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    Italy's president demanded guarantees Saturday that all the nation's roads are safe following the Genoa highway bridge collapse, after he hugged and comforted mourners at a state funeral for many of the dead in the grieving port city. Hours earlier, the toll from Tuesday's bridge collapse rose unofficially to 42 with the discovery of four more bodies. Firefighter Stefano Zanut told Sky TG24 TV they had extracted from tons of broken concrete the crushed car that an Italian couple on vacation with their 9-year-old daughter had been traveling in. Zanut said the last body pulled out of the wreckage was that of a young Italian man, an employee of Genoa's trash company, who was working under the bridge when it collapsed. The man's mother had refused to leave a tent set up a few hundred yards away from the rubble until his body was found. Before the state funeral ceremony began in a pavilion on Genoa's fairgrounds, President Sergio Mattarella offered quiet words of comfort for families of the victims. He then took his place with other Italian leaders, including Premier Giuseppe Conte and the transportation and infrastructure minister, in the cavernous hall. Usually quite reserved in demeanor, Mattarella was embraced tightly for a long moment by a woman who was among the grieving. Families of 19 of the dead had their loved ones' coffins brought to the hall for the funeral Mass led by Genoa's archbishop, Cardinal Angelo Bagnasco. Among the coffins were those of two young Albanian Muslim men who lived and worked in Italy. Their remains were blessed at the end of the Catholic service by a Genoa imam, who drew applause when he prayed for God to 'protect Italy and all Italians.' At other funerals elsewhere in Italy on Friday, angry mourners blamed authorities of negligence and incompetence for failing to keep the bridge safe. During the state funeral, applause rang out and many fought back tears as a prelate read out the first names of some 30 victims who have so far been identified. The mourners also applauded for Italian firefighters, police and volunteers for the civil protection department as they arrived for the funeral. Mattarella toured what's left of the Morandi Bridge, which broke apart in a fierce rainstorm, sending a long stretch of roadbed crashing 45 meters (150 feet) into a dry river bed and near several apartment buildings. Those buildings have been evacuated and local authorities have said they will have to be demolished. Mattarella didn't speak at the funeral, held on a national day of mourning, but after the ceremony ended, he told reporters the bridge collapse 'is an unacceptable tragedy.' He called the funeral 'a moment of grief, shared grief, by all of Italy.' He demanded that 'responsibility be ascertained with rigor' for the collapse of the bridge, which linked two major highways, one leading to Milan and the other toward France. Prosecutors say they are focusing their probe on possible design flaws or inadequate maintenance of the highway bridge, which was completed in 1967. 'I, too, have traveled over this bridge many times, even recently,' said Mattarella, demanding that authorities commit to carrying out their 'duty to guarantee the safety of our roads.' The mood at the state funeral was subdued, although families voiced frustration and anger that public infrastructure isn't safe in Italy. 'These are mistakes that keep on repeating. And now, for the umpteenth time, angels have flown into heaven and paid for the mistakes of other human beings, severe mistakes,' said one mourner, a local man who would only give his first name, Alessandro. He held a placard that read: 'In Italy, we prefer ribbon-cuttings to maintenance' — referring to the country's dilapidated infrastructure. After leaving the funeral, Roberto Fico, president of Parliament's lower chamber, told reporters: 'Today, the victims' families taught us a big lesson. I apologize, even though it's not my fault, in the name of the state for what it might not have done in the last years.' In his homily, the cardinal said the tragedy 'gashed the heart of Genoa.' 'The initial disbelief and then the growing dimension of the catastrophe, the general bewilderment, the tumult of emotions, the pressing 'Whys?' have touched us yet again and in a brutal way showed the inexorable fragility of the human condition,' Bagnasco said. He encouraged citizens to show solidarity so 'we can build new bridges to walk together' and rise above the tragedy. Bagnasco told the mourners that Pope Francis had called him Friday evening to express his closeness to all those suffering. Also attending the Mass were players and managers from the city's two major league soccer teams, Genoa and Sampdoria. Their weekend matches were postponed out of respect for the dead. The names of the dead were placed on each coffin before the altar. Photographs, flowers and on one coffin a signed sports jersey, a sports trophy and a stuffed animal added personal touches. Players from a local team in Italy's Serie D soccer, Campi Corniglianese, came to pay tribute to one of their own. Among the two Albanian dead was Marius Djerri, 22, who played for the team and was on his way to work for a cleaning company along with his compatriot when their truck plunged into the abyss. Team president Augustus Pintus recalled him as 'a golden boy. Maybe not the strongest player on the pitch, but as a person, I would like all players to be like him.' RAI state radio said authorities now believe there are no more missing in the bridge collapse after a German man called officials to say he wasn't involved in the disaster. ___ D'Emilio reported from Rome. ___ Frances D'Emilio is on twitter at www.twitter.com/fdemilio
  • In Britain, there is a growing sense of Brexit deja vu. Two years after the country voted to leave the European Union, emotional arguments about membership in the bloc are raging as fiercely as they did during the 2016 referendum. With seven months until Britain officially leaves the bloc, negotiations faltering, chances are rising of an acrimonious divorce — and the one thing that pro- and anti-EU forces have in common is that they are both unhappy. Former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage announced Saturday that he was returning to political campaigning in a bid to derail British Prime Minister Theresa May's plan for future ties with the EU. Farage, the right-winger who helped lead the successful 'leave' campaign in 2016, wrote in the Daily Telegraph that he would join a cross-country bus tour by the group Leave Means Leave to oppose May's 'cowardly sell-out.' Referring to U.K. politicians and civil servants, he said 'unless challenged, these anti-democrats will succeed in frustrating the result' of the referendum. Negotiations on future relations between the U.K. and the bloc have faltered, largely due to divisions within May's Conservative government over how close an economic relationship to seek with EU. Last month the government finally produced a plan, proposing to stick close to EU regulations in return for free trade in goods. That infuriated Brexit-backers such as Farage and former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who say it would leave the U.K. tethered to the bloc and unable to strike new trade deals around the world. Opponents of Brexit say that, even if the EU accepts May's plan — which appears unlikely — it would still erect barriers between Britain and the EU, its biggest trading partner. Meanwhile, time is running out. Britain and the EU say they aim to hammer out an agreement on divorce terms and future trade by October — or, at the latest, December — so that it can be approved by all individual EU countries before the U.K. leaves the bloc on March 29. This week Latvian Foreign Minister Edgars Rinkevics put the chances of getting a Brexit deal at 50-50, a figure echoed by other EU leaders. U.K. businesses, however, have warned strongly that leaving without a deal could cause mayhem for trade and travel, bringing higher food prices, logjams around U.K. ports and disruption to everything from aviation to medical supplies. The U.K. government says it remains confident of reaching a deal, but is preparing for a 'no deal' scenario. Anti-Brexit campaigners are urging a second referendum on whether to accept any agreement that is reached. The idea is opposed by the government but supported by a growing number of politicians, trade unions and groups including the British Medical Organization. Bob Kerslake, a former head of Britain's civil service, said Saturday that the consequences of leaving the EU without a deal were so serious that Brexit should be put on hold if agreement wasn't reached. 'If the government can negotiate a good deal, then so be it,' he told the BBC. 'But if they can't and we end up in this position, then we have to reopen the question of whether we go forward with Brexit at all. It is not too late to do that.
  • Turkey's president said Saturday his country will stand strong against an 'attempted economic coup' amid heightened tensions with the United States. Recep Tayyip Erdogan told thousands of supporters in Ankara that the country was being 'threatened by the economy, sanctions, foreign currency, interest rates and inflation.' 'We tell them that we see their game and we challenge them,' he said. Turkey is reeling from a massive sell-off of its currency as Washington imposed sanctions and threatened new ones if an American pastor under house arrest isn't released. Evangelical pastor Andrew Craig Brunson faces up to 35 years in jail if convicted of espionage and terror-related charges. He maintains his innocence. The lira's value dropped 38 percent against the dollar since the beginning of the year and sunk as low as 7.24 this week. On Friday, ratings agencies Standard & Poor and Moody's downgraded Turkey's credit rating further to 'junk' status, pointing to currency volatility and concerns over central bank independence. Some Erdogan supporters at his ruling party's congress to elect a new executive branch wore shirts with the lira sign.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin made a flying visit to Austria to attend the wedding of the country's foreign minister Saturday before heading to Berlin for talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Austrian authorities imposed tight security measures around the site of the ceremony near the southern border with Slovenia, where Foreign Minister Karin Kneissl married her partner Wolfgang Meilinger, a businessman. Kneissl, an independent, was nominated by the pro-Russia Austrian Freedom Party, whose leaders also attended the wedding. Photos showed Putin dancing with the bride, who was dressed in a traditional Austrian costume. According to Austrian public broadcaster ORF, Putin also brought a small Cossack men's choir along to entertain about 100 guests at the wedding. Austrian lawmaker Joerg Leichtfried of the opposition Social Democratic Party criticized Kneissl's decision to invite Putin to the wedding, saying it called into question Austria's role as a neutral intermediary in the conflict in eastern Ukraine, where Russia-backed rebels are battling government forces. Austria currently holds the European Union's rotating presidency. Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Russian news agencies that the Russian president spent about an hour at the wedding. Putin gave the newlyweds a cold press oil machine, a traditional Russian samovar and a landscape painting that 'depicts the place where the groom hails from,' according to Peskov. Peskov said Putin said 'quite a long toast in German in which he said he was thankful and happy that he got a chance to visit the hospitable Austria.' Speaking hours later alongside Merkel before the two leaders held bilateral talks at the German government's guesthouse in Meseberg, north of Berlin, Putin said they would discuss bilateral ties, economic cooperation and Russia's Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline beneath the Baltic Sea. The United States and some European countries have criticized the pipeline, saying it could increase Europe's energy dependence on Russia, harm Ukraine — currently a major gas transit country — and pose an environmental risk. Germany imported 53 billion cubic meters of Russian gas last year. 'Nord Steam 2 is purely an economic project and it doesn't close the door to shipping gas through Ukraine,' Putin said. Transit fees for Russian gas are an important item contributing to the Ukrainian budget. With protesters audible Saturday outside the guesthouse in Meseberg, Putin also raised the issue of humanitarian aid and funding for international reconstruction in Syria. 'It's important to help those areas that the refugees can return to,' he said. 'I think it's in everyone's interests, including Europe's.' Germany, which has taken in hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees fleeing the war, has in the past insisted it wouldn't contribute to the reconstruction of Syria before a political settlement to end the war has been reached. Merkel said the talks would also touch on the possibility of establishing a United Nations mission to help bring about peace in Ukraine. ___ Nataliya Vasilyeva in Moscow contributed to this report.
  • Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro raised wages for the fifth time this year and said he wanted to peg prices to the nation's fledgling cryptocurrency as part of a package of measures that economists say is likely to accelerate hyperinflation. Maduro made the announcement in a televised address Friday night ahead of a previously announced monetary overhaul next week that will see five zeros lopped off from the nation's currency, the bolivar, in a bid to fight inflation forecast by the International Monetary Fund to top 1,000,000 percent this year. Maduro set the new monthly minimum wage at 1,800 sovereign bolivars, the new currency that goes into effect Monday. That's a 3,300 percent increase over the wage of just over 5 million bolivars set in June with the old currency but still around $30 at the widely used black market rate. Adding to confusion, he said he wanted to peg wages, prices and pensions to the petro — a cryptocurrency announced in February but which has yet to start circulating. He said one petro would equal $60, or 3,600 sovereign bolivars, with the goal of moving toward a single 'floating' exchange rate in the future tied to the digital currency. The embattled socialist leader is trying to rescue the OPEC nation's economy from the brink against a backdrop of crippling U.S. financial sanctions, a foreign debt crisis and a plunge in oil production to levels unseen since the 1940s. Widespread shortages of food and medicine, as well as rolling blackouts that have kept the country's second-largest city largely in the dark the past week, are adding to social tensions. Maduro has long contended that Venezuela's crisis is the product of an 'economic war' waged by his enemies and the U.S. and he took the same line Friday. 'The U.S. government has been carrying out a war, in several ways, to stop the Republic from making international purchases and asphyxiating us internationally,' Maduro said as his top advisers looked on. Venezuelans have grown accustomed to ambitious economic announcements that fall flat and Maduro's long televised address Friday night was short on details. But in raising wages so aggressively and announcing the crypto-pegged exchange rate he appeared to be acknowledging that the government was losing the battle to prop up the currency, economists said. In setting a rate for the petro, Maduro was implicitly taking the country's exchange rate to 6 million bolivars per U.S. dollar, on par with widely used black market exchange rates compared with the current official DICOM rate of 248,832 bolivars per dollar. Economists said they expect more financial turmoil. 'The next few days will be very confusing both for consumers and the private sector,' said Asdrubal Oliveros, director of Caracas-based think tank Ecoanalitica, which is highly critical of the government. 'It's a chaotic scenario.' Maduro said the government would help small businesses and industry absorb the financial hit from the wage hike. He also hiked the nation's sales tax four points to 16 percent and said he would take other measures to eliminate Venezuela's fiscal deficit, which is believed to be about 20 percent of gross domestic product. Oliveros called the goal admirable but illusory so long as the government continues to print money to finance runaway spending and hike wages.
  • Justice Department lawyers asked a federal judge Friday to let them file a legal appeal that could, for now, keep President Donald Trump's critics from getting access to financial records related to his Washington, D.C., hotel. Trump has been fighting multiple lawsuits that argue that foreign representatives' spending money at the Trump International Hotel is a violation of the U.S. Constitution's emoluments clause, which bans federal officials from accepting benefits from foreign or state governments without congressional approval. U.S. District Judge Peter J. Messitte, who is based in Maryland, ruled last month that one of those lawsuits could go forward. In a sally to prevent the case moving on to legal discovery — which would potentially unearth financial records such as Trump's income tax returns — Justice Department lawyers asked Messitte on Friday to put the case on hold while they appeal his decision to a higher court in Richmond, Virginia. The plaintiffs, the state of Maryland and the District of Columbia, have said they plan to move forward quickly with discovery — for example, seeking information from the hotel, a Trump hotel steakhouse and the General Services Administration as well as the president's financial records. In court documents, the Justice Department objected to any discovery on a sitting president in his official capacity because of separation of powers concerns, in order to avoid a 'constitutional confrontation' between two branches of government. Justice lawyers argued that the 'public interest is decidedly in favor of a stay because any discovery would necessarily be a distraction to the President's performance of his constitutional duties.' D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine responded: 'After winning two major rulings in this case already, we anticipated President Trump's most recent motion. Nonetheless, our case is still moving forward. We are on track to propose a schedule for discovery by September 14, and we hope to request relevant documents shortly thereafter.' The emoluments clause has never been fully tested in an American courtroom. Two other lawsuits accusing the president of violating the emoluments clause are also being heard in other federal courts. Neither has reached the discovery stage. Messitte's ruling last month that an emolument 'extends to any profit, gain or advantage' was the first time a federal judge had defined the term's application to the president. It is that definition, and the argument that the plaintiffs have suffered actual harm and have a right to sue, that the Justice Department wants reviewed by a higher court. The plaintiffs have argued that Trump — who has declined to divest from his assets as president — is capitalizing on the presidency and causing harm to businesses trying to compete with his Washington hotel, which is just steps from the White House. The Justice Department has said earnings from business activities, including hotel room stays, don't qualify as emoluments. Its attorneys have argued that under Maryland and D.C.'s interpretation, no federal official would even be able to own stock from a foreign company that provides profits or collects royalties. The case raises important questions and should provide 'clarity on the boundaries of what a president can do while in office,' said Ted Boutrous, a partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP who's been keeping an eye on all the cases, but isn't involved. 'The discovery would be interesting too,' he added with a laugh. __ Follow Tami Abdollah on Twitter at https://twitter.com/latams
  • If you grew up during the 1980s, you may remember a time when heavy metal music filled the airwaves on the radio and MTV. But heavy metals in the baby food you feed to your infant?!? That’s not good. Yet it’s more common than you might think, according to a startling claim made by Consumer Reports in newly published research. RELATED: Retailers are pulling this potentially deadly product — is it in your home? Is your baby and toddler food safe? The magazine checked 50 nationally distributed baby foods for cadmium, lead, mercury and inorganic arsenic, which is the type most harmful to humans’ health. Some 68% of products they tested had “worrisome” levels of one or more heavy metal. Meanwhile, 15 products may pose a “potential health risk” if just one serving was consumed daily on a regular basis. Scientific evidence suggests lower IQ and behavior problems may be exacerbated by exposure to dangerous heavy metals at an early age. There are also known links to autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. One of the most shocking elements of this report is the amount of brands on the naughty lists that have “organic” in their name! Meals and Entrées Naughty list Consumer Reports recommends less than one serving a day unless otherwise noted. Earth’s Best Organic Chicken & Brown Rice Earth’s Best Turkey, Red Beans & Brown Rice Gerber Chicken & Rice Gerber Turkey & Rice Sprout Organic Baby Food Garden Vegetables Brown Rice With Turkey Gerber Lil’ Meals White Turkey Stew With Rice & Vegetables* * Less than half of one serving a day is recommended Nice list Gerber Lil’ Entrées Chicken & Brown Rice With Peas & Corn Fruits and Vegetables Consumer Reports recommends less than one serving a day unless otherwise noted. Naughty list Gerber Carrot, Pear & Blackberry Gerber Carrots Peas & Corn With Lil’ Bits Plum Organics Just Sweet Potato Organic Baby Food Beech-Nut Classics Sweet Potatoes* Earth’s Best Organic Sweet Potatoes, 1st Stage* * Less than half of one serving a day is recommended Nice list Beech-Nut Classics Apple, Pear & Banana Beech-Nut Naturals Carrot, Broccoli, Apple & Strawberry Beech-Nut Organic Peas, Green Beans, and Avocado Gerber Grabbers Strong Veggies, Broccoli, Carrot, Banana, Pineapple Gerber Organic Peas, Carrots & Beets Happy Baby Organics Purple Carrots, Bananas, Avocados & Quinoa See which Cereals and Snack Food are on he naughty and nice lists in the full report from Consumer Reports. More stories you may like on Clark.com Two legitimate ways to get free Disney World tickets How kids can get free eyeglasses How to prevent ‘forgotten baby syndrome’ and hot car deaths Related Articles from clark.com: Discover is eliminating another credit card benefit in 2018 Read More Search Read More Need more cash? | 35 easy ways to make extra money each month Read More
  • A privacy group said in a letter sent to the Federal Trade Commission on Friday that Google has violated the terms of a 2011 settlement because of practices exposed in an Associated Press report this week. The Electronic Privacy Information Center said in the letter to the FTC that Google's recording of time-stamped location data — even after users have turned off a setting called Location History — 'clearly violates' the 2011 settlement. The center lobbied the FTC to take action on Google nearly a decade ago. That helped lead to the settlement in which Google agreed to a 20-year monitoring regime and vowed to not misrepresent the degree to which users have control over private data. Three days after the AP story was published Monday, Google altered a help page explanation but didn't change its tracking. The AP investigation found that even with Location History turned off, Google stores user location when, for instance, the Google Maps app is opened, or when users conduct Google searches that aren't related to location. Automated searches of the local weather on some Android phones also store the phone's whereabouts. Critics say Google's insistence on tracking its users' locations stems from its drive to boost advertising revenue. It can charge advertisers more if they want to narrow ad delivery to people who've visited certain locations.
  • The Princeton Review recently released its 62nd annual college rankings lists, which are based wholly off what students attending the schools have said in response to their surveys. After tallying answers to 80 different questions from more than 138,000 students at 384 schools, they produced the book The Best 384 Colleges which gives a comprehensive look at things like campus life, student body and even financial aid. Princeton Review lists top schools for financial aid on ‘Best Colleges’ lists Financial aid is a key factor in whether or not many students are able to attend college or university. Without it, some simply can’t afford higher education. When it comes to financial aid, here are the colleges that have the best packages, according to the what the students who attend them told the Princeton Review: #1. Vanderbilt University #2. Bowdoin College #3. Colgate University #4. Vassar College #5. Washington University in St. Louis #6. Princeton University #7. Yale University #8. Pomona College #9. Williams College #10. Thomas Aquinas College #11. Rice University #12. California Institute of Technology #13. Stanford University #14. Grinnell College #15. University of Wisconsin-Madison #16. Lafayette College #17. Brown University #18. Skidmore College #19. St. Olaf College #20. Cornell University One thing to note is that the Princeton Review says the schools aren’t ranked overall #1 to #384, but rather there are several lists and the institutions are organized into the top 20 for each of its 62 different ranking list categories. When it comes to whether a person can attend college or not, much of their decision may be based on finances. Will they take out a loan? When will they have to pay it back? If you want to know more about borrowing money for college, here are some key things to know about the student loan forgiveness program. Keep up to date with the latest cybersecurity news and more at Clark.com. Subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Twitter and Facebook! More Clark.com stories you may like:  9 ways to pay for college without student loans These sites can help you save money on text books 7 money tips every college graduate ought to know Related Articles from clark.com: Discover is eliminating another credit card benefit in 2018 Read More Search Read More Need more cash? | 35 easy ways to make extra money each month Read More
  • The sales and marketing director of Backpage.com pleaded guilty Friday to conspiring to facilitate prostitution, acknowledging that he participated in a scheme to give free ads to prostitutes in a bid to draw them away from competitors and win over their future business. Dan Hyer is the second Backpage.com employee to plead guilty in cases in Arizona in which the site has been accused of ignoring warnings to stop running prostitution ads, some of which involved children. Authorities say the site has brought in $500 million in prostitution-related revenue since its inception in 2004. Some of the site's operators also are accused of laundering money earned from ad sales after banks raised concerns that they were being used for illegal purposes. In all, six others affiliated with Backpage.com, including founders Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin, still face charges in the case. Hyer, 49, faces a maximum fine of $250,000 and up to five years in prison for his conviction. As part of the plea, prosecutors will dismiss 50 charges of facilitating prostitution and 17 money laundering charges against Hyer. It's unclear whether the plea deal calls for Hyer to testify against others in the case. Hyer said about 10 or 11 years ago his company would copy ads from the adult section of Craigslist and other sites, repost them on Backpage.com and then offer client a free ad, which prosecutors say was offered for a trial period. Hyer also said the ads were sometimes illegal because they contained links to another site that lets customers post reviews of their experiences with prostitutes. The object of the strategy was to compete with Craigslist and increase Backpage.com's revenues, Hyer said. An indictment filed in the case alleged Backpage.com used the strategy in Nashville and other cities and planned to expand such efforts in Los Angeles and New York. Asked by U.S. District Judge Steven Logan whether he was agreeing to the plea deal because he believed he was guilty of the conspiracy charge, Hyer responded, 'Yes, your honor.' Moments before pleading guilty, an emotional Hyer lifted his glasses to wipe his eyes with a tissue. Backpage.com is a Dutch-owned limited liability corporation. Its principal place of business is in Dallas, and federal officials say it kept its bank accounts and servers in Arizona. Another employee of the site, CEO Carl Ferrer, has previously pleaded guilty to a separate federal conspiracy case in Arizona and state money laundering charges in California. In addition, the company pleaded guilty to human trafficking in Texas and in a money laundering conspiracy case in Arizona. Ferrer has agreed to testify against others. The six remaining defendants in the Arizona case are scheduled for trial in January 2020. They have pleaded not guilty to the charges. Sentencing for Hyer is scheduled for Nov. 19. ___ Follow Jacques Billeaud at twitter.com/jacquesbilleaud. His work can be found at https://bit.ly/2GGWEPO.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Adam Charles Eades was last seen leaving his home on Cedro Drive in Kissimmee on Friday at around 5:35 p.m. Adam was last seen wearing a white t-shirt, yellow basketball shorts with a red stripe and a Mickey Mouse logo on the side, grey socks and black Crocs. Adam wears glasses and both pinky fingers are crooked.  Adam left in good health and does not take any medications. Anyone who has seen him or knows where he is is asked to call 911 immediately.
  • Orange County detectives are asking for help to identify an armed robber who stole money from a gas station Thursday evening. At 9:47 p.m., the armed robber entered the Townstar/Marathon gas station at 300 North Kirkman Road and pointed a handgun at the cashier, demanding money.  The victim complied and places stacks of cash on the counter. Once the suspect got the money, he ran away on foot heading northbound from the station.  Police describe him as a male in his 20s, about 5'7-5'9'' with a skinny build. He was last seen wearing a black ski mask, gloves, a plaid-style long sleeve shirt, and a black t shirt with the 'punisher' logo on the front.  Anyone with any information is asked to call Crimeline at 800-423-8477.
  • A woman in San Bernardino, California, told CBSLA agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detained her husband as they drove to the hospital to deliver their child. >> Read more trending news Maria del Carmen Venegas said that her husband, Joel Arrona-Lara, was driving her to the hospital for a planned Cesarean section Wednesday when ICE agents surrounded their car at a gas station. Venegas, a mother of five, told CBSLA she showed officers her identification, but her husband did not have his ID with him. She said they lived nearby and offered to drive back to the house to get his ID, but officers placed Arrona-Lara into custody, leaving Venegas alone at the gas station, images from the store’s surveillance video showed. She said she drove herself to the hospital to deliver their child. “My husband needs to be here,” Venegas said. “He had to wait for his son for so long, and someone just took him away.” Venegas told CBSLA that her husband has never been in trouble with the law, and they are currently working on finding an attorney to help secure his release. ICE confirmed to the local Univision and Telemundo stations that Arrona-Lara is in custody. “Mr. Arrona-Lara is currently in the custody of ICE pending deportation procedures before the Executive Office of Immigration Review,” a spokesperson said. “All those who violate immigration laws would be subject to an immigration arrest and, if a final order determines their removal, be deported from the United States.”
  • A body was found in a burned car in the parking lot of a mini-golf course at Walt Disney World in Florida Saturday morning, officials said.  >> Read more trending news Orange County deputies began investigating the body in the Fantasia Gardens mini-golf course parking lot on Epcot Resorts Boulevard around 4 a.m. after the Reedy Creek Fire Department called for assistance, WFTV reported. Once firefighters extinguished the car, officials found a body inside, officials said.  Officials did not identify the body or the vehicle’s owner. The fire marshal, homicide detectives and Sector 6 investigators are on scene conducting an investigation, according to the sheriff’s office.  
  • Within weeks of a South Georgia teacher’s disappearance, two of her former students told friends at a party they had killed Tara Grinstead and burned her body, according to documents filed this week in Irwin County Superior Court, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  >> Read more trending news  Grinstead’s case was featured on the popular true crime podcast, “Up and Vanished.” >>Related: Georgia irresistible to true-crime podcasts Grinstead was reported missing in October 2005, and the following month, Ryan Alexander Duke and Bo Dukes told others they were responsible for her death and it was reported to police, court documents state. But the case remained cold until early 2017, when both Duke and Dukes were arrested.  So did investigators drop the ball? Yes, according to Duke’s attorneys. And because it took so long to arrest the suspects, most of the charges should be dropped due to the statute of limitations, the motion states.  >>Related: Who was Tara Grinstead? “It is undisputed that Irwin County law enforcement knew of these crimes within months of the disappearance of Tara Grinstead,” a court motion states. “In fact, a search of the area where Ms. Grinstead’s body was allegedly burned was conducted...” Grinstead, 30, an Irwin County High School teacher and former beauty queen, was last seen on Oct. 22, 2005, when she left a cookout and said she was going straight home. Two days later, she was reported missing when she didn’t show up to teach history. Ryan Alexander Duke, 33, was arrested and charged with murder in the death of Tara Grinstead. Because Duke and Dukes were identified as suspects later in 2005 but not charged until 2017, all but the murder charge should be dropped, Duke’s public defenders claim in one of two dozen motions filed in the past week.  “Duke and Dukes were identified as suspects and known to law enforcement in 2005,” the motion states. “By a generous application of the statute of limitations of four years, the statute would have run (expired) near December of 2009.” The GBI declined to comment on the allegations in the motion and referred questions to the District Attorney. The District Attorney could not be reached for comment Friday afternoon.  In another motion, Duke’s attorney asks that his indictment be dismissed because the language used is too “vague, ambiguous and indefinite.” In April 2017, a grand jury indicted Duke on six counts, including malice murder, felony murder, aggravated assault, burglary and concealing the death of another. In June 2017, Dukes was indicted on charges including concealing a death, tampering with evidence, and hindering apprehension of a criminal.  Dukes “did unlawfully and knowingly destroy physical evidence by burning the body of Tara Faye Grinstead, a human being, at a location off Bowen’s Mill Highway,” in Fitzgerald, the indictment states.  After Duke and Dukes were arrested, the GBI searched woods behind a pecan farm in the area but have not publicly said what was found. A hearing on the motions has been scheduled for Sept. 20 in Irwin County.