ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
82°
Mostly Sunny
H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    82°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 93° L 75°
  • clear-day
    76°
    Morning
    Mostly Sunny. H 93° L 75°
  • cloudy-day
    90°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 75°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National

    A California woman is jailed on charges related to the death of her 18-month-old toddler inside a hot car, according to Mendocino County authorities. >> Read more trending news  Deputies were called to Howard Memorial Hospital in Willits, California, Wednesday afternoon after the death of a young boy identified as Chergery Teywoh Lew Mays. The child had been taken to the hospital by his mother, Alexandra Raven Scott, Detective Sgt. Andrew Porter with the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release on Facebook. Scott, a resident of Humboldt County, went to visit friends in Willits around 3 a.m. Wednesday, leaving the boy inside the car for hours. “It is believed the child was left unattended in the back seat of the vehicle with the windows rolled up for about 10 hours,” Porter said. The temperature was about 80 degrees in Willits when the boy was found around 1 p.m., but officials told KTLA-TV it was more like 130 degrees inside the car.  Scott is jailed without bail on suspicion of willfully causing or permitting a child to suffer great bodily injury or death.
  • Crews were scrambling Saturday to clean up a BNSF oil train derailment in northwest Iowa that dumped crude into floodwaters, while officials seek to get a handle on the extent of the spill and its cause. Thirty-three oil tanker cars derailed Friday just south of Doon in Lyon County, leaking oil into surrounding floodwaters from the swollen Little Rock River. BNSF spokesman Andy Williams said Saturday that the cause of the derailment hadn't yet been determined, but a disaster proclamation issued by Gov. Kim Reynolds for Lyon and three other counties placed the blame on rain-fueled flooding. Some officials have speculated that floodwaters eroded soil beneath the train track. The nearby Little Rock River rose rapidly after heavy rain Wednesday and Thursday. The amount of oil spilled also wasn't known by Saturday afternoon, Williams said, but he added that officials hoped to have a better idea once they're able to reach the derailed oil tankers. Within hours of the derailment, BNSF had brought in dozens of semitrailers loaded with equipment to clean up the spill, including containment booms, skimmers and vacuum trucks. 'We are working as quickly as we can to get this cleaned up,' Williams said Saturday. 'We've had skimmers working since yesterday on the floodwater south of the site.' A major part of that work includes building a temporary road parallel to the tracks to allow in cranes that can remove the derailed and partially-submerged oil cars. Williams said officials hoped to reach the cars by sometime Saturday afternoon. The train was carrying tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada, to Stroud, Oklahoma, for ConocoPhillips. ConocoPhillips spokesman Daren Beaudo said each tanker can hold more than 25,000 gallons (20,817 imperial gallons) of oil. He did not know how much had spilled. Beaudo also did not know whether the derailed oil cars were the safer, newer tankers intended to help prevent leaks in the event of an accident. 'We lease those cars and are in the process of verifying with the owners the exact rail car specifications,' Beaudo said in an email. Reynolds was set to visit the derailment site Saturday afternoon as part of a tour of areas hit by recent flooding. The derailment also caused concern downstream, including as far south as Omaha, Nebraska, about 150 miles (240 kilometers) from the derailment site. The spill reached the Rock River, which joins the Big Sioux River before merging into the Missouri River at Sioux City. Omaha's public water utility — Metropolitan Utilities District — said it was monitoring pumps it uses to pull drinking water from the Missouri River. Rock Valley, Iowa, just southwest of the derailment, shut off its water wells within hours of the accident. It plans to drain and clean its wells and use a rural water system until testing shows its water is safe. ___ For the latest information about the derailment: https://bit.ly/2K1wIAZ
  • Thousands of senior citizens across the United States are finding a profitable side hustle --- opening up their homes to strangers on Airbnb. Nearly 78,000 seniors (ages 60 and up) across the U.S. shared their homes on Airbnb in 2017 -- accounting for $700 million in earnings, the company reports. The typical host earned an extra $7,000 in income a year -- a positive boost for people living on fixed incomes. >> Read more trending news  Airbnb is a website that allows people to open up their homes for vacation rentals or short-term leasing. There are over 5 million homes listed on Airbnb in over 81,000 cities. According to Airbnb’s annual survey, 41 percent of seniors reported that hosting their home has helped them afford to stay in their homes -- places they’ve often lived most of their lives.  Airbnb states that 45 percent of senior hosts rely on that extra income to make ends meet and spend it on important costs of living.  Senior hosts are beloved on Airbnb, the company said. 88 percent of trips hosted by seniors last year resulted in 5-star reviews. Percentage of active listings with senior Airbnb hosts  New Mexico34%Maine32%Vermont28%Hawaii26%Delaware26%  Typical host earnings for seniors by state  Hawaii$14,000California$11,700Washington, D.C.$10,500Washington$8,700Rhode Island$8,500Percentage of senior host reviews with 5-stars  Nebraska93%North Dakota93%Kansas93%South Dakota92%Indiana91%
  • A teen girl helped a blind, deaf man communicate on a recent Alaska Airlines flight, according to KIRO. Dianne McGinness with Alaska Airlines shared the heartwarming story after a passenger on the flight wrote a post this week about the interaction that was shared over 400,000 times. The passenger, Lynette Scribner, was traveling on the same flight as the teen and man, and was moved to write a post on the touching encounter.  >> Read more trending news  Scribner said the man, Tim Cook, was traveling home to Portland after visiting his sister. Cook lives at Portland's Brookdale Senior Living.  When passengers of the flight realized Cook was blind and deaf, many helped ensure he was comfortable. A man sitting next to Cook gave him the aisle seat and helped with little tasks like opening his coffee creamer and pouring it into his coffee, Scribner shared. A flight attendant made an announcement asking if a passenger on board knew American Sign Language. Fifteen-year-old Clara Daly, who has studied ASL for the last year, rang her call button. When Daly learned the man could communicate only if someone signed into his hand, she immediately went to help. Cook asked Daly questions and she patiently sign-spelled answers into his hand. Scribner said Daly learned ASL because she has dyslexia, and it was the easiest foreign language for her to learn. “Clara was amazing,” an Alaska Airlines flight attendant said in the news release. “You could tell Tim was very excited to have someone he could speak to -- and she was such an angel.” “When (Cook) asked (Daly) if she was pretty, she blushed and laughed as the seat mate, who had learned a few signs, communicated an enthusiastic yes to Tim,” Scribner shared. “I don't know when I've ever seen so many people rally to take care of another human being. All of us in the immediate rows were laughing and smiling and enjoying his obvious delight in having someone to talk to.” After the flight, McGinness said Cook met a service provider from Brookdale Senior Living at the gate. Cook said the flight was the best trip he's ever taken. Daly told her mom she thought the encounter was 'meant to be,' since her original flight was canceled and she was redirected to Cook's flight. On Thursday, Scribner added a note on her beloved post: “We are all starving for good news and this was just what we needed.”
  • Latino elected officials from around the nation questioned the head of the U.S. Census Bureau on Saturday over the proposed addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 survey, denouncing it as a purely political move. Members of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials said the decision to ask about citizenship status will result in an undercount of Latino communities. At the group's annual conference in Phoenix this week, several said the question will deter many from responding to the survey for fear that authorities will use the information against them. Acting Director Ron Jarmin said the Census Bureau is barred by law from sharing data with other government agencies. 'People have always had trepidation about responding to a government survey,' Jarmin said. 'The critical message that we need to get out to everybody is that participation in the Census is safe, it's secure.' The U.S. Constitution requires a census every 10 years, and its results are used to determine the number of seats each state has in the House of Representatives, as well as how federal money is distributed to local communities and schools. Latino leaders at the conference on Saturday said they fear the question of citizenship will be detrimental to an accurate count of people living the U.S. 'We know it's a political thing, we know it's gonna affect our communities,' executive director Arturo Vargas said. 'Everybody knows this is just bad policy.' The announcement in March by U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to include the question was met with criticism and has resulted in several lawsuits, including one in California and another in New York brought by 17 Democratic attorneys general and others. Ross said the question was needed in part to help the government enforce the Voting Rights Act, a 1965 law meant to protect the political representation of minorities. The decennial census hasn't included a question about citizenship since 1950. But panelists like U.S. Rep. Jimmy Gomez, D-California, said there is a more sinister reason to add the question. Gomez said the administration has misled Congress about why it really wants to do so. 'I think this is a real travesty, I think the American people should be outraged,' Gomez said. The Trump administration's ultimate goal is to take congressional seats from areas with a high population of immigrants, he added. Lubby Navarro, a member of the Miami-Dade County Public Schools Board, said adding the citizenship question will make it harder for community leaders who advocate for participation. 'The fear that exists right now with the citizenship question is going to exacerbate our work,' Navarro said.
  • Anthony Bourdain’s mother revealed that while she was “never really a fan” of her son’s tattoos, she plans to get one in his memory. Gladys Bourdain told the New York Times that she plans to get “Tony” tattooed in small letters on the inside of her wrist some time next week, and use his tattoo artist. >> Read more trending news  The 61-year-old chef and host of CNN’s “Parts Unknown” was found dead on June 8 in a hotel room in France. Investigators say he hanged himself. On Friday, a prosecutor said Bourdain had no traces of drugs or alcohol in his system.  The famous chef had several tattoos, getting his first at 44. Bourdain told Maxim in August 2017 that each tattoo marks a significant moment in his life. “I don't overly place importance on them, but [tattoos] do commemorate in a way that photographs can't,” Bourdain said. “I stopped taking photographs a long time ago when I travel. There's this realization that the lens is inadequate to capture the moment, so maybe I'm just looking to mark time in another way that's very personal.” Gladys Bourdain said that a private ceremony will be held soon, adding, “He would want as little fuss as possible.” A Bourdain family spokesperson told the BBC the family has no plans for a public memorial at this time.
  • White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said she and seven members of her family were kicked out of The Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Virginia on Friday night. TMZ first reported that the restaurant’s owner kicked out Sanders and her family out of “moral conviction.”  >> Read more trending news  A waiter posted on Facebook that Sanders was in the restaurant for “a total of two minutes” before being asked to leave. Sanders confirmed the incident on Twitter. “Last night I was told by the owner of Red Hen in Lexington, VA to leave because I work for @POTUS and I politely left,” Sanders tweeted Saturday. “Her actions say far more about her than about me. I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so.” Sanders’ father, former Gov. Mike Huckabee, tweeted his support, saying it was an act of “bigotry.” The Red Hen’s Facebook and Yelp pages were bombarded with reviews from people from both sides. While some praised the restaurant, many others said the owner was being “intolerant.” This comes after Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen bolted from a Washington, D.C. Mexican restaurant after protesters confronted her at her table -- with the blessing of the manager.
  • Police in Pittsburgh are searching for the driver of a dark sedan who drove through a crowd of protesters on Friday night.  Officials told WPXI no one was hurt.  This happened during the third straight night of protests related to the police shooting death of Antwon Rose, 17, who was killed during a traffic stop earlier in the week. >>Read: Protesters gather in Pittsburgh for third straight night The car plowed into the crowd near PNC Park, where fans were leaving a Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game. >>Read: LIVE UPDATES: Car drives through crowd of protesters at PNC Park One person at the scene Friday night tweeted, “Someone tried to drive through us, police responded in riot gear.” Allegheny County police officials said that Rose was a passenger in a vehicle stopped in East Pittsburgh Tuesday night, because it fit the description of a car seen fleeing the area of a shooting in the nearby borough of North Braddock.  As an officer handcuffed the driver of the car, which investigators said had bullet damage to the back window, Rose and a second passenger got out of the car and ran.  Rose, who police officials said was shot three times, was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead.  Police are now investigating reports that Rose may have fired a weapon during a drive-by shooting before his death, and he had gun powder residue on his hands. In a statement to WPXI, Coleman McDonough, Allegheny County Police superintendent, stated that those claims are “false.” “While ACPD does have a video showing the North Braddock incident, that video does NOT show Antwon Rose firing a gun. The information about gunshot residue is also false. Crime Lab reports are still pending and have not yet been issued,” McDonough said. The East Pittsburgh police officer who fatally shot Rose has been identified as Michael Rosfeld. >>Read: Officer was sworn in hours before killing unarmed teen, mayor says He was sworn into the department just hours before the shooting, but has worked for several police forces, including the University of Pittsburgh. No arrests have been made and investigations are ongoing.
  • Colorado holds primaries Tuesday to select the top two contenders to succeed Gov. John Hickenlooper, a centrist Democrat whose promotion of aerospace, tech and a plethora of other industries helped generate unprecedented economic growth in this rapidly-growing state of 5.6 million people. But to win, the leading Republican and Democratic candidates are eschewing the middle ground in this heavily independent purple state to appeal to their respective bases. Republican Walker Stapleton has wedded himself to President Donald Trump, and Democratic U.S. Rep. Jared Polis is tacking left on universal health care and marijuana. That may be a risk: This year, independents — voters not affiliated with any party — can vote in the Republican or Democratic primaries. While independents are the largest voting bloc in Colorado, analysts say it's too soon to measure their impact on primary outcomes. Still, to hear Stapleton tell it, he's already past the primary and running against Polis. Stapleton, a two-term state treasurer, lashed out at Polis, a five-term Boulder congressman, several times during a Republican gubernatorial debate Tuesday — on immigration, raising taxes for schools and roads and safety standards for oil and gas drilling in a rapidly expanding Denver metropolitan area. 'I've taken a de minimis amount of money from people in the energy industry, but guess what — I hope they're listening, because it's going to need to be a lot more to defeat Jared Polis,' Stapleton said, referring to Polis' $12 million investment in his own campaign and advocacy of local control over Colorado's $31 billion oil and gas industry. On that issue, Polis, a tech entrepreneur and one of the wealthiest members of Congress, advocates strict safety standards and full-throttle investment in green and renewable energy. He is a longtime advocate of Colorado's burgeoning marijuana industry and eliminating federal interference. But he's also fighting a surprisingly close primary race centered on public education issues against former state Treasurer Cary Kennedy, leaving it to the state Democratic Party to tackle Stapleton. In all, four Republicans and four Democrats want to succeed the term-limited Hickenlooper. It's the top primary race in a state that hasn't elected a Republican governor since Bill Owens, who served from 1999-2007, or opted for a Republican presidential candidate since George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004. Republicans hold a 4-3 advantage in Colorado's congressional delegation and one of two U.S. Senate seats. They control the state Senate and serve as treasurer, attorney general and secretary of state. In the primary run-up, Republicans and Democrats offered starkly different post-Hickenlooper visions for Colorado's role — or resistance — in implementing Trump administration policies on immigration, the environment, taxes and health care. In recent days, Hickenlooper himself has barred state agencies, including the National Guard, from supporting immigrant family separations, and he ordered Colorado to adopt California's strict vehicle pollution rules. Stapleton bear-hugged the administration's deportation policies just as immigrant family separations were causing a national outcry. So, too, did his GOP rivals Victor Mitchell and Greg Lopez. Only Doug Robinson, a nephew of former presidential nominee Mitt Romney, opposed them at the Denver Post-KMGH-TV debate. 'It's not who we are as Americans,' Robinson said. 'We are the party of family values.' It's an uphill climb for Stapleton, a favorite of the GOP establishment whose mother is a cousin of President George H. W. Bush. Mitchell, who's invested nearly $5 million in his campaign, challenges Stapleton's truthfulness, especially his claim — since abandoned — to be the only U.S. state treasurer to endorse Trump's income tax cuts last fall. The Democratic race has focused on protecting immigrant rights, strengthening the Affordable Care Act and pressing state concerns such as underfunded schools and roads and skyrocketing housing costs. All vow to amend constitutional tax-and-spending restrictions that hamper investment in schools and transportation — a goal that proved elusive for Hickenlooper. Kennedy has run a strong grass-roots campaign embraced by Colorado's largest teachers union. A former Denver deputy mayor, she authored a constitutional amendment designed to raise K-12 spending. Both Polis and former state Sen. Mike Johnston also have extensive education credentials. Former New York City mayor and gun-control advocate Michael Bloomberg has invested in Johnston's campaign, which has featured roundtables on gun violence. Also running is Democratic Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne, a former high-ranking health care executive who avoids the campaign squabbling, preferring a measured and sophisticated insistence that Colorado's challenges have no easy answers. 'I think the election is for sale,' Lynne said this week as her opponents bickered over their campaign finances. 'I'm a workhorse, and not a show horse.
  • Minnesota Republican Party Chairwoman Jennifer Carnahan says she has been the target of racist and sexist attacks from fellow Republicans. Carnahan posted on her personal Facebook page on Friday that some GOP leaders around the state have called her 'a stupid Asian not even born in America' and used racial slurs, the Star Tribune reported. Carnahan was born in South Korea and adopted by Minnesota parents. The newspaper posted a screenshot of her post . Carnahan told the newspaper that the remarks are 'starting to get to me,' but declined to identify who attacked her. She said was merely venting on her personal page and thanking her father for his support after she reached out to him for advice. Carnahan said on Facebook that she receives hate-filled email and social media messages on a daily basis. She wrote that she was confronted at President Donald Trump's rally in Duluth this past week, where she said she was told she is 'disgusting.' She said she has received emails telling her she is 'not worth a penny' and should 'crawl back into a hole and stay there,' and that she deserves to make less money than her male predecessors. Democrats blame Trump for unleashing a new era of racial division. Carnahan, whose term ends next year, rejects that idea. 'I told (Trump) I want to run again to be chair because I want to deliver the state to you in 2020,' Carnahan said. 'If I thought he was a racist or that anything he did was stoking racial divisions, I wouldn't want to work on his behalf because I've had to deal with racism my entire life.' ___ Information from: Star Tribune, http://www.startribune.com