CORONAVIRUS:

 What You Need To Know

On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
64°
Mostly Cloudy
H 68° L 62°
  • cloudy-day
    64°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 68° L 62°
  • cloudy-day
    76°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 68° L 62°
  • cloudy-day
    76°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 80° L 65°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment

    Shirley Douglas, the impassioned Canadian activist and veteran actress who was mother to actor Kiefer Sutherland and daughter of Canada medicare founder Tommy Douglas, died Sunday. She was 86. Sutherland announced his mother’s death on Twitter, saying she succumbed to complications surrounding pneumonia. He said it was not related COVID-19. “My mother was an extraordinary woman who led an extraordinary life,” said Sutherland. “Sadly she had been battling for her health for quite some time and we, as a family, knew this day was coming.” A native of Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Douglas worked with directors including Stanley Kubrick ('Lolita') and David Cronenberg ('Dead Ringers'), and she won a Gemini Award for her performance in the 1999 TV film “Shadow Lake.” She tirelessly supported a variety of causes throughout her life, including the civil rights movement, the Black Panthers and the fight to save Canada's public health care, pioneered by her politician father. In 1965, Douglas married Canadian actor Donald Sutherland, with whom she had two children before they divorced — twins Rachel, a production manager, and Kiefer, who became a film and TV star in his own right. Douglas had another son, Thomas, from a previous marriage. Born on April 2, 1934, Douglas showed an early interest in the arts as well as politics as she journeyed on the campaign trail with her father, who became premier of Saskatchewan, a national leader in the New Democratic Party and a socialist icon. She attended the Banff School of Fine Arts and went on to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in England, where she acted in theater and TV and participated in anti-nuclear marches. In the ’60s and ’70s, while living in California, Douglas campaigned against the Vietnam War and protested for various causes. She helped to establish a fundraising group called Friends of the Black Panthers. Her support for the group brought controversy — she was refused a U.S. work permit and charged in 1969 with conspiracy to possess unregistered explosives. The courts eventually dismissed the case and exonerated her. She also was a co-founder of the first chapter in Canada of the Performing Artists for Nuclear Disarmament. Douglas, though, was foremost a champion for Canada's medicare system. She would speak of the importance of a universal health care system at virtually any opportunity and lobbied government officials. Douglas, who had lived in Toronto since 1977, was nominated for two other Canadian arts Geminis: in 1998 for her leading role in the series “Wind at My Back” and in 1993 for starring in the film “Passage of the Heart.” She was also an Officer of the Order of Canada, one of the country's highest honors, and an inductee into Canada’s Walk of Fame.
  • The English singer-songwriter Marianne Faithfull is being treated for coronavirus in a London hospital. Her manager Francois Ravard said Sunday that Faithfull is stable, however, and responding to treatment. “We all wish her well and a full and speedy recovery,” Ravard said. The 73-year-old has had a number of health issues over the years, including a long battle with hepatitis C and breast cancer, which she was diagnosed with in 2006. An icon of the 1960s' British music scene, Faithfull rose to fame with the hit song “As Tears Go By.' A bout of severe laryngitis coupled with drug use in the 1970s would forever alter her crisp, clear voice to become something lower, raspier and perhaps even more distinctive. After an absence from music, she had a celebrated comeback in 1979 with the album “Broken English” Her most recent album, “Negative Capability,” was released in 2018 to wide acclaim.
  • Britain needed a message of hope Sunday. The queen delivered it. Queen Elizabeth II offered support to a country locked down in the coronavirus pandemic, promising the nation that it would rise to the challenge and overcome the outbreak. In a rare address to the nation, the 93-year-old monarch acknowledged the suffering that many families have experienced because of the COVID-19 crisis, which has infected more than 47,806 people in the U.K. and killed at least 4,934 of them. She drew upon wisdom from her decades as Britain’s head of state to urge resolve in a time of crisis. “While we have faced challenges before, this one is different,” she said. 'This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour, using the great advances of science and our instinctive compassion to heal. “We will succeed — and that success will belong to every one of us.” Her remarks were broadcast only moments before Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Downing Street office announced he had been admitted to the hospital for “precautionary tests.'' The news will add to unease in Britain, which has been in lockdown for nearly two weeks. The queen gives yearly Christmas messages but has given an address like this on only three previous occasions. She delivered speeches after the Queen Mother’s death in 2002, before the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997, and at the time of the first Gulf War in 1991. But times are unprecedented. She lauded Britain’s beloved National Health Service in a broadcast that featured pictures of medical teams suiting up to go battle the virus. She praised other essential services, as images of soldiers loading medical equipment on trucks rolled on the screen. She also praised everyday citizens who are adhering to the terms of the lockdown and staying at home and helping to prevent the spread of the virus. “I am sure the nation will join me in assuring you that what you do is appreciated and every hour of your hard work brings us closer to a return to more normal times,’’ the queen said. “I also want to thank those of you who are staying at home, thereby helping to protect the vulnerable and sparing many families the pain already felt by those who have lost loved ones. “Together we are tackling this disease, and I want to reassure you that if we remain united and resolute, then we will overcome it.” The leader who spends much of her time cutting ribbons and visiting charitable organizations, also made the point of mentioning the general public, such as the 750,000 people who volunteered to help the vulnerable. “I hope in the years to come everyone will be able to take pride in how they responded to this challenge,” she said. “Those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any.’’ “That the attributes of self-discipline, of quiet, good-humored resolve, and of fellow feeling still characterize this country.” The crisis has hit close to home for the queen. Her son and the heir to the throne, 71-year-old Prince Charles, had a mild case of the disease. She herself left London, the epicenter of Britain’s outbreak, and took up residence at her home in Windsor with her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh. Both the monarch and her 98-year-old husband are among those over 70 whom the British government have advised to stay home for 12 weeks. The virus causes mild to moderate symptoms in most people, but for some, especially older adults and the infirm, it can cause pneumonia and lead to death. Many in the U.K. have compared the pandemic to World War II, suggesting the effort needed to overcome COVID-19 would be similar. The queen herself suggested a parallel, and reminded the nation that other crises have served to strain family ties. “It reminds me of the very first broadcast I made, in 1940, helped by my sister. We, as children, spoke from here at Windsor to children who had been evacuated from their homes and sent away for their own safety,” she said. “Today, once again, many will feel a painful sense of separation from their loved ones. But now, as then, we know, deep down, that it is the right thing to do.” The address was recorded in the White Drawing Room at Windsor Castle. The location was chosen specifically because it allowed enough space between the monarch and the camera person, who wore personal protective equipment. Leadership expert James O’Rourke from the University of Notre Dame said that the monarch’s remarks couldn’t have come a moment too soon. With Johnson ill with the virus himself, the queen offers a message of continuity to a country in lockdown. “Britons have not faced such grim circumstances since the darkest days of World War II, with the Blitz and the mass evacuation at Dunkirk in 1940,” he said. “Now, more than ever, the people of the U.K. must have someone to rely upon, someone whose word they can trust.” The queen invoked the words of a World War II-era song “We'll Meet Again” by Vera Lynn that offered hope to many a soldier sent to fight, promising that loved ones would be reunited in the end. The parallel was unmistakable: It can't last forever. “We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return,” she said. “We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again.” ___ Follow AP news coverage of the coronavirus pandemic at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak
  • Actor Logan Williams, who appeared in CW’s “The Flash” as the young Barry Allen, has died. He was 16. Williams’ agent, Michelle Gauvin, says he died Thursday. Gauvin did not give the cause of his death, but she said his sudden death comes as a “shock.” “The Flash” star Grant Gustin posted a photo of him with Williams and actor Jesse L. Martin on Instagram that was taken during the filming of a series pilot in 2014. Gustin called the news of Williams’ death “devastating” then spoke highly about his talent and professionalism. John Wesley Shipp, who played Barry Allen in the CBS version of “The Flash,” posted photos with Williams on Twitter. Shipp said he was “heartsick” after hearing the news. Williams started acting at the age of 10. He appeared in other television shows, including “When Calls the Heart” and “The Whispers.”
  • Patricia Bosworth, an actress who once starred alongside Audrey Hepburn and later wrote biographies on several stars including Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift, has died due to the coronavirus. She was 86. Bosworth’s stepdaughter, Fia Hatsav, told The New York Times that pneumonia brought on by the virus was the cause of death. Bosworth died on Thursday in New York. Bosworth played a nun opposite of Hepburn in the 1959 classic “The Nun’s Story.” Along with penning bios for Brando and Clift, she also wrote biographies on actress Jane Fonda and famed photographer Diane Arbus, who photographed Bosworth in a Greyhound bus advertisement. Her biography on Arbus served as the base for the 2006 film “Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus,” which starred Nicole Kidman. Under the tutelage of Lee Strasberg, Bosworth studied acting at the Actors Studio alongside Marilyn Monroe, Paul Newman, Steve McQueen and Fonda. Bosworth worked on Broadway and starred in television shows including “Naked City” and “The Patty Duke.” Bosworth turned her attention from acting to focus on a career in journalism as a successful editor and writer. She wrote for The New York Times and New York magazine, and was an editor for several publications including Screen Stars, McCall’s and contributed to Vanity Fair. She wrote memoirs about her own life in 1998's “Anything Your Little Heart Desires: An American Family Story' and 2017’s “The Men in My Life: A Memoir of Love and Art in 1950s Manhattan.
  • Spanish singer-songwriter Luis Eduardo Aute, whose politically charged songs became popular during Spain’s transition from dictatorship to democracy, died Saturday at the age of 76, a performing arts guild said. The Spanish General Society of Authors and Publishers said Aute died in Madrid after a recent decline his health. Aute suffered a serious stroke in 2016 and never recovered fully. His biggest hit was the song “Al alba” (“At Dawn”), an homage to the victims of the repression carried out during the decades-long authoritarian rule of Gen. Francisco Franco. Aute released over 30 albums. In addition to music, he was also an accomplished painter, sculpture, and film director.
  • The singer Pink had tested positive for COVID-19, she said Friday, also announcing that she is donating $500,000 each to two emergency funds. In a pair of tweets, she said she and her three-year-old son were displaying symptoms two weeks ago, and she tested positive after accessing tests through a primary care physician. Her family had already been sheltering at home and continued to do so, she said. They were tested again “just a few days ago,' and were negative. The Grammy Award-winning artist behind eight studio albums and hits like “Get the Party Started,” “What About Us,” “Raise Your Glass” and “Just Give Me a Reason” called for for free and widespread testing. “It is an absolute travesty and failure of our government to not make testing more widely accessible,” she wrote. “This illness is serious and real. People need to know that the illness affects the young and old, healthy and unhealthy, rich and poor, and we must make testing free and more widely accessible to protect our children, our families, our friends and our communities.” She announced she's donating $1 million across two coronavirus-related relief funds, with $500,000 each going to the Temple University Hospital Fund in Philadelphia and the COVID-19 response fund run by the Mayor's Fund for Los Angeles. The Temple University donation honors the singer born Alecia Moore's mother, Judy Moore, who worked at the hospital's cardiomyopathy and heart transplant center for nearly two decades, she said. She called health care workers “heroes” and ended her post with an appeal to the public. “These next two weeks are crucial: please stay home,” she wrote. “Please. Stay. Home.”
  • Selena Gomez opened up about being diagnosed with bipolar disorder during a social media chat with Miley Cyrus. Gomez spoke about her diagnosis during a 20-minute conversation Friday on Cyrus’ “Bright Minded” series on Instagram. The singer says she “realized that I was bipolar” after she recently visited a mental hospital. The 27-year-old Gomez said understanding her disorder more “took the fear away.” “And so when I got to know more information, it actually helps me,” she said. “It doesn’t scare me once I know it.” Gomez revealed in 2017 that she underwent kidney transplant due to her struggle with lupus. She said at the time the transplant was needed for her “overall health.' In her discussion with Cyrus, Gomez said she has witnessed mental health issues within her family. “I’ve seen some of it even in my own family, where I’m like, ‘What’s going on?’ I’m from Texas. It’s just not known to talk about mental health,” she said. “You got to seem cool. And then I see anger built up in children and teenagers or whatever young adults because they are wanting that so badly. I just feel like when I finally said what I was going to say, I wanted to know everything about it. And it took the fear away.”
  • From finding ways to help others cope to sheltering in place to canceling events, here’s a look at some of the ways the entertainment industry is reacting to the spread of the coronavirus, which most people recover from but can cause severe illness in the elderly and those with preexisting medical conditions. IHEART’S LIVING ROOM CONCERT An Elton John-led, star-studded benefit concert that raised more than $10 million to battle the coronavirus will be re-aired on Fox next week. Billie Eilish, Mariah Carey and Alicia Keys will be shown performing from their homes on “Fox Presents the iHeart Living Room Concert for America,” which will air Monday. The money will go to Feeding America and First Responders Children’s Foundation. The hourlong event originally aired Sunday on Fox and iHeartMedia radio stations. Other performers include Tim McGraw, H.E.R. and Sam Smith, who sang “How Do You Sleep” in a cappella form. Dave Grohl sang “My Hero” from his studio in Hawaii, Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong strummed his guitar to “Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” while Camila Cabello sang “My Oh My” from Miami with a guitar assist from beau Shawn Mendes. Lady Gaga, Lizzo, Ellen DeGeneres and Ryan Seacrest paid tribute to those combating the spread of the virus. FILM ACADEMY DONATES $6M TO HELP INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is giving $6 million to help film industry employees out of work due to the coronavirus pandemic. The film academy, which puts on the annual Academy Awards, said Friday that it will donate $2 million to the Actors Fund, which supports performers and behind-the-scenes workers; $2 million to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, the long-running nonprofit offering relief to members of the entertainment community in need; and $2 million to the Academy Foundation, its own charitable arm. “As we face a pandemic, it’s incumbent upon us to help those in the motion picture community who are suffering,” said David Rubin, academy president, said in a statement. “The shutting down of productions, businesses and theaters has had devastating consequences. By contributing financially to The Actors Fund, MPTF, and the Academy Foundation’s wonderful grants program, we can help provide our extended family with desperately needed assistance.” SOUTH KOREA ASKS 8,000 THEATERGOERS TO SELF MONITOR The South Korean capital of Seoul says it will ask more than 8,500 theatergoers to self-monitor at home after Canadian and American cast members of “The Phantom of the Opera” were found to have the coronavirus. Seoul City official Na Baek-ju said Friday the musical’s international tour was halted following the positive test of an unidentified Canadian actress, who began experiencing throat pain and dry coughs days after she began performing at the city’s Blue Square theater on March 14. She last appeared on stage on Monday, a day before her test. Officials have since tested 138 of her contacts, including colleagues and guests at the downtown Somerset Palace hotel, and confirmed the infection of an American actor on Thursday. Na said officials were still awaiting test results for 48 people while the other 89 tested negative. He said the hotel was ordered to prevent guests from leaving the property and stop taking new customers. South Korea earlier on Friday reported 86 new cases of the coronavirus, bringing its nationwide total to 10,062. While the country’s caseload has slowed from early March when officials reported around 500 new cases per day, there’s concern over a steady rise in infections in the densely populated Seoul metropolitan area, where about half of the country’s 51 million people live. ___ Associated Press entertainment writer Jonathan Landrum Jr. contributed to this report.
  • Anthony Terrell believes an imprisoned man currently serving two life sentences may not have been the person who murdered his brother as part of a killing spree that rocked Atlanta four decades ago. Terrell hopes new light can be shed nationwide on the murders that terrorized the African American community in the city within a two-year time span with the HBO documentary “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children.' The five-part series, which begins Sunday, will explore how the victims’ family members and others remain skeptical about Wayne Williams being the sole killer, despite evidence linking him to those murders and 10 others. “I really want them to find out who did it,” said Terrell, whose 12-year-old brother, Earl, was one of the 29 abducted and killed between 1979 and 1981. “It would be closure to a lot of parents and others who want answers. It’s more than just blaming Wayne Williams. His name was embedded in everybody’s heads. Let us be focused on something else. He was convicted of two adults, but the rest were children. What about them?' Williams was convicted in 1982 in the deaths of two adults, who were thought to be among 29 black children and young adults killed by the same person. After Williams’ conviction, police closed the rest of the cases, blaming them on Williams without formally charging him. The 61-year-old Williams says in the documentary that he never killed anyone. He has appealed his convictions, but they have been denied several times. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Police Chief Erika Shields are leading a charge to reopen the investigation. The series kicks off with Bottoms’ announcing the city’s effort to re-examine evidence. Last year, Bottoms said she was hopeful that technological advancements and newly available genetic databases could turn up new information. Terrell said the reopening of the case is long overdue, but hopes the documentary can show the black community's plight while enduring the tragedies in their neighborhoods in Atlanta. “This documentary could enlighten a lot of curious people,” he said. “I want people to know what happened in Atlanta. Why don't people know? They need to know.' John Legend is one of those interested in the case. The renowned singer said he didn’t know much about the child murders in Atlanta while growing up in Ohio as a kid. “I didn’t hear one thing about it,” said Legend, an executive producer of the project with Mike Jackson through their film company Get Lifted, in association with Roc Nation. “I was born in 1978, so I was very young when all this was happening. But it wasn’t a part of our folklore. It wasn’t a part of the things we talked about. ... I think there’s a lot of folks around the country that this would be new to them.” Filmmaker Sam Pollard said the documentary touches on the racial and political tensions between black locals and the Ku Klux Klan along with the Atlanta Police Department. He said the series will point toward other possible suspects, thanks to an anonymous source who had new evidence connecting members of the KKK to the murders. “We walked into this project thinking Wayne was the killer,” Pollard said. “But as we started to dig into the research, educate people and connect the dots. ... there may have been a rush to judgement in this trial. For me personally, I came to the conclusion that Wayne didn’t kill anybody.” Retired journalist Monica Kaufman, who reported on the murders, said the case was mishandled by officials at a time when Atlanta was on the rise after Maynard Jackson was elected as the city’s first black mayor in 1973. The city has had a black mayor ever since then, becoming known for its thriving black business ownership, hip-hop and film scene, and having one of the largest airports in the world. Kaufman said the rise of Atlanta would have been “sullied” if the cases were solved 40 years ago. “The city was up and coming, and we didn’t want anything to tarnish that image,” she said. “I think that if those cases had been solved in some ways, if there had been more than one murderer, it would have changed the political structure. It would have affected the business in Atlanta. It would have changed this city forever.” ___ Follow AP Entertainment Writer Jonathan Landrum Jr. on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrLandrum31