On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-night
74°
Partly Cloudy
H 82° L 71°
  • clear-night
    74°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 82° L 71°
  • cloudy-day
    73°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 82° L 71°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    84°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 84° L 74°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Business Headlines

    Chile is one of the richest countries in the region. Haiti is the poorest. Ecuador has a centrist government. Bolivia's is socialist. Yet, from Port-au-Prince to Santiago, furious demonstrators were marching this week to demand fundamental change, part of a wave of often-violent protests that has set tires, government offices, trains and metro stations ablaze across Latin America and the Caribbean. What's driving the protests thousands of miles apart, across countries with profoundly different politics, economies, cultures and histories? One important factor: Despite their differences, the countries hit by fiery protests this month saw often-dizzying commodity-driven growth in the first decade of this century, followed by a slump or stall as prices dropped for key exports. Even Haiti , its own economy largely stagnant, saw billions in aid from oil-rich Venezuela flood in, then disappear. That pattern of boom then slackening is a dangerous one for less-than-agile leaders. It expands the middle class, creating citizens who feel entitled to receive more from their governments, and empowered to demand it. And it sharpens the sense of unfairness for those left out of the boom, who see neighbors prospering while they stand still or slide backward. Chile, the world's largest copper producer, boomed from 2000 to 2014 before growth dropped off. The average Chilean still earns roughly $560 to $700 a month, income that makes it hard for many to pay their bills. Then, last week, an independent panel implemented a 4-cent subway fare increase that the Chilean government initially said was needed to cope with rising oil prices and a weaker local currency. For thousands of Chileans, it was a final indignity after years of struggling as the country prospered. Clashes wracked Chile for a sixth day Wednesday, with the death toll at 18 in an upheaval that has almost paralyzed a country long seen as an oasis of stability. 'People went out to protest because they feel the government cares more about the wealthy, and that social programs help the very poor but the rest of the population is left to care for themselves,' said Patricio Navia, an adjunct assistant professor at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University. 'They are not poor enough to get government subsidies, nor rich enough to get government tax credits. They revolted to make their voice heard.' Marta Lagos, the Santiago, Chile-based director of the polling firm Latinobarometro, said Chile's growth rates hid the over-concentration of wealth in the hands of the elite. Like Chile, oil-rich Ecuador saw a steep rise in GDP as oil topped $100 a barrel and President Rafael Correa built multi-lane highways, airports and universities. Then oil slumped, leaving Ecuador with billions in debt and a steep annual budget shortfall. Correa's successor, Lenín Moreno, took out a three-year $4.2 billion IMF credit line and this month announced a $1.3 billion austerity package that included the elimination of fuel subsidies and a resulting sharp rise in gasoline and diesel prices. That sent Ecuadorians to the streets, led by the country's well-organized, mostly rural indigenous peoples, many of whom are subsistence farmers who saw little to no benefit from the boom years. As a law professor, Mariana Yumbay is better off than most people in Ecuador's mountainous Bolivar province, who raise corn and potato or herds of cattle, pigs and sheep. Even as Ecuador prospered under Correa, indigenous farmers in Bolivar depended on rainfall because they have no irrigation networks, she said. More than 40 percent of children are malnourished and many people live on about $30 a month. 'Unfortunately the state hasn't had a policy of steering economic resources to pull indigenous people and farmers out of poverty,' Yumbay, 46, said this month as she protested outside Ecuador's National Assembly. Moreno ended the protests by agreeing to restore the subsidies, a solution that analysts said left him weakened and facing the same economic troubles that loomed before nearly two weeks of often-violent protests. Haiti was worse off than any other country in the region at the start of the new century but saw an infusion of billions of dollars in highly subsidized oil from Venezuela starting in 2009. Another factor: the flood of international aid after the country's devastating 2010 earthquake. When oil slumped and Venezuela's economy collapsed, the subsidized fuel ended, and the already-impoverished island suffered regular gasoline shortages. Investigations by Haiti's Senate and a federal auditor alleged that government officials had embezzled and misappropriated billions in proceeds from the Venezuelan program known as Petrocaribe. Fueled partly by a group of internet-savvy young Haitians known as the Petrocaribe Challengers, street protests erupted that organizers say won't stop until President Jovenel Moise leaves office. In Bolivia, President Evo Morales has had 14 years of low inflation and strong GDP growth of 4% a year on average, thanks largely to earnings during the commodities-boom years. In recent years, the country's income from natural gas sales has been dropping due to falling prices, drops in reserves and less demand from Brazil and Argentina. Experts say the economy is looking increasingly fragile. Against that backdrop, the popularity he won for his economic management and infrastructure investment has been weakened by corruption scandals in his administration and his insistence on seeking re-election despite losing a referendum on the issue. After allegations of fraud in the Sunday election, protests multiplied across Bolivia outside vote-counting centers this week. Rioting was reported in at least six of Bolivia's nine regions and in the national capital of La Paz, police used tear gas in attempts to quell fighting between supporters of Morales and opponent Carlos Mesa outside a vote-counting center. Protesters threw firecrackers and stones. Morales' opponents burned election offices and ballots in several cities and called for a strike on Wednesday, Morales said his opponents are trying to stage a coup. ___ Associated Press writer Michael Weissenstein reported this story from Havana and AP writer Luis Andres Henao reported from Buenos Aires, Argentina. AP writers Eva Vergara in Santiago, Chile, and Carlos Valdez and Paola Flores in La Paz, Bolivia, contributed to this report. ___ Michael Weissenstein on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mweissenstein
  • Tesla posted a surprising profit of $143 million in its latest quarter, raising hopes the electric car pioneer may finally be turning the corner after posting mostly losses during its first decade as a publicly held company. The positive results announced Wednesday came after Tesla lost $1.1 billion during the first half of the year. That had caused many investors to lose faith in the company even as it boosted sales of its vehicles. Doubts about Tesla led its stock to fall by 23% so far this year, while the bellwether Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed 20%. But Tesla's shares recovered a big chunk of those losses after its third-quarter numbers came out, soaring 20% to $306 in extended trading. The rally stemmed largely from investors' surprise given the widespread expectation on Wall Street that Tesla would register yet another significant loss for the July-September period. Analysts surveyed by FactSet had projected Tesla would lose about $253 million during the third quarter. Instead, Tesla delivered a 'jaw dropper,' said Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives. 'The Street wanted profitability and Tesla delivered in big fashion.' The performance represents a measure of vindication for Tesla's enigmatic co-founder and CEO Elon Musk, who has been facing more questions about whether he is the right person to be steering the company at this critical juncture. Seemingly emboldened, Musk reiterated a pledge to sell at least 360,000 vehicles this year. Tesla will have to sell about 105,000 cars during the final three months of the year, after delivering a record 97,000 vehicles in the third quarter. Boosting sales even more in the current quarter is something most analysts have been doubting Tesla will be able to pull off, but that mindset may change after the company's financial breakthrough in the past quarter. But Tesla will still have to prove it can sustain the momentum, something that it hasn't done so far. For instance, the company recorded back-to-back quarterly profits last year, only to sustain huge losses during the first half of this year even as it sold more cars. The company fared better during the same time last year with a profit of $311 million. That means the net income for this year's quarter was down 54% by comparison. Tesla probably would have lost money again in the past quarter if not for mass layoffs and other cost-cutting measures that Musk has imposed this year as he faced mounting pressure to make money. The company's operating expenses in the past quarter decreased 16% from last year to $930 million. In a Wednesday conference call, Musk promised to remain 'highly focused' on reaching decisions that help bolster the company's long-term prospects. Even so, Tesla will almost certainly post yet another annual loss this year, just as it has done every year since its initial public offering in 2010. Since then, Tesla has amassed more than $5.5 billion in losses. More financial potholes could still be looming as Tesla faces increasing competition, with more automakers rolling out their own electric vehicles to cater to the growing number of consumers looking for alternatives for fuel-burning vehicles. Many of those automakers will be able to take advantage of alluring tax incentives that are now being phased out for Tesla because of its head start in the field. 'We have passed peak Tesla, it has already seen its best days,' asserted David Kudla, chief investment strategist for Mainstay Capital Management, a financial advisory firm that focuses on the auto industry.
  • Microsoft on Wednesday reported its latest solid quarterly report card to Wall Street, buoyed by another round of business customers signing up for its cloud computing services. The company reported fiscal first-quarter profit of $10.7 billion, up 21% from the same period last year. The net income of $1.38 per share beat Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 13 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.25 per share. The software maker posted revenue of $33.1 billion in the July-September period, up 14% from last year and also beating forecasts. Ten analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $32.2 billion. Microsoft shares have risen 35% since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has risen 20%. In the final minutes of trading on Wednesday, shares hit $137.11, an increase of 27% in the last 12 months. It's been dueling with Apple this season as the most valuable company in the S&P 500. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has been rewarded for his efforts in steadily lifting the company's earnings since taking over in 2014. His compensation was $42.9 million in the fiscal year that ended in June, a 66% raise over the previous year, according to a statement filed last week ahead of the company's annual shareholder meeting in December. That included a $1 million base salary increase, which the board said it awarded because of 'his significant contributions to Microsoft's success during his tenure as CEO' and a desire to encourage his 'continued strong leadership.' The strongest sales growth has come from adding new corporate and government clients to Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform. Azure's quarterly revenue grew 59 percent from the same time last year, much of that powered by contracts worth at least $10 million each, the company said. A less profitable part of Microsoft's business has been its consumer products, such as Xbox, which saw no revenue growth in the quarter, and Surface laptops, which declined 4%. The Surface team, though a small part of Microsoft's business, launched a new line of devices this fall and expects demand to pick up during the holiday season. _____ Parts of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research.
  • Ford Motor Co.'s third-quarter net income tumbled nearly 60% as the company booked $1.5 billion in charges mainly for restructuring, and Chinese and U.S. sales fell. The Dearborn, Michigan, automaker knocked a half-billion dollars off its full-year pretax earnings guidance. Ford now says it will make $6.5 billion to $7 billion, or $1.20 to $1.32 per share. Ford's net income from July through September was $425 million, or 11 cents per share. Excluding restructuring charges, the company made 34 cents per share. That soundly beat Wall Street estimates that averaged 26 cents per share. Revenue fell 2% to $36.99 billion, partly because the company bungled the launch of the new Ford Explorer SUV. Sales of the highly profitable Explorer were down 48% for the quarter as quality problems forced the company to hold shipments to dealers. Ford's revenue also beat Wall Street estimates of $36.87 billion, according to data provider FactSet. Included in the restructuring charges was $800 million to reduce the value of assets in India, where the company formed a joint venture with Mahindra, as well as ending its Chariot ride-hailing service. Chief Financial Officer Tim Stone said Ford is making progress, emphasizing improved free cash flow to $200 million. He said the automaker is rolling out the right portfolio of new products, restructuring to improve productivity, and developing smart autonomous vehicles. 'We think the trajectory is improving across the business,' he said. Ford, which released earnings after the markets closed Wednesday, said higher than expected warranty costs, expected lower sales and income in China and increased discounts in North America caused the company to cut its full-year guidance. Shares of Ford fell 2.5% to $8.98 in after-hours trading. The company did show improvement in North America, its most lucrative market, where pretax profits were up 2.5% to just over $2 billion. Ford still lost $281 million in China, but that was better than a $378 million loss a year ago. Ford had planned to send the Chicago-built 2020 Explorer to dealers during the normal model year changeover in late summer. But quality problems forced it to delay deliveries and even ship thousands of the SUVs to Michigan for repairs. The company says dealers are now getting them in large numbers directly from the factory, although some are still being sent off for fixes. As a result, Explorer sales slumped during the quarter, cutting into revenue and income. That helped to drag Ford's overall U.S. sales for the quarter down 5.1%, according to the Edmunds.com auto pricing website. 'Ford has almost fully made its transition away from cars, but the company has yet to show that this gamble is driving sales in a meaningful way,' said Jeremy Acevedo, Edmunds' senior manager of insights. 'If the company can't turn the corner with a stable of brand-new SUVs right when shoppers want them most, there could be cause for concern.' Ford switched the Explorer from front-wheel-drive to rear-wheel-drive, and gave it a gas-electric hybrid version for the 2020 model year. The SUV's launch was the most complex in the company's history, spokeswoman Kelli Felker said. For example, 96% of the work stations at the Chicago factory had to be changed for the launch, she said. The company sent the SUVs 260 miles (420 kilometers) to a plant in Flat Rock, Michigan, for repairs, largely because there is little space around the Chicago factory to store them. Plus, Ford had space and a trained workforce in Michigan to make the repairs, Felker said. Among the problems are loose wiring harnesses, gear displays that aren't activated, faulty seats and an improper shifter cover. 'We have higher expectations for our performance,' CEO Jim Hackett told analysts on a conference call. President Joe Hinrichs said Ford tried to do too much in the complex launch of the Explorer and Lincoln Aviator. He told analysts that dealers have plenty of inventory now, and the company has learned how to better manager product launches. Also, Ford is having to offer larger discounts on vehicles to keep sales going, Acevedo said. Ford's average discount per vehicle was $5,361 in Q3, up 1.8% from last year, Acevedo said. The spending was $1,360 above the industry average of $4,001, according to Edmunds, which provides content for The Associated Press.
  • Virgin Group founder Richard Branson says Brexit is the 'saddest thing' that's happened to Britain and Europe since World War II. Speaking in Israel, where he was inaugurating new Virgin Atlantic services, Branson said British voters were 'misled' before the 2016 referendum and if given another chance would vote to stay in Europe. He added: 'I would certainly recommend that that's how they should vote.' British lawmakers blocked Prime Minister Boris Johnson's attempt Tuesday to fast-track his Brexit bill through Parliament so that the U.K. can leave the bloc as scheduled on Oct. 31. Britain is now awaiting a decision from Brussels about whether the bloc will delay the U.K.'s scheduled departure to prevent a chaotic no-deal exit in just eight days.
  • Joe Biden cast President Donald Trump on Wednesday as a fraudulent populist whose tax policies, economic stewardship and erratic leadership have hurt U.S. workers and betrayed voters in the critical battleground state of Pennsylvania. After scrapping with fellow Democrats for weeks, Biden returned to his hometown of Scranton to focus on his ultimate foe: Trump. The former vice president sought to dent Trump's argument that regardless of what working people may think about him personally, the actions of his administration have helped them. 'This administration has no idea what hard-working, decent, ordinary Americans are going through,' Biden said of middle-class struggle in a growing but uneven economy. 'Go back to your old neighborhoods and ask them how they're doing,' Biden said, lamenting that the rising cost of health care, college and housing deny the 'breathing room' that should define middle-class security. 'Too many middle-class and working-class folks can't look their kids in the eye any longer and say it's going to be OK and mean it.' Trump appeared later in the day in Pittsburgh, at the opposite end of the state, but made no mention of Biden. The speech, which was billed as an economic policy address, is the type of forum where Biden often has his strongest moments in a campaign that has contended with verbal missteps and inconsistent debate performances. But it's becoming increasingly difficult for Biden or any other Democratic White House hopefuls to compete with the daily cacophony of Washington as Trump rails against the House impeachment inquiry. Biden was reminded of that on the eve of his speech. On the same day that a top U.S. diplomat offered damning testimony against the president , Trump scrambled the conversation by saying Democrats are effectively 'lynching' him. When Biden's campaign joined the resulting chorus of critics , the president's re-election campaign revived a 1998 video of then-Sen. Biden using the same 'lynching' metaphor when discussing impeachment proceedings against President Bill Clinton. Biden tweeted an apology for his choice of words Tuesday night, but made no mention of the matter Wednesday in Scranton. Instead, he highlighted his plans on a host of issues, including repealing Republican tax cuts, taking action on climate change, strengthening gun regulations, spending more on education and expanding government health insurance. The visit is an early effort to block a Trump victory in Pennsylvania next year and narrow his path to re-election. The president won the state by about 44,000 votes in 2016, taking a state that had sided with Democrats in presidential races since 1988. Reclaiming Pennsylvania, along with Michigan and Wisconsin, would put the eventual Democratic nominee on track to winning the White House. Biden recalled stories from his childhood in Scranton, including his father's 'long walk' up the stairs of their home to tell 10-year-old 'Joey' that the family had to move to Delaware because the elder Biden had lost his job. Turning to Trump, he said, 'I think the longest walk his father ever made was to drop off $400 million in his trust account,' Biden said. It was a reference to reports that Fred Trump steered hundreds of millions of dollars to his son as the future president built his real estate and promotions business. Biden argues that he's the Democrat best positioned to defeat Trump by reassembling President Barack Obama's winning coalition to reclaim some working-class whites who sided with Trump while also reversing Democrats' decline from 2012 among non-white voters in cities like Philadelphia, Detroit and Milwaukee. For his part, Trump takes credit for an economy that has continued a steady upward trend since the recovery from the 2008 crash began during Obama's administration. Trump touts a 50-year low in unemployment, but the reality is more complicated, with ever-widening income inequality, a rising national debt and the uncertainty of Trump's multi-front trade wars. Still, Americans' assessment of how Trump handles the economy has been consistently been higher than his overall job approval rating. Biden railed against escalating corporate profits and salaries for CEOs. He held up the decades after World War II, when wage increases reflected the rise in U.S. productivity, in contrast to the last 40 years, when inflation-adjusted wages remained relatively flat for all but the highest wage-earners, and the investment class amassed fortunes reminiscent of the Gilded Age. That span covers nearly all of Biden's career as a U.S. senator and vice president. In using the economy as an argument against Trump, Biden also indirectly highlighted differences with progressive Democratic rivals Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. Biden touted tax changes that would treat capital gains on investments essentially as wages — a move that would bring tax increases for the wealthiest Americans. That's short of Warren's proposed direct tax on personal net worth exceeding $50 million and Sanders' tax on Wall Street transactions. Biden also pitched his public option health insurance plan as competition against private insurers. Warren and Sanders want single-payer government insurance to supplant private insurance altogether. Biden called for tuition-free two-year college and technical training. Warren and Sanders want to extend the taxpayer investment to all four-year public schools. Even as Biden knocked corporate excess Wednesday, he slipped in a caveat: 'I think corporations can do a lot of good things.' For at least one member of the hometown crowd, Biden struck the right notes. 'All these young people want drastic change,' said Elaine Sparko, a 65-year-old retired teacher who came to hear Biden. 'I think he is a person who could stand toe to toe with Trump. I think we need a moderate.' ___ Barrow reported from Atlanta. ___ Follow the reporters on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BillBarrowAP and https://twitter.com/MichaelRubinkam .
  • The Vatican's financial watchdog agency on Wednesday strongly denied allegations of wrongdoing by Vatican prosecutors who ordered an unprecedented raid on its offices and seizure of confidential documents. The board of the Financial Information Authority, which works with national financial intelligence units around the world in the fight against money laundering and other financial crimes, issued a statement Wednesday insisting the agency's activities were entirely proper. An internal AIF investigation concluded that neither the authority's suspended director, Tommaso Di Ruzza, nor anyone else at the agency 'improperly exercised his authority or engaged in any other wrongdoing.' The statement was issued by the Vatican press office in a sign of institutional backing. Acting on orders from Vatican prosecutors, Vatican gendarmes searched AIF headquarters Oct. 1 and seized files and records in connection with an investigation into the Holy See's investment in a London real estate venture that went sour. The raid sparked an institutional crisis and raised alarm internationally, given AIF's role as an independent watchdog authority over the Holy See's financial activities. Officials expressed alarm that other countries would be less willing to share sensitive information with the AIF in the future if that material could so easily end up in the hands of Vatican police. According to the search warrant, which was seen by The Associated Press, prosecutors only alleged that the AIF's actions in the real estate operation were 'not clear' and faulted Di Ruzza for being in contact with a London law firm. Prosecutors appeared to have misunderstood that AIF was working with Britain's financial intelligence unit to try to catch the businessmen who were fleecing the Holy See in the real estate deal. The Vatican had put 150 million euros into the luxury apartment building in London's tony Chelsea neighborhood, only to see tens of millions end up in the pockets of middlemen managing the venture. The Vatican's secretariat of state in 2018 decided to buy the building outright while working with British authorities to nab the middlemen. But internally, the Vatican bank and auditor general's office raised an alarm with Vatican prosecutors that the buyout looked suspicious, sparking the raids on AIF and the secretariat of state. In the statement, AIF's board said it was 'confident that potential misapprehensions will be clarified soon.' It added that it had full faith and trust in Di Ruzza 'and moreover commends him for the institutional work carried out in the handling of this particular case.' Di Ruzza's reputation, and that of four other Vatican employees suspended as part of the investigation, was tarnished further when a Vatican police flyer featuring their headshots, names and titles was leaked to an Italian newsmagazine. The Vatican police chief, who is Pope Francis' personal bodyguard, resigned as a result of the leak scandal. The investigation has come at a sensitive time for the Vatican, as it prepares early next year for a regular visit by the Council of Europe's Moneyval evaluators, who monitor the Holy See's adherence to international norms to fight money laundering and terrorist financing. Moneyval in the past has faulted Vatican prosecutors for the relatively few financial prosecutions carried out based on AIF reports of suspicious transactions.
  • Five Jamaican citizens who were recruited to work at a Montana ski resort for the ultra-rich just north of Yellowstone National Park say they and more than 100 other Jamaicans were discriminated against and paid less than other employees doing the same work. They sued the club and a hospitality staffing agency last year and are scheduled to enter mediated settlement talks in Missoula on Wednesday, court records said. The lawsuit alleges the Jamaicans did not receive tips or service charges that are included on restaurant and bar bills like other employees did while cooking for or serving wealthy club members, who include Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Berkshire Hathaway founder Warren Buffett and Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg. The club's and the plaintiffs' attorneys declined to comment prior to the mediation session. While five people filed the lawsuit, they allege the discrimination was directed at 110 Jamaicans who received employment visas to work at the exclusive ski and golf club in the mountains near Big Sky during the winter of 2017-18. The complaint argues the lost tips and service charges could amount to around $500 a night for workers at the nicest restaurants. Jamaican cooks were paid $12 per hour while others were paid $15 to $18 an hour, the complaint alleges. The complaint also alleges non-Jamaican workers were given preference to work special events where they could be paid more money. Those who complained said they were told they would not receive tips and service charges because they 'were not from here,' while a server who complained was told he could always be 'taken back to Jamaica,' the lawsuit states. Georgia-based Hospitality Staffing Solutions violated Montana law by taking deductions from Jamaican workers' pay for purported damages to employer-provided housing and in one case, for an airplane ticket, the lawsuit alleges. The Yellowstone Club acknowledged some of the deductions, but blamed Hospitality Staffing Solutions and did nothing to correct the underpayment, the lawsuit states. An attorney for Hospitality Staffing Solutions did not respond to an email seeking comment Tuesday. 'Each defendant blamed the other,' with the club claiming Hospitality Staffing was responsible for payroll and Hospitality Staffing claiming the decisions were being made by Yellowstone Club Operations, the complaint said. The plaintiffs filed discrimination complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in September 2018 and received notices of their right to sue in July, weeks after Yellowstone Club bars agreed to pay $370,000 to the state of Montana for selling liquor without a license and storing liquor away from licensed premises. Club executives also face allegations that they violated state law by storing and serving alcohol at a private terminal at Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport. The state seized bottles of liquor, wine and beer from the terminal just days after the club settled the previous liquor license complaint. ___ This version corrects that the allegations center on the winter of 2017-18, not last winter.
  • U.S. health officials want women getting breast implants to receive stronger warnings and more details about the possible risks and complications. The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that manufacturers should add a warning highlighted by a box — the most serious type — to the information given to women considering implants. The agency is also recommending patients complete a checklist to make sure they understand all the possible side effects of the implants, such as scarring, pain, rupture and even a rare form of cancer. 'We have heard from many women that they are not fully informed of the risks when considering breast implants,' the agency said in a statement detailing the recommendations. The agency also wants companies to explain that breast implants often require repeat surgeries and they should not be considered lifelong devices. About 1 in 5 women who get implants for cosmetic reasons need to have them removed within eight to 10 years, according to the FDA. The agency will take public comment on the proposed guidelines before adopting them. The new proposal is the FDA's latest attempt to manage safety issues with the devices primarily used for breast augmentation, the most frequently performed cosmetic surgical procedure in the U.S. Roughly 400,000 patients get implants each year, 100,000 of them after cancer surgery. As outlined Wednesday, manufacturers would not be required to adopt the boxed warning and checklist, noted Madris Tomes, a former FDA staffer. 'The FDA needs to enforce the use of this and not just hope it's used,' said Tomes, who now runs a company that analyzes device injuries and malfunctions. 'Women deserve to know what is being implanted and need to know not to take these risks lightly.' In recent years, the FDA and regulators elsewhere have grappled with a link between a rare cancer and a type of textured implant. In July, the FDA called on manufacturer Allergan to pull its Biocell implant after it was tied to heightened risk of a form of lymphoma. The company issued a worldwide recall for the implants, which had already been restricted or removed from numerous countries. In a separate issue, the FDA has received thousands of reports from women who blame their implants for a host of health problems including rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue and muscle pain. Earlier this year, the FDA held a meeting at which dozens of women urged the agency to place new warnings and restrictions on implants. The FDA has stood by its long-standing position that the implants are essentially safe so long as women understand they can have complications. But following the meeting, the agency said women should get more explicit, understandable information about implant risks. The devices have a silicone outer shell and are filled with either saline or silicone. The FDA's draft guidelines recommend manufacturers clearly disclose and list their ingredients for patients. ___ Follow Matthew Perrone on Twitter: @AP_FDAwriter ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • Tunisia's newly elected president has vowed to fight hard for women's rights during his first address to the nation after being sworn in at the country's parliament. In his speech Wednesday at the Assembly of People's Representatives, Kais Saied said his administration would fight corruption and shore up the freedoms gained over the past few years, since the Arab Spring began in Tunisia. 'We will support women to gain more rights, especially economic and social rights,' he said. 'The dignity of a nation comes from the dignity of its citizens, men and women equally.' With the Tunisian economy struggling, the 61-year-old said 'there will be no tolerance in wasting any cent of the money of our people' and promised to respond to the 'youth's aspirations for employment and dignity.' He pledged to tackle the roots of extremism, saying 'we must stand united against terrorism.' The country was hit in 2015 by a series of deadly attacks which hit the tourism sector hard. Saied, who presented himself as an independent outsider while winning the presidential election earlier this month, also pointed at the governing elite's failure since the 2011 revolution that unleashed the Arab Spring pro-democracy uprisings. 'The Tunisians need a trust relation to be established between those who are governing and those who are being governed, who have long suffered injustice and iniquity,' he said. He reaffirmed he would strongly advocate for 'the Palestinian cause.' Saied then headed toward the presidential palace of Carthage, north of the capital Tunis, to formally start his five-year term. He succeeds the late Beji Caid Essebsi, who died in office in July.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • President Donald Trump said Wednesday in 'a major breakthrough' he is lifting all sanctions against Turkey. >> Read more trending news  The sanctions were imposed last week. Turkey will stop combat and the ceasefire will be permanent, the President said. 'We have saved the lives of many, many Kurds,' Trump said. 'We've done something that is very, very special.' Trump said Turkey and Syria must keep the peace.  'It's their neighborhood. They need to take care of it,' Trump said. 'Let someone else fight over this long bloodstained sand.' The president said a small number of troops would remain in Syria to protect oil interests. Wednesday morning, Trump tweeted there was 'Big success on the Turkey/Syria border.' 'Safe Zone created! Ceasefire has held and combat missions have ended,' Trump tweeted. Turkey and Russia reached an agreement Tuesday, installing their forces along the border of northeast Syria after U.S. troops that were withdrawn from the area, The Associated Press reported. On Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan met in Sochi, Russia, and revealed a 10-point memorandum about Syria, CNN reported. According to the memorandum, Turkish military and Russian military police will patrol the border. The United States was not included in the negotiations.
  • A Missouri man recently fired from his job at Arby’s for allegedly setting fires returned Saturday to the restaurant, where police allege he mutilated and decapitated a cat in the men’s restroom. Tanner Maggard, 19, of Lee’s Summit, is charged with second-degree animal abuse and second-degree property damage, according to online Jackson County court records. The animal abuse charge, which involves abuse by torture and/or mutilation while the animal was alive, is a felony. >> Read more trending news  WDAF in Kansas City obtained the court documents, including police reports that allege Maggard went to Arby’s on Saturday and placed an order before going into the restroom. When he came out, the records show, he asked the manager, “Oh, I see you remodeled the bathroom, huh?” Maggard went back into the restroom a short time later and was still in there when the manager went in to clean it. The manager told police he could hear Maggard in a stall, coughing and gagging. The manager left the restroom, followed by Maggard a short time later. Maggard went outside, the court documents say, according to WDAF. When the manager returned to finish his cleaning, he found a mutilated and decapitated cat on the diaper changing table in the stall where Maggard had been, the news station reported. Blood covered the walls, door and toilet. The manager told officers he went outside, where he spotted Maggard sitting in his truck, waiting to see his former boss’ reaction to the scene he had left behind, the court documents allege. Maggard then drove away. The records show that responding officers who processed the scene in the restroom did not detect the odor of decomposition, which indicated that the cat was recently killed, WDAF reported. Maggard repeatedly denied knowledge of the cat’s demise when questioned by detectives, the news station said. The restaurant did not have security cameras in place.  The restaurant had to replace the changing table and toilet in the stall and repaint the walls, the documents say. Online court records show Maggard was booked into the Jackson County Jail with bail set at $10,000. Maggard appeared to have bonded out as of Wednesday, according to jail records. Maggard is not allowed within 1,000 feet of the Arby’s. He is also not allowed to have contact with domesticated animals, the records show.
  • We told you about the Kitty Beautiful Cat Cafe earlier this month, now they're looking to hire young adults on the Autism spectrum. This new Orlando cafe is looking to give Autistic adults a big step towards independence. Heather Strauss is a co-owner of the cafe and a mom to two Autistic kids.  “I want to help take care of other people’s kids, kind of like how I want to take care of my own.” Strauss told me about the Autistic employee she just hired. “His parents started to cry, same way I would’ve. It just means the world because as a parent of kids on the Autism spectrum you’re always fighting for your kid, you’re always fighting for opportunities.” Autism disorders specialist, Kimberly Snoeblen, describes what makes Autistic people such great assets to the workforce.  “They have great abilities. They will be the person that’s always on time. They will be the person that follows the rules to the nth degree.” The Kitty Beautiful Cat Cafe will be having its grand opening the weekend of November 1st. Until then, Strauss plans to set up more young Autistic adults for success.
  • The search goes on for the man who a woman said grabbed her while she was jogging along the Northlake Parkway Trail in Lake Nona. According to the Orlando Police Department, the woman was on a run around 6:30 a.m. Sept. 23, when a man came behind her and touched her buttocks and her shoulder.  Police released a composite sketch Wednesday. They said detectives worked with the woman to create it.  Investigators said the man is described as Hispanic and in his early 20s. He stands 5 feet, 8 inches and has black spiky hair.  Anyone with information regarding the case is asked to call Crimeline at 800-423-TIPS.  No other details were released.

Washington Insider

  • Denouncing the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump undertaken by Democrats in the House, several dozen GOP lawmakers stormed into a secure hearing room in the bowels of the Capitol on Wednesday, demanding that the proceedings be made public, and delaying a scheduled deposition involving a Pentagon official for a little over five hours. 'We're going to go, and see if we can get inside,' said Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), as a group of several dozen Republicans pushed their way into the room, unhappy with how Democrats are handling this investigation. 'This is very unfair to the President,' said Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-AZ). 'The American people deserve a public and open process,' said Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), as Republicans prevented three different committees from moving ahead with Wednesday's hearing. Those interrupting the proceedings included Republican lawmakers who are allowed into the secure hearing room - because they are on one of the three committees involved in these closed door depositions - Intelligence, Oversight, and Foreign Affairs. Democrats labeled the sit-in a political stunt that smacked of desperation. 'Trump wanted a foreign government to investigate his political opponent,' said Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH). 'That is a crime.' “Today's circus-like stunt will delay but it will not prevent our search for the truth about the president’s stunning misconduct,” said Rep. Val Demings (D-FL). 'GOP 'storming' a classified deposition was a ridiculous stunt,' said Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY). Democrats also criticized the GOP effort for violating rules on security, as a number of Republican lawmakers brought cell phones into the secure facility, which is prohibited.  It resulted in officials having to conduct a sweep of the rooms, to make sure no electronic devices had been left behind. 'You may wonder why is it happening now?” asked Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA).  “Because Bill Taylor gave a devastating opening statement yesterday. They're freaked out. They're trying to stop this investigation.” Taylor is the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine - he testified Tuesday before investigators, making the case that President Trump was withholding military aid for Ukraine in a bid to get the Ukraine government to publicly announce investigations which might help Mr. Trump's re-election bid. In a tweet on Wednesday afternoon, the President took direct aim at Taylor. Reports indicated the President may have been told by allies in the U.S. House of their Wednesday plans. “This looks awfully like obstruction,” said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). After ordering some pizza and refusing to leave the room known as a SCIF - Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility - GOP lawmakers moved on after about five hours, as Laura Cooper, a deputy assistant Secretary of Defense began her testimony around 3:15 pm.