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    Police are searching for a 20-year-old woman who was reported missing in St. Cloud. Authorities said Faith Kepner left her home Friday on foot at about 10:30 p.m. Then, at about 10:57 p.m., her mother received a text from Kepner saying she was at Walmart Neighborhood Market on Nolte Road, police said. Kepner did not return home. According to a news release: “Faith is described as a white female, brown hair, brown eyes, approximately 5’05” and approximately 110 lbs. Faith was last wearing a pink shirt, black shorts, black hooded sweatshirt with a heart emblem, and black & red Sketchers sneakers.” The release also said that Kepner “lacks the mental capacity for her age due to an illness/disability.” Video surveillance from the Walmart Neighborhood Market confirmed that Kepner visited the business. Anyone with information is asked to call the St. Cloud Police Department at 407-891-6700, ext. 6752.  ***Press Release*** Missing Endangered Adult pic.twitter.com/69DQzLxCC9 — St.Cloud Police Dept (@StCloudPD) April 22, 2019 DOWNLOAD: Free WFTV News & Weather Apps Not near a TV? Click here to watch WFTV newscasts live Watch Live: Doppler 9 HD 
  • The St. Cloud police department is searching for a young woman with a disability reported missing over the weekend. Faith Kepner, 20, disappeared Friday after leaving her home to visit a nearby grocery store. Investigators say Kepner told her family that she was going to walk to the Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market located at 2025 Nolte Road in St. Cloud.  Surveillance video from the business shows Kepner visited the store but she never returned home. Kepner is white with brown hair and brown eyes.  She’s approximately 5’05” and weighs around 110 lbs.  She was last seen wearing a pink shirt, black shorts and a black hooded sweat shirt with a heart emblem with black and red Sketchers sneakers. Investigators consider Kepner to be endangered because she lacks the mental capacity for her age, due to an illness/disability. If you know where she is, call the St. Cloud Police Department in reference to report number 19-002303.
  • Democratic U.S. Sen. Bob Casey of Pennsylvania is lobbying for a presidential primary debate in his home state, which is a projected battleground in the 2020 presidential election. Casey's letter Monday to Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez says holding a primary debate in Pennsylvania would benefit the party in a state that holds great electoral importance to Democrats. Casey said Democrats can't afford to lose Pennsylvania if they hope to beat President Donald Trump, after Trump in 2016 became the first Republican to win Pennsylvania since 1988. Casey described Trump's victory as a 'wake-up call' and said a debate in the politically divided state would help Democrats. The DNC is planning a dozen debates, and has announced two locations — starting with Miami this June and Detroit in July.
  • SpaceX has suffered a serious setback in its effort to launch NASA astronauts into orbit this year. Over the weekend, the Dragon crew capsule that flew to the International Space Station last month was engulfed in smoke and flames on an engine test stand. SpaceX says it was testing the Dragon's abort thrusters at Cape Canaveral, Florida, when Saturday's accident occurred. The company says the test area was clear and no one was injured. This Dragon was supposed to be used in a launch abort test in June, with another capsule making the first flight with a crew as early as July. NASA said Monday it's too early to revise the target launch dates. Earlier this month, NASA announced major delays for test flights of Boeing's Starliner crew capsule.
  • Now that spring practice has ended, here's a list of Southeastern Conference football players who are poised to break out this fall. Classes listed are their classes in the fall. EASTERN DIVISION FLORIDA AMARI BURNEY, LB, Soph. — Burney, a converted safety, takes over for NFL-bound Vosean Joseph at the all-important 'star' position in Florida's defense. The 6-foot-2, 222-pound sophomore can chase down ball carriers, run with receivers and blitz off the edge — the kind of versatility that will keep offenses guessing. Joseph led Florida with 93 tackles last season - nine for loss - and also had five pass breakups. Burney could be even better. GEORGIA DEMETRIS ROBERTSON, WR, Jr. — This former five-star recruit started his career at California. He had just four catches for 109 yards last year in his first season at Georgia but has won compliments from coach Kirby Smart this spring. The 6-foot Robertson has a great opportunity for playing time now that Riley Ridley and Mecole Hardman have left school early to enter the draft. KENTUCKY JAMAR 'BOOGIE' WATSON, OLB, Jr. — Watson will be Kentucky's main edge rusher this fall now that 2018 All-America selection and SEC defensive player of the year Josh Allen has left for the NFL. Watson recorded five sacks last year to rank second on the team behind Allen's 17. Watson capped a solid spring by recovering a fumble in the spring game. MISSOURI JORDAN ELLIOTT, DT, Jr. — This Texas transfer showed his potential last year when he recorded three sacks in the regular-season finale against Arkansas and was named SEC defensive player of the week. He followed that up with a productive spring and should emerge as one of Missouri's top defensive players. SOUTH CAROLINA ZACCH PICKENS, DT, Fr. — Pickens is an early enrollee who drew rave reviews this spring. Pickens was the nation's No. 1 defensive tackle and No. 8 overall prospect in his high school class according to composite rankings of recruiting sites compiled by 247Sports. He's South Carolina's most highly rated signee since Jadeveon Clowney arrived on campus eight years ago. TENNESSEE WANYA MORRIS, OT, Fr. — Morris has a legitimate shot to begin his college career as Tennessee's starting left tackle. The early enrollee spent spring practice working with the first-team offensive line. Tennessee signed two five-star offensive tackle prospects by adding Morris and Darnell Wright, who won't arrive on campus until this summer. It wouldn't be a surprise if both end up starting. VANDERBILT RILEY NEAL, QB, Sr. — Neal started 32 games at Ball State before heading to the SEC as a graduate transfer. Neal now is competing with Deuce Wallace for the right to replace four-year starter Kyle Shurmur as Vanderbilt's starting quarterback. Neal split first-team reps with Wallace during spring practice. WESTERN DIVISION ALABAMA LaBRYAN RAY, DE, Jr. — Ray could be the Crimson Tide's next breakout defensive lineman. The former five-star recruit had 39 tackles and 2 ½ sacks last season and is a likely starter opposite Raekwon Davis. Alabama's defensive line must replace All-America tackle Quinnen Williams and AP second-team all-SEC end Isaiah Buggs. ARKANSAS TREY KNOX, WR, Fr. — This 6-5 freshman should provide an immediate impact for an Arkansas offense that needs more weapons with the Razorbacks coming off a 2-10 season. In the spring game, Knox caught three passes for 57 yards, including a 45-yard touchdown. AUBURN SETH WILLIAMS, WR, Soph. — The 6-3 Williams emerged as a playmaker his freshman season and appears poised for an even bigger role this year following the departures of Ryan Davis and Darius Slayton. Williams was the offensive most valuable player of the spring game with four catches for 103 yards and two touchdowns. LSU DEREK STINGLEY JR., CB, Fr. — Stingley should continue LSU's tradition as Defensive Back U. The former five-star recruit will enter August camp as LSU's No. 1 punt returner and will compete with sophomore Kelvin Joseph for a starting cornerback spot opposite Kristian Fulton. He picked off a pass in the spring game. MISSISSIPPI ELIJAH MOORE, WR, Soph. — Moore managed to get considerable playing time during his freshman season as part of a loaded group of receivers that included A.J. Brown, D.K. Metcalf and DaMarkus Lodge. Now those guys are gone and Moore will be one of the Rebels' main options. MISSISSIPPI STATE ERROLL THOMPSON, LB, Jr. — Thompson was very good last season and delivered 87 tackles, but he was a little overshadowed on a defense that also had potential first-round draft picks Montez Sweat and Jeffery Simmons. Now that Sweat and Simmons have departed, Thompson has a chance to move into the SEC's elite as a leader of the Bulldogs' defense. TEXAS A&M BOBBY BROWN III, DL, Soph. — Brown played well enough in a reserve role as a freshman to be named the Aggies' top defensive newcomer at the team's banquet. The 6-4, 325-pound Brown figures to take on a much a larger role this fall. Brown and returning starter Justin Madubuike should give Texas A&M a dynamic tandem at defensive tackle. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • This week's NFL draft showcases some of the Southeastern Conference's top defensive players from a year ago. It also is a window into the SEC's challenges this year. Last year's Associated Press All-America team featured six defensive linemen or linebackers from the SEC: Alabama's Quinnen Williams, Kentucky's Josh Allen, LSU's Devin White, Mississippi State teammates Montez Sweat and Jeffery Simmons and Florida's Jachai Polite. All of them left for the NFL. Now a conference that prides itself on producing great defensive linemen and linebackers must find candidates to replace all the guys entering the pros. Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt doesn't expect that to be a major problem. 'There won't be a drop-off of defensive football in this league,' said Pruitt, a former Alabama defensive coordinator. 'Guys in this league recruit too well. Lots of teams have depth, so there's always elite pass rushers in this league.' The SEC's definitely losing some elite defenders. ESPN draft analysts Mel Kiper Jr. and Todd McShay did a combined mock draft last week that had Allen, Williams, White and Sweat all getting taken within the first eight overall picks and Simmons going later in the first round. But there's still plenty of talent left. Alabama's Raekwon Davis and Auburn's Derrick Brown earned second-team all-SEC honors from the AP last season. The two linemen enter the summer as legitimate All-America candidates as they attempt to lead their teams. 'That's the whole reason I came back, to teach the younger guys and just help the team (as much) as I can, to the best of my ability,' Davis said. Tennessee outside linebacker Darrell Taylor had eight sacks in 2018 - the most of any returning SEC player - but must get more consistent after collecting seven of those sacks in just two games. Texas A&M returns Justin Madubuike, who had 10 ½ tackles for loss and 5 ½ sacks last year. According to composite rankings of recruiting sites compiled by 247Sports, Georgia signed the nation's top high school prospect in outside linebacker Nolan Smith and the No. 1 junior-college recruit in outside linebacker Jermaine Johnson. Missouri's Jordan Elliott is another player to watch. The SEC also should get breakthrough seasons from plenty of pass rushers who haven't yet made names for themselves. That happens just about every year in the SEC. 'The biggest thing that sticks out in the SEC on the front four is the athleticism,' Mississippi State coach Joe Moorhead said. 'On a consistent basis, there are guys who can stop the run, rush the passer and do some unique things from a blend of size and skill that you don't find many other places.' Here are some other SEC stories to watch. NO NEW HEAD COACHES Nobody in the SEC had to worry about adjusting to a new head coach this spring. After five of the league's 14 members had new coaches in 2018, the league didn't make any head coaching changes this offseason. This shapes up as the first season since 2006 in which the SEC has no first-year coaches. FAMILIAR FAVORITES Alabama and Georgia faced off in last season's SEC championship game after the Crimson Tide edged the Bulldogs in the College Football Playoff championship game a year earlier. Those two teams could meet in December again this season as they'll head into the fall as clear favorites in their respective divisions. EXPERIENCED EAST QBs Every team in the SEC East has a quarterback who has started at least 13 games. Returning starters in the East include South Carolina's Jake Bentley (32 career starts), Georgia's Jake Fromm (28), Florida's Feleipe Franks (21) and Kentucky's Terry Wilson (13). Missouri's top candidate to replace four-year starter Drew Lock is graduate transfer Kelly Bryant, who started 18 games at Clemson. Ball State graduate transfer Riley Neal, who made 32 starts at his former school, is competing with Deuce Wallace for the right to take over for four-year starter Kyle Shurmur at Vanderbilt. QB COMPETITIONS IN WEST With so many experienced quarterbacks in the East, most of the notable quarterback competitions are in the West. Auburn has freshman early enrollee Bo Nix and Joey Gatewood seeking the job. Mississippi State is choosing between Keytaon Thompson and Jalen Mayden. SMU transfer Ben Hicks worked out with Arkansas this spring and will receive a challenge from Texas A&M transfer Nick Starkel this summer. COORDINATOR MOVES SEC teams made changes at nearly 40 percent of the offensive and defensive coordinator positions during the offseason. Ole Miss made two high-profile hires by bringing in former Power Five head coaches Rich Rodriguez as offensive coordinator and Mike MacIntyre as defensive coordinator. Alabama brought back former Washington and Southern California coach Steve Sarkisian as offensive coordinator. Former Georgia offensive coordinator Jim Chaney left for the same position at Tennessee. ___ AP sports writer David Brandt in Starkville, Mississippi, contributed to this report. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • For the second time in less than a year, some residents at a Lake Mary condo complex are without a home due to a fire.  50 residents of Regency Park on Lake Emma Rd. had to be evacuated this morning after the fire started in a building toward the front of the complex, just before 5:00 a.m.   It quickly spread to the roof of the building, and it took over 45 firefighters to eventually knock it down.   There were no injuries reported, although a pet cat and snake had to be rescued.   Four units in the building that caught fire are a total loss, according to firefighters.   There was another fire reported at Regency Park last summer that also caused extensive damage.
  • Hockey players are conditioned to think that winning the Stanley Cup means going through the best teams to be the best team. That doesn't mean they are blind to some of the inequalities of the NHL's current divisional playoff format. An Associated Press/Canadian Press survey of NHLPA representatives from all 31 teams shows that almost half favor changing the format — and most support going back to seeding the Eastern and Western Conferences 1 through 8, the structure that was used from 1994-2013. This is the sixth playoffs where each division's top three teams and a wild card are bracketed together with no reseeding by round. A year ago, Nashville and Winnipeg finished first and second in the league in points and had to meet in the second round. The same thing happened with Washington and Pittsburgh in 2017. 'It's kind of tough the fact that a lot of good teams are going out first or second rounds,' Columbus defenseman David Savard said. 'I think maybe we need to look back at maybe 1 against 8 and play that format.' Savard was among 15 players (48.4 who said the divisional format should be changed. Seven (22.6%) said it should stay the same and the other nine (29%) were noncommittal. The players were surveyed March 7-April 4, before the playoff matchups for this year were fully set. The NHL went to back to a divisional structure similar to what it used from 1982-93 in large part to create or revive rivalries. Toronto and Boston are meeting in the first round for the second consecutive year, while the Capitals and Penguins met in the playoffs three times in a row. There is little doubt those teams dislike each other a lot more now than they did before this playoff format. 'I think it's good for the rivalries,' said New Jersey goaltender Cory Schneider, who supports the current format. 'I think it's good for the teams seeing each other year after year. You can cry what's fair or not fair, the two best teams meeting in the second round, but it's going to be great hockey one way or another. I think that's the best part about the playoffs is that it's a two-month gladiator event where everyone just beats the crap out of each other.' Presidents' Trophy winner Tampa Bay losing in the first round to eighth-seeded Columbus is more of a Lightning problem than a format problem. If the Lightning had gotten past the Blue Jackets, a potential second-round series against the Bruins would have guaranteed to knock out one of the top three teams in the league before the conference finals. Travel is the biggest concern among players when it comes to a playoff format, and it's much more of an issue in the spread-out West. Grouping by divisions is designed to limit those issues, but the wild-card system means a team like Nashville could have to face a team from California, Vancouver, Edmonton or Calgary in the first round if it lines up that way. 'The biggest issue is probably the travel for the Western Conference,' said Predators defenseman Yannick Weber, who did not indicate a preference either way for changing the format. 'If we have to go to California for each round and Eastern teams have a little bit of an easier schedule, I think that's the only downside from it.' The most equitable format is seeding playoff teams 1 through 16, which the NHL tried in 1981 and 1982. The potential for cross-continent travel in each round is the biggest impediment to making that leap. The Southern Professional Hockey League has tested a 'challenge round' format where the top three seeds in each conference get to pick their first-round opponent from seeds 5-8. Florida Panthers defenseman Keith Yandle suggested that for the NHL in a recent interview with Sportsnet in Canada. A pick-your-opponent format would create plenty of bulletin-board material for lower-seeded teams. But in a sport where matchup advantages, injuries and momentum matter more than the results of an 82-game regular season, it could silence complaints that the current format devalues everything from October through March. 'It almost gets to a point that the regular season doesn't really mean anything because you see those divisions, there's such a big difference between them,' Pittsburgh defenseman Kris Letang said. 'If you have to cross over and now you're facing an easier division because you're a wild card, doesn't seem to be fair for me. The whole regular season needs to have a bigger effect on the playoffs.' That's where the argument comes in that the NHL should move to a play-in system like baseball, perhaps where the Nos. 7 and 10 seeds and Nos. 8 and 9 seeds in each conference play once to see who gets in. That would theoretically give more of a boost to the top two teams in the East and West. Colorado's Ian Cole, who played twice in the recent Penguins-Capitals playoff trilogy, supports the division rivalry format because it's doing what it intended: generate interest. 'We were actually talking about it the other day in the locker room: As much as you'd like to see one through eight or one through 16, then you're having Calgary playing Florida, for instance, in the first round,' Cole said. 'Does that move the needle, as opposed to Boston versus Montreal, which certainly does move the needle?' This format is locked in through at least next season. 'I think there was some good thought behind it and yeah, sure, there are going to be some divisions stronger than others,' he said. 'Some teams are going to get left out because of that or get in because of that,' Cole said. 'It's one of those things that this is the current format and we work with it the best we can.' ___ Follow AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno ___ More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • If there was a silver lining for Indiana fans after the Pacers were the first team to be bounced from the 2019 NBA playoffs, it's this: They won't have to watch any more first-round games. For that, they should be thankful. Drama is in very short supply so far in these playoffs. Close games? Few and far between (more on this later). Ratings? They're down double-digit percentages from last year, a massive hit that suggests casual fans aren't watching if LeBron James — out of the playoffs for the first time since 2005 — isn't playing. Tickets? There were seats on the secondary market available for Monday's Milwaukee-Detroit game for as little as $18. That's $18, by the way, to see a Bucks team that was the best team in the NBA during the regular season. The Bucks have the likely MVP in Giannis Antetokounmpo. Pistons fans can probably bank on it being their team's last home game of the season. And apparently, not very many people want to go see that game. Can't blame them. The divide between the haves and the have-nots in the NBA looks like a canyon right now. Unless San Antonio takes two of the next three against Denver, or someone rallies from 3-1 or 3-0 down, the eight higher-seeded teams will all win in the first round for the first time since 2008. On the one hand, that means the second-round matchups could be really good. Boston-Milwaukee. Golden State-Houston. Philadelphia-Toronto. None of them are set yet, but they would all be fascinating if they happen. 'You take control of a series by winning games on the road,' Golden State star Stephen Curry said. 'We've been able to do that.' This past weekend, all the higher-seeded teams took control by winning away from home. Road teams went 4-0 on Saturday. Road teams went 4-0 again on Sunday. That's never happened in NBA history. And with lower seeds not cashing in on home-court advantage, this first round might wind down real fast. Boston swept away Indiana. Houston can sweep Utah on Monday night. Philadelphia, Golden State, Toronto and Portland all have a chance to win in five games. Entering Monday, only one series — Denver vs. San Antonio — was assured of going six games. There might not be a single Game 7 in the first round. The last time that happened was 2011. Fans might want the drama that comes with close games, long series, back-and-forth tussles. Players, of course, don't mind going without. 'Not worried about it or paying attention to anybody else right now,' said Toronto guard Danny Green, whose team is up 3-1 over Orlando. 'We're focused on us and Orlando. We don't skip steps here. We can't think about the next series. We haven't won this series yet. Can't even think about the next series. Orlando's our focus. They deserve all our focus. They're a pretty damn good team. And we're not looking ahead because we haven't beat them yet. The job's not finished.' There have been 30 games played in these playoffs entering Monday. Road teams have gone 16-14, which is absurd. And just two of the 30 games have been decided by three points or less. The average margin of victory so far in these playoffs: 13.7 points per game. So there's been lopsided games, and for the most part, lopsided matchups. By Wednesday, there might be only two first-round series left. By Thursday, it might be one. By Friday, the first round might be over. There's a chance this could be the fastest first round since the NBA made the opening matchups all best-of-sevens in 2003. The earliest the second round can start is Saturday. Here's hoping the intrigue ramps up around then as well. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Authorities found the body of a woman in the sand near the Miami Beach that a boat crashed into over the holiday weekend. Florida Fish and Wildlife spokesman Ronald Washington tells news outlets the body was found Monday morning near Government Cut. After the boat crashed Saturday night, authorities found the bodies of a man and a woman. Another passenger in the boat was seriously injured and taken to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center. Rescuers spend much of Sunday searching for the missing woman. Officials haven't released the names of the victims.