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Entertainment

    CBS offered no indication Tuesday that it would publicly release the findings of the report that led the network to deny a $120 million exit package to Leslie Moonves, the chief executive who was dismissed for sexual misconduct. Moonves, once the most powerful executive in the television industry, lost the payout Monday when the CBS board of directors concluded that there were grounds to fire him because of violations of network policy and his 'willful failure' to cooperate with the investigation. The board cited a just-concluded report by outside investigators, but the network is not spelling out the details. Moonves, who built CBS into the nation's most popular network, was ousted in September after several women accused him of sexual misconduct and retaliation if they resisted his advances. He has characterized his relationships as consensual and denied attempts to stonewall investigators. The board was verbally briefed on the investigation. Portions of the report's findings were leaked to The New York Times earlier this month. The network would not comment on the issue Tuesday. Keeping such employment details private is standard business practice at most corporations, said Jennifer Drobac, an Indiana University professor and expert in employment law. But Moonves' prominence, and the damage that his behavior may have done to the business, make it important to come clean in this instance, she said. CBS may be concerned about provoking litigation, but it shouldn't be a worry if the truth is on the network's side, she said. 'It's better for CBS to put it out there and own the problem, explain why it is no longer a problem and demonstrate how they took it seriously, so they can instill greater confidence in the new management,' Drobac said. Lawyer Gloria Allred, who represents four of the women interviewed by investigators, also said the report should be made public. However, the names of the alleged victims and what they specifically accuse Moonves of doing should be left out unless those women specifically give their permission, she said. Several months after 'Today' show anchor Matt Lauer was fired for sexual misconduct, NBC publicly released the findings of its investigation, without identifying the people involved. NBC was criticized for keeping the investigation in-house instead of turning to outside lawyers. An earlier internal report on false statements made on 'NBC Nightly News' by former anchor Brian Williams was kept under wraps. One expert in crisis communications argued that it was better for CBS not to release its complete findings on Moonves. 'You release the conclusion,' said Richard Levick, chairman and chief executive of Levick International. 'You do not release the report.' He said it would send the wrong signal for people who spoke to investigators with the expectation of anonymity if details they provided were made public. 'It's not only about the accused in situations like this but the accusers who wish to preserve their identity,' Levick said. CBS hired lawyers Mary Jo White, a former U.S. attorney, and Nancy Kestenbaum to conduct the inquiry. Investigators were also looking into conduct at '60 Minutes,' where former Executive Producer Jeff Fager was recently fired for a threatening note sent to another CBS reporter looking into accusations that he had acted inappropriately at some parties and protected bad behavior by others. The Times said earlier this month that it had reviewed a copy of the report and outlined several specific accusations, including that Moonves had a CBS employee 'on call' to perform oral sex. Moonves told investigators it was consensual, the report said. Investigators said they found Moonves had 'deliberately lied about and minimized the extent of his sexual misconduct,' the newspaper quoted the report as saying. Indiana's Drobac said that the leak is another argument in favor of releasing the full report publicly, since the nature of how the information came out lends doubt to both the conclusions and Moonves' response. The network revamped its board of directors following Moonves' ouster and last week said that it was donating to women's advocacy groups $20 million that had been set aside for Moonves' severance. Despite the apparent decision to keep the report private, the board did offer some insight into its findings. CBS said Monday that investigators had concluded that harassment and retaliation are not pervasive at CBS, but that the company had not placed a high priority on preventing such behavior. Investigators found other instances where top people in the company had not been held accountable for their behavior. The network said it had recently appointed a new 'chief people officer' responsible for improving the workplace environment.
  • Prime-time viewership numbers compiled by Nielsen for Dec. 10-16. Listings include the week's ranking and viewership. 1. NFL Football: Philadelphia at L.A. Rams, NBC, 18.12 million. 2. NFL Football: L.A. Chargers at Kansas City, Fox, 17.41 million. 3. '60 Minutes,' CBS, 14.55 million. 4. 'NCIS,' CBS, 12.28 million. 5. 'NFL Pregame,' NBC, 11.66 million. 6. NFL Football: Minnesota at Seattle, ESPN, 11.63 million. 7. 'NFL Pregame,' Fox, 10.34 million. 8. 'Football Night in America,' NBC, 9.22 million. 9. 'FBI,' CBS, 9.04 million. 10. 'The Voice' (Tuesday), NBC, 8.97 million. 11. 'God Friended Me,' CBS, 8.53 million. 12. 'The Voice' (Monday), NBC, 8.43 million. 13. 'The Big Bang Theory,' CBS, 8.08 million. 14. 'Survivor,' CBS, 7.78 million. 15. 'NCIS: New Orleans,' CBS, 7.76 million. 16. 'Mom,' CBS, 7.71 million. 17. 'Young Sheldon,' CBS, 7.7 million. 18. 'Bull,' CBS, 7.4 million. 19. NFL Football: Cleveland at Denver, NFL Network, 7.29 million. 20. 'NCIS: Los Angeles,' CBS, 7.21 million. ___ ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co.; CBS is a division of CBS Corp.; Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox; NBC is owned by NBC Universal.
  • Professional football — the lifeblood of live television this time of year — illustrated its dominance in the ratings this past week. Four NFL games finished among the Nielsen company's 20 most popular prime-time programs, with NBC's Sunday night and Fox's Thursday contests the top two. Both games featured Los Angeles teams. Add in three pre-game shows, and football accounted for seven of Nielsen's entries. The games usually dwarf regular programming. For example, Fox drew 17.4 million to its Thursday night game. Its next most popular show, 'Last Man Standing,' had 12 million fewer viewers. Similarly, the 18.1 million people who watched NBC's 'Sunday Night Football' were nearly 10 million more than 'The Voice.' CBS' lineup has a broader base of support and no pro football in prime-time, but it should be noted that its highest-rated show, '60 Minutes,' comes on after football on the East Coast. CBS won the week in prime time, averaging 7.2 million viewers. NBC had 6.2 million viewers, Fox had 5.1 million, ABC had 3.6 million, Univision had 1.4 million, ION Television had 1.3 million, the CW had 1.2 million and Telemundo had 1.1 million. ESPN was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 2.4 million people in prime time. Fox News Channel had 2.04 million, Hallmark had 2.02 million, MSNBC had 1.91 million and USA had 1.31 million. ABC's 'World News Tonight' topped the evening newscasts with an average of 8.9 million viewers. NBC's 'Nightly News' was second with 8.6 million and the 'CBS Evening News' had 6.4 million For the week of Dec. 10-16, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: NFL Football: Philadelphia at L.A. Rams, NBC, 18.12 million; NFL Football: L.A. Chargers at Kansas City, Fox, 17.41 million; '60 Minutes,' CBS, 14.55 million; 'NCIS,' CBS, 12.28 million; 'NFL Pregame,' NBC, 11.66 million; NFL Football: Minnesota at Seattle, ESPN, 11.63 million; 'NFL Pregame,' Fox, 10.34 million; 'Football Night in America,' NBC, 9.22 million; 'FBI,' CBS, 9.04 million; 'The Voice' (Tuesday), NBC, 8.97 million. ___ ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks. ___ Online: http://www.nielsen.com
  • Celebrities offer their thanks, remembrances and condolences on the death of actress-director Penny Marshall, who died Monday at 75. ___ 'I loved Penny. I grew up with her. She was born with a great gift. She was born with a funnybone and the instinct of how to use it. I was very lucky to have lived with her and her funnybone. I will miss her.' — Rob Reiner, who was married to Marshall from 1971 to 1981, via Twitter. 'Goodbye, Penny. Man, did we laugh a lot! Wish we still could. Love you. Hanx.' — Tom Hanks on Twitter. 'She was funny & so smart. She made the transition from sitcom star to A List movie director with ease & had a major impact on both mediums. All that & always relaxed, funny & totally unpretentious. I was lucky to have known & worked with her.' — Ron Howard on Twitter. 'I am absolutely heartbroken.' — Rosie O'Donnell, in an emailed statement. 'Thank you, Penny Marshall. For the trails you blazed. The laughs you gave. The hearts you warmed.' — Ava Duvernay, via Twitter. 'I first met Penny one month after having arriving here in LA. I was a guest star on a TV pilot she was working on. The next time we worked together was on that iconic episode of 'Happy Days.' She was so inventive, so funny and so warm. She brought her own unique brand of humor to what was on the written page.' — Henry Winkler, in an emailed statement. 'Thank you for what you contributed to us girls. Grateful to have worked with you. Rest well you great Broad!!!' — Viola Davis on Twitter. 'Penny will be missed. May she Rest in Peace.' — Robert De Niro, via emailed statement. 'Yesterday I held a Golden Gloves award from the 1930's, given to me by Penny Marshall. Hadn't seen it in years. Then today's news... Penny told me the story of Jim Braddock, which became the movie Cinderella Man. She was kind, she was crazy, so talented and she loved movies.' — Russell Crowe, via Twitter. 'I grew up wanting to be as funny as Penny Marshall, and had the pleasure of meeting her a few times. Watch some old Laverne and Shirley to see why her brother Garry insisted on casting her. Comedy gold, she was.' — 'Big Bang Theory' actress Mayim Bialik, via Twitter. 'What an inspiring woman #PennyMarshall was. Funny, talented, kind and giving. Penny was so supportive of my career from the very beginning and I will always be so grateful. A wonderful actress, producer and director. She will be missed by so many.' — Reese Witherspoon on Instagram. 'Sad to hear of Penny Marshall's passing. a great comedienne a terrific director and a dear friend.' — Billy Crystal, via Twitter. 'Such a wonderful, funny and talented lady. Without her support and encouragement, I would not be where I am today. She will be missed.' — Mark Wahlberg on Twitter. 'The Marshall family grieves again as the great #PennyMarshall dies at age 75. What an extraordinary family they were and continue to be, and how much love and sympathy my family and I send their way. The end of an era.' — Bette Midler on Twitter. Marshall's brother, 'Pretty Woman' director Garry Marshall, died in 2016. 'I'm sad to read she has passed. Director, producer and actress who had the humor, wit and fortitude to stand equally with the boys in Hollywood. Goodbye Penny, we will miss you. RIP.' — actress Marlee Matlin, who shared a photo on Twitter in which she said she was emulating Marshall. 'Penny Marshall had me audition 6 times for a role and then I didn't get it. She didn't know that I would audition for her forever. It was a treat to be in the room. She was glorious.' — Jason Alexander, via Twitter. 'Penny Marshall was a sweet woman. I was very fortunate to spend time with her. So many laughs. She had a heart of gold. Tough as nails. She could play round ball with the best of them.' — Danny DeVito, via Twitter. 'The LA Clippers are deeply saddened by the passing of Penny Marshall, a resilient pioneer with legendary talent, a committed advocate for women, and a passionate member of Clipper Nation.' — The NBA's Los Angeles Clippers, whose sidelines Marshall sat on for nearly every home game, via Twitter. 'She was an incredible artist. Met her when I was a broke young actor. She gave me her court side seats to a Clippers game. 'Here, I can't watch them lose anymore.' I felt like such a big shot with my friends that night sitting in Penny Marshall's seats watching the Clippers lose.' — actor Alan Tudyk, via Twitter. — 'Big.' ''A League of Their Own.' ''Awakenings.' Today, we say goodbye to one of the greats. Penny Marshall, you will be missed.' — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences via Twitter. 'Penny Marshall brought us great laughter and truly broke new ground as a director. Neither a schlemiel, nor ever a schlimazel, she shall be missed by her many fans.' — George Takei on Twitter. 'I had the good fortune to be directed by her once and she was sharp and smart and hilarious. And A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN still holds up. What an amazing talent.' — Patton Oswalt on Twitter. 'I don't know what to say.' — Michael McKean, Marshall's 'Laverne & Shirley' co-star, via Twitter.
  • Penny Marshall, who indelibly starred in the top-rated sitcom 'Laverne & Shirley' before becoming the trailblazing director of smash-hit big-screen comedies such as 'Big' and 'A League of Their Own,' has died. She was 75. Michelle Bega, a spokeswoman for the Marshall family, said Tuesday that Marshall died in her Los Angeles home on Monday night due to complications from diabetes. Marshall earlier fought lung cancer, which went into remission in 2013. 'Our family is heartbroken,' the Marshall family said in a statement. In 'Laverne & Shirley,' among television's biggest hits for much of its eight-season run between 1976-1983, the nasal-voiced, Bronx-born Marshall starred as Laverne DeFazio alongside Cindy Williams as a pair of blue-collar roommates toiling on the assembly line of a Milwaukee brewery. A spinoff of 'Happy Days,' the series was the rare network hit about working-class characters, and its self-empowering opening song ('Give us any chance, we'll take it/ Read us any rule, we'll break it') foreshadowed Marshall's own path as a pioneering female filmmaker in the male-dominated movie business. 'Almost everyone had a theory about why 'Laverne & Shirley' took off,' Marshall wrote in her 2012 memoir 'My Mother Was Nuts.' ''I thought it was simply because Laverne and Shirley were poor and there were no poor people on TV, but there were plenty of them sitting at home and watching TV.' Marshall directed several episodes of 'Laverne & Shirley,' which her older brother, the late filmmaker-producer Garry Marshall, created. Those episodes helped launch Marshall as a filmmaker. When Whoopi Goldberg clashed with director Howard Zieff, she brought in Marshall to direct 'Jumpin' Jack Flash,' the 1986 comedy starring Goldberg. 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' did fair business, but Marshall's next film, 'Big,' was a major success, making her the first woman to direct a film that grossed more than $100 million. The 1988 comedy, starring Tom Hanks, is about a 12-year-old boy who wakes up in the body of a 30-year-old New York City man. The film, which earned Hanks an Oscar nomination, grossed $151 million worldwide, or about $320 million accounting for inflation. The honor meant only so much to the typically self-deprecating Marshall. 'They didn't give ME the money,' Marshall later joked to The New Yorker. Marshall reteamed with Hanks for 'A League of Their Own,' the 1992 comedy about the women's professional baseball league begun during World War II, starring Geena Davis, Madonna and Rosie O'Donnell. That, too, crossed $100 million, making $107.5 million domestically. More than any other films, 'A League of Their Own' and 'Big' ensured Marshall's stamp on the late '80s, early '90s. The piano dance scene in FAO Schwartz in 'Big' became iconic. Hanks' reprimand from 'A League of Their Own' — 'There's no crying in baseball!' — remains quoted on baseball diamonds everywhere. On Tuesday, Marshall's passing was felt across film, television and comedy . 'Big' producer James L. Brooks praised her for making 'films which celebrated humans' and for her helping hand to young comedians and writers. 'To many of us lost ones she was, at the time, the world's greatest den mother.' 'She had a heart of gold. Tough as nails,' recalled Danny DeVito, who starred in Marshall's 1994 comedy 'Renaissance Man.' ''She could play round ball with the best of them.' Marshall's early success in a field where few women rose so high made her an inspiration to other aspiring female filmmakers. Ava DuVernay, whose 'A Wrinkle in Time' was the first $100 million-budgeted film directed by a woman of color, said Tuesday: 'Thank you, Penny Marshall. For the trails you blazed. The laughs you gave. The hearts you warmed.' In between 'Big' and 'A League of Their Own,' Marshall made the Oliver Sacks adaptation 'Awakenings,' with Robin Williams and Robert De Niro. The medical drama, while not as successful at the box office, became only the second film directed by a woman nominated for best picture. Carole Penny Marshall was born Oct. 15, 1943, in the Bronx. Her mother, Marjorie Marshall, was a dance teacher, and her father, Anthony, made industrial films. Their marriage was strained. Her mother's caustic wit — a major source of material and of pain in Marshall's memoir — was formative. (One remembered line: 'You were a miscarriage, but you were stubborn and held on.') 'Those words are implanted in your soul, unfortunately. It's just the way it was,' Marshall once recalled. 'You had to learn at a certain age what sarcasm is, you know? When she says it about somebody else, you laughed, but when it was you, you didn't laugh so much.' During college at the University of New Mexico, Marshall met Michael Henry, whom she married briefly for two years and with whom she had a daughter, Tracy. Marshall would later wed the director Rob Reiner, a marriage that lasted from 1971 to 1981. Tracy, who took the name Reiner, became an actress; one of her first roles was a brief appearance in her mother's 'Jumpin' Jack Flash.' Marshall is also survived by her older sister, Ronny, and three grandchildren. Marshall's brother Garry, already established as a writer, coaxed her to move out to Los Angeles in 1967. She studied acting while supporting herself as a secretary — a role she would later play on 'Happy Days.' Her first commercial was for Head & Shoulders opposite a then-unknown Farrah Fawcett. 'I just cannot bring myself to accept that the homely person on the screen is me,' Marshall told TV Guide in 1976. 'I grew up believing an actress is supposed to be beautiful. After I saw myself in a 'Love American Style' segment, I cried for three days. I've had braces put on my teeth twice, but they did no good.' Marshall never again matched the run of 'Big,' ''Awakenings' and 'A League of Their Own.' Her next film, the Army recruit comedy 'Renaissance Man,' flopped. She directed 'The Preacher's Wife' (1996) with Denzel Washington and Whitney Houston. Her last film as director was 2001's 'Riding in Cars With Boys,' with Drew Barrymore. Marshall also helmed episodes of ABC's 'According to Jim' in 2009 and Showtime's 'United States of Tara' in 2010 and 2011, and directed the 2010 TV movie 'Women Without Men.' Marshall, a courtside regular at Los Angeles Lakers games, left behind a long-in-the-making documentary about former NBA star Dennis Rodman. When the project was announced in 2012, Marshall said Rodman asked her to do it. 'I have a little radar to the insane,' explained Marshall. 'They seek me out.' ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Some advertisers say they are leaving conservative host Tucker Carlson's show following his remarks that immigrants could make the U.S. 'poorer and dirtier.' It's the latest example of sponsors leaving a Fox News Channel show after controversy, but experts say the flap is likely to blow over. So far, the show's biggest advertisers appear to be sticking with him and his prime-time show, 'Tucker Carlson Tonight.' Carlson said last Thursday that there's pressure from 'our leaders' to accept immigrants 'even if it makes our own country poorer and dirtier and more divided.' He added Monday that in the Southwest, 'thanks to illegal immigration, huge swaths of the region are covered with garbage and waste that degrade the soil and kill wildlife.' The comments caused a furor on social media. Several advertisers, including the IHOP restaurant chain, personal finance website NerdWallet and Pacific Life insurance, have pulled advertising from the show. (NerdWallet is a content partner of The Associated Press.) SmileDirectClub said it is working with its ad buyers to stop running ads during any political opinion shows. 'As a company, we strongly disagree with Mr. Carlson's statements,' Pacific Life said in a tweet Thursday. 'Our customer base and our workforce reflect the diversity of our great nation, something we take great pride in.' IHOP spokeswoman Stephanie Peterson said the chain continually evaluates ad placements to make sure they align with the company's values of 'welcoming all folks from all backgrounds and beliefs.' She said the company will continue to advertise on other Fox News programs. Earlier this year, Laura Ingraham lost some advertisers after she made negative comments about Florida school shooting survivor David Hogg. And last year, Bill O'Reilly saw advertisers abandon him following reports of sexual-misconduct complaints against him; he left the network shortly afterward. Fox News Channel said in a statement that 'left wing advocacy groups' were using social media to 'stifle free speech.' The network said it 'continues to stand by and work with our advertisers through these unfortunate and unnecessary distractions.' Later on Tuesday, Fox issued another statement saying it won't allow Carlson to be 'censored by agenda-driven intimidation efforts.' Fox added that all advertisers have switched their ads to other shows, so no revenue was lost. Carlson said he would not back down to criticism. 'We're not intimidated,' he wrote . 'We plan to try to say what's true until the last day. And the truth is, unregulated mass immigration has badly hurt this country's natural landscape.' Most of Carlson's biggest advertisers are sticking with the show or staying mum. MyPillow, which makes pillows and mattress toppers, has no plans to leave. It's the show's biggest advertiser in terms of dollars spent, according to Kantar Media. 'I make all of my advertising decisions based on what is best for MyPillow, my customers and my employees,' MyPillow inventor and CEO Mike Lindell said in a statement Tuesday. The number five top advertiser, AstraZeneca, said it would 'continue to assess our advertising purchases regarding the heightened attention surrounding this matter,' but did not announce any action. The other top three advertisers, Rosland Capital, a precious metals asset firm, and weight-loss companies Jenny Craig and Nutrisystem, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Allen Adamson, co-founder of brand consultancy Metaforce, said Tucker's comments, 'while damaging in short term, will be supplanted by some other news event. No matter how polarizing your comments are, if you wait long enough someone else will say something more polarizing and take limelight away.' And advertisers often come back once the controversy dies down. In a statement, NerdWallet said it is pulling ads 'at this time and will be reevaluating any ongoing advertising on this program.' Jeff Greenfield, co-founder of marketing measurement firm C3metrics, said these types of controversies are 'usually short term' and amount to little more than a slap on the wrist. He said shows 'don't feel it unless you permanently pull spending, and most people are not going to do that.
  • Sandra Bullock has an impromptu idea for how to solve the Oscars host problem, and it involves a lot of improvisation. The Oscar-winning actress told The Associated Press Monday at a screening of her new film 'Bird Box ' that she thinks random actors should be pulled out of the audience and read what's on the teleprompter to cover a segment of the show. Organizers 'don't even have to tell them it's happening, just put up the teleprompter, and go, 'it's your turn,'' Bullock said. 'You're an actor, figure it out.' Bullock says it's a genius solution that everyone in the room is perfectly suited to handle. Well, almost everyone — Bullock says she's not attending next year's ceremony, but would participate in her idea if she was. No host for February's Academy Awards has been announced since Kevin Hart backed out of emcee duties earlier this month over backlash to his old homophobic tweets. Bullock's idea relied on a bit of improvisation. She told the AP, 'I just pulled that out of my butt. It's amazing.' By the end of the red carpet for 'Bird Box,' it already had the support of some of Bullock's co-stars. 'I don't think we need a host anymore, man. I really believe it should be a show that we just do,' Lil Rel Howery said. 'Maybe if you can get celebrities to do some really funny sketches instead of one person. Something fun.' Actor BD Wong said if anyone can pull off Bullock's idea, it's her. 'She's got tons of good ideas. First of all, she's the life of every party,' Wong said. 'I would just give her the gig to figure out how to organize it because she would be the person to figure out how to do it.' 'Bird Box' has a limited theatrical release and will be on Netflix on Friday. The Oscars will be held Feb. 24.
  • Olivia Newton-John's autobiography, released last fall in her longtime home Australia, comes out in the U.S. in 2019. Gallery Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, announced Tuesday that 'Don't Stop Believin'' would be published March 12. The book will include a new afterword by the award-winning singer and actress, known for such hits as 'Physical' and 'I Honestly Love You' and for her starring role in the movie version of 'Grease.' The 70-year-old said in September that she was again being treated for breast cancer. She was first diagnosed in 1992.
  • Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Alice Walker and The New York Times are drawing fire after she praised an author who critics say expresses anti-Semitism and is a conspiracy theorist. In an interview in Sunday's 'By The Book' column, the 74-year-old author of 'The Color Purple' said David Icke's 1995 book, 'And The Truth Shall Set You Free,' is on her nightstand. She said 'in Icke's books there is the whole of existence, on this planet and several others, to think about.' New York Times spokesperson Danielle Rhoades says the column is not a list of recommendations from its editors, and 'the subject's answers are a reflection on that person's personal tastes, opinions and judgments.' Icke is a British author. Walker declined comment through her publicist.
  • The Ambrosian Library in Milan is planning a series of exhibitions to commemorate the 500-year anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci's death, including the display of the most important pages of the Renaissance genius' Atlantic Codex. The library, which has preserved the Codex since 1637, announced Tuesday that it will exhibit 46 of its most famous drawings, which encompass the artist's career from his Florentine youth to his later years in France. The 1,119-page Atlantic Codex is an encyclopedia of technical knowledge from the Renaissance, representing Leonardo's own inventions but his representations of technology as it existed. The commemoration will run from Dec. 18-Sept. 15, and will be broken up into three sections, the first focused on Milan, the second on civil engineering studies and the last on Leonardo's French period.