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    Japan's economy grew at an annual rate of 1.8% in July-September, according to revised government data, better than the modest annual pace of 0.2% it gave as an earlier estimate. The world's third largest economy has marked the fourth straight quarter of expansion, supported by consumer purchases ahead of a tax hike that kicked in recently. The better results from the Cabinet Office, released Monday, reflect higher capital investment. Private consumption was also a tad higher than the initial numbers, and exports did not fall as drastically as first expected.
  • Ted Simmons can thank WAR, on-base percentage and other modern measures of baseball players for helping him reach the Hall of Fame 31 years after he retired. The eight-time All-Star catcher was elected to the Hall by a veterans committee after falling one vote short two years ago. Simmons received 13 of 16 votes when the modern era committee gathered Sunday ahead of the winter meetings. Also elected was Marvin Miller, the union leader who revolutionized baseball by empowering players to negotiate multimillion-dollar contracts and to play for teams of their own choosing. “This is a great, great day in my life,” Simmons said during a conference call. “It's obviously a very special day for me and Marvin's family and I'm just very, very pleased to be a part of it.' Primarily a catcher in a 21-year big league career, the switch-hitter batted .285 with 248 homers and 1,389 RBIs for St. Louis (1968-80), Milwaukee (1981-85) and Atlanta (1986-88). He will be inducted into Cooperstown during ceremonies on July 26 along with any players chosen next month by the Baseball Writers' Association of America from a ballot headed by former New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter. Simmons made just one appearance on the BBWAA ballot, receiving 17 of 456 votes (3.7%) in 1994, falling shy of the 5% threshold to remain on the ballot. Simmons was on 11 of 16 ballots when the modern era committee met in 2017 and elected Jack Morris with 14 votes and Alan Trammell with 13. He has benefited from modern metrics such as a Baseball Reference WAR of 50.3. Eight other players who were primarily catchers topped 50, and they are all in the Hall: Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, Gary Carter, Bill Dickey, Carlton Fisk, Gabby Hartnett, Mike Piazza and Iván Rodríguez. Simmons said he thought his one-and-done on the BBWAA ballot would forever keep him out of Cooperstown. But then analytics came along. “If it weren't for the analytics people, my career as a potential Hall of Famer probably would have been shut down and forgotten about a long time ago,” he said. “When people started talking about on-base percentage and WAR, and explained how WAR comprised, then it became a real look into a real study and thena real comparison started to develop. “”I played in an era with Bench and (Manny) Sanguillén and Fisk, Carter, (Bob) Boone, (Steve) Yeager, all those people through that period as catchers. It's difficult to match up with people like Bench, who won World Series year in, year out, Fisk in Boston, who had great, great years. 'As analytics departments became so in depth, people started telling me about WAR, what was involved with that. People started looking at me and it revitalized my whole candidacy for the Hall of Fame.' Nicknamed Simba for his shoulder-length hair, Simmons was an outspoken opponent of President Richard Nixon and the Vietnam War. In the days before free agency, he played much of the 1972 season without a contract because of a pay dispute, finally agreeing to a two-year deal in late July. Simmons hit .300 or higher seven times and finished with 2,472 hits. Among players who were primarily catchers, his RBIs are second to Berra's 1,430 and his hits are second to Rodríguez's 2,844. He had a career .348 on-base percentage and struck out only 694 times in 8,680 at-bats. Following his retirement as a player, Simmons became the Cardinals' director of player development. He was hired as Pittsburgh's general manager in January 1992 and the Pirates came within one strike out reaching the World Series before losing Game 7 of the NL Championship Series to Atlanta. He presided over a teardown that included the departures of Barry Bonds and Doug Drabek, then quit in June 1993 following an angioplasty procedure to unclog a blocked artery to his heart.
  • A volcano erupted Monday on a small New Zealand island frequented by tourists, and a number of people were missing and injured after the eruption. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said about 100 tourists were on or near White Island when it erupted in the afternoon. “Some of those, at this stage, are unaccounted for,” she said. ''A number of people are reportedly injured and are being transported to shore.' She said the incident appeared to be “very significant.” “All our thoughts are with those affected,” she said. Ardern said there were no confirmed fatalities. St John medical responders said in a statement they believed there were 20 people on the island who were injured and in need of medical treatment. It said it had dispatched seven helicopters to the island with paramedics aboard. The GeoNet agency said a moderate volcanic eruption had occurred and raised its alert level to four, on a scale where five represents a major eruption. White Island sits about 50 kilometers (30 miles) offshore from mainland New Zealand. There will be questions asked as to why tourists were still able to visit the island after scientists recently noted an uptick in volcanic activity. White Island is northeast of the town of Tauranga on North Island, one of New Zealand's two main islands. Police were asking people to avoid areas on the North Island that were close to the eruption, including the Whakatane Heads and Muriwai Drive areas. GeoNet says it is New Zealand’s most active cone volcano and about 70 percent of the volcano is under the sea. Twelve people were killed on the island in 1914 when it was being mined for sulphur. Part of a crater wall collapsed and a landslide destroyed the miners' village and the mine itself. The remains of buildings from another mining enterprise in the 1920s are now a tourist attraction, according to GeoNet. The island became a private scenic reserve in 1953, and daily tours allow more than 10,000 people to visit the volcano every year. The island is also known by the indigenous Maori name Whakaari.
  • Twelve of the 26 first-year coaches in the Football Bowl Subdivision are taking their teams to bowls. Ohio State’s Ryan Day is among six first-year coaches at bowl-bound Power Five schools. His unbeaten Buckeyes are the No. 2 seed in the College Football Playoff and will play Clemson in the Fiesta Bowl. The Military Bowl will pit first-year coaches in Temple’s Rod Carey and North Carolina’s Mack Brown. Brown took off five years from coaching after leaving Texas in 2013. He’s in his second go-round at Carolina, where he coached from 1988-97. Chris Klieman, who jumped from FCS powerhouse North Dakota State to Kansas State, is heading to the Liberty Bowl to face Navy. Louisville’s Scott Satterfield, who won bowls his last four years at Appalachian State, leads Louisville into the Music City Bowl against Mississippi State. Manny Diaz will take Miami to the Independence Bowl to play Louisiana Tech. Other first-year coaches heading to bowls are Central Michigan’s Jim McElwain, Utah State’s Gary Andersen, Liberty’s Hugh Freeze, Charlotte’s Will Healy, Western Kentucky’s Tyson Helton and Appalachian State’s Eli Drinkwitz. SORRY, ROCKETS Toledo is not headed to a bowl despite going 6-6 this season. With 79 teams bowl eligible and 78 slots available, there was going to be a team left out. The Rockets lost their final three games of the regular season and will have their streak of nine straight winning seasons snapped. The last time Toledo missed a bowl was when the Rockets went 7-5 in 2013 and still stayed home. The Mid-American Conference did put seven other teams in bowls this season, matching the league’s best mark. The MAC also had seven bowl invitations in 2012 and 2015. NO ROOM AT THE INN The College Football Playoff selection committee ranked more Group of Five schools than ever before – but the major bowls only had room for one of them. Five schools from outside the Power Five showed up in the final playoff rankings. That’s the most in a final poll since the system began six years ago. But a spot in the New Year’s Six was assured to only one of them and it went to Memphis (12-1, No. 17 CFP), which will play Penn State in the Cotton Bowl after beating Cincinnati in the American Athletic Conference title game. For the others, they’ll have to be content with their lower-level bowl berths. Mountain West winner Boise State (12-1, No. 19) will face Washington and former coach Chris Petersen in the Las Vegas Bowl. Sun Belt champion Appalachian State (12-1, No. 20) drew UAB in the New Orleans Bowl. Cincinnati (10-3, No. 21) plays Boston College in the Birmingham Bowl. And Navy (9-2, No. 23) takes on Kansas State in the Liberty Bowl. In each of the past four seasons, only three Group of Five schools appeared in the committee’s final rankings. LIBERTY, CHARLOTTE FIRST-TIMERS Liberty and Charlotte will be making their first bowl appearances. Liberty completed its two-year Football Bowl Subdivision reclassification process over the summer and qualified for a bowl in its first year of eligibility under first-year coach Hugh Freeze. The Flames (7-5) will play Georgia Southern (7-5) in the Cure Bowl on Dec. 21. Freeze took over the Liberty job last December after being out of college football for two seasons. He resigned from Mississippi in July 2017 for unbecoming personal conduct and NCAA rules violations. Charlotte (7-5) went on a school-record, five-game win streak to end the regular season and will play Buffalo (7-5) in the Bahamas Bowl on Dec. 20. The 49ers also have a first-year coach in Will Healy. Healy was hired at Charlotte after he turned around Austin Peay in the Football Championship Subdivision. THOSE TRANSFER QBS Three of the four starting quarterbacks in the College Football Playoff are transfers. Former Alabama quarterback Jalen Hurts is back in the playoff for the fourth straight year, this time with Oklahoma, after going three times with the Crimson Tide. Hurts follows Heisman winners Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray as quarterback transfers to find success in coach Lincoln Riley's offense. LSU, the Sooners’ opponent in the Peach Bowl, is led by Heisman Trophy front-runner Joe Burrow. He started his career at Ohio State before transferring to LSU in 2018. Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields was at Georgia last season. The Buckeyes play in the Fiesta Bowl against Clemson, whose quarterback, Trevor Lawrence, led the Tigers to a national championship as a freshman last season. PONY UP SMU is getting a bowl trip to Florida after its first 10-win season in 35 years in what will be a true road game. The Mustangs are playing the Boca Raton Bowl on Dec. 21 against Conference USA champion Florida Atlantic in the Owls’ home stadium. “I don’t think any of us will care too much about that. That’s certainly not going to affect the way we prepare,” coach Sonny Dykes said. “Sometimes that’s the way things go when it comes to bowl games. It’s a little bit unusual, but it’s not going to have an impact on us.” Despite the best season for the Mustangs (10-2) since the program resumed play following the NCAA death penalty when the school didn’t field a team in 1987 or 1988, there had been some projections that they would play in the Frisco Bowl — just more than 25 miles from campus — for the second time in three years. SMU instead gets to go to the Sunshine State to play against another 10-win team. “We really wanted to make sure that the players felt like we were in a game that would be exciting for them, and be deemed a reward for a great season,” athletic director Rick Hart said. “Candidly, this is where they wanted to go. It worked out great in that way, because bowl games should be all about the student-athletes and their experience.” ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and twitter.com/ap_top25
  • Renee Zellweger, Brad Pitt and Eddie Murphy are locks. But whether “Cats' has it in the bag, too, we won't know until the 77th annual Golden Globes are announced Monday morning. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association will unveil their nominations in Los Angeles beginning at 8:04 a.m. EST. They will be live-streamed on the Golden Globes' Facebook page and their website, with the second wave of nominees carried live on NBC's “Today” show at 8:15 a.m. Dakota Fanning, Susan Kelechi Watson and Tim Allen will announce the nominations from the Beverly Hilton hotel. The Globes separate their top categories between drama and comedy/musical, giving some movies well outside the awards conversation an opportunity. While movies like Martin Scorsese's “The Irishman,' Quentin Tarantino's “Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood' and Noah Baumbach's “Marriage Story' are widely expected to come away with numerous nods, few would be surprised if the press association — a group known for its sometimes quirky picks, its penchant for A-listers and its fondness for musicals — also included the upcoming, much-memed big-screen adaptation of “Cats.” The HFPA, a group with 87 voting members, was shown an unfinished cut of Tom Hooper's film. More likely are nominations for the likes of Joaquin Phoenix ('Joker'), Jennifer Lopez ('Hustlers'), Murphy ('Dolemite Is My Name'), Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio ('Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood,' slated as a comedy for the Globes), Zellweger ('Judy'), Awkwafina ('The Farewell') and the leads of “Marriage Story”: Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson. In the early going, Netflix has dominated awards season. “The Irishman” last week won best film from the New York Film Critics Circle and the National Board of Review. “Marriage Story” virtually swept the IFP Gotham Awards. On the television side, the Globes often relish being the first awards group where late fall series are eligible, meaning that Netflix's “The Crown' and Apple's “The Morning Show' could have a big morning, along with Emmy winners “Fleabag' and “Game of Thrones.' HBO's “Watchmen' could also be a factor. Ricky Gervais will host the Globes for the fifth time on January 5. Tom Hanks, a possible nominee for his performance as Mister Rogers in “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,' will receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award. The Carol Burnett Award will go to Ellen DeGeneres. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Marvin Miller, the union leader who revolutionized baseball by empowering players to negotiate multimillion-dollar contracts and to play for teams of their own choosing, was elected to baseball's Hall of Fame on Sunday along with former St. Louis Cardinals catcher Ted Simmons. After falling short in his first seven times on veterans committee ballots, Miller received 12 of 16 votes from this year's 16-man modern committee, exactly the 75% required. Simmons was on 13 ballots, and former Boston outfielder Dwight Evans was third with eight. Miller, who died at age 95 in 2012, led the Major League Baseball Players Association from 1966-82, a time when players gained the right to free agency after six seasons of big league service, to salary arbitration and to grievance arbitration. He led the union through five work stoppages and was an adviser during three more after he retired. After several turndowns, Miller had asked not to be considered for the Hall, calling the process “a farce.' He asked his children not to participate. “It would have been a great honor 20 years ago,' Miller's daughter Susan said. Miller and Simmons will be inducted into Cooperstown during ceremonies on July 26 along with any players chosen next month by the Baseball Writers' Association of America from a ballot headed by former New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter. Simmons, involved in a high-profile contract dispute in 1972, recalled how Miller united a disparate group of players. 'Marvin would patiently wait for every single player to speak their mind,' Simmons said. “No matter how inane, no matter how un-thought out, no matter how off the mark the question came, Marvin painstakingly, patiently waded through it all. And in the end, after everyone had spoke their mind, he would bring it all together and present it in a way that everyone felt as though, yes, this is exactly what we collectively think.” Simmons, an eight-time All-Star during a 21-year big league career, was a switch-hitter who batted .285 with 248 homers and 1,389 RBIs for St. Louis (1968-80), Milwaukee (1981-85) and Atlanta (1986-88). Despite his accomplishments, Simmons was up for election by voters from the BBWAA just once. He drew only 3.7 percent support in 1994 and was removed from future BBWAA ballots. Miller will be inducted 12 years after Bowie Kuhn, the baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn whom Miller routinely defeated in labor negotiations, and three years after Bud Selig, the commissioner who in 1994-95 presided over the longest work stoppage in baseball's history. “The Hall of Fame is called the Hall of Fame and Museum. Imagine a museum of baseball without Marvin Miller in it,' former union chief operating officer Gene Orza said. “It's like having a museum of modern art without Picasso in it. I guess I'm happy for all the people who are happy. But I don't think Marvin would lose any sleep one way or the other over this.' In 2008, four years before he died, Miller sent a letter to the BBWAA saying he didn't want to be considered anymore. 'These changes resulted in a vastly more competitive game, fan interest, and increased wealth for all, including the owners of baseball clubs,' his son, Peter Miller, said in 2013. “Although he enjoyed the recognition, my father did what he did not for fame and glory, but for justice and for equitable labor-management relations. To treat that as something of lesser value than personal fame, is really to dishonor him and the players.” Players averaged $19,000 in 1967, when the union first started calculating, and just over $240,000 during Miller's final year. The average is now over $4 million. “He gave players freedom and money that has made the game better for everyone,' Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench tweeted. Miller received 44% of the votes in 2003 and 63% in 2007 when all Hall of Famers could participate on a veterans panel. After the Hall downsized the veterans committees, he got three of 12 votes later in 2007 from a committee considering executives that elected Kuhn. “I am surprised,' said Donald Fehr, the union's head from 1983-2009. “Ï have long thought that eventually academics if no one else would create the necessary momentum to rectify the omission, rectify the wrong. I'm glad to see that they have bestowed that recognition. It's long overdue and immensely deserved.' Miller got seven of 12 votes in 2009 and then, when the format was changed again, he got 11 of 16 from an expansion era committee in 2010 — falling one vote short. He received six votes or fewer of 16 in 2013 and seven of 16 from the new modern era committee in 2017. “Players are pleased that Marvin will now take his rightful and long overdue place in the Hall of Fame in recognition of the monumental and positive impact he had on our game and our industry,” current union head Tony Clark said in a statement. Nicknamed Simba for his shoulder-length hair, Simmons was an outspoken opponent of President Richard Nixon and the Vietnam War. In the days before free agency, he played much of the 1972 season without a contract because of a pay dispute, finally agreeing to a two-year deal in late July. Now 70, Simmons received 17 of 456 votes in 1994, falling shy of the 5% threshold to remain on the ballot. Simmons was on 11 of 16 ballots when the modern era committee met in 2017 and elected Jack Morris with 14 votes and Alan Trammell with 13. Simmons has benefited from modern metrics such as a Baseball Reference WAR of 50.3. Eight other players who were primarily catchers topped 50, and they are all in the Hall: Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, Gary Carter, Bill Dickey, Carlton Fisk, Gabby Hartnett, Mike Piazza and Iván Rodríguez. Simmons hit .300 or higher seven times and finished with 2,472 hits. Among players who were primarily catchers, his RBIs are second to Berra's 1,430 and his hits are second to Rodríguez's 2,844. Dave Parker received seven votes, and Steve Garvey and Lou Whitaker six each. Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Thurman Munson and Dale Murphy all got three or fewer. ——— AP Sports Writer Bernie Wilson contributed to this report. ——— More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Elizabeth Warren was paid nearly $2 million for legal work stretching back three decades, her campaign disclosed Sunday night, amid calls from a top Democratic presidential rival that the Massachusetts senator should be more forthcoming about what she earned from past corporate clients. In May, Warren released a list of close to 60 cases she worked on as an attorney going back to the 1980s. Fifteen pages of new data now shows what she was paid in nearly 40 of those — about $1.9 million. The list includes “all the income she earned from each case that we have been able to determine from public records, Elizabeth’s personal records, and other sources,” Warren spokeswoman Kristen Orthman said. “If Democrats are going to defeat Donald Trump, or whoever the Republican Party might replace him with, we must nominate a candidate who can create the most robust possible contrast against Republicans on conflicts of interest and corruption issues,” Orthman said in a statement. “Elizabeth does not sell access to her time — no closed door big dollar fundraisers, no bundling program, no perks or promises to any wealthy donor.” The new information comes against the backdrop of an escalating feud between Warren and Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana. Last week, Warren decried the mayor’s attending of closed-door fundraisers, saying, “I think that Mayor Pete should open up the doors so that anyone can come in and report on what’s being said.” She added, “No one should be left to wonder what kind of promises are being made to the people that then pony up big bucks to be in the room.” Buttigieg and his campaign shot back that Warren should release more of her past tax returns, shedding additional light on what she earned as an attorney for rich and powerful firms — setting the stage for Sunday’s disclosure. Warren had previously released 11 years of tax returns. The pair have also clashed over Buttigieg’s past work for powerful consulting firm McKinsey & Co. from 2007 to 2010. Buttigieg on Friday released a summary of the work he did — but he has not heeded Warren’s calls to make public a full client list, citing a nondisclosure agreement he signed with McKinsey. Warren’s campaign said Sunday’s disclosure provides more information on her business income than releasing additional, past tax returns would because her tax documents don’t fully itemize earnings the same way the details it released do. A steady rise in the polls throughout the summer landed Warren among the Democratic primary front-runners, but polling in recent weeks has suggested her support is plateauing or beginning to slip. At the same time, Buttigieg has seen his polling numbers improve enough to become a front-runner himself, with the lead-off Iowa caucuses now less than two months away. Among the clients for whom Warren consulted were the attorneys for Rabobank, a Dutch financial institution that became a creditor in the Enron bankruptcy; former directors of Getty Oil, who were involved in Texaco’s bankruptcy; and women whose allegations of harm from silicone breast implants produced by Dow Corning were imperiled when the company filed for bankruptcy. The cases listed involve Warren serving as a consultant, mediator or expert witness in addition to those in which she served as counsel. Her largest disclosed payday was nearly $187,000 for a case originally filed in 1995. Her campaign said Warren “represented a well-known chain of department stores to make sure that it could stay alive and pay its creditors. Elizabeth succeeded, and the company continued to employ people across its many stores.” Warren taught at Harvard Law School before being elected to the Senate in 2012.
  • Patrick Mahomes got some help from the Chiefs defense to hold off the New England Patriots and wrap up the division title. Kansas City clinched the AFC West when Bashaud Breeland knocked away Tom Brady's fourth-down pass attempt to Julian Edelman in the end zone and the Chiefs beat New England 23-16 win on Sunday. After building a 20-7 lead, the Chiefs survived a series of mistakes and questionable officiating to hold off a late rally by the defending Super Bowl champions. Combined with Oakland's loss to Tennessee, the Chiefs (9-4) clinched the AFC West. The loss ended the Patriots' 21-game home win streak in the regular season and playoffs, which was tied for the longest in team history. It also was the third-longest string in NFL history. Mahomes was 26 of 40 for 283 yards, a touchdown and interception, playing through a hand injury he suffered during Kansas City's second offensive series. Tight end Travis Kelce added a 4-yard TD run. Mahomes now is the third quarterback this season to earn his first win against the Patriots, joining Baltimore’s Lamar Jackson and Houston’s Deshaun Watson. All three were previously 0-2. “You want to beat the best. You want to go out and play against the best and give your best effort, 'Mahomes said. “It wasn’t pretty the whole time. It was just a tough, hard-fought win. He said he got creative after his injury. “I let the trainers look at it. They gave me to good to go,' Mahomes said. “I went out there, battled and figured out ways to throw the ball across the middle. Maybe not shoot those long shots I usually throw. But enough to get them back and still score touchdowns.” New England (10-3) has lost two in a row. Tom Brady was under pressure all game and finished 19 of 36 for 169 yards, a touchdown and interception. the 169 yards are his second-fewest passing yards this season. He spoke after the game with his right elbow heavily wrapped. “They threw a lot of different defenses at us,” Brady said. “Some we handled well and some we didn't.' Trailing 23-16, New England got the ball back on its 32 with 5:04 to play. The Patriots immediately gained 35 yards on a pass from halfback James White to Jakobi Meyers to get into Kansas City territory. Officials appeared to miss a pass interference call on a deep pass to Phillip Dorsett and the Chiefs forced a fourth-and-6 at the 29. But the 42-year-old Brady got free and scrambled 17 yards for a first down. The Patriots couldn't get into the end zone, however, losing the rematch of January's AFC title game in Kansas City. The Chiefs led 23-7 in the third quarter before they committed multiple miscues that helped the Patriots close the gap. First, Patriots special teamer Nate Ebner blocked Dustin Colquitt's punt, which rolled out of bounds at the Chiefs 19. It set up a 10-yard run by Brandon Bolden that made it 23-13, but James White was stopped short on his 2-point conversion run attempt. The Chiefs gave the Patriots another opportunity late in the third quarter. Kelce caught a pass and was hit by Devin McCourty, forcing a fumble and recovery by Stephon Gilmore, who had a clear path the the end zone. The play was blown dead, though, with Kelce ruled down by contact. It prompted an immediate challenge by Patriots coach Bill Belichick, which resulted in the call being overturned and the ball awarded to New England. The Patriots quickly drove to the Kansas City 15 and Brady found N'Keal Harry with a short pass. Harry weaved through multiple defenders and appeared to stretch the ball over the pylon. Yet he was ruled to have stepped out of bounds at the 3. “Yeah, I mean, it's — yeah. Doesn't happen very often.,' Brady said of the ruling. “So, it happened. We still had a chance and wish we could have scored there at the end.” Brady was sacked three plays later and the Patriots kicked a field goal to close within 23-16. Referee Jerome Boger told a pool reporter after the game that the covering official on the Harry play was blocked out by defenders. “The downfield official who was on the goal line and looking back toward the field of play had that he stepped out at the 3-yard line,' Boger said. “So, they got together and conferred on that. The final ruling was that he was out of bounds at the 3-yard line.” The Chiefs were without two of their leading rushers, Damien Williams (rib injury) and Darrel Williams (placed on injured reserve Thursday with a hamstring injury). It left the rushing duties primarily in the hands of LeSean McCoy, with support from Darwin Thompson and Spencer Ware. They didn't get much traction in the run game other than from McCoy, who finished with 11 rushes for 39 yards. But after a slow start, Kansas City's receivers were able to find space and passing lanes for Mahomes. One notable example came early in the second quarter. Mecole Hardman got behind Patriots cornerback Jonathan Jones and Mahomes withstood pressure to deliver a deep pass off his back foot for a 48-yard touchdown to put the Chiefs in front 10-7. Brady was intercepted by Breeland on the first play of the Patriots' ensuing drive and Kansas City went right back to work. Taking over on the New England 39, Mahomes found Kelce in the middle of the field for a 20-yard gain to get the Chiefs inside the 5. Two plays later Kelce took a direct snap and ran it in for a 4-yard TD. INJURIES Chiefs: LG Andrew Wiley left in the second quarter with a shoulder injury. Patriots: Harry left in the fourth quarter with a hip injury. TRICKERY The Patriots received the game's opening kickoff and needed just five plays to drive 83 yards and take 7-0 lead on a 37-yard flea-flicker from Brady to Edelman. The series was aided by a pair of third-down pass interference penalties called on Chiefs cornerbacks Charvarius Ward and Breeland. BLOCKED Ebner's punt block in the third quarter was the Patriots fourth of 2019, setting a franchise record for a season. With one more they will tie the 1990 Chiefs for the most blocked punts in a season in NFL history MISSING EQUIPMENT The Kansas City Chiefs needed a police escort to get their equipment to Foxborough, Massachusetts, in time for kickoff. Chiefs spokesman Ted Crews confirmed that some of the gear was sent to the wrong place and had to be rushed to the stadium. It arrived about two hours before kickoff. The Massachusetts State Police tweeted that they helped the equipment get to the stadium from Logan Airport. UP NEXT Chiefs: host Broncos next Sunday. Patriots: visit Bengals next Sunday. ___ Follow Kyle Hightower on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/khightower ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Japanese Empress Masako, still recovering from stress-induced mental health issues, said Monday she was happy to have completed her duties as part of Emperor Naruhito's enthronement rituals and pledged to keep up the work and help her husband more for the happiness of the people. In a palace statement marking her 56th birthday, Masako thanked people who have warmly welcomed the couple after Naruhito succeeded to the throne on May 1, following his father's abdication. “Many smiley faces I've seen in many places are precious memories for me and they will be my big moral support as I move forward,' the statement said. A Harvard-educated former diplomat, Masako had been largely absent from public appearances for years. She developed adjustment disorder, a condition marked by depression and other stress-induced symptoms, after giving birth to the couple's only child, Princess Aiko, and facing pressure to have a son to continue Japan's male-only imperial succession. Naruhito’s succession rituals spanned from late April to early December, and Masako was seen smiling and seemed healthy at her public appearances. Her her doctors welcomed her accomplishment as a positive sign, but cautioned the people against raising their expectations too high, saying that could interfere with her recovery. Masako's long absence from imperial events and trips had raised concern that she could do even part of the work done by hugely popular former Empress Michiko. But she accompanied Naruhito at all events, including his first public greeting as emperor when some 140,000 people gathered. She sat next to Naruhito in an open car during a royal parade in November, enthusiastically waving to 119,000 well-wishers on the roadside, and she was seen overwhelmed with emotion and wiping tears with a handkerchief. Masako thanked Naruhito for his consideration and support for her and said that she hoped to further improve her health so she can give him more support. “I hope to fulfill my duty as Empress, while trying to further improve my health so that I can help His Majesty and work for the people’s happiness, together with him,” the statement released by the Imperial Household Agency said. Her doctors said Masako has been able to expand her activities and regained confidence little by little as she constantly sought ways to maintain her health while taking care of her daughter, Princess Aiko. Warm welcome from the people also gave her encouragement. But the doctors say she managed to complete her duties related to the enthronement ceremonies because of her strong sense of responsibility, not because she had fully recovered. “We believe it’s desirable” that she was able to expand her activity, the doctors said in a statement that was also released by the palace. “But she has not fully recovered and her conditions have ups and downs. She gets tired after a major event or after a series of events,” the doctors said. “Having over-expectations could go counter to her recovery.” The doctors said it is important for Masako to continue her treatment while obtaining understanding and support from around her. “We hope you will continue to warmly watch over her recovery,' they said. There are expectations that Naruhito — who is Japan's first emperor with a college degree and who studied at Oxford — and Masako will internationalize the imperial household. Many Japanese were particularly impressed when she and Naruhito casually chatted with President Donald Trump and first lady Melania without interpreters during their visit in late May as first state guests of the new emperor. The royal couple also freely conversed many foreign dignitaries who attended state banquets and tea parties to celebrate Naruhito’s enthronement in October. As a former diplomat, Masako expressed concerns about global issues, including marine plastic pollution, poverty, child abuse and people in the conflicts-torn areas. She mourned for the death of Tetsu Nakamura, a Japanese doctor and aid worker who was gunned down in Afghanistan last week.
  • Former Red Sox slugger David Ortiz made his first public appearance in the Dominican Republic on Sunday nearly six months after he was shot in what authorities called a case of mistaken identity. The Dominican-born superstar was greeted by a standing ovation and raucous cheers when he entered the Quisqueya Stadium Juan Marichal for the Game of Legends, a charity exhibition and home run derby featuring Dominican major league players and retired stars. “Praise God and long live the Dominican Republic,” Ortiz said to the thousands of fans in the country's most important stadium. He thanked his fans, fellow players and the press for its support after the shooting. “I'm happy to be here with my people,” he told The Associated Press before the game. He did not play. Also present were Dominican stars such as Hall of Famers Pedro Martínez and Juan Marichal, Mets second baseman Robinson Canó and Nationals outfielder Juan Soto. A 10-time All-Star and three-time World Series champion, Ortiz helped the Red Sox end their 86-year championship drought in 2004 and batted .688 against the St. Louis Cardinals in 2013 to win the Series MVP. Ortiz retired after the 2016 season with 541 home runs, and the team retired his uniform No. 34. He maintained a home in the Boston area and had been living part of the year in the Dominican Republic, where he was often seen getting his cars washed and hanging out with friends, including other baseball players, artists and entertainers. He was seriously wounded June 9 when a hit man allegedly hired by a drug trafficker mistakenly shot him as he sat with friends in a Santo Domingo bar, authorities have said. They said the target was meant to be Sixto David Fernandez, a cousin of the man alleged to have arranged the attack. Authorities said the hit men confused Ortiz with Fernandez. The two men are friends and were sharing a table. Officials said the killing was contracted by Victor Hugo Gomez, described as an associate of Mexico's Gulf Cartel. Authorities said Gomez wanted Fernandez killed because he believed his cousin turned him into Dominican drug investigators in 2011. They said Gomez then spent time in prison in the Dominican Republic with one of at least 11 suspects arrested in the shooting. Gomez later resurfaced in the U.S. as one of dozens of suspects sought by federal authorities following a March 2019 drug trafficking sting in Houston. Doctors in the Dominican Republic removed Ortiz's gallbladder and part of his intestine after the shooting and he underwent further surgery in the U.S. “I thought he was never going to come back here,” said Filvia Núñez, a fan who said she was surprised and delighted to see Ortiz Sunday.