On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

not-available-day
47°
Clear
H 55° L 36°
  • not-available-day
    47°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 55° L 36°
  • clear-night
    37°
    Morning
    Clear. H 55° L 36°
  • cloudy-day
    59°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 64° L 54°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

News

    Evansville coach Walter McCarty has been fired and that interim coach Bernie Seltzer would continue to lead the team, the university announced Tuesday. McCarty was placed on administrative leave on Dec. 26 so university officials could investigate allegations of sexual misconduct and violations of the school's Title IX policy. In a statement announcing the decision, which is effective immediately, the school said it had received additional reports of off-court misconduct with members of the “campus community” during McCarty's tenure of less than two seasons. It also noted that McCarty had previously participated in a training program about unacceptable behavior. “While the investigation of potential Title IX violations will continue under university policies, UE has decided that, based on the facts uncovered thus far, it is necessary to terminate Mr. McCarty's employment immediately,' the school said. “There is no place at UE for any behavior by any University employee or student that jeopardizes the safety and security of others.” The Purple Aces stunned the college basketball world earlier this season when McCarty, a former star at Kentucky, beat the No. 1-ranked Wildcats in Lexington, Kentucky. McCarty finishes his career at Evansville with a record of 20-25. He also played in the NBA with the New York Knicks, Boston Celtics, Phoenix Suns and Los Angeles Clippers. Following his career, McCarty served as an assistant coach with the Celtics, Pacers and at the University of Louisville before taking the Evansville job.
  • Prosecutors accused U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald on Tuesday of involvement in hacking the phones of Brazilian officials involved in a corruption investigation, though Brazil's high court had blocked investigations of the journalist or his Brazil-based news outlet in relation to the case. A federal judge would have to approve a formal charge based on allegations by prosecutor Wellington Divino Marques de Oliveira that Greenwald helped a group of six people hack into phones of hundreds local authorities. De Oliveira accuses Greenwald of criminal association and illegal interception of communications. He charges the six alleged hackers with criminal organization, money laundering, cybercrimes and illegal interception of communications. Brazil's federal police looked at the same evidence and did not find any wrongdoing by Greenwald. A ruling by Supreme Court Justice Gilmar Mendes later barred investigations of Greenwald and his The Intercept Brasil in relation to the alleged hacking. Prosecutors decided to recommend charges against the journalist anyway. Greenwald's The Intercept Brasil published excerpts from conversations involving current Justice Minister Sérgio Moro, saying they showed the then-judge was improperly coordinating with prosecutors at the time he was a judge overseeing a vast corruption investigation. That probe led to the imprisonment of numerous business executives and politicians on corruption charges, including former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. He was released from jail in November because he has appeals pending. While many Brazilians hail Moro as a hero, others believe he unfairly targeted da Silva and other top leftist figures. Moro is now a key member of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro’s Cabinet. Greenwald's lawyers called the prosecutors' allegations “bizarre” and said the accusations challenge the top court ruling protecting the journalist and freedom of the press in Brazil. “Their objective is to disparage journalistic work,” the lawyers said in a statement. Greenwald posted a video saying the accusation is 'an attack to freedom of the press, to Brazil's Supreme Court (rulings), to the conclusions of the federal police and to Brazilian democracy.” “We will defend a free press. We will not be intimidated by the abuse of the state apparatus or by the Bolsonaro administration,” he said. Prosecutors said in a statement that an unreleased audio links Greenwald to the group of hackers as they broke the law, terming it “auxiliary participation in the crime” and saying he was 'seeking to subvert the idea of protection of a journalistic source into immunity to guide criminals.' Brazil's top court last year said that 'the constitutional secrecy' around journalistic sources prevented the Brazilian state from using 'coercive measures' against Greenwald. Because of that, a judge would have to authorize any attempt by prosecutors to formally investigate the journalist or bring charges. Judge Ricardo Leite will analyse the unusual accusation against Greenwald and the group of six alleged hackers. There is no deadline for a decision. The Brazilian Association of Investigative Journalists said in a statement that “the charges against Greenwald are based on a distorted interpretation of conversations of the journalist with his source, and has as its sole purpose embarassing the professional, which is very serious.” Literary and free expression group PEN America said in a statement that the move against Greenwald raises serious concerns that he may be the target of politically motivated retaliation. “It is impossible to separate these charges against Glenn from his work as an investigative reporter,” said PEN America’s senior director of free expression programs Summer Lopez. “While we don’t know all the contours of this story, we do know two things. First, Glenn’s reporting has deeply embarrassed the Brazilian government. Second, Brazil’s president has repeatedly and consistently attacked the press in general and Glenn in particular.” Greenwald, an attorney-turned-journalist who lives in Brazil, has frequently come under criticism by Bolsonaro. Moro has not acknowledge the veracity of the reports by The Intercept Brasil, saying they come from “criminal invasion” of the phones of several prosecutors. Many others involved in the leaked messages or mentioned in them have confirmed their content. Lawmaker Eduardo Bolsonaro, a son of the president, celebrated the accusation on social media. “Glenn Greenwald always said he loved Brazil and wanted to know the country's depths. Maybe he will even know jail,” the legislator said.
  • Democratic presidential candidates have spent weeks reassuring voters they can unify the party, avoid the divisions that plagued the 2016 primary and defeat President Donald Trump in the fall. Instead, the scars of that battle are being ripped open less than two weeks before the Iowa caucuses. With tensions already escalating between leading Democratic contenders, the party's last presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, reignited a years-old feud with Bernie Sanders on Tuesday by refusing to say whether she would support her former rival should he win the nomination this year — before later insisting that she will do “whatever I can” to support the eventual nominee. Clinton also said in an upcoming documentary that “nobody likes” Sanders, adding in an interview with the Hollywood Reporter that he has permitted a culture of “relentless attacks' on his competitors, 'particularly the women.” Clinton's criticism is the latest — and perhaps, the loudest — flash point in the Democratic Party's high-stakes nomination fight that has exposed divisions based on gender, race, age and ideology. Democratic officials fear that such divisions could ultimately make it harder to beat Trump, pointing to lingering bad blood between Clinton and Sanders four years ago that may have helped him eke out a victory. “My No. 1 goal is to win,' Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez told The Associated Press. “The only way this is possible is if we're united around our eventual nominee, and I have no doubt that every candidate in this race will do that, no matter who she or he is.” “The stakes get higher on an almost daily basis,' he added, “making it all the more imperative we come together.' Clarifying her earlier comments, Clinton added later Tuesday in a tweet that “the number one priority for our country and world is retiring Trump, and, as I always have, I will do whatever I can to support our nominee.” Trump and his Republican allies, sensing an opportunity to weaken his opponent, have poked at the Democratic infighting from afar in recent days. In particular, the president publicly sided with Sanders in a dispute with Elizabeth Warren and blamed Democrats for treating Sanders unfairly because the Senate impeachment trial prevents him — and three other Democrats seeking the presidency — from campaigning in Iowa. Trump's concern, of course, isn't about the party's treatment of Sanders. He hopes that continued discord among Democrats might push some disaffected supporters of the Vermont senator in Trump's direction come November, or at least persuade them to stay home on Election Day. That's in part what happened after the party's long and bitter nomination fight between Sanders and Clinton. “At the end of the day, no one wants history to repeat itself,' said Democratic strategist Sabrina Singh. Yet healing old resentments — and some new ones — that threaten to divide core factions of the Democratic Party may be easier said than done, especially as the 2020 field jockeys for position in the sprint to the Iowa caucuses. Tensions remain high between Sanders and progressive ally Warren just a week after the Massachusetts senator disclosed the contents of a 2018 private conversation with Sanders in which he allegedly said a woman could not defeat Trump. Warren refused to shake Sanders' hand after last week's presidential debate, and microphones captured a fiery confrontation in which Warren accused Sanders of calling her a liar. Warren refused to address the explosive feud as she campaigned in recent days. At the same time, she stepped deeper into the ideological fight between the progressive and moderate wings of the party, raising questions about former Vice President Joe Biden's commitment to Social Security. Biden, who has been at the center of heated attacks related to race, gender and ideology for much of the last year, is trying to finish the run-up to Iowa highlighting unity as a core element in his closing message, according to senior adviser Anita Dunn. Biden has said repeatedly that should he not become his party's nominee, he would endorse the person who is and work to help him or her in whatever way he could. “He believes the risk is too high for Democrats to form a circular firing squad,” Dunn said. Pete Buttigieg, the 38-year-old former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, also embraced an optimistic tone as he courted Iowa voters in recent days, casting himself as best positioned to take down Trump and to unify the nation afterward. “In this most divided moment, there is more unity than you would think,' Buttigieg declared Sunday in Pella, Iowa. 'Not that any two people would agree on everything. But we can agree on where we need to head in this country. We can agree on the problems that need to be solved. We can agree to come together to solve them.” Sanders did not face voters on Tuesday, forced instead to join Warren and the rest of his Senate colleagues on Capitol Hill for the first day of Trump's Senate impeachment trial. Sanders' chief strategist Jeff Weaver said that unity would also serve as a core plank in his message heading into Iowa, although with 13 days to go before voting begins, he warned that it was too soon to declare a definitive closing message. Sanders has not shied away from attacking his Democratic rivals, particularly Biden, on issues like trade, health care and foreign policy. “In terms of the caucus, we’re still a long ways away,” Weaver said. “Things can change even in the final days.” Indeed, Sanders is trudging toward caucus day through conflicts with several Democratic critics. He has long insisted that he does not engage in personal attacks, but Sanders was forced to apologize Monday for an opinion article penned by a key supporter and promoted by his campaign that described Biden as corrupt. “It is absolutely not my view that Joe is corrupt in any way. And I'm sorry that that op-ed appeared,” Sanders told CBS. Democratic strategist Jesse Ferguson, a former Clinton campaign aide, described “vigorous debate over the issues” as a healthy and helpful part of the primary process that can be used to energize the Democratic Party's diverse coalition. “What can do damage,” Ferguson said, “is when you’re making real character attacks rather than policy attacks — things that will linger into the general election and play into Trump’s message.” Ferguson's fears were playing out at a Biden campaign event Tuesday in Ames, Iowa, where 70-year-old Democrat Linda Lettow said she was worried about her party's unity heading into November. Yet she agreed with Clinton's criticism of Sanders, calling the Vermont senator the biggest threat to party cohesion and blaming him for not working hard enough to help Clinton in 2016. 'Why would she like him?' Lettow said of the independent senator. “He's not even an actual Democrat.' ___ Associated Press writers Thomas Beaumont in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and Bill Barrow in Ames, Iowa, contributed to this report. ___ Catch up on the 2020 election campaign with AP experts on our weekly politics podcast, “Ground Game.”
  • A rancorous dispute over rules marked the first full day of President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. Highlights of Tuesday's session and what's ahead as senators conduct just the third impeachment trial of a president: RULES REVERSAL A proposal by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would have imposed a tight two-day schedule for opening arguments by each side. The plan, an apparent bid by McConnell to get the trial moving quickly, also would have forced senators to vote affirmatively to consider evidence compiled by the House during its impeachment proceedings. The proposal drew immediate protests from Democrats, and some Republicans made their concerns known in private during a GOP lunch. The initial plan, they argued, would have helped Democrats cast Republicans as squeezing testimony through in the dead of night. McConnell quickly added an extra day for opening arguments and stipulated that evidence from the House proceedings be included in the record. FROM EUROPE, A PRESIDENTIAL TWEET Trump, attending a global leaders conference in Davos, Switzerland, made his feelings about impeachment clear. “READ THE TRANSCRIPTS!” he tweeted from overseas. The tweet referred to a rough transcript of Trump's phone call in which he asked new Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy for “a favor.” The call sparked a whistleblower's complaint that led to an investigation culminating in a House vote to impeach Trump on a charge of abuse of power for pushing Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden while withholding military aid from Ukraine. The House also voted to impeach Trump on a charge of obstruction of Congress. REJECTED RULES AMENDMENT Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York offered the first amendment to the rules — a proposal to issue a subpoena to the White House for “all documents, communications and other records” relating to the Ukraine matter. In a likely prelude to other Democratic requests, Republicans promptly rejected Schumer's amendment on a 53-47, party-line vote. CHARGES OF COVER-UP Amid the partisan back and forth, House prosecutors and White House lawyers offered initial arguments. Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and lead prosecutor, said the rules package proposed by McConnell was “a process for a rigged trial” and a ”cover-up.” Schiff and other Democrats cite the White House transcript as evidence of Trump's political pressure campaign on Ukraine, although the president repeatedly describes the call as “perfect.” NO CRIME, NO IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE Trump's legal team does not dispute his actions in the July 25 call. But White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, the president's lead lawyer, said the charges against the president don't amount to impeachable offenses and that Trump committed no crime. They also say there's no evidence that aid to Ukraine was tied to a request for an investigation of Biden and his son Hunter, a former board member of a Ukrainian gas company. AVOIDING A SENATE CIRCUS 'Just because the House proceedings were a circus that doesn’t mean the Senate’s trial needs to be,” tweeted Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. He supports holding a vote after hearing arguments on both sides to determine whether additional witnesses or documents should be considered by the Senate. WHAT'S NEXT? More legal skirmishes are expected Wednesday, and White House lawyers may move to call for the case to be dismissed, although it was not clear if they planned to pursue that option. Some Republicans have said they would oppose a dismissal vote. Absent another unexpected delay, opening arguments by both sides are likely to resume.
  • Free agent outfielder Marcell Ozuna and the Atlanta Braves reached an $18 million, one-year deal Tuesday that puts him on the team he helped beat in the playoffs last October. Ozuna hit .429 with two home runs for the St. Louis Cardinals in their five-game win over the Braves in the NL Division Series. The 29-year-old Ozuna hit .241 with 29 home runs and 89 RBIs last season. His low batting average was something on an oddity because he ranked among the major league leaders in the highest percentage of hard-hit balls, according to Statcast. Ozuna is a two-time All-Star who spent his first five seasons with the Marlins, then was traded and played two years in St. Louis. Ozuna's signing leaves infielder-outfielder Nicholas Castellanos as the last remaining major free agent with spring training set to start in about three weeks. The two-time NL East champion Braves have been busy this offseason. On Monday, they signed former AL Cy Young Award winner and longtime Seattle ace Felix Hernández to a minor league with an invite to big league spring training. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The U.S. government's auto safety agency is looking into allegations that all three of Tesla's electric vehicle models can suddenly accelerate on their own. Brian Sparks of Berkeley, California, petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration asking for an investigation. An agency document shows 127 owner complaints to the government that include 110 crashes and 52 injuries. The agency said it will look into allegations that cover about 500,000 Tesla vehicles including Model 3, Model S and Model X vehicles from the 2013 through 2019 model years. The agency's investigations office will evaluate the petition and decide if it should open a formal probe. “I am concerned that these complaints reflect a systemic defect that has not been investigated by NHTSA,” Sparks wrote to James Owens, the acting NHTSA administrator. “I am also concerned that these potential defects represent risk to the safety of Tesla drivers, their passengers, and the public.” Messages were left Friday seeking comment from Tesla. NHTSA is already investigating three December crashes involving Tesla vehicles in which three people were killed. The agency's special crash investigations unit sent teams to Gardena, California, and near Terre Haute, Indiana, to probe two fatal crashes. Another crash in Connecticut also is under investigation. Frank Borris, a former head of safety defect investigations for NHTSA, said the number of complaints cited in the petition is unusual and warrants further investigation. “The sheer number of complaints would certainly catch my eye,” said Borris, who now runs an auto safety consulting business. Tesla owners communicate with other owners on Internet forums and social media, and that could influence the number of complaints, he said. He said the timing of the petition is good, because the agency needs to do a “deeper dive” into Tesla safety. Some of the unintended acceleration complaints, which have yet to be verified by NHTSA, allege that the cars’ electronics malfunctioned. In his 69-page petition, Sparks analyzed the complaints to NHTSA and determined that many of the crashes happened while drivers were parking the Teslas. He compared Tesla's unintended acceleration complaint rate to other vehicles and found Tesla's to be much higher. Many of the reports, Sparks wrote, show that Tesla has refused to share data with vehicle owners after an unintended acceleration incident. “It is clear that Tesla has the data and is aware of the problem,” Sparks wrote. In one complaint, an owner in San Clemente, California, told NHTSA that in November of 2018, a Model X SUV accelerated on its own to full power during a U-Turn on a city street. The driver had a foot on the brake, but the SUV accelerated in a fraction of a second, according to the complaint. The driver alleged that something in Tesla’s system “triggered the sudden spontaneously full acceleration, resulting in this collision.” The SUV hit a parked vehicle, the air bags inflated and the owner had a large abdominal bruise and several small chest bruises, according to the complaint. People who file complaints with NHTSA are not identified in the agency’s database. The driver asked NHTSA to find out whether the Tesla complaints had common elements, including parking or making turns at low speeds. In another crash, in May of 2013, the owner of a Model S sedan in Thousand Oaks, California, complained that while pulling into a parking spot, the car suddenly accelerated on its own. The Model S went over a parking block and a curb and struck a cement light post. The air bags inflated, but no one was hurt, the complaint said. Three weeks after the crash, the owner got a letter from Tesla saying that the accelerator was depressed to 48% just before the crash and 98% at the time of impact. The owner still believes the car accelerated by itself, the complaint stated. Anyone can petition NHTSA to investigate an auto safety problem, and the agency said in a statement Friday that it encourages people to report concerns. In the other Tesla crashes that NHTSA is investigating, authorities are trying to determine whether the cars were operating on Autopilot, a system designed to keep a car in its lane and a safe distance from other vehicles. Autopilot also can change lanes on its own. Separately, the National Transportation Safety Board will hold a hearing Feb. 25 on a fatal crash in Mountain View, California, involving a Tesla that was operating on the company's Autopilot driver assist system. Tesla has said repeatedly that its Autopilot system is designed only to assist drivers, who must still pay attention and be ready to intervene at all times. The company contends that Teslas with Autopilot are safer than vehicles without it, but cautions that the system does not prevent all crashes. NHTSA’s crash program has inspected 23 crashes involving vehicles that the agency believed were operating on some form of partially automated advanced driver assist system. Fourteen of these cases involved Tesla models. The team investigates more than 100 crashes per year. ____ This story has been corrected to fix the spelling of former NHTSA official Frank Borris' last name.
  • Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg launched a new impeachment-focused television ad Tuesday urging the Senate to remove President Donald Trump from office. The ad will run in 27 states, including states represented by vulnerable Republican senators, and be Bloomberg's only ad on television in the next few days. It comes as the Senate begins its impeachment trial against Trump based on charges he abused his power and obstructed Congress. “It's time for the Senate to act and remove Trump from office, and if they won't do their jobs this November, you and I will,” Bloomberg says in the ad, which appears to use footage from a recent campaign stop. Bloomberg has focused his campaign more on Trump than his Democratic primary rivals have. The billionaire businessman and former New York City mayor has promised to continue spending his own money to defeat Trump even if he loses the Democratic nomination. Forbes on Tuesday increased Bloomberg's estimated net worth to $60 billion, up from $50 billion previously and making him the nation's eighth richest person. He's already spent more than $200 million of his own money on his primary campaign, by hiring staff and running television ads in several dozen states. Bloomberg's impeachment-focused ad will run in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Maine, Michigan, North Carolina and Texas, as well as 19 other states. It's designed to reach voters in states with Republican senators who could be defeated in November. Five of those key states also vote on March 3, known as Super Tuesday, where Bloomberg is focusing his attention in the primary contest. The ad also highlights Bloomberg's spending to boost Democratic candidates in key U.S. House races in 2018, when the party took back control of the lower chamber. ___ Catch up on the 2020 election campaign with AP experts on our weekly politics podcast, “Ground Game.”
  • Tiger Woods won't have to wait until he's 50 to enter the World Golf Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame on Tuesday announced changes to the criteria and the selection process, starting with the age limit being reduced from 50 to 45. Players become eligible if they are 45 in the year of the induction ceremony. The next induction is in 2021. Woods turns 45 in January. “We believe these changes will enhance the Hall of Fame in many ways and bring greater attention to the most deserving players at a time in their careers when they are still competing at the highest level,” said Greg McLaughlin, the CEO of the World Golf Foundation. Woods is a shoo-in. The criteria include 15 victories on a player's home tour or two majors. Woods has 82 victories on the PGA Tour, along with five on the European Tour and victories on the Japan Golf Tour, Asian Tour and PGA Tour of Australasia. He also has those 15 majors. Woods figures to have company on the ballot. Also eligible for the 2021 induction class are three-time major champion Padraig Harrington, Jim Furyk, Henrik Stenson and Lee Westwood, and LPGA major champions Liselotte Neumann, Dottie Pepper and Jane Geddes. The Hall of Fame originally had an age limit of 40, which is why Vijay Singh, Ernie Els and Phil Mickelson were inducted years ago. It later was moved to 50. The criteria also allow for anyone three years removed from retirement, always vague for a sport in which no one ever really retires. Also, the Veterans category has been eliminated and Lifetime Achievement is now called “contributor.' Meanwhile, the selection process no longer includes a majority of golf administrators voting. Ten media members and six Hall of Famers will be part of the nominating committee that narrows the list of candidates to four men, four women and two contributors. Eight media members join seven administrators and four Hall of Famers in the final selection process. No more than four can be part of any induction class, and they must get 75% of the vote. TOKYO ROSE Justin Rose returns to Torrey Pines at No. 8 in the world and looking in both directions. He was No. 1 in the world at this time a year ago, and that's where he wants to return. It's the other direction — as far down as No. 15 in the world — that has his attention when it comes to the Olympics. Countries are limited to two players, with as many as four only if they all are among the top 15 in the world. Rose, the leading player from Britain, is confident he'll be in Tokyo to defend his gold medal. But it's not a given. Tommy Fleetwood is at No. 10. Paul Casey is No. 18. Matt Fitzpatrick is at No. 24, and a resurgent Lee Westwood moved up to No. 29 with his victory in Abu Dhabi. “Team GB is a really strong team,” Rose said. “For me, the 15 is the key mark. Obviously, I'm trying to look at the world rankings and try to go up. I had a little slip toward the end of last year, but having been No. 1 in the world, hopefully I'm looking north, not south. But 15 is the key number. ... You'd be unlucky to be in the top 15 and not go to Tokyo.” That's the prospect facing Americans, who currently have nine players among the top 15. But it's early. There are three majors, The Players Championship, two World Golf Championships and two other events that typically dish out big ranking points (Riviera and the Memorial) before the cutoff to qualify. “It would be fantastic if we could field four guys,” Rose said. LPGA SPONSORSHIP Women's golf took some steps toward greater financial opportunities in the last week with personal endorsements. AT&T announced a deal with Maria Fassi of Mexico, who kept her LPGA Tour card after playing only half of last season because she wanted to finish school at Arkansas. She is the first LPGA player signed by AT&T — the only other golfer it has under such a contract is Jordan Spieth, and even that was a big deal because it was the first personal endorsement for AT&T since it ended its contract with Tiger Woods a month after the scandal in his personal life. “Sports need role models like Maria whose incredible skills on the course and character beyond it continually elevate the game of golf for women and for all athletes,” said Lori Lee, the global marketing officer for AT&T. Meanwhile, Cisco Systems announced partnerships with six players, divided evenly among the PGA Tour and LPGA Tour. The San Jose-based company previously announced an endorsement deal with Maverick McNealy. Cisco signed as global brand ambassadors Danielle Kang, Nelly Korda and Jessica Korda. On the PGA Tour, it signed Keith Mitchell, Viktor Hovland and Chez Reavie. Cisco's also has a partnership with the USGA and its championships. AWARDS The PGA of America for 30 years has honored the media through its Lifetime Achievement Award in Journalism. Now it is paying tribute to the pictures. It has selected Leonard Kamsler to receive the inaugural PGA of America Lifetime Achievement Award in Photojournalism. For 60 years, Kamsler produced photos of everyone from Ben Hogan to Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus to Seve Ballesteros. He wroked primarily for Golf Magazine, and contributed to Golf Digest, Golf World and PARGolf. Kamsler worked the Masters for 40 straight years through 2002, and left his mark as the first to set up a remote-controlled camera behind the 12th and 15th holes. He also covered the PGA Championship for nearly 20 years, along with 22 U.S. Opens and the 1963 Ryder Cup. He will be honored May 13 at the PGA Championship at Harding Park. Se Ri Pak of South Korea was selected to receive the Bob Jones Award, the highest honor from the USGA, recognizing individuals who demonstrate the spirit, character and respect that made Jones a legendary figure. Pak inspired an entire nation. She won two majors as a rookie in 1998 and went on to win 39 times and five majors. Since then, South Korea has emerged as the dominant country in women's golf. Pak will be honored during the U.S. Open at Winged Foot. DIVOTS The Augusta National Women's Amateur has invited 72 players from around the world, including seven of the top 10 and 13 of the top 20 from the World Amateur Golf Ranking. The tournament is held Wednesday and Thursday at Champions Retreat, with a practice round and final round at Augusta National on the Friday and Saturday before the Masters. .... Alexandra Armas was appointed CEO of the Ladies European Tour, reporting directly to the LPGA-LET joint board that is chaired by LPGA commissioner Mike Whan. Armas was executive director of the LET from 2008-2012. ... Martin Trainer, the only player to play in all four PGA Tour events this year, has not made a 36-hole cut since the Texas Open a week before the Masters. STAT OF THE WEEK Lee Westwood's first and 25th victory on the European Tour were 24 years apart. FINAL WORD 'Love. That's all I need. And that's what I've got.' — Jack Nicklaus when asked what we wanted for his 80th birthday. ___ More AP golf: https://apnews.com/apf-Golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Additional U.S. troops have been flown out of Iraq for closer evaluation of potential concussion injuries from the Iranian missile attack of Jan. 8, U.S. defense officials said Tuesday. The exact number of troops flown to Germany was not immediately clear, but officials said it was a small number. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because some details were still being sorted out. Last week, 11 U.S. service members were flown from Iraq to U.S. medical facilities in Germany and Kuwait for further evaluation of concussion-like symptoms. Navy Capt. Bill Urban, spokesman for U.S. Central Command, which oversees military operations across the Middle East, confirmed the additional evacuations but did not say how many were included. “As medical treatment and evaluations in theater continue, additional service members have been identified as having potential injuries,” Urban said Tuesday evening. “These service members — out of an abundance of caution — have been transported to Landstuhl, Germany, for further evaluations and necessary treatment on an outpatient basis. Given the nature of injuries already noted, it is possible additional injuries may be identified in the future.” As recently as last Tuesday night, President Donald Trump said he had been told no American had been harmed in the Iranian missile strike. The question of American casualties was especially significant at the time because the missile attack's results were seen as influencing a U.S. decision on whether to retaliate and risk a broader war with Iran. Trump chose not to retaliate, and the tensions with Iran have eased somewhat. In the days following the Iranian attack, medical screening determined that some who took cover during the attack were suffering from concussion-like symptoms. No one was killed in the attack on Ain al-Asad air base in western Iraq. The strike was launched in retaliation for a U.S. drone missile strike that killed Qassem Soleimani, the most powerful military general in Iran, on Jan. 3 at Baghdad International Airport.
  • Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden continued to run up his advantage among black political leaders Tuesday, with four Congressional Black Caucus members announcing their support, including three who previously backed Sens. Kamala Harris or Cory Booker. Georgia Rep. Sanford Bishop was making his first public declaration of support in the Democratic primary. New Jersey Rep. Donald Payne previously backed Booker. Florida Reps. Alcee Hastings and Frederica Wilson previously backed Harris. Payne, Hastings and Wilson are the first Black Caucus members to pick new candidates after Booker and Harris ended their campaigns. The Biden campaign confirmed the endorsements Tuesday, bringing the 77-year-old candidate's roster of Black Caucus supporters to 15. That far outpaces any of his Democratic rivals and underscores his advantage with and dependence on a key Democratic constituency. Harris had peaked at 11 Black Caucus endorsements. “He will be the kind of president who will be able to relate to every demographic in the country, north, south, middle America,” Bishop told The Associated Press in an interview ahead of his public announcement. “He’ll be able to empathize and be taken seriously by every demographic. He’s not so far to the left that he would put off anyone.” Bishop’s colleagues offered similar sentiments via written statements, echoing the candidate’s contention that he’s the Democrat best-positioned to win in November and handle the aftermath. “Our candidate needs to have the strength to beat Donald Trump and the heart to bring this country together, for the sake of our children,” Wilson said. Florida, with 219 pledged delegates at stake March 17, and Georgia, with 105 pledged delegates at stake on March 24, will hold two of the most significant primaries after the March 3 Super Tuesday slate when Democrats will scramble for more than a third of the total 3,979 pledged delegates. New Jersey, meanwhile, is among the last contests. But its 126 pledged delegates on June 2 could prove crucial if Democrats' historically large field results in a drawn-out fight that requires every primary and caucus to determine a nominee. Black voters hold significant sway in choosing the Democratic nominee. Biden has maintained a lead in most national polls of Democratic voters because he’s the clear favorite of African American voters, especially older ones. Consequently, he appears to hold a wide advantage, for now, in South Carolina, the South’s first primary and the first state contest with a large contingent of black voters. Yet in the overwhelmingly white early states of Iowa and New Hampshire, Biden is clustered with other top contenders: Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg.