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    Washington Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer is scheduled to pitch Wednesday night against the Philadelphia Phillies, a day after breaking his nose during batting practice. Scherzer was injured Tuesday when he took a ball off his face while attempting a bunt. The team says a CT scan was negative. Manager Dave Martinez says Scherzer was 'very adamant' about pitching despite a bruise around his right eye. The three-time Cy Young Award winner will pitch the second game of the Nationals' day-night doubleheader. He is 5-5 with a 2.81 ERA this season. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • A Virginia National Guard sergeant is accused of stealing World War II-era dog tags from the National Archives and Records Administration in Maryland, at least the second theft case involving the research facility. Robert Rumsby, 29, of Fredericksburg, Virginia, told investigators he took dog tags that belonged to four U.S. airmen killed in plane crashes in 1944, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court last month. Rumsby's wife is the great niece of one of the deceased airmen. Rumsby said he gave that airman's dog tags to his wife's grandmother as a Christmas gift and gave another airman's dog tags to a relative of that serviceman. The complaint charges Rumsby with theft of public records. He has an Aug. 14 trial date at the federal courthouse in Greenbelt, Maryland. Rumsby told the Stars and Stripes newspaper he took the dog tags from the facility in College Park, Maryland, so he could give them to dead soldiers' families. 'I think the intent was there. I think the approach was wrong. Even at the time, I knew the approach was wrong,' he said. 'I had taken four identification tags from those record groups specifically for families I knew would treasure them.' Rumsby declined to be interviewed this week, telling an Associated Press reporter to 'go fry someone else if that is your intention.' 'Feel free to publish a story on how the U.S. Government withheld information from families concerning personal effects being held without their knowledge for 70 plus years,' he wrote in an email. Rumsby isn't the first visitor to be accused of stealing from the National Archives facility in College Park. Antonin DeHays, a French historian and author, was sentenced in April 2018 to one year in prison after pleading guilty to stealing at least 291 dog tags and other relics, most of which he sold on eBay and elsewhere for a total of more than $43,000. 'Some of these dog tags bore evidence of damage, such as dents and charring due to fire sustained during the crashes,' said a court filing in DeHays' case. The College Park facility stores thousands of dog tags that were seized by the German Luftgaukommandos, which prepared reports on Allied aircraft crashes during World War II. In January 2017, National Archives staff were investigating possible thefts of artifacts when they discovered that dog tags belonging to World War II aviator Theodore Ream were missing from a box Rumsby had accessed in October 2016, according to the criminal complaint. Rumsby's wife is the great niece of Ream, whose sister is the grandmother of Rumsby's wife. Investigators recovered Ream's dog tag from a shadow box at the grandmother's home in Chesapeake, Maryland. In 2015, Rumsby also accessed a box that contained dog tags for three airmen who died in a July 21, 1944, plane crash. When investigators questioned him on April 4, Rumsby retrieved the dog tags for two of those airmen from a shelf in his home and said he had given the third dog tag to a relative of that airman, according to the complaint. Rumsby was quoted in an April 2018 article in the New York Times about civilians volunteering to identify the remains of soldiers in U.S. military cemeteries. The article said Rumsby, a former Army lieutenant, had spent years indexing unknown graves from World War II. Rumsby is assigned to the Virginia National Guard's 116th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. National Guard spokesman A. A. 'Cotton' Puryear said Rumsby's unit leaders are aware of the criminal case. 'Once the civilian judicial process is complete, his chain of command will evaluate to see if any military administrative action would be appropriate,' Puryear said in an email. ___ Associated Press investigative researcher Randy Herschaft in New York contributed to this report.
  • Tiffany Haddish says she chose to join a boycott of Georgia after she read the state's new anti-abortion legislation. Haddish announced this week that she had cancelled a show in the state and explained her reasoning Tuesday at the launch of a 'Harry Potter' mobile augmented-reality game. 'The reason that I cancelled the show, is because I read that bill,' she said. 'And I feel like everyone should just take the time to read it.' The new law bans abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can be as early as six weeks, before many women know they are pregnant. It was signed into law on May 7. Haddish had been scheduled to perform June 22 at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta. Major Hollywood studios have said they may reevaluate filming in Georgia. Celebrities like John Legend and Spike Lee have joined calls for a boycott. The 'Girls Trip' star on Tuesday was the host of an event that unveiled the new 'Wizards Unite' video game at Universal Studios' Wizarding World of Harry Potter. 'I love everything about 'Harry Potter' because it teaches unity, it teaches friendship, it teaches loyalty, it teaches to believe in something,' Haddish said.
  • President Donald Trump raised $24.8 million less than 24 hours after kicking off his reelection campaign, a figure that dwarfs what the top Democratic contenders took in over the course of months. The staggering total was announced in a tweet on Wednesday morning by Republican Party Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel. She declared that it was proof that 'enthusiasm across the country for this president is unmatched and unlike anything we've ever seen.' Trump's massive haul is a demonstration of the power of incumbency, underscoring simmering Democratic worries they are not doing enough to prepare for the matchup with Trump. It's also a sign that Trump's fundraising operation is already in high gear at a time when many Democratic donors have yet to engage and their party contends with a sprawling primary that has drawn more than 20 candidates. Many Democratic White House candidates have hyped their fundraising pulls in the 24 hours after launching their campaign. Former Vice President Joe Biden reported a $6.3 million haul in the first 24 hours, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke took in $6.1 million and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders reported $5.9 million. Trump beat all three combined, including the front-runner Biden, whom he bested by nearly fourfold. Still, his campaign has yet to release a breakdown of how he raised the money, leaving it unclear how much was raised from wealthy Republican megadonors, versus grassroots supporters who chipped in a few dollars online. But the cash will add to the existing gulf in resources between Republicans and Democrats. Trump already reported $48.7 million cash on hand at the end of March, spread across three committees tied to his campaign. The Republican National Committee had an additional $34.7 million during the same period. The Democratic National Committee, meanwhile, had just $7.5 million with $6.2 million in debt, records show.
  • A modified version of President Donald Trump's $4 billion-plus request to care for tens of thousands of migrant refuges massing at the southern border swept through a key Senate panel on Wednesday after senior lawmakers removed 'poison pills' that Democrats objected to. The Appropriations Committee approved the bill by a 30-1 vote on its way to a floor vote next week. The Democratic-controlled House has yet to unveil its version of the bill as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has struggled to win support from the chamber's potent Hispanic Caucus. The bipartisan vote likely means that the Senate will take the lead in writing the legislation, which needs to pass into law before the House and Senate leave for vacation next week. The legislation contains $2.9 billion to care for unaccompanied migrant children — more than 50,000 children have been referred to government care since October — and $1.3 billion to care for adult migrants. There's also money to hire new judges to decide asylum claims. The bipartisan session came after weeks of acrimony and just in time to avert a humanitarian disaster as money is about to run out. To win Democratic support, panel chair Richard Shelby, R-Ala., agreed to drop Trump's request for Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention beds and a provision to block any of the money in the legislation from being diverted to building a border wall. 'Let's stay with the humanitarian aid,' Shelby said, describing his pitch to fellow lawmakers. 'Let's keep the poison pills out.' Top panel Democrat Patrick Leahy of Vermont and others described terrible, overcrowded conditions in federal holding facilities. 'Children in our care are being forced to sleep under bridges, and families are being placed in outdoor pens without shelter,' Leahy said. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., cast the sole 'nay' vote, outlining a variety of concerns with the government's handling of the migrant crisis, including abuses by for-profit detention facilities. 'America is better than this,' Merkley said. 'The way we are treating migrant children, the way we are treating migrant families awaiting adjudication.' But both Democrats and Republicans praised the legislation, which contains $30 million to reimburse local governments and nonprofits who assist refugees.
  • President Donald Trump's nominee to be the next U.S. envoy to the United Nations on Wednesday defended her record on climate change, saying it is a 'real risk to our planet' that must be addressed. Kelly Knight Craft told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that she believes human behavior has contributed to climate change and she'll push countries deal with it. However, she also said the United States should not have to bear an 'outsized burden' in mitigating its effects that harm American economic growth. 'If confirmed, I will be an advocate for addressing climate change,' she said. Her comments came in response to questions from Democrats on the panel prompted by previous remarks she made doubting the causes and severity of climate change . Democrats are also concerned about possible conflicts of interest as she holds extensive investments in fossil fuels. 'Climate change needs to be addressed as it poses real risk to our planet,' she said. 'Human behavior has contributed to the changing climate. Let there be no doubt: I take this matter seriously, and if confirmed, I will be an advocate for all countries to do their part in addressing climate change.' The Trump administration has been criticized by environmentalists and scientists for rolling back regulations on greenhouse gas emissions and announcing its withdrawal, effective next year, from the Paris Climate Accord that aimed to limit climate change. Craft is a longtime GOP activist from Kentucky who is currently U.S. ambassador to Canada. She would be first major political donor to occupy the U.N. post. She said that withdrawing from the Paris agreement did not mean the administration was ceding a leadership role on climate change. 'We don't need to be a member to show leadership,' she said, arguing that developing countries like China and India were not being asked to make the same contributions as the United States. Craft has been credited by supporters with playing a major role in her current role in helping to secure a proposed new trade agreement between the U.S., Canada and Mexico but has been criticized for frequent absences from Ottawa. Craft testified that all of her travel had been approved in advance by the State Department and that she and her husband had paid for all personal trips. In addition to climate change, Craft also faced Democratic questions about her relative lack of diplomatic experience, which her Republican supporters said was belied by her two years as serving as the top envoy to a close ally and neighbor. Craft vowed to continue the efforts of Trump's first ambassador to the U.N., Nikki Haley, to push for reform at the world body and to fight against anti-Israel resolutions and actions by the United Nations and its affiliated agencies. During Haley's tenure, the administration withdrew from the U.N. Human Rights Council and the U.N. educational and scientific agency for adopting positions it deemed to be hostile to Israel. Trump nominated Craft to replace Haley after his first choice for the job, former State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert, withdrew from consideration.
  • The top U.S. trade negotiator said he will meet with his Chinese counterpart to discuss a trade dispute between the world's two biggest economies before a summit next week in Japan between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping of China. Appearing before the House Ways and Means Committee Wednesday, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said he planned to speak with the top Chinese negotiator by phone in the next day and a half. Then the two are expected to meet, along with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, in Osaka ahead of the Trump-Xi summit at the Group of 20 meeting June 28-29. Lighthizer did not name his counterpart. But Vice Premier Liu He has led the Chinese delegation in past talks. Eleven rounds of talks have failed to resolve the differences between the world's two biggest economies. The U.S. accuses China of using predatory tactics in an aggressive push to supplant American technological dominance. These, the U.S. says, include stealing trade secrets, forcing foreign firms to hand over technology and unfairly subsidizing Chinese tech firms. Trump has also pointed to the U.S. trade deficit with China — a record $381 billion last year — as a sign that China is pursuing abusive trade practices. 'We have a very unbalanced relationship with China, and we have one that risks literally the jobs of the future for America,' Lighthizer said Wednesday. 'So, it's very important that we get this relationship right.' The United States has slapped 25% tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese imports. The Chinese have counterpunched by targeting $110 billion in U.S. products. Until last month, it appeared that the two countries were edging slowly but steadily toward a deal. But then the U.S. accused China of reneging on commitments it had made in earlier rounds of talks. Negotiations stopped, and the Trump administration rolled out plans to tax another $300 billion in Chinese imports, extending the tariffs to everything China ships to the United States. The threat of an escalation in the dispute has rocked financial markets and clouded prospects for the global economy. In seven days of hearings that began Monday, hundreds of businesses are urging Lighthizer's office to rethink the plan to expand the China tariffs. On Tuesday, Trump tweeted that he'd spoken on the phone with Xi and that the two leaders would meet in Osaka. But it's still unclear when the two countries' negotiating teams will resume detailed talks. 'When actual negotiations begin again, I can't say at this point,' Lighthizer said. 'We're talking. We're going to meet.
  • The Latest on an environmental rule covering coal-fired power plants (all times local): 11:50 a.m. The Trump administration expects new coal-fired power plants to open as a result of a major new regulatory change. Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler says he expects that increase in coal plants as a result of the repeal of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan. Wheeler spoke to reporters after signing the final version of the repeal. The Obama-era plan sought to fight climate change by prodding coal-fired power plants out of the nation's electrical grid. Wheeler says the administration's repeal will lead investors to put money into more coal plants. U.S. coal-plant closings have reached near record numbers in recent years owing to competition from cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. ___ 11:30 a.m. New York's attorney general says the state will sue to block the Trump administration's rollback of an Obama-era rule designed to wean the nation's electrical grid off coal-fired power plants and their climate-damaging pollution. Attorney General Letitia James announced the state's intentions on Twitter shortly after the Environmental Protection Agency replaced the rule with a less ambitious one. She makes reference to the administration's '#DirtyPower rule.' She tweets that it's 'another prime example of this administration's attempt to rollback critical regulations that will have devastating impacts on both the safety & health of our nation.' The Trump administration says the Obama administration overstepped its legal authority in approving the Clean Power Plan. EPA chief Andrew Wheeler says coal is essential to the nation's power grid. ___ 11:05 a.m. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the Trump administration's rollback of a rule targeting coal-fired power plants is 'a stunning giveaway to big polluters.' Pelosi says in a statement that climate change is 'the existential threat of our time' and that the administration is ignoring scientific studies about climate change and yielding to special interests. Pelosi is reacting to Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler's scrapping of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, which sought to reduce the country's reliance on coal and move to renewable energy sources. Wheeler replaced it with a less ambitious rule. The administration argues that Obama's EPA overstepped its legal authority in approving the Clean Power Plant rule. ___ 10:35 a.m. The Trump administration has rolled back a landmark Obama-era effort targeting coal-fired power plants and their climate-damaging pollution. It's replacing the Obama rule with a less ambitious one that gives states more discretion in regulating those power plants. Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler says it's a sign that 'fossil fuels will continue to be an important part of the mix' in the U.S. energy supply. President Donald Trump campaigned partly on a pledge to bring back the U.S. coal industry, which has been hit hard by competition from cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. The rule will go into effect shortly after publication in the Federal Register. Environmental groups pledge court challenges. ___ 12:25 a.m. The Trump administration is close to completing one of its biggest rollbacks of environmental rules. Lawmakers, environmentalists and others are readying for an announcement about a replacement for an Obama-era regulation that sought to limit coal-fired plants in the nation's electrical grid. The Clean Power Plan was one of President Barack Obama's signature efforts to curb climate-changing emissions. Critics of the Obama administration say it overstepped its legal authority in issuing the power plant rule. Those opposing the rollback say it will worsen climate change and increase deaths from coal-plant pollution.
  • The German aid group Sea-Watch is urging European governments to agree to accept several dozen migrants that it rescued in the Mediterranean a week ago. Sea-Watch said Wednesday many of the 43 migrants still on board their boat are suffering from dehydration because of sea sickness, and other issues, the dpa news agency reported. Italian Prime Minister Matteo Salvini on the weekend allowed ashore 10 of those rescued — those suffering from illnesses and families with children. Germany's Interior Ministry says more than 50 German cities and towns have sent the federal government a written declaration that they are willing to take in migrants rescued from the Mediterranean. But it says the prerequisite for that would be 'broad participation of the EU member states and coordination through the European Commission.
  • A cancer patient is the latest woman to accuse a retired University of California, Los Angeles gynecologist of sexually abusing her during treatment. The Los Angeles Times reports the 44-year-old unnamed woman has sued UCLA and Dr. James Heaps, alleging he touched her inappropriately during a medical examination. Heaps pleaded not guilty last week to sexual battery during his treatment of two other patients at a university facility. Heaps didn't comment on the latest lawsuit but has repeatedly denied wrongdoing. His attorney, Tracy Green, called previous allegations meritless. A UCLA Health spokesperson told the Times on Tuesday that the allegations in the newest lawsuit are 'very disturbing.' The newspaper says at least 22 other women have alleged Heaps sexually assaulted them while he practiced at UCLA. ___ Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com/