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National

    A Louisiana baseball team has become the first from the state to win a Little League World Series. >> Read more trending news  According to WDSU, the team of 12-year-olds from River Ridge, a New Orleans suburb, defeated Curacao in an 8-0 shutout Sunday to claim the title.  >> Watch the moment here Pitcher Egan Prather gave up only two hits during six innings, The Associated Press reported. “I can’t process it,” the team's manager, Scott Frazier, told the AP. “This tournament started with approximately 7,700 teams, and here we are with the best out of everybody. It’s just surreal.” Rep. Steve Scalise, R-Louisiana, took to Twitter to praise the team. 'WORLD CHAMPS! Congratulations to Louisiana’s River Ridge team on winning the@LittleLeague World Series!!' Scalise tweeted. 'So proud of this history-making team—our first-ever #LLWS champions. Way to represent [the United States] and Louisiana!' He added: 'Next up → How about a trip to the @WhiteHouse, @realDonaldTrump?' 'Congratulations to Louisiana’s Champions. See you at the White House!' Trump replied. >> See the tweets here Meanwhile, the team from Chofu, Japan, beat Hawaii 5-0 to claim third place in the championship, the AP reported. Read more here or here.
  • A dog who vanished five years ago is back in the arms of her North Carolina family – all thanks to a microchip. >> Read more trending news  According to People magazine, the black-and-white dog, Zoey, arrived earlier this month at the Guilford County Animal Shelter, where staffers quickly discovered that the pup had an unregistered microchip. After making several calls, employees were able to track down Zoey's owner, who had been looking for the dog for years, the shelter wrote in a Facebook post Thursday. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 'Imagine her surprise that after 5 YEARS of Zoey missing, Guilford County Animal Services was calling to inform her that her precious Zoey was now at the shelter,' the post read. Family members were thrilled to see their dog again, the shelter said. Adorable photos captured the moment when one child greeted the long-lost pet with a hug. >> See the photos here Read more here or here.
  • Thousands turned out to a benefit hosted by comedian Dave Chappelle that honored victims of a mass shooting in Ohio. The star-studded 'Gem City Shine' took place Sunday in Dayton's Oregon District, the historic neighborhood that was marred by a 32-second rampage that killed nine people and left dozens injured Aug. 4. Stevie Wonder headlined the event, which also featured Chance the Rapper and Talib Kweli, among other musicians, news outlets reported. The event was designed to raise both spirits as well as money for the victims and survivors of the shooting. 'Don't forget what this place is about! Mankind learned how to fly in this city,' Chappelle told the crowd. 'Don't forget what this place is about. When the rest of the country was all slavery, everybody was free in Ohio.' Chappelle, who lives in nearby Yellow Springs, was treated to a rendition of 'Happy Birthday' by attendees, instigated by comedian Jon Stewart. Earlier Sunday, Kanye West hosted a Sunday Service in a Dayton park. The service for victims featured choir singers and was also attended by Chappelle. Sunday evening's benefit contributed to helping the community heal, business owners said. 'It's reclaiming Dayton. We don't want anybody to be scared,' Abby Beach told the Dayton Daily News. 'We want everyone to know it's an exciting and fun-loving community.' Mayor Nan Whaley says no taxpayer money was used for the benefit. The mayor and the chamber of commerce raised funds for security and Chappelle donated the stage and secured talent, she said. 'And the least we can do, Dave, is we have declared it Dave Chappelle day in Dayton, Ohio,' Whaley said on stage Sunday night.
  • A 911 call led to the arrest of a Pennsylvania woman after police said they found her son home alone surrounded by drugs. >> Read more trending news  Police said Leslie Brown, 29, of Penn Hills, called them from a Family Dollar in Lincoln-Lemington saying her son was missing and she had lost sight of him in the store. Employees told WPXI-TV that she was frantic and that they searched every aisle and back room. Police said the child was never in the store with her but was at home alone surrounded by heroin. When police went to the home, they said the boy answered the door and police immediately saw bundles of heroin and stamp bags right next to where the child said he watched TV. Police said the boy told them: 'It's Mommy's medicine. She makes it sometimes.'  Brown admitted to making and selling heroin as her only source of income, according to police. Police said they found drugs in her home and car marked 'Power trip,' 'Panda,' 'Say hello to my little friend,' and 'Playboy.'  Brown was taken into custody and charged with endangering the welfare of children and nearly a half-dozen drug charges. Police said the child is safe and now with his grandparents.
  • Police are investigating after a 12-year-old boy was found shot at a Georgia elementary school. >> Read more trending news  The Rockdale County Sheriff's Office said deputies responded around 6:30 p.m. Friday to a person shot at Peek's Chapel Elementary School.  Deputies found a 12-year-old boy with a gunshot wound. He was taken to a local hospital, where he is in the intensive care unit but stable. His identity hasn't been released.  A 15-year-old has been charged with aggravated assault and aggravated battery. The teen's identity has not been released.  WSB-TV investigative reporter Nicole Carr was in Rockdale County, digging into how the shooting could have happened. The school district released a statement saying no students or staff were on campus at the time of the shooting:  'We are deeply concerned about the incident that occurred after hours on the property of Peek's Chapel Elementary Friday night. At this time, our thoughts and prayers are with the young man who was injured. Again, this occurred after hours when no students or staff were on campus. We will assist law enforcement as needed during their investigation.' Carr learned, however, that the campus was open to the public when the shooting happened because the school grounds and basketball court are open on evenings and weekends.  Carr spoke to a neighbor, who said the basketball court was full of young people as the helicopter took off with the injured child.  Another neighbor who has a grandson at the school, Angela Glenn, said enough is enough.  'I'm just worried about these kids,' Glenn said. 'First of all, how are they getting their hands on guns so easily, you know?
  • Movie mogul Harvey Weinstein is due back in court on Monday to face a new indictment that prosecutors say would open the door for an actress to testify against him in his sexual assault case. Prosecutors say Weinstein will appear in state court in Manhattan, where he's expected to enter a not guilty plea. He has previously pleaded not guilty to charges accusing him of raping a woman in 2013 and performing a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006. The new indictment against Weinstein hasn't been made public. But in court papers, prosecutors said it was needed to bring evidence involving Annabella Sciorra, best known for her work on 'The Sopranos.' She says Weinstein raped her inside her Manhattan apartment after she starred in a film for his movie studio in 1993. Weinstein, 67, who's free on $1 million bail, has denied all accusations of non-consensual sex. Prosecutors can't charge Weinstein with the alleged attack on Sciorra because the accusation dates to 13 years before New York eliminated its statute of limitations for rape cases in 2006. But in court papers filed this month, they told the judge the indictment will give them a legal foundation to call the actress as a witness to strengthen the predatory sexual assault charge against Weinstein. The Associated Press generally does not name people who say they are victims of sexual assault, but Sciorra went public with her story in a story in The New Yorker in October 2017. Court papers filed by the defense called the attempt to make Sciorra a prosecution witness an '11th-hour maneuver' that 'raises significant legal issues' that could delay the trial by several weeks. Separately, defense attorneys are asking appeals court to move the trial case out of New York City because a 'circus-like atmosphere' there fueled by news reports and social media posts. A decision on the request could come as early as Monday.
  • Critics of a new Missouri ban on abortions at or after eight weeks of pregnancy are asking a judge to block the law from taking effect this week. Attorneys for Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union head to court Monday to ask U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs to put the law on hold while their legal challenge against it plays out in court. They face a tight deadline: The law is set to take effect Wednesday. Planned Parenthood and ACLU lawyers in a court filing wrote that unless Sachs blocks the law, it will severely limit access to abortion and prevent the 'vast majority of patients from obtaining the constitutionally protected medical care they seek.' 'As a result, some patients will be prevented from obtaining abortion care entirely, and be forced to carry their pregnancies to term against their will_for some, even in the face of significant health risks that nevertheless would not qualify as a 'medical emergency' under the Bans,' attorneys wrote. They added that other patients will seek abortions out of state or 'outside the medical system,' despite health risks. The law includes exceptions for medical emergencies, but not for rape or incest. If courts don't uphold the eight-week ban, the bill includes a series of less-restrictive bans ranging from 14 weeks up to 20 weeks. The bill also bans abortions based solely on race, sex or a diagnosis indicating the potential for Down syndrome. Attorneys for the state argue that courts have allowed limits on abortions based on the gestational age of the fetus, although similar abortion restrictions in North Dakota and Iowa have been struck down by judges. In court documents, they told the judge that the state's goal is 'protecting fetal life' as well as protecting women. Federal law allows states to prohibit abortions after fetuses are viable outside the womb, which can be from 24 to 28 weeks. Missouri's bill also includes an outright ban on abortions except in cases of medical emergencies, but that would take effect only if the landmark 1973 U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade ruling that legalized abortion nationwide is overturned. Missouri already has some of the nation's most restrictive abortion regulations. Just one clinic in the state performs abortions. ___ Ballentine reported from Jefferson City, Missouri.
  • An Oklahoma judge is expected to rule Monday in the first state case to go to trial accusing an opioid drugmaker of being responsible for the devastating consequences arising from addiction to the powerful painkillers. Cleveland County District Judge Thad Balkman is scheduled to deliver his judgment in open court at 3 p.m. The case is at the forefront of a wave of similar lawsuits by states, cities, counties and Indian tribes against drug companies over the wreckage caused by the national opioid crisis. Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter has called consumer products giant Johnson & Johnson, the last remaining defendant group in the case, a 'kingpin' company that helped fuel the most devastating public health crisis in the state's history. Before the six-week trial started in late May, Oklahoma reached a $270 million settlement with OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma and an $85 million deal with Israeli-owned Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. 'The judge will probably find in favor of (Oklahoma), but will decline to give it a huge damage award, particularly since Purdue, the real bad boy in all of this, was able to cap its liability at the relatively modest sum of $270 million,' said University of Kentucky law professor Richard Ausness, who has written extensively about opioid litigation. 'Whatever happens, the losing side will probably appeal, so the matter will drag on for several more years.' Attorneys for Oklahoma outlined a plan developed by state mental health and addiction specialists to abate the opioid crisis that would range between $12.6 billion for 20 years or $17.5 billion over 30 years. Attorneys for Johnson & Johnson say that estimate is wildly inflated and claim the state is trying to hold the company liable for damages without any evidence that it caused the crisis. 'Throughout trial our team repeatedly laid waste to the state's case, which it built on misstatements and distortions,' John Sparks, local counsel for Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiary, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., said following closing arguments. 'The facts are that Janssen appropriately provided essential pain treatment options to Oklahomans while balancing the inherent risks associated with these medicines.' ___ Follow Sean Murphy at www.twitter.com/apseanmurphy
  • Sources reportedly told Axios that President Donald Trump may have suggested using nuclear weapons to disrupt the formation of hurricanes. >> Read more trending news  While the idea may sound extreme, a 'Frequently Asked Questions' webpage from 2014 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website fields a similar question. The page that appears on The Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory attempts to answer the question 'Why don't we try to destroy tropical cyclones by nuking them?' In short, Christopher Landsea, a former research meteorologist with the Hurricane Research Division of the Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory at NOAA, said that aside from the deadly radioactive fallout, there simply isn't enough energy in even a large nuclear explosive to alter a large hurricane. Additionally, of the 80 or so tropical waves or depressions that form every year, only around five develop into hurricanes. Attempting to bomb each depression would be an inefficient way to prevent possible hurricanes. Here is the answer as it appears on what appears to be a NOAA FAQ page created in 2014:
  • Officials have proposed a federal shelter for migrant children apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border, and it could be set up in Orlando. >> Read more trending news  But there is confusion on where the shelter would be placed.  A letter posted on Twitter between the Orange County mayor and a Florida representative names the potential location along the city's south side. In the letter, Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings told Rep. Carlos Smith the federal government is looking at 1850 W. Landstreet Road as an 'unaccompanied alien children shelter.' 'We don't need new child detention facilities. What we need to do is reunite kids with their families,' Smith said. The General Services Administration has not officially said if it is looking to place the facility at the West Landstreet Road location, but in an email sent Friday, it said it has recently issued 'a presolicitation notice for a leased space in Orlando.' The Department of Health and Human Services said the facility will care for 500 children and 24-hour care will be provided by 500 staff members. It said the shelter will require child bedrooms, bathrooms, classrooms, medical and dining services and more. The address listed in the letter is currently a Travel Lodge. Smith said he doesn't think that is the right location. 'There's an abandoned condemned property across the street that looks pretty rough. I think it's possible that they were off on the street address by one digit, 1850 instead of 1851.