on all sides was distracting from the purpose of our network, which is to provide entertainment value,” said a statement provided by Molly Biwer, senior vice president for public affairs and communications at Hallmark. In an interview, she added: “The Hallmark brand is never going to be divisive. We don't want to generate controversy, we've tried very hard to stay out of it ... we just felt it was in the best interest of the brand to pull them and not continue to generate controversy.' There was immediate criticism on Twitter. Ellen DeGeneres asked Hallmark: “Isn't it almost 2020? What are you thinking? Please explain. We're all ears.' Biwer confirmed that a conservative group, One Million Moms, part of the American Family Association, had complained about the ads to Bill Abbott, CEO of Crown Media Family Networks, Hallmark's parent company. A post on the group's website said that Abbott 'reported the advertisement aired in error.' The group also wrote: “The call to our office gave us the opportunity to confirm the Hallmark Channel will continue to be a safe and family-friendly network.' Zola had submitted six ads, and four had a lesbian couple. After Hallmark pulled those ads, but not two featuring only opposite-sex couples, Zola pulled its remaining ads, the company said. “The only difference between the commercials that were flagged and the ones that were approved was that the commercials that did not meet Hallmark’s standards included a lesbian couple kissing,' said Mike Chi, Zola's chief marketing officer, in a statement sent to the AP. ”Hallmark approved a commercial where a heterosexual couple kissed. “All kisses, couples and marriages are equal celebrations of love and we will no longer be advertising on Hallmark,' Chi said. In one of the pulled ads, two brides stand at the altar and wonder aloud whether their wedding would be going more smoothly if they had used a wedding planning site like Zola. The lighthearted ad ends with the two brides sharing a quick kiss on the altar. Actress Sandra Bernhard, who played one of the first openly bisexual characters on network TV in “Roseanne,' also criticized Hallmark's decision. “All the groovy gay ladies i know won't be watching your Christmas schlock,' she wrote on Twitter, addressing Hallmark. “They'll be out celebrating with their ’families' wives, children, friends on & on & getting married in chic ensembles. Didn't you all get the memo? Family is all inclusive.' The developments came as Hallmark appeared to be considering more same-sex themed content. Asked about the possibility of holiday movies based on same-sex relationships, Abbott was quoted in The Hollywood Reporter in mid-November as saying on its TV podcast: “We’re open to really any type of movie of any type of relationship.
  • The runner who allegedly smacked a TV reporter’s backside during a Savannah road race has been charged, according to multiple news outlets. WSAV-TV anchor Alex Bozarjian, who was slapped on the behind while covering the annual Bridge Run last Saturday, filed a sexual battery police report after the incident, which was shown on live TV. Thomas Callaway was arrested Friday and charged with sexual battery, according to WSAV, Bozarjian’s employer. Callaway turned himself in at the Chatham County Sheriff’s Office on Friday and was released on a $1,300 bond, according to WSAV. A clip of the incident that was posted to Twitter had been viewed close to 12 million times by Saturday afternoon. Bozarjian said the person who smacked her “hurt me, both physically and emotionally.” Online sleuths identified Callaway, according to the New York Post, thanks to his race number shown in other photos. Callaway’s lawyer, Joseph Turner, called him a “loving husband and father who is very active in his community” and local church, insisting he was “working with those involved to correct the situation,” according to the New York newspaper. “While we regret the situation, Mr. Callaway did not act with any criminal intentions,” Turner said in a statement. Bozarjian appeared Tuesday on CBS’ “This Morning” and confirmed Callaway “did try to make contact” with her. “He separates himself from the runners, and he kind of winds up. And he hit me hard,” she said. The Savannah Sports Council banned the accused runner from participating in future events.
  • Felix Rohatyn, the financier and government adviser who was credited with helping to save New York City from ruin during the 1970s as chairman of the agency that oversaw the city's finances, died Saturday. He was 91. Rohatyn's son Nicolas Rohatyn said his father died at his Manhattan home. The cause was “simply old age,' he said. Born in Vienna in 1928, Rohatyn (pronounced ROH-uh-tin) fled Nazi-occupied France with his family in 1940 and arrived in the United States in 1942. After rising to prominence with the banking firm Lazard, formerly Lazard Freres, Rohatyn was named chairman of the state-appointed Municipal Assistance Corporation in 1975. The position, which he held until 1993, gave him power over taxes and spending in the nation's largest city that was unusual for someone who did not hold elected office. As chairman of the agency, Rohatyn pushed the financially strapped city to make reforms including a municipal wage freeze and charging tuition at the formerly free City University of New York. Rohatyn wrote in the agency's annual report that the alternative to such cutbacks, which were criticized by many New Yorkers, “would have been bankruptcy for the city, which would have generated infinitely greater social costs.' Rohatyn likened his work brokering financial deals to the job of a surgeon. 'I get called when something is broken,” he told The Associated Press in 1978. “I’m supposed to operate, fix it up and leave as little blood on the floor as possible.” A longtime Democratic donor, Rohatyn was President Bill Clinton's first choice for vice chairman of the Federal Reserve in 1996, but he withdrew from consideration for the post due to opposition in the Republican-controlled Senate. Clinton named Rohatyn ambassador to France instead, and he served in the position from 1997 to 2000. Rohatyn returned to Lazard as a senior adviser in 2010 and remained active in public life well into his 80s. Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo named him co-chairman of a commission dedicated to improving the resilience of the state’s infrastructure following Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Rohatyn was a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and the author of books including “Bold Endeavors: How Our Government Built America, and Why It Must Rebuild Now,'' published in 2009, and 'Dealings: A Political and Financial Life,' published in 2010. Rohatyn married Jeanette Streit in 1956. Their marriage ended in divorce. He married the former Elizabeth Fly in 1979. She died in 2016. Rohatyn's survivors include sons Pierre, Nicolas and Michael, stepdaughter Nina Griscom and six grandchildren.
  • Newtown marked the seventh anniversary of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School with vigils, church services and a moment of joy when the community's high school football team — with a shooting victim's brother as linebacker — won the state championship Saturday in a last-minute thrill. The Newtown High School Nighthawks won the Class LL state championship on a 36-yard touchdown pass as time expired, beating Darien 13-7. The title was the first for Newtown since 1992. The team ends the season undefeated. Ben Pinto, whose brother Jack was among those killed in the shooting, played linebacker for Newtown. “The whole town showed out on this special night,” senior Jared Dunn told The Hartford Courant. “We knew we had to bring it home for our town.' Twenty first graders and six educators were killed at the elementary school on Dec. 14, 2012. At a remembrance service earlier Saturday, Monsignor Robert Weiss, of St. Rose of Lima Church, expressed dismay about how the spate of deadly gun violence has continued in the U.S. since Sandy Hook. “On this day seven years ago, we all thought the world was going to change. But it seems we were deluded because the situation has gotten even worse with the violence of guns,” Weiss told a packed memorial Mass on Saturday, Hearst Connecticut Media reported. “We live in fear, we live in anxiety, and yet we live in hope because we know God walks with us.” According to Connecticut Against Gun Violence, which helped to organize vigils held in the state on Saturday, more than 700,000 Americans have been killed or injured in gun violence since the Sandy Hook shooting. The annual memorial Mass at St. Rose of Lima began with the traditional reading of the names of the Sandy Hook victims. A bell was solemnly rung after each name was recited. While seven years have passed, many in the small community of Newtown still struggle to cope with the magnitude of the tragedy. “Just when I thought I was moving past the difficult part of this experience, it comes back. And I know it is like that for a lot of us in Newtown,” Rabbi Shaul Praver said during an interfaith service at Newtown Congregational Church. Weiss was overcome by tears at the end of his homily. “I am asked all the time how we are doing — how our families are doing — and my answer is, ‘I don’t know,’ because every day brings something new,” Weiss said. “All we are given is what we have here this morning.” Gov. Ned Lamont ordered all state and U.S. flags in Connecticut to be flown at half-staff from sunrise to sunset on Saturday in remembrance of the Newtown victims. “The tragedy that occurred that day is one of the worst in our history,” Lamont, a Democrat, said in a statement. 'But in its aftermath, we witnessed an unprecedented outpouring of humanity, hope, and kindness cascading into our state from over the entire world, spreading a message of love that we must proactively protect.”
  • A shooting that wounded one person in a mall food court sent suburban Atlanta shoppers fleeing in panic Saturday. The Cobb County Police Department says the person was wounded at Cumberland Mall after 1 p.m., and that the shooting suspect then ran away. The victim was taken to a hospital, but police didn't identify the person or describe the extent of the victim's injuries. Police said they have identified a suspect and are looking for him. Three witnesses told The Associated Press they saw a man bleeding on the floor of the mall's food court after shots were heard. None of the witnesses would identify themselves. Videos posted online showed people with shopping bags running in all directions from the food court, with some hiding under counters and tables. Shoppers reported that store employees in some cases told them to hide in stockrooms. Zyon Davis told WGCL-TV that he was shopping in a sporting goods store when he overheard two men arguing loudly at a deli in the food court. Davis said one of the men then drew a gun. “You heard the gunshots, probably two or three shots,' Davis said. In the aftermath, Davis said some people pushed and shoved others to the ground as they ran. “It was very chaotic,” Davis said. “Everybody was running everwhere. Everything was a mess.” Police said the shooting was “an isolated incident,” calling it a dispute between people who knew each other and “not an active shooter event.” Police added that the original supervisor who arrived at the mall, “out of an abundance of caution,” described the scene as an active shooter incident, meaning a gunman targeting numbers of people in a public place. The mall was closed for a time Saturday afternoon following the shooting. Cumberland Mall, in suburban Cobb County, is owned by Brookfield Properties, which manages more than 170 shopping centers across the United States. The mall has more than 1 million square feet (92,000 square meters) of retail space and is anchored by Macy's and Costco. It's in a busy suburban business district, near where major league baseball's Atlanta Braves play in their new stadium.