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    A teenage gunman and the boy he shot just outside a Northern California high school are affiliated with street gangs and were involved in an ongoing dispute, authorities said Wednesday. Santa Rosa police located the 17-year-old shooter's .32 caliber revolver Tuesday night discarded in some bushes about 3½ miles (5.6 kilometers) from Ridgway High School, authorities said. The gun had four rounds of ammunition and two spent cartridges; it was stolen in 2016 in a residential burglary in Santa Rosa, police said. The 16-year-old victim was shot twice and released from a hospital Tuesday night, Capt. John Cregan told The Associated Press. He would not identify the gangs. The gunman and the victim argued Tuesday morning outside of the high school, where both are students, as part of an ongoing dispute, he said. The gunman opened fire, triggering a lockdown for thousands of students and staff in three schools before police tracked him to a gym class nearly two hours later. 'The investigation has shown this was an isolated incident of violence following a verbal altercation,' the statement said. 'There is no evidence to suggest the suspect planned any other acts of violence against additional students.' The suspect has been booked into juvenile lockup on suspicion of attempted murder but has not yet been formally charged, Cregan said. His name was not released because of his age. Cregan said it's not known if the shooter stole the revolver in 2016 but he said it's likely he bought it illegally on the street. The suspect put the gun into his backpack after the shooting and handed the bag to someone in a vehicle who drove away. Investigators are still trying to determine if the driver knew there was a gun in the backpack. The shooter then went into a nearby classroom, following lockdown protocol, and behaved normally as detectives tracked his path through surveillance footage. Ridgway High School, about 55 miles (89 kilometers) north of San Francisco, is an alternative continuation school for Santa Rosa High.
  • The Latest on the World Series (all times local): 4:40 p.m. The World Series opener between the Washington Nationals and Houston Astros narrowly averted setting a record low. Washington's 5-4 victory Tuesday night averaged 12,194,000 fans, according to national numbers from Nielsen. That edges the 12,191,000 who tuned in for San Francisco's 7-1 win over Kansas City in the 2014 opener. The numbers are down 11.4% from last year's Game 1 between the Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers, which averaged 13.76 million viewers. The 2017 opener between Houston and LA averaged 14.7 million. The game Tuesday still won the night for Fox. It was also the most-watched game of the postseason, surpassing the 7.47 million who watched Saturday's Game 6 of the AL Championship Series between Houston and the New York Yankees. According to Major League Baseball, the League Championship Series averaged 5.15 million viewers, which is down slightly from the 5.31 million average last season. ___ 3 p.m. Houston Astros manager AJ Hinch has made a couple of tweaks to his lineup for Game 2 of the World Series against the Washington Nationals. A night after designated hitter Yordan Alvarez had two hits and drew a walk, Hinch moved the rookie up one spot in the lineup to bat sixth on Tuesday night. Alvarez switched places with shortstop Carlos Correa, who had a single and three strikeouts in Game 1. Robinson Chirinos was in the lineup to catch Justin Verlander after Martín Maldonado caught on Monday night. The Nationals went with the same lineup they had in their 5-4 victory in Game 1 as they try to maintain a lead with Stephen Strasburg on the mound before the series shifts to Washington for Game 3 on Friday. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • An attorney for former Sheriff Joe Arpaio urged an appeals court Wednesday to erase the lawman's now-pardoned criminal conviction so it can't be raised against him in any future court cases. The former six-term sheriff from metro Phoenix is appealing a ruling that refused to expunge his conviction for disobeying a 2011 court order barring his traffic patrols that targeted immigrants. The 2017 ruling said pardons don't erase convictions or the facts of cases and that President Donald Trump's pardon of Arpaio only removed his possible punishments. Judge Daniel Collins, one of the three judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals who heard Arpaio's appeal in San Francisco, said the pardon caused Arpaio's case to be dismissed and that the criminal charge can't be refiled. 'What more do you want?' Collins asked. Arpaio attorney Jack Wilenchik said the judges should clarify that the conviction doesn't have any legal consequences on his client. 'This is a matter of judicial housekeeping,' Wilenchik said. Special prosecutor Christopher Caldwell urged the judges to reject Arpaio's arguments, saying the there are no legal consequences from the now-pardoned conviction and that U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton didn't abuse her judicial powers when she refused to erase the conviction. 'We believe Judge Bolton's order properly preserved the power of executive branch to pardon a criminal defendant while avoiding punishment for the conduct,' said Caldwell, who was appointed to the case by the appeals court after the U.S. Justice Department refused to defend Bolton's ruling. Arpaio's lawyers had previously told the appeals court that the lawman was deprived of his opportunity to appeal his conviction because the pardon came before he was sentenced and final judgment was entered, so the conviction must be erased. Caldwell had argued in the past that Arpaio gave up his right to appeal the conviction when he accepted the August 2017 pardon — and that if the former sheriff wanted to challenge the conviction, he should have rejected the clemency and taken his chances in the appeals court. Lawyers for the Justice Department won the conviction against Arpaio, but once the pardon was issued, the agency sided with Arpaio in arguing that the conviction should be expunged because he was pardoned before the conviction became final. Arpaio, who didn't attend Wednesday's hearing, has acknowledged continuing his immigration patrols but insisted his disobedience wasn't intentional. He was accused of prolonging his immigration patrols for 17 months to boost his successful 2012 re-election campaign. In finding Arpaio guilty in July 2017, Bolton cited TV interviews and a news release in which Arpaio made comments about keeping up his patrols, even though he knew they were no longer allowed. Arpaio's defiance of the court order is believed to have contributed to his 2016 election loss. The 87-year-old lawman is now seeking the Republican nomination to run for sheriff next year. His first political comeback attempt ended when he placed third in the 2018 U.S. Senate primary. Even if the pardon hadn't been issued, the misdemeanor conviction wouldn't have prevented him from running for office again. ___ Follow Jacques Billeaud at twitter.com/jacquesbilleaud.
  • Formula One disqualified Renault from the Oct. 13 Japanese Grand Prix on Wednesday, knocking both of the team's cars out of the points for that race because of an illegal driver aid. Daniel Ricciardo was sixth and Nico Hulkenberg 10th in Suzuka. Rival team Racing Point protested over what it believed was an illegal Renault braking system. Formula One officials determined the braking balance system was not a technical violation, but was an improper driver's aid. The decision impacts several teams and drivers across the grid in the season standings. Renault is now just six points ahead of Toro Rosso for fifth in the team standings. Racing Point's Sergio Perez moves ahead of both Renault drivers from 11th into ninth. Ferrari's Charles Leclerc is now 11 points clear of teammate Sebastian Vettel and Red Bull's Max Verstappen in third heading into Sunday's Mexican Grand Prix.
  • Tesla posted a surprising profit of $143 million in its latest quarter, raising hopes the electric car pioneer may finally be turning the corner after posting mostly losses during its first decade as a publicly held company. The positive results announced Wednesday came after Tesla lost $1.1 billion during the first half of the year. That had caused many investors to lose faith in the company even as it boosted sales of its vehicles. Doubts about Tesla forced its stock to fall by 23% so far this year, while the bellwether Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed 20%. But Tesla's shares recovered a big chunk of those losses after its third-quarter numbers came out, soaring by nearly 18% to $299.41 in extended trading. The rally stemmed largely to the widespread expectation on Wall Street that Tesla would register yet another significant loss for the July-September period. Analysts surveyed by FactSet had projected Tesla would lose about $253 million during the third quarter. Instead, Tesla delivered a 'jaw dropper,' said Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives. 'The Street wanted profitability and Tesla delivered in big fashion.' The performance represents a measure of vindication for Tesla's enigmatic co-founder and CEO Elon Musk, who has been facing more questions about whether he is the right person to be steering the company at this critical juncture. Seemingly emboldened, Musk reiterated a pledge to sell at least 360,000 vehicles this year. Tesla will have to sell about 105,000 cars during the final three months of the year, after delivering a record 97,000 vehicles in the third quarter. Boosting sales even more in the current quarter is something most analysts have been doubting Tesla will be able to pull off, but that mindset may change after the company's financial breakthrough in the past quarter. But Tesla will still have to prove it can sustain the momentum, something that it hasn't done so far. For instance, the company recorded back-to-back quarterly profits last year, only to sustain huge losses during the first half of this year even as it sold more cars. The company fared better during the same time last year with a profit of $311 million. That means the net income for this year's quarter was down 54% by comparison. Tesla probably would have lost money again in the past quarter if not for mass layoffs and other cost-cutting measures that Musk has imposed this year as he faced mounting pressure to make money. The company's operating expenses in the past quarter decreased 16% from last year to $930 million. Even so, Tesla will almost certainly post yet another annual loss this year, just as it has done every year since its initial public offering in 2010. Since then, Tesla has amassed more than $5.5 billion in losses. More financial potholes could still be looming on the road ahead as Tesla faces increasing competition, with more automakers rolling out their own electric vehicles to cater to the growing number of consumers looking for alternatives for fuel-burning vehicles. Many of those automakers will be able to take advantage of alluring tax incentives that are now being phased out for Tesla because of its head start in the field. 'We have passed peak Tesla, it has already seen its best days,' asserted David Kudla, chief investment strategist for Mainstay Capital Management, a financial advisory firm that focuses on the auto industry.
  • Michigan State's basketball team is ranked No. 1 in the preseason for the first time and is looking forward to validating the votes. 'Now you have to go out and prove why you're ranked No. 1,' All-America guard Cassius Winston said. The Spartans will find out soon if they're that good because Hall of Fame coach Tom Izzo has put together one of his toughest schedules — even for him. Izzo regularly tests his teams during the nonconference schedule, hoping it prepares them to win Big Ten championships and contend for national titles. If Izzo can cut down the nets after winning a second NCAA championship, he may look back on a grueling gauntlet of games fondly. The top-ranked Spartans open the season against No. 2 Kentucky on Nov. 5 in New York and return to the area the following week to play No. 12 Seton Hall. At the Maui Invitational, Michigan State could match up with No. 3 Kansas. And less a month after the opener, Michigan State plays No. 4 Duke in one of the most highly anticipated games in Breslin Center history. 'With the brutal schedule we play early, especially in the first 26 days, I think it will be important to maintain a perspective regardless of wins and losses and what we're really trying to accomplish,' Izzo said. 'We're trying to accomplish get better every day. We're trying to accomplish get better by the end of the season. And, that's what we're going to keep our eyes on.' STAR WATCH Winston could have entered the NBA draft last summer as an All-America guard and Big Ten player of the year. Winston briefly looked into his options with the league and was told he would likely be a second-round pick. He returned for his senior season in the hopes of capping his career with the school's third national championship. 'You dream of going to the NBA, that's the ultimate goal, and it's hard to turn down,' he said. 'But the NBA is going to be there.' Winston is the only consensus selection on The Associated Press preseason All-America team. To be considered one of the best at the end of the year, Winston relentlessly worked on improving his 6-foot-1, 185-body over the offseason after being told to rest for six weeks. Winston said he reduced his body fat by 6% after lifting weights five days a week. 'He is the straw that stirs the drink and I think deserves all the attention he's been getting because he is a special player,' Izzo said. INJURY REPORT Michigan State will be without senior Joshua Langford, the projected starter at shooting guard, until at least January. He had a setback with a foot injury that led to him playing just 13 games last season and needing surgery after averaging 15 points per game. 'He's handled everything a lot better than I would have handled it,' Izzo said. 'And, now my job is to support him in every way I can.' Senior Kyle Ahrens is out for about a week with an ankle injury after missing last season's run to the Final Four because of an ankle injury. Highly touted freshman guard Rockets Watts was limited in a scrimmage against Gonzaga because of a strained Achilles tendon injury, but he was able to practice this week. COMING AND GOING Michigan State opens the season with Xavier Tillman and Aaron Henry returning as starters along with Winston and four other players coming back with some level of experience from last season. The Spartans may miss the low-post scoring presence of Nick Ward, who skipped his senior year to play professionally. They also will need new players to step in to fill the outside shooting, defensive and leadership roles previously filled by Matt McQuaid and Kenny Goins. FAMILIAR NAME Izzo's son, Steven, is a walk-on freshman after growing up going to games as a fan in the stands. The 5-8, 150-pound guard played for Lansing Catholic High School last season, playing without his father in attendance 16 times. 'I just want to make sure everybody knows nobody's taking a scholarship from anybody or really a spot from anybody,' Izzo said. ___ More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ Follow Larry Lage at https://twitter.com/LarryLage
  • Houston Astros manager AJ Hinch has made a couple of tweaks to his lineup for Game 2 of the World Series against the Washington Nationals. A night after designated hitter Yordan Alvarez had two hits and drew a walk, Hinch moved the rookie up one spot in the lineup to bat sixth on Tuesday night. Alvarez switched places with shortstop Carlos Correa, who had a single and three strikeouts in Game 1. Robinson Chirinos was in the lineup to catch Justin Verlander after Martín Maldonado caught on Monday night. The Nationals went with the same lineup they had in their 5-4 victory in Game 1 as they try to maintain a lead with Stephen Strasburg on the mound before the series shifts to Washington for Game 3 on Friday. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The shutdown of one of the nation's oldest nuclear power plants last year is having a surprising, stinging consequence for a New Jersey bay considered one of the nation's most fragile. The environmental group Save Barnegat Bay held a conference Wednesday where scientists noted the increase of tiny jellyfish near the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant. The stinging sea nettles that had been sucked into the plant and killed by heated water are now thriving and multiplying. The influx has some worrying about swimming conditions in the area, while other say the plant closure should begin to restore conditions to where they were before the plant became operational in 1969. 'This is one of the unintended consequences' of the plant's shutdown, said Paul Bologna, a professor at Montclair State University known for his research on jellyfish. 'There are huge numbers of them out there now, substantially more than we had been seeing in 2018.' Bologna and others presented their findings at a three-day conference on Barnegat Bay organized by the environmental group. 'When I was a kid, we played in the bay all day long, so long that our skin was all pruned up,' said Britta Wenzel, Save Barnegat Bay's executive director. 'My kids had their first swimming experiences in the bay, and in a lot of places, you can't do that anymore.' The nuclear plant, which closed in Sept. 2018, had been altering conditions in the bay for decades, discharging water that was 10 degrees hotter than normal. Joe Bilinski, research scientist with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, said the immediate effect of the plant shutdown is the beginning of a return to conditions in the bay that existed before the plant went online. 'Conditions are going back to what they were 50 years ago,' he said. 'It's starting to restore an equilibrium.' Environmentalists had long sought the closure of the plant, arguing that its heated discharge water harmed the bay. They also cited the large numbers of fish and turtles that got pinned against suction grates at the plant's water intake pipes, and the millions of fish and crab eggs that were killed by traveling through the water as it surged around the radioactive parts of the plant, picking up heat. But that same heat that killed the fish and crab eggs also did an effective job of killing tiny jellyfish polyps, Bologna said. Now, in the absence of heated water, those tiny jellyfish are surviving and thriving. The plant's heated water played a role in its shutdown. New Jersey environmental officials had wanted it to build closed-system cooling towers to eliminate the need to draw water from the creek to cool the plant, but its former owners balked, saying that would cost too much. Instead, they reached an agreement with the state to shut the plant down earlier than they had intended. So far the increased numbers of jellyfish are being found mainly in two locations near the former plant, in the Forked River section of Lacey Township, and in Toms River. But scientists say they expect the sea nettles to expand into parts of the bay and into other waterways. Fish and crab populations could benefit from the shutdown, even as species that were drawn to the warmer waters now leave the area. The plant used an almost unfathomable amount of water each day to cool its reactors: 1.4 billion gallons, Bilinski said. Now, only 5% of that amount circulates through the plant, and the artificial channel connecting the Forked River and the Oyster Creek is almost stagnant, 'like a lagoon,' Bilinski said. That means fish and turtles are no longer being trapped up against intake grates. But is also means that some species of fish that had been drawn to the warmer waters of the bay have now largely disappeared. Several long-term studies are underway measuring changes in and around the bay after the plant's shutdown. ___ Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC
  • Actress Rose McGowan filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday alleging that Harvey Weinstein and two of his former attorneys engaged in racketeering to silence her and derail her career before she accused him of rape. The suit filed in Los Angeles names as defendants Weinstein, attorneys David Boies and Lisa Bloom and their law firms, and Black Cube, an Israeli intelligence firm hired by Weinstein. The lawsuit alleges that the defendants conspired to defraud, smear and marginalize McGowan as she was preparing to name Weinstein during the run-up to the explosion of the #MeToo movement late in 2017. The suit comes on the heels of a pair of recent books that detail Weinstein and his team's efforts to keep his accusers quiet. 'Harvey Weinstein was able to perpetrate and cover up decades of violence and control over women because he had a sophisticated team working on his behalf to systematically silence and discredit his victims,' McGowan said in a statement. 'My life was upended by their actions, and I refuse to be intimidated any longer.' Weinstein's attorney Phyllis Kupferstein said McGowan is 'a publicity seeker looking for money' and her suit is meritless. 'From the moment she sought a $6 million dollar payout in return for not making these baseless allegations, which we rejected at the time, we knew that she was waiting for an opportune time such as this to begin her suit,' Kupferstein said. Emails seeking comment from the other defendants were not immediately returned. McGowan, 46, known for her role in the 'Scream' movie franchise, was one of the earliest and one of the most prominent of dozens of women to accuse Weinstein of sexual misconduct, making her a major figure in the #MeToo movement. McGowan had been tweeting in 2017 that she was preparing to name her rapist in a forthcoming memoir, 'Brave,' which was published the following year. The lawsuit alleges that the defendants used spies posing as women's rights advocates and journalists to obtain a copy of the memoir, illegally recorded her conversations, and smeared her to those in the entertainment industry who were working on projects with her. Hers is one of several lawsuits, along with criminal charges, against Weinstein stemming from the sexual misconduct allegations, including a defamation suit from actress Ashley Judd. But McGowan's lawsuit goes further than most in including the team around Weinstein, alleging that they illegally conspired to intimidate her, other victims, and journalists attempting to tell their stories. 'Weinstein enlisted others — including his co-Defendants in this case — as co-conspirators, all working with a single mission: to protect Weinstein's reputation, suppress negative information about him, and silence and discredit his accusers,' the lawsuit states. The lawsuit heavily cites and repeats stories detailed in the recently released books 'Catch and Kill' by New Yorker writer Ronan Farrow, and 'She Said' by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey. Both books delve in to the work done for Weinstein by Boies and Bloom, two of the most prominent and visible attorneys in the nation, who both faced heated criticism for representing the movie mogul became known. Boies is best known for defending Al Gore during the disputed 2000 presidential election. Bloom, like her mother and fellow attorney Gloria Allred, is primarily known as a women's rights attorney who often represents women in sexual harassment and assault cases. The lawsuit alleges that Bloom approached McGowan and Farrow as an ally in an attempt to get them to back off Weinstein, without revealing that she was working for him to revive his reputation. Bloom's attorney, Eric M. George, said in a statement that it 'is inexcusable that Ms. McGowan chose to include my client in her lawsuit. Facts matter. There is simply no credible factual or legal basis for her claims against my client.' An email to Boies seeking comment was not immediately returned. The suit seeks both compensatory and punitive damages to be determined at trial, and an injunction forbidding further misconduct toward McGowan. 'McGowan has suffered tremendously from Defendants' conspiracy and lies,' the suit states.' Her book sales suffered; her expenses mounted; her job opportunities vanished; and her emotional health cratered. She has experienced trauma and depression from defendants' actions, and the deep betrayal will have life-long effects.' The Associated Press generally does not name people who say they are victims of sexual assault, unless they speak publicly as McGowan has done. Weinstein, 67, is scheduled for trial in January on charges alleging that he raped an unidentified woman in his Manhattan hotel room in 2013 and performed a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006. The former movie mogul has denied all allegations of non-consensual sex. ___ Follow AP Entertainment Writer Andrew Dalton on Twitter: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton .
  • Microsoft on Wednesday reported its latest solid quarterly report card to Wall Street, buoyed by another round of business customers signing up for its cloud computing services. The company reported fiscal first-quarter profit of $10.7 billion, up 21% from the same period last year. The net income of $1.38 per share beat Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 13 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.25 per share. The software maker posted revenue of $33.1 billion in the July-September period, up 14% from last year and also beating forecasts. Ten analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $32.2 billion. Microsoft shares have risen 35% since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has risen 20%. In the final minutes of trading on Wednesday, shares hit $137.11, an increase of 27% in the last 12 months. It's been dueling with Apple this season as the most valuable company in the S&P 500. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has been rewarded for his efforts in steadily lifting the company's earnings since taking over in 2014. His compensation was $42.9 million in the fiscal year that ended in June, a 66% raise over the previous year, according to a statement filed last week ahead of the company's annual shareholder meeting in December. That included a $1 million base salary increase, which the board said it awarded because of 'his significant contributions to Microsoft's success during his tenure as CEO' and a desire to encourage his 'continued strong leadership.' The strongest sales growth has come from adding new corporate and government clients to Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform. Azure's quarterly revenue grew 59 percent from the same time last year, much of that powered by contracts worth at least $10 million each, the company said. A less profitable part of Microsoft's business has been its consumer products, such as Xbox, which saw no revenue growth in the quarter, and Surface laptops, which declined 4%. The Surface team, though a small part of Microsoft's business, launched a new line of devices this fall and expects demand to pick up during the holiday season. _____ Parts of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research.