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    An Iranian government spokesman says the oil aboard an Iranian tanker pursued by the U.S. has been sold to an unnamed buyer. The Adrian Darya, previously known as the Grace 1, carries 2.1 million barrels of crude, worth some $130 million. Ali Rabiei made the announcement at a news conference on Monday in Tehran. He says the buyer of the oil will decide the ship's ultimate destination. The tanker was held for weeks off Gibraltar after being seized by authorities there on suspicion of violating EU sanctions on Syria. The U.S. has a warrant in federal court to seize the ship and has been warning nations not to accept it. The ship had put its destination as Turkey, but later removed it. It's still in the Mediterranean Sea heading east.
  • An Italian assisted-breeding company says it has fertilized eggs removed from the last two female northern white rhinos with sperm from the now-dead last male, but it will be about 10 days before it's known whether the eggs have become embryos. Cesare Galli, a founder of Avantea and an expert in animal cloning, said, 'We expect some of them will develop into an embryo.' Avantea said that only seven of 10 eggs extracted last week from the females in Kenya could be used in the fertilization attempts Sunday using frozen sperm that had been taken from the male, which died in March 2018. Wildlife experts and veterinarians are hoping that the species can reproduce via a surrogate mother rhino.
  • German business confidence has fallen for a fifth consecutive month and hit a nearly seven-year low, according to a closely watched survey. The Ifo institute said Monday that its monthly confidence index declined to 94.3 points in August from 95.8 in July. Managers' views of the current situation and the outlook for the next six months both worsened. It was the lowest reading for the index since November 2012 and the Ifo insitutute's head, Clemens Fuest, said 'there are ever more indications of a recession in Germany.' The survey is based on responses from some 9,000 firms. The German economy contracted by 0.1% in the April-June period and the country's central bank, the Bundesbank, said last week it 'could decline slightly' again in the summer. Germany has Europe's biggest economy.
  • President Donald Trump, under pressure to scale back a U.S.-China trade war partly blamed for a global economic slowdown, said Monday that the two sides will begin serious negotiations soon. Trump said his trade negotiators had received two 'very good calls' from China. He did not say when the calls were made and he declined to say whether he is in direct contact with President Xi Jinping. Trump said the conversations were a sign that China is serious about making a deal following the latest tit-for-tat tariffs between them. 'I think we're going to have a deal, because now we're dealing on proper terms. They understand and we understand,' Trump said as he met with Egypt's president on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit in France. 'This is the first time I've seen them where they really want to make a deal. And I think that's a very positive step,' Trump said. The president said he'll say more about China later Monday. There was no immediate comment from the Chinese. Trump and Xi agreed in June to resume negotiations. But talks in Shanghai in July ended with no indication of progress. Negotiators talked by phone this month and are due to meet again in Washington next month. Trump last week hiked tariffs on China after China taxed some U.S. imports in retaliation for a previous round of imports levied by Trump. Trump also 'ordered' U.S. corporations to find alternatives to doing business in China. On Sunday, Trump seemed to express regret over the escalating trade war, which some analysts blame for signs of weakness in the U.S. and global economy. But the White House later said Trump's only regret was that he didn't impose even higher tariffs on China. ___ Follow Zeke Miller and Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/zekejmiller and http:www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • China allowed its yuan to sink Monday and U.S. President Donald Trump said the two sides will talk 'very seriously' about a war over trade and technology following tit-for-tat tariff hikes and Trump's threat to order American companies to stop doing business with China. The escalations prompted warnings that the chances of a settlement of the fight that threatens to tip the global economy into recession were disappearing. But at a conference in France, Trump said serious negotiations would begin. 'We are going to start talking very seriously,' Trump said at the meeting of the Group of Seven major economies in Biarritz. He said the Chinese 'mean business.' The yuan declined to 7.1468 to the dollar, a relatively modest change from Friday's low point of 7.0927 but its weakest rate since January 2008. The yuan has lost 6.5% from this year's high on Feb. 28. Chinese leaders have promised to avoid 'competitive devaluation' to hold down export prices in the face of Trump's tariff hikes. But regulators are trying to make the state-set exchange rate more market oriented. That allows investor jitters about the tariff war to push the yuan lower. Trump announced more tariff increases Friday on Chinese goods and said he was ordering American companies to stop dealing with China. He said later he was threatening to use emergency powers under a 1977 law that targets rogue regimes, terrorists and drug traffickers. That came after Beijing announced tariff hikes on $75 billion of American imports in retaliation for earlier U.S. increases. 'This tit-for-tat escalation shows how unlikely a trade deal and de-escalation have become,' Louis Kuijs of Oxford Economics said in a report. Chinese have hardened their position, especially after Trump imposed curbs in May on technology sales to telecom equipment giant Huawei, China's first global tech brand. 'It does not appear likely they will yield in the face of more economic pressure,' UBS economists Tao Wang, Ning Zhang and Jennifer Zhong said in a report. A weaker yuan would help Chinese exporters cope with U.S. hikes tariffs. But it also would hurt China by making it costlier for real estate developers and others to repay billions of dollars in foreign debt. Trump said Friday he would raise planned tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese goods from 10% to 15%. The U.S. Trade Representative said tariffs already imposed on another $250 billion in Chinese imports would rise from 25% to 30% on Oct. 1 following a public comment period. That was in response to Beijing's announcement of tariff increases on $75 billion of American imports. The government said it also would go ahead with penalties on imports of U.S.-made autos and auto parts that were announced last year but suspended while the two sides negotiated. The Chinese government said those increases would take effect in two batches on Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. That matches the timeline for Trump's plan to extend tariff hikes to $300 billion of Chinese imports. The latest U.S. tariff hikes are 'based on irrational arrogance and enthusiasm,' the Communist Party newspaper People's Daily said Sunday. Chinese government spokespeople have appealed to Washington to reach a compromise to end the dispute. Trump has warned that Americans might need to endure economic pain to get long-term results. Negotiators met last month in Shanghai and are due to meet next month in Washington. But they have given no sign of progress. The two sides are deadlocked over how to enforce any deal. China insists Trump's punitive tariffs must be lifted as soon as a deal takes effect. Washington says at least some must stay to make sure Beijing keeps any promises it makes. Chinese exporters have been battered by a plunge in sales to the United States, their biggest and richest foreign market. But Communist leaders are resisting pressure to roll back plans for government-led creation of global competitors in robotics and other technologies. Europe and Japan echo U.S. complaints that Beijing's industrial plans violate its market-opening commitments and are based on stealing or pressuring companies to hand over technology. Some American officials worry they might erode U.S. industrial leadership. The weakness of the yuan, also known as the renminbi, or 'people's money,' is among U.S. grievances against Beijing. American officials complain a weak yuan gives Chinese exporters an unfair price edge in foreign markets and helps swell the massive U.S. trade deficit with China. China's central bank sets the exchange rate each morning and allows the yuan to fluctuate by 2% against the dollar during the day. The central bank can buy or sell currency — or order commercial banks to do so — to dampen price movements. The People's Bank of China allowed the yuan to fall past the politically sensitive level of seven to the dollar early this month. Previously, economists had expected the central bank to put a floor under the currency at that level to avoid spooking financial markets. ___ Miller and Superville reported from Biarritz.
  • G-7 leaders are wrapping up a summit dominated by tensions over U.S. trade policies and a surprise visit by Iran's top diplomat. U.S. President Donald Trump and summit host French President Emmanuel Macron will finish off the three-day summit with a joint news conference Monday. But first the leaders of the Group of Seven rich democracies — the U.S., France, Britain, Germany, Japan, Canada and Italy — are holding a string of meetings on climate change, how digitalization is transforming the world and other issues. The troubled world economy is overshadowing the meetings in the French Atlantic resort of Biarritz. Macron also took a big gamble by inviting the Iranian foreign minister to Biarritz, hoping to secure a breakthrough in global tensions over Iran's nuclear program.
  • Lawmakers on each side of Hong Kong's political divide said Monday the other side bears responsibility after violence during anti-government protests over the weekend. Pro-government members of the Legislative Council condemned the acts of protesters who blocked streets, threw gasoline bombs and assaulted police officers. 'You can say a lot of different opinions to the government,' said Starry Lee, chairwoman of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong. 'But violence is different. If we can accept violence, our city will be ruined.' Pro-democracy legislators countered that the government and the police need to take responsibility, the former for introducing the extradition legislation that sparked the protests and the latter for what they say is selective enforcement of the law targeting government opponents. Kwok Ka-ki, a member of the Civic Party, blamed Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam. He called her creation of a platform for dialogue a delaying tactic rather than an attempt to resolve the conflict. 'She is the one who should shoulder all the responsibility, and now she is trying to get away from all the responsibility and shifting the focus to the so- called platform.' A hardline contingent took over streets on Saturday and Sunday following peaceful pro-democracy marches. They argue that peaceful protest is not enough to get the government to respond. Police used tear gas to clear the streets and arrested more than 50 people. The movement has five demands including democratic elections and an independent inquiry into what it alleges is police violence in breaking up demonstrations.
  • The year's last Grand Slam tennis tournament gets started with quite a matchup: Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova are scheduled to face each other at the U.S. Open for the first time. The two stars meet in Arthur Ashe Stadium on Monday night. Williams has won 23 Grand Slam singles titles, Sharapova five. Both own a career Grand Slam. Both have been ranked No. 1. As defending champion and top seed Naomi Osaka put it: 'Of course I'm going to watch it. I know you all are going to watch it. I think everyone in New York is going to watch it.' And not just in New York. Other past U.S. Open champions in action on Day 1 include defending champion Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Williams' older sister, Venus. ___ More AP Tennis: https://www.apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Thousands turned out to a benefit hosted by comedian Dave Chappelle that honored victims of a mass shooting in Ohio. The star-studded 'Gem City Shine' took place Sunday in Dayton's Oregon District, the historic neighborhood that was marred by a 32-second rampage that killed nine people and left dozens injured Aug. 4. Stevie Wonder headlined the event, which also featured Chance the Rapper and Talib Kweli, among other musicians, news outlets reported. The event was designed to raise both spirits as well as money for the victims and survivors of the shooting. 'Don't forget what this place is about! Mankind learned how to fly in this city,' Chappelle told the crowd. 'Don't forget what this place is about. When the rest of the country was all slavery, everybody was free in Ohio.' Chappelle, who lives in nearby Yellow Springs, was treated to a rendition of 'Happy Birthday' by attendees, instigated by comedian Jon Stewart. Earlier Sunday, Kanye West hosted a Sunday Service in a Dayton park. The service for victims featured choir singers and was also attended by Chappelle. Sunday evening's benefit contributed to helping the community heal, business owners said. 'It's reclaiming Dayton. We don't want anybody to be scared,' Abby Beach told the Dayton Daily News. 'We want everyone to know it's an exciting and fun-loving community.' Mayor Nan Whaley says no taxpayer money was used for the benefit. The mayor and the chamber of commerce raised funds for security and Chappelle donated the stage and secured talent, she said. 'And the least we can do, Dave, is we have declared it Dave Chappelle day in Dayton, Ohio,' Whaley said on stage Sunday night.
  • Israeli warplanes attacked a Palestinian base in eastern Lebanon near the border with Syria early on Monday amid rising tensions in the Middle East, the Lebanese state-run National News Agency reported. The strike comes a day after an alleged Israeli drone crashed in a Hezbollah stronghold in southern Beirut while another exploded and crashed nearby. The agency's report said there were three strikes after midnight on Sunday, minutes apart, that struck a base for a Syrian-backed group known as the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - General Command, an ally of the Lebanese Hezbollah militant group. There was no immediate comment from Israel on the strike, which the agency said hit near the village of Qusaya in the eastern Bekaa Valley. Airstrikes by Israel against Palestinian factions in Lebanon, such as this one, have been rare in the past years. Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah said on Sunday that his group will confront and shoot down any Israeli drones that enter Lebanese airspace from now on, raising the potential for conflict amid heightened regional tensions. Nasrallah also vowed to retaliate to an Israeli airstrike inside Syria that took place late Saturday, which he said killed two Hezbollah members. He said allowing Israel to keep flying drones over Lebanon would lead to a similar situation as in Iraq, where a series of attacks there targeting military bases and weapons depot belonging to Iranian-backed Shiite militias have left the country on edge. U.S. officials say at least one of the airstrikes on the militia in Iraq was carried out by Israel. In Saturday's strikes near the Syrian capital, Damascus, Israel publicly stated it was thwarting an imminent drone strike against Israel by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard. The Lebanese news agency also reported that Israeli drones flew over parts of southern Lebanon on Monday. Hezbollah and Israel fought a monthlong war in 2006. The volatile border between the two countries, which remain technically in a state of war, has been mostly calm since that conflict.