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Health

    Avengers: Endgame' fans and other moviegoers who attended late-night screenings at a California theater last week may have been exposed to measles, KNBC-TV and other news outlets are reporting. >> Can you get measles if you’ve been vaccinated? Should adults get a measles booster? According to the Orange County Health Care Agency, doctors recently diagnosed a Placentia woman, who is in her 20s, with the disease. The patient had taken an international trip to 'one of many countries currently experiencing widespread measles activity,' officials said in a Tuesday news release. >> Measles outbreak causes quarantine of students, staff at 2 California universities 'Orange County residents may have been exposed to measles since the ill person visited public locations while infectious,' the agency said. The woman, who is now 'under voluntary isolation at home,' reportedly visited the AMC Movie Theater at 1001 S. Lemon St. in Fullerton from 11 p.m. April 25 to 4 a.m. April 26. She also went to 5 Hutton Centre Drive in Santa Ana from 7:45 a.m. to 9 a.m. April 23 to 25 and the St. Jude Emergency Department in Fullerton from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. April 27. >> Read more trending news  People who went to those locations at the same time as the patient should review their vaccination history and watch for symptoms such as fever or rashes for up to 21 days after they were exposed to the disease, officials said. >> CDC: Number of measles cases in U.S. second-highest since 2000 'People who have not had measles or the measles vaccine are at higher risk after an exposure, so they should talk with a health care provider about receiving Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccination,' the news release said. Read more here or here.
  • Two former clients of a New Mexico spa that offered 'vampire facials' have been diagnosed with HIV, state health officials said Monday. >> Vampire facial made popular by Kim Kardashian causes HIV, hepatitis scare in New Mexico According to the New Mexico Department of Health, both clients 'received injection-related procedures' at the now-shuttered VIP Spa in Albuquerque between May and September of last year.  >> Read more trending news  Tests found that the clients recently were infected with the same strain of the virus, 'increasing the likelihood that the two HIV infections may have resulted from a procedure at the VIP Spa,' the news release said. The spa, which shut down in September after a health inspection, offered 'vampire facials,' procedures in which plasma is extracted from a client's own blood, then injected into the patron's face, KRQE-TV reported. The treatment gained popularity in 2013 when reality TV star Kim Kardashian posted about it on Instagram. >> See her 2013 Instagram post here The state Health Department is offering free HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C testing for former clients of the spa. So far, more than 100 patrons have been tested, officials said.  Read more here or here.
  • Researchers in Australia say they have found a link between attitudes toward bike riders and acts of deliberate aggression toward them on the road. In a pilot test of the “dehumanization of cyclists,” researchers at Queensland University of Technology, Monash University and the University of Melbourne studied 442 people in Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. Dehumanization, the group said in the study abstract, “refers to any situation where people are seen or treated as if they are less than fully human.” The participants were first asked if they were a cyclist or noncyclist themself.  >> Read more trending news  Participants then were shown either the evolution illustration of ape to man, or an adaption of that image showing the stages of evolution from cockroach to human. The insect-human image was designed because of reported slurs against cyclists, comparing them to cockroaches or mosquitoes, according to lead author Alexa Delbosc, senior lecturer in the Institute of Transport Studies at Monash University. On both the ape-human and insect-human scale, 55% of noncyclists and 30% of cyclists rated people who ride bicycles as not completely human. Seventeen percent said they had used their car to deliberately block a cyclist, 11% had deliberately driven their car close to a cyclist, and 9% had used their car to cut off a cyclist.  'When you don't think someone is 'fully' human,” phys.org quoted Delbosc as saying, “it's easier to justify hatred or aggression toward them. This can set up an escalating cycle of resentment.” He added: 'If cyclists feel dehumanized by other road users, they may be more likely to act out against motorists, feeding into a self-fulfilling prophecy that further fuels dehumanization against them.” The researchers say they believe their findings suggest the concept of dehumanizing bike riders deserves further exploration. “If we can put a human face to cyclists, we may improve attitudes and reduce aggression directed at on-road cyclists,” they write in their study abstract. “This could result in a reduction in cyclist road trauma or an increase in public acceptance of cyclists as legitimate road users.”
  • Just one day after a Georgia company recalled more than 110,000 pounds of ground beef over possible E. coli contamination, another meat-packing plant has followed suit. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, Franklin Park, Illinois-based Grant Park Packing issued a recall Wednesday for more than 53,000 pounds of bulk raw ground beef produced Oct. 30 to Nov. 1, 2018, then shipped to Minnesota for distribution and Kentucky for institutional use. >> On USDA.gov: Read the complete recall notice here The recalled meat, which may be contaminated with E. coli O103 bacteria, is labeled 'North Star Imports & Sales, LLC. 100% GROUND BEEF BULK 80% LEAN/ 20% FAT' and comes in 40-pound cardboard boxes, the FSIS said in a news release. The products are marked 'FOR INSTITUTIONAL USE ONLY' and include lot code GP.1051.18, establishment No. EST. 21781 and pack dates 10/30/2018, 10/31/2018 and 11/01/2018. >> PREVIOUS STORY: E. coli fears prompt recall of 110,000 pounds of ground beef 'FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160°F,' the news release added. The recall came amid reports that an E. coli O103 outbreak has sickened 156 people in 10 states, including Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee and Virginia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. 'Further testing is ongoing to determine if the recalled ground beef products are related to the E. coli O103 outbreak,' the FSIS said. 'Based on the continuing investigation, additional product may be recalled.' >> Read more trending news  The bacteria can cause diarrhea, vomiting and, in rare cases, a severe kidney infection called hemolytic uremic syndrome, according to the FSIS. Symptoms of the condition, which occurs more frequently in children and older adults, include pallor, easy bruising and a decrease in urine. For more information about the recall, call Grant Park Packing at 312-421-4096.
  • A Georgia company is recalling more than 110,000 pounds of ground beef over possible E. coli contamination, federal health officials said Tuesday. >> PREVIOUS STORY: Ground beef cause of E. coli outbreak, CDC says According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, Carrollton, Georgia-based K2D Foods, which does business as Colorado Premium Foods, issued the recall Tuesday for raw ground beef products produced from late March through early April and shipped to restaurant distributors in Georgia and Florida. The recalled meat, which may be contaminated with E. coli O103 bacteria, is labeled 'Ground Beef Puck' and comes in two 24-pound vacuum-sealed packages in cardboard boxes, the FSIS said in a news release. The products include establishment No. EST. 51308 and 'Use Thru' dates of 4/14/19, 4/17/19, 4/20/19, 4/23/19, 4/28/19 and 4/30/19. >> Recall alert: 30K lbs. ground beef recalled because of ‘extraneous materials’ Restaurants that have the recalled products should throw them away or return them, officials said. 'FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160°F,' the news release added. The recall came amid reports that an E. coli O103 outbreak has sickened 156 people in 10 states, including Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee and Virginia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. 'Further testing is ongoing to determine if the recalled ground beef products are related to the E. coli O103 outbreak,' the FSIS said. 'Based on the continuing investigation, additional product may be recalled.' >> Read more trending news  The bacteria can cause diarrhea, vomiting and, in rare cases, a severe kidney infection called hemolytic uremic syndrome, according to the FSIS. Symptoms of the condition, which occurs more frequently in children and older adults, include pallor, easy bruising and a decrease in urine. For more information about the recall, call Colorado Premium Foods at 970-313-4400. Read more here.
  • Are you taking statins? They may not work well for about half of the people taking them, according to a new report.  >> On AJC.com: Blood pressure medication recalls: Everything you should know Researchers from the University of Nottingham in England recently conducted a study, published in the Heart journal, to determine the effectiveness of statins, which are used to treat high cholesterol.  To do so, they examined more than 165,000 people who were taking the drug to decrease heart disease risk by lowering cholesterol levels. According to national guidelines, statins must reduce bad cholesterol levels by 40% after two years to be considered effective, the team noted.  After analyzing the results, they found 51% of the subjects had a poor response to the treatment, which put them at a higher risk of developing heart disease. The drug was effective for the other 49%. >> Read more trending news  “Our research has shown that in almost half of patients prescribed statins they are very effective and offer significant protection against cardiovascular disease,” co-author Stephen Weng said in a statement. “However, for the other half – whether it’s due to your genetic make-up, having side effects, sticking to the treatment, or other medications – we don’t see that intended benefit.” The scientists believe genetic factors and patients not staying on their medicine could be the main reasons the medication did not work well for more than half of the participants.  They also explained the United Kingdom follows the same trends in the United States and other countries, so their findings could be applied to Western populations.  The scientists now hope to continue their investigations, so they can better predict patients’ cholesterol responses to treatments. >> On AJC.com: Common painkillers triple side effects of dementia, study says The authors concluded: “We have to develop better ways to understand differences between patients and how we can tailor more effective treatment for those millions of patients who are simply blanket prescribed statins.” 
  • The construction industry is facing an alarming problem: a staggering suicide rate. >> Watch the news report here According to a recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more male construction workers take their lives than any other industry. The CDC report showed that the 2015 suicide rate for men in construction was 53 per 100,000. That is four times higher than the overall suicide rate. >> These jobs have the highest suicide rates in the country, CDC says 'We have an industry that is loaded with what I would call alpha males,' said Chris Brennan, business representative of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades in Boston.  'When someone kills themselves, that's it, it's over. And it's a scary subject for people, so we need to do a better job of understanding of what was going on and the darkness,' Brennan said. 'They’re supposed to be tough men and women who can deal with pain and challenges that other folks maybe can’t deal with,' said Steve Mongeau, the executive director of Samaritans, a suicide prevention center in Boston. Mongeau blames several factors. They include a competitive, high-pressure environment, a higher prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse, separation from families and long stretches without work. 'That inconsistency can lend itself to some concerns, self-doubts, possible worry, possible issues in other areas that could lead you to become somewhat despondent and consider suicide as an option,' Mongeau said. The CDC stresses that suicide prevention on the construction site is critical because it's where many workers spend most of their time.  Friends and family can help spot and prevent suicide, too. Some of the signs to watch out for are increased tardiness and absenteeism, decreased productivity and self-confidence, isolation from co-workers and agitation and increased conflict among co-workers. >> Read more trending news  One of the ways the construction industry has responded to the alarming rate of worker suicides is through the creation of the Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Chairman Michelle Walker said the organization's goal is simple but critical: to raise awareness.  'There’s a huge portion of the construction population and construction business owners and leaders that are simply unaware of the fact that this is an issue in the industry,' Walker said. That's why Brennan is developing a program that will give local workers the tools they need to build a better support system. He believes the peer-to-peer approach could mean the difference between life or death.  'We’re just trying to draw those people out, draw them out, say, 'Hey, come on out to the light, and we’ll get better, we’ll get better together,' Brennan said.  If you or someone you know has suicidal thoughts, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-TALK. It is staffed 24 hours per day.
  • Which is better for you: drinking a bottle of wine each week or smoking 10 cigarettes? You probably answered that question wrong. According to a new study, the cancer risk for women is the same for each. The cancer risk from smoking cigarettes is fairly well-known, but “the number of cancers attributed to alcohol is poorly understood by the public,” according to the study, which was recently published in the journal BMC Public Health. In fact, a 2017 survey by the American Society of Clinical Oncology found that 70 percent of Americans didn’t know alcohol consumption can lead to cancer. >> On AJC.com: 'Beer before wine’ is not always fine, new study determines Tobacco use accounts for 7 million deaths per year globally, with an estimated two-thirds of smokers expected to die from their habit, according to The BMJ. About 3.3 million deaths occur each year because of the harmful use of alcohol, BMJ reported, corresponding to 5.9 percent of all deaths globally. To increase the public’s awareness of cancer from alcohol, researchers from the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Bangor University and University of Southampton compared the cancer risk of drinking wine to the cancer risk of smoking cigarettes. >> On AJC.com: Taking a break from alcohol can improve sleep and weight, study says Using data from Cancer Research U.K. and other sources, the scientists concluded “that if 1,000 non-smoking men and 1,000 non-smoking women each drank one bottle of wine a week, around 10 extra men and 14 extra women could develop cancer during their lives; equivalent to the lifetime cancer risk stemming of a man having five cigarettes a week, and a woman having 10 smokes.” But the bad news doesn’t end there. When wine consumption increased to three bottles a week, or about half a bottle a day, “around 19 men and 36 women may develop an alcohol-related cancer.“ Does this mean drinking wine is just as bad for you as smoking? No, the researchers said. >> Read more trending news  They were “absolutely clear that this study is not saying that drinking alcohol in moderation is in any way equivalent to smoking. Smoking kills up to two thirds of its users, and cancer is just one of the many serious health consequences. This study purely addresses cancer risk in isolation.” >> On AJC.com: Do you drink too much? Here’s what a new study says However, the National Cancer Institute lists alcohol as a known human carcinogen, or cancer-causing agent. Longtime alcohol consumption has been linked to the development of head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer and colorectal cancer. You can read the full study on BMC Public Health’s website.
  • Are you the parent of a baby or small child? If so, it's time to check your medicine cabinet. Kingston Pharma is recalling one lot of infant cough syrup sold at Dollar General stores nationwide over possible Bacillus cereus or Bacillus circulans contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. >> On FDA.gov: Read the full news release here The recall is for 2-ounce bottles of DG™/health NATURALS baby Cough Syrup + Mucus marked with Lot KL 180157, UPC 8 54954 00250 0 and an 11/20 expiration date. 'Bacillus cereus in food products has the potential to produce two forms of gastrointestinal illness, one being a syndrome primarily of vomiting, and the other of diarrhea,' the news release said. 'Most often, illnesses are mild and self-limiting, although more serious and even lethal cases have occurred.' >> Read more trending news  Kingston Pharma said it hasn't received any reports of illnesses in connection with the recalled product. If you bought the recalled cough syrup, you should take it back to the store for a refund, the release said. For more information, call the company at 1-844-724-7347 from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT or email Christina.Condon@SciRegs.com.
  • Parents have to start early in the week to prepare their children for daylight saving time, a pediatric sleep doctor told Pittsburgh's WPXI-TV. >> Watch the news report here On Sunday, we will be springing clocks forward an hour and losing some sleep. That can be difficult for everyone, but especially children. Dr. Deepa Burman of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center said the shift can make behaviors change quickly. >> Daylight saving time 2019: When do we set our clocks ahead? 'They might be having more frequent meltdowns at bedtime because they might be more tired from that loss of sleep,' Burman told WPXI. Burman said parents need to ease children into the change by pushing bed time up by 15 minutes a night in the days leading up to daylight saving time. 'By the time the time change happens, you are already ready for that 8 p.m. bedtime,' she said. She says with darker mornings and lighter nights ahead, it is also important to adjust your morning routine a bit to wake up your body sooner. >> Read more trending news  'If you live in Pittsburgh where we don't have as much natural light, try to get artificial lights, bright lights, turn on all the lights in your house,' Burman said. She also stressed the importance of putting away electronics well before a child's bedtime, or it could make falling asleep more difficult. 'Those artificial lights can actually decrease the body's melatonin,' Burman said. The doctor said the consequences of long-term sleep deprivation can include memory and attention problems, especially in young children.