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The Latest Business Headlines

    Harley-Davidson is seeking a select group of college students who are eager for an internship on two wheels. >> Read more trending news  The motorcycle company's #FindYourFreedom internship is going viral, and for good reason. The 12-week paid internship involves riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle across the country this summer. The best perk of all? Interns who complete the program get to keep the motorcycle. Full requirements for the internship can be found on Harley-Davidson's website. In addition to riding across the country, interns will be expected to attend company events along the way, post scenes from the journey on social media and serve as  brand ambassadors, recruiting others into the sport of motorcycling. Applicants who don't know how to ride a motorcycle will be required to take a course offered by Harley-Davidson Riding Academy. The internship is open to college juniors and seniors who are at least 18 years old and are interested in marketing and public relations. Creative applications are encouraged.
  • It's not uncommon to see brand new commercial jets flying in and out of Paine Field, just north of Seattle, defying rain and low visibility that define the region. That's because the airport with two runways has for decades served as home to Boeing assembly lines, rolling out models such as the 777 for test flights over the Pacific Ocean. Now an entrepreneur is getting a chance to build the airport's first passenger terminal, betting travelers in Seattle's rapidly-expanding suburbs will use it for short-haul trips instead of fighting traffic and long lines at SeaTac International, one of the country's busiest hubs. Brett Smith's company is investing about $40 million to build the terminal. In the process, he wants to increase U.S. acceptance of a global trend: Putting commercial airport terminals in the hands of private companies instead of the government. Smith is the founder and chief executive officer of Propeller Investments LLC., which secured a 50-year agreement with Snohomish County three years ago through a local subsidiary to build and operate the terminal in Everett, Washington. Operations are due to start in the fall, with announcements already made from Alaska Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines for up to 24 flights per day. The deal stands out for U.S. airports because it's structured as a public-private partnership, a model that divides the responsibilities of owning and operating public assets between governments and the private sector. It's also notable because Propeller has no experience in building or operating airport terminals. The project contrasts with about 500 commercial airports across the U.S., where local governments own and operate most of the facilities. Those airports have relied on decades of federal funding and passenger fees to help finance infrastructure improvements. But traditional funding sources have remained flat since the turn of the century, failing to keep up with increased air travel demand. Airport privatization proponents point to efficiencies and variety of passenger amenities like stores and restaurants found in major European hubs such as London's Heathrow and Frankfurt Airport, both of which are run by companies and rated among the 10 best airports in 2018 by Skytrax, an independent agency that ranks airports and airlines based on traveler reviews. No U.S. airports made the list this year. 'Public-private partnerships in the airport realm were almost unheard of 18 months ago. Now barely a day goes by where I don't get a call asking about them,' said Peter Kirsch, a Denver-based partner at Kaplan Kirsch Rockwell, the law firm that represented Snohomish County during its negotiations with Propeller. The firm also represented Propeller during its talks with the airlines. 'It's the future of airport development.' Only a handful of U.S. airports have adopted any form of privatization. Southwest Airlines financed and built a five-gate terminal at Houston's Hobby Airport that opened in 2015. Denver signed an agreement last year to allow a group of companies led by Madrid-based Ferrovial, the company that built and operates two terminals at Heathrow, to renovate Jeppesen Terminal at Denver International Airport and operate concessions. Almost half of airports in the European Union are either 'fully' or 'partially' private, according to a study by Airports Council International, an advocacy group made up of airport operators. It estimates U.S. airports will need to implement $100 billion of infrastructure works by 2021 to accommodate passenger and cargo volume growth. 'There's an old adage that says 'necessity is the mother of invention,'' said Patti Clark, who used to manage Valdosta Regional Airport in Valdosta, Georgia, and now teaches airport sustainability and environmental management at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla. 'What we have is an aging infrastructure of airports in the U.S. Partnerships with the private sector help improve facilities and competitiveness.' But those projects carry the risks of being dependent on the airlines, which are already grappling with thin profit margins. Airlines reducing or cancelling their operations in a particular terminal can leave 'gaping holes' in operator revenues, she said. Paine Field handles about 300 flights per day. In 2015, the Snohomish County Council voted to lease 10.5 acres (4.2 hectares), or less than 1 percent of the airport's total area, to Propeller for 30 years and give the company two additional 10-year extension options. It marks the first test for Smith, who tried to secure deals to establish commercial operations in Georgia's Gwinnett and Paulding Counties. He was unsuccessful due to opposition from the communities and Delta Airlines, which dominates traffic at nearby Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta. 'To me this is an honor, so it has to go well,' said Smith, who relocated to Seattle from New York to oversee construction. 'We have to be able to show that with privatization you get a really good product.' Propeller sold $50 million of bonds in February to finance the project, paying investors about double the interest rate they would earn on similar U.S. Treasurys, according to data compiled by The Associated Press. The company doesn't have a credit rating. 'We're trying to really grow the job base here in Snohomish County, and having that direct access for businesses, I think it'll be a boon,' County Executive Dave Somers said. The company's lack of a track record isn't a concern because 'it's a land lease. If they can pull it off, then they can pull it off. If they don't pull it off, we haven't lost anything.' ____ AP Business Writer Stan Choe contributed to this story.
  • The Latest on the global finance meetings in Washington (all times local): 1:10 p.m. The International Monetary Fund's policymaking committee says a strong world economy is threatened by increasing tension over trade and a heavy global debt load. Officials say longer-term global prospects are clouded by sluggish productivity growth and aging populations in wealthy countries. Policymakers say in a statement at the end of three days of meetings that countries should take advantage of the broadest-based expansion in a decade and enact reforms that will make their economies more efficient. And cutting government debts is urged. The IMF expects the world economy to grow 3.9 percent this year and next — that would be the fastest since 2011. But an intensifying dispute between the U.S. and China over Beijing's aggressive attempt to challenge U.S. technological dominance has raised the prospect of a trade war that could drag down worldwide growth. ___ 1 p.m. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) says he's had a number of discussions with his counterparts — during global finance meetings in Washington — that have dealt with President Donald Trump's 'America First' trade policies. Mnuchin says he's tried to make clear that the United States isn't trying to erect protectionist barriers through its proposals to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports and up to $150 billion worth of Chinese goods. Mnuchin says Trump 'has been very clear on what on what our objectives are. We are looking for reciprocal treatment.' He says some of his one-on-one talks concerned requests for exemptions from the U.S. tariffs. He says he's considering making a trip soon to China. ___ 11:25 a.m. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) is urging the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank to pursue reforms that will support Trump administration foreign policy initiatives. Mnuchin says the World Bank needs to continue to shift its lending from fast-growing developing countries such as China to poorer nations. He says in a speech prepared for the World Bank's policy committee that the bank should direct its resources at 'poorer borrowers and away from countries better able to finance their own development objectives.' Mnuchin cites progress in achieving changes at the World Bank that the U.S. put forward last year, but says more needs to be done. The administration's America First trade policies put it the U.S. at odds with other countries at this weekend's global finance meetings in Washington. ___ 12:50 a.m. The United States is resisting pressure to back off President Donald Trump's tough America First trade policy at a meeting of global finance leaders worried about the threat of a damaging trade war. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) charged that 'unfair global trade practices impede stronger U.S. and global growth, acting as a persistent drag on the global economy.' He urged the International Monetary Fund to do more to combat unfair trade practices. Mnuchin issued the comments Friday during the spring meetings of the 189-country IMF and its sister lending agency, the World Bank. The three days of meetings wrap up Saturday. Other countries have used the gathering to protest Trump's protectionist trade policies, which mark a reversal of seven decades of U.S. support for ever-freer global commerce.
  • Ireland-based Smyths Toys has reached a deal to take over more than 90 Toys R Us stores in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. In March, Toys R Us said it would be liquidating its U.S. business. Its German branch said in a statement Saturday that Smyths Toys has signed an agreement to take over its activities in the three countries, with 93 stores and four online shops. Smyths Toys, which according to the statement operates 110 stores and online shops in Ireland and Britain, said it is confident of establishing and expanding its brand in continental Europe. The deal requires approval by a U.S. court and other authorities. It foresees Smyths Toys taking over Toys R Us' regional employees and local headquarters in Cologne. No financial details were given.
  • The European Aviation Safety Agency has tightened a nearly month-old directive ordering inspections of some fan blades in engines like those used on a Southwest Airlines jet involved in a fatal accident. A directive published by EASA late Friday called for inspections within 20 days of blades in the oldest CFM56-7B engines — those that have been through 30,000 engine cycles or more since installation. Newer blades will have to be inspected within 133 days, and the inspections repeated within 3,000 cycles. A March 26 directive called for ultrasonic inspections within nine months. The updated instructions cited a 'further failure' of a CFM56-7B fan blade. A fan blade snapped off mid-flight on a Southwest Airlines flight Tuesday, causing an engine to explode in an accident that fatally injured a passenger.
  • The fossil-fuels lobbyist tied to the bargain-priced Capitol Hill condo leased by Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt is taking early retirement as a result of the scandal. J. Steven Hart sent an email to friends and colleagues on Friday announcing he's leaving Williams & Jensen, the powerhouse Washington lobbying firm where he served as chairman. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the email, which was first reported by The Wall Street Journal. Hart, 64, said he was planning to retire in November, but that the intense scrutiny resulting from the unusual rental arrangement with the head of the EPA led him to expedite his departure. Media reports first disclosed last month that Pruitt paid just $50-a-night for the condo to a corporation co-owned by Hart's wife, who is also a lobbyist, triggering several ethics investigations. In his email to friends, the veteran Washington insider attempted to make light of the issue. 'I want to thank so many of you who have taken the time to send me and Vicki notes and flowers as we learned a new and personal meaning of 'Fake News' and 'Real Friends,'' Hart wrote. 'They say if you need a friend in Washington, get a dog. We now know that adage is not always accurate.' The embattled EPA administrator has described Hart as a personal friend and insisted that he paid a market rate for the condo, though comparable properties nearby are publicly listed at more than double what he paid. EPA's press office did not respond to a request for comment. A chorus of Democrats and a growing list of Republicans have called for Pruitt's ouster amid a string of ethics issues, including questions about his use of first class air travel and such pricey security precautions as a $43,000 anti-eavesdropping phone booth for his office. EPA's inspector general announced earlier this week he will review spending by Pruitt's full-time security detail, the latest in about a dozen ongoing investigations related to Pruitt by various government agencies. Prior to being tapped by Trump to lead EPA, Pruitt served as the elected attorney general of Oklahoma. Hart's firm represents OGE Energy Corp., one of the state's electric utilities. Campaign finance records show the lobbyist hosted a 2014 fundraiser for Pruitt's state re-election effort where more than three dozen OGE executives cut checks, even though he was running without a Democratic opponent. Once Pruitt arrived at EPA, copies of his daily calendar obtained by AP through a public records request show he meet with two top OGE executives and a registered lobbyist from Hart's firm in March 2017, when he was living at the condo. In October, EPA announced it would rewrite the Clean Power Plan, an Obama-era regulation that sought to limit planet-warming carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants like those operated by OGE, which paid Hart's firm $400,000 in lobbying fees last year. ___ Follow Associated Press environmental reporter Michael Biesecker at http://twitter.com/mbieseck
  • Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin expressed cautious optimism Saturday over efforts to resolve trade tensions that have rattled financial markets and clouded the global economic outlook. Mnuchin held a string of meetings over the past three days with financial officials from China, Japan and Europe over the punitive tariffs the administration has unveiled in an effort to fulfill President Donald Trump's campaign promise to reduce America's huge trade deficits. In a session with reporters, Mnuchin refused to say how close the United States was to resolving the various trade disputes but did indicate progress was being made in the talks. In his discussion with Chinese officials, Mnuchin said the two sides covered the proposals that Chinese President Xi Jinping has made to open the Chinese market. 'We are cautiously optimistic,' Mnuchin told reporters, saying that he may soon travel to Beijing for further talks with the Chinese. The United States and China are on the brink of what would be the biggest trade dispute since World War II. The US and China have proposed imposing tariffs of $50 billion on each others' products and Trump is looking to impose tariffs on up to $100 billion more of Chinese goods. The rising trade tensions dominated the three days of talks among top finance officials attending meetings of the Group of 20 major economies, the 189-nation International Monetary Fund and its sister lending agency, the World Bank. The US get-tough trade approach was roundly criticized by many countries at the finance meetings but Mnuchin insisted that the United States was not trying to provoke a global trade war but simply achieving a more fair system for American workers. 'The president has been very clear on what our objectives are,' Mnuchin said. '''We are looking for reciprocal treatment. This is not about protectionism.' While the administration's America First approach rankled other nations, Mnuchin did announce a change in position with the World Bank, one of several multilateral institutions that Trump officials have criticized in the past. Last year, the administration said it was opposed to what would be the first increase in the World Bank's capital resources since 2010. But on Saturday, Mnuchin said the United States had dropped its opposition and would support the increase as part of a package of lending reforms. The proposal would provide the World Bank with a $13 billion increase in its lending resources. Both the World Bank and IMF held meetings of their policy committees on Saturday. In a closing communique, the IMF expressed concerns that the rising trade tensions could dim what at the moment are bright prospects for the global economy, which is expected to grow this year at the fastest pace since 2011. 'Trade tensions are not to the benefit of anyone,' said Lesetja Kganyago, who leads the policymaking committee and is governor of the South African Reserve Bank. 'If there is a trade conflict, there could never be winners. We could all only be losers.' On Friday, Mnuchin had called on the IMF to do more to police countries running large trade surpluses, a role that has traditionally been left to the Geneva-based World Trade Organization. While many IMF member countries would object to such a broadening of the IMF's powers, the final communique did state, 'We will work together to reduce excessive global imbalances in a way that supports global growth.' The communique did not spell out how this would be accomplished. The IMF communique did list a series of threats to the current global upturn and finance officials pledged to work cooperatively. 'Rising financial vulnerabilities, increasing trade and geopolitical tensions and historically high global debt threaten global growth prospects,' the IMF communique said. In his speech to the IMF's policy committee Saturday, Yi Gang, the head of China's central bank, said that global growth could be hurt by 'an escalation of trade frictions caused by unilateral actions,' an obvious reference to America's threatened tariffs against China.
  • U.S. health officials on Friday told consumers to throw away any store-bought romaine lettuce they have in their kitchens and warned restaurants not to serve it amid an E. coli outbreak that has sickened more than 50 people in several states. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its warning about tainted romaine from Arizona, saying information from new illnesses led it to caution against eating any forms of the lettuce that may have come from the city of Yuma. Officials have not found the origin of the contaminated vegetables. Previously, CDC officials had only warned against chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes. But they are now extending the risk to heads or hearts of romaine lettuce. People at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating from whole heads of romaine lettuce. They were traced to lettuce harvested in the Yuma region, according to the CDC. So far, the outbreak has infected 53 people in 16 states. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. Symptoms of E. coli infection include diarrhea, severe stomach cramps and vomiting. The CDC's updated advisory said consumers nationwide should not buy or eat romaine lettuce from a grocery store or restaurant unless they can get confirmation it did not come from Yuma. People also should toss any romaine they already have at home unless it's known it didn't come from the area, the agency said. Restaurants and retailers were warned not to serve or sell romaine lettuce from Yuma. Romaine grown in coastal and central California, Florida and central Mexico is not at risk, according to the Produce Marketing Association. The Yuma region, which is roughly 185 miles (298 kilometers) southwest of Phoenix and close to the California border, is referred to as the country's 'winter vegetable capital.' It is known for its agriculture and often revels in it with events like a lettuce festival. Steve Alameda, president of the Yuma Fresh Vegetable Association, which represents local growers, said the outbreak has weighed heavily on him and other farmers. 'We want to know what happened,' Alameda said. 'We can't afford to lose consumer confidence. It's heartbreaking to us. We take this very personally.' Growers in Yuma typically plant romaine lettuce between September and January. During the peak of the harvest season, which runs from mid-November until the beginning of April, the Yuma region supplies most of the romaine sold in the U.S., Alameda said. The outbreak came as the harvest of romaine was already near its end. While Alameda has not met with anyone from the CDC, he is reviewing his own business. He is going over food safety practices and auditing operations in the farming fields. ___ This story has been corrected to restore the full name of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • The Justice Department has opened an antitrust investigation into whether AT&T, Verizon and a standards-setting group worked together to stop consumers from easily switching wireless carriers. The companies confirmed the inquiry in separate statements late Friday in response to a report in The New York Times. The U.S. government is looking into whether AT&T, Verizon and telecommunications standards organization GSMA worked together to suppress a technology that lets people remotely switch wireless companies without having to insert a new SIM card into their phones. The Times, citing six anonymous people familiar with the inquiry, reported that the investigation was opened after at least one device maker and one other wireless company filed complaints. Verizon, which is based in New York, derided the accusations on the issue as 'much ado about nothing' in its statement. It framed its efforts as part of attempt to 'provide a better experience for the consumer.' Dallas-based AT&T also depicted its activity as part of a push to improve wireless service for consumers and said it had already responded to the government's request for information. The company said it 'will continue to work proactively within GSMA, including with those who might disagree with the proposed standards, to move this issue forward.' GMSA and the Justice Department declined to comment. News of the probe emerge during a trial of the Justice Department's case seeking to block AT&T's its proposed $85 billion merger with Time Warner to over antitrust concerns. That battle centers mostly on the future of cable TV and digital video streaming. Verizon and AT&T are the two leading wireless carriers, with a combined market share of about 70 percent.
  • Cities and nations are looking at banning plastic straws and stirrers in hopes of addressing the world's plastic pollution problem. The problem is so large, though, that scientists say that's not nearly enough. Australian scientists Denise Hardesty and Chris Wilcox estimate, using trash collected on U.S. coastlines during cleanups over five years, that there are nearly 7.5 million plastic straws lying around America's shorelines. They figure that means 437 million to 8.3 billion plastic straws are on the entire world's coastlines. But that huge number suddenly seems small when you look at all the plastic trash bobbing around oceans. University of Georgia environmental engineering professor Jenna Jambeck calculates that nearly 9 million tons (8 million metric tons) end up in the world's oceans and coastlines each year, as of 2010, according to her 2015 study in the journal Science . That's just in and near oceans. Each year more than 35 million tons (31.9 million metric tons) of plastic pollution are produced around Earth and about a quarter of that ends up around the water. 'For every pound of tuna we're taking out of the ocean, we're putting two pounds of plastic in the ocean,' says ocean scientist Sherry Lippiatt, California regional coordinator for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's marine debris program. Seabirds can ingest as much as 8 percent of their body weight in plastic, which for humans 'is equivalent to the average woman having the weight of two babies in her stomach,' says Hardesty of Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation. Organizers of Earth Day, which is Sunday, have proclaimed ending plastics pollution this year's theme. And following in the footsteps of several U.S. cities such as Seattle and Miami Beach, British Prime Minister Theresa May in April called on the nations of the British commonwealth to consider banning plastic straws, coffee stirrers and plastic swabs with cotton on the end. McDonald's will test paper straws in some U.K. locations next month and keep all straws behind the counter, so customers have to ask for them. 'Together with our customers we can do our bit for the environment and use fewer straws,' says Paul Pomroy, who runs the fast-food company's U.K. business. The issue of straws and marine animals got more heated after a 2015 viral video showing rescuers removing a straw from a sea turtle's nose in graphic and bloody detail. But a ban may be a bit of a straw man in the discussions about plastics pollution. Straws make up about 4 percent of the plastic trash by piece, but far less by weight. Straws on average weigh so little — about one sixty-seventh of an ounce or .42 grams — that all those billions of straws add up to only about 2,000 tons of the nearly 9 million tons of plastic waste that yearly hits the waters. 'Bans can play a role,' says oceanographer Kara Lavendar Law, a co-author with Jambeck of the 2015 Science study. 'We are not going to solve the problem by banning straws.' Scientists say that unless you are disabled or a small child, plastic straws are generally unnecessary and a ban is start and good symbol. These items that people use for a few minutes but 'are sticking round for our lifetime and longer,' Lippiatt says. Marcus Eriksen, an environmental scientist who co-founded the advocacy group 5 Gyres, says working on bans of straws and plastic bags would bring noticeable change. He calls plastic bags, cups and straws that break down in smaller but still harmful pieces the 'smog of microplastics.' 'Our cities are horizontal smokestacks pumping out this smog into the seas,' Eriksen says. 'One goal for advocacy organizations is to make that single-use culture taboo, the same way smoking in public is taboo.' Steve Russell, vice president of plastics for the American Chemistry Council, said people can reduce waste by not taking straws, but 'in many cases these plastics provide sanitary conditions for food, beverages and personal care.' The key to solving marine litter, Russell says, is 'in investing in systems to capture land-based waste and investing in infrastructure to convert used plastics into valuable products.' Even though Jambeck spends her life measuring and working on the growing problem of waste pollution, she's optimistic. 'We can do this,' Jambeck says. 'I have faith in humans.' ___ AP Retail Writer Joseph Pisani contributed from New York. ___ Follow Seth Borenstein on Twitter at @borenbears . His work can be found here . ___ This Associated Press series was produced in partnership with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Police in Orange County are looking for a person of interest in relation to a murder that happened Friday afternoon.   At 1:19 p.m., deputies responded to The Bondsman on West Michigan Street in reference to a check on well being. Upon arrival, a victim was found dead at the scene.    The person of interest is James Cole. Cole was accompanied by a black female and possible left the scene in the pictured car.    Anyone with any information on this case is asked to contact Crimeline at 800-423-TIPS(8477). There is a reward of up to $5,000 if it leads to an arrest.
  • Actor Joonas Suotamo, the man behind the famed wookie Chewbacca in the upcoming Solo: A Star Wars Story stopped by Disney's Hollywood Studios recently to take in the action of the park's Star Wars themed offerings. This all comes ahead of his scheduled appearance at the park's Star Wars: Galactic Nights event, which will take on May 27 and run from 7 p.m. until midnight.  The Star Wars themed event will feature unique exclusive photo opportunities, merchandise, and of course, the celebrities.  This year, Joonas will be a celebrity guest speaker to talk about his movie- making experience, as well as answer questions from some lucky fans.  Guests in attendance can also be expected to see the nods to the new movie during the fireworks presentation of Star Wars: A Galaxy Far, Far Away.  The Solo: A Star Wars Story movie will open in theaters on May 25th.  You can see the actor's experience in the park here:
  • Former President George H.W. Bush is known for wearing festive socks. He wore a special pair of socks Saturday to the funeral of his wife of 73 years, Barbara Bush, in tribute to her work in literacy awareness. >> Read more trending news  Barbara Bush, the wife of the nation’s 41st president and mother of the nation’s 43rd, died Tuesday at her Houston home. She was 92. Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath posted on Twitter that the former president is wearing socks festooned with books. McGrath went on to say that Barbara Bush's literacy campaign raised over $110 million in 30 years. The private funeral ceremony is being attended by approximately 1,500 invited guests, including first lady Melania Trump, former President Bill Clinton, former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama.
  • Approximately 1,500 guests attended former first lady Barbara Bush's private funeral ceremony in Houston Saturday. Barbara Bush, the wife of the nation’s 41st president and mother of the nation’s 43rd, died Tuesday at her Houston home. She was 92. About 2,500 mourners paid their respect at a public viewing held Friday in Houston, The Associated Press reported. >> Read more trending news  The service took place at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston. Jeb Bush delivered a eulogy for his mother. Longtime friend Susan Baker and historian Jon Meacham also gave remarks during the 90-minute service. Multiple musical selections were performed. A procession followed, with burial at the Bush Library at Texas A&M University in College Station. Barbara Bush will be buried next to her daughter, Robin, who was 3 years old when she died of leukemia in 1953, The AP reported. Notable guests included first lady Melania Trump, former President Bill Clinton, former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama, The AP reported.
  • The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating after a man in Orlando is dead following a deputy involved shooting Friday evening.  It happened around 8:30 p.m. near West South Street and Lime Avenue.  Orange County Deputies say 48 year old James Bauduy was wanted after reportedly shooting and killing his girlfriend's 82 year old mother, Elfriede Asendorf, and then carjacking his girlfriend earlier this week in the Conway-Windermere area.  After receiving a tip, deputies were able to locate him. Bauduy was shot by two deputies, but it is unclear if the man was carrying a weapon.  He was then taken to the hospital, where he died. The deputies in the involved shooting were not hurt. At least half a dozen shots were reportedly fired during the incident.  Both deputies have been reassigned to administrative duties for no less than a week, pending the investigation.