ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
83°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 93° L 75°
  • clear-day
    83°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    88°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 93° L 75°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    81°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 90° L 75°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Business Headlines

    President Donald Trump met with executives from several of the nation's leading chip and computer part makers Monday and discussed restrictions his administration has imposed on the sale of components to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, the White House said. Huawei is embroiled in a trade dispute between China and the U.S. The Trump administration in May sanctioned Huawei, which it has deemed a threat to national security, and curbed sales of U.S. equipment to the Chinese company. The move was widely seen as intended to persuade resistant U.S. allies in Europe to exclude Huawei equipment from their next-generation wireless networks, known as 5G. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross recently announced a partial reprieve: His department will issue export licenses to companies to sell technology to prohibited foreign companies such as Huawei only when it's determined there is no threat to national security. The White House said the tech CEOs requested Monday that the Commerce Department make timely decisions on equipment sales, and the president agreed. The executives also expressed optimism about the deployment of 5G networks in the U.S. Trump's executive order in May empowered the government to ban the technology and services of 'foreign adversaries' deemed to pose 'unacceptable risks' to national security. It didn't name specific countries or companies but followed months of U.S. pressure on Huawei, the world's biggest supplier of network gear. Meanwhile, Trump has been escalating tariffs on Chinese imports. The CEOs of chipmakers Micron, Qualcomm, Intel and Broadcom attended the White House meeting, as well as the chief executives of Western Digital, which makes data storage devices and cloud storage, and Cisco, which sells routers, switches and software. The companies' business has been hurt by the restrictions over Huawei. Also attending was Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Google supports Huawei's smartphones with its Android operating system. The tech giant announced in May it would comply with the U.S. restrictions meant to punish Huawei. Google said it would continue to support existing Huawei smartphones but future devices would not have its flagship apps and services, including maps, Gmail and search. Only basic services would be available for future versions. Huawei's smartphone sales in the U.S. are tiny, and the Chinese company's footprint in telecom networks is limited to smaller wireless and internet providers. That means any impact on U.S. consumers of a Google services cutoff would be slight. Spokesmen for Google and Intel declined to comment Monday. Qualcomm spokespeople didn't return a message seeking comment, and representatives of Micron, Broadcom, Western Digital and Cisco couldn't immediately be reached.
  • The new president of the American Airlines pilots' union says his group will help assure the public that the Boeing 737 Max is safe when it is cleared to fly again. But Eric Ferguson also says Boeing needs to fully explain how the Max differs from previous versions of the 737 — something Boeing failed to do when it rolled out the new model. 'We can't know what we do not know, so we are expecting full disclosure of every modification to the air frame,' Ferguson told reporters Monday. Ferguson took over the Allied Pilots Association in June, a few months after a heated meeting between Boeing officials and some American Airlines pilots. The pilots were angry that the manufacturer had not told them about new flight-control software that could push the plane's nose down. The software activated based on faulty sensor data on flights that crashed off Indonesia and in Ethiopia, killing 346 people. Boeing is reworking the software and hopes to get the plane flying again in the fourth quarter, although some analysts think 2020 is more likely. Boeing and some of the airlines that use the Max are in the early stages of designing a public relations campaign to make passengers feel safe boarding a plane that has crashed twice. 'When we see Allied Pilots Association pilots operating the airplane, the flying public can be assured that it is safe to operate, we will not compromise in that area,' Ferguson said. He added that the pilots 'will participate as necessary to assure the public that it is safe.' The pilots' union at Southwest Airlines has said it will ask Boeing for compensation to cover legal costs and income that pilots lost due to flights that were canceled after the plane was grounded in March. Ferguson said he believes some of his union's pilots have lost money too. As for suing Boeing or asking for compensation, he said, 'We are not there yet, but it's certainly something to consider.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first generic copies of a popular, pricey pill for nerve pain. The agency on Monday said it approved nine generic versions of Pfizer Inc.'s Lyrica. It is also used for seizures and fibromyalgia, a condition that causes chronic, widespread pain. Lyrica, approved in 2004, is Pfizer's second bestseller, with sales last year of $4.6 billion. The heavily advertised drug costs about $460 to $720 per month without insurance, depending on the pharmacy. Prices can vary widely. Prices for generic versions range from about $140 to $370 per month, according to the drug price comparison site GoodRx . Common side effects include dizziness, blurred vision and sleepiness. Serious side effects include allergic reactions and life-threatening breathing problems.
  • A suspected arson fire threw Italy's high-speed rail system into chaos Monday, forcing the cancellation of dozens of train runs and frustrating vacationers and commuters along the heavily-traveled Milan-Naples corridor. The state railways company said the suspicious fire occurred near Rovezzano station along the Rome-Florence line and caused those trains which did depart to be delayed as much as four hours. The blaze was under investigation. Amid deteriorating relations between feuding government parties, Interior Minister Matteo Salvini went to Rovezzano to inspect the site after dangling the possibility that the fire might be linked to a recent reprise of violent protests by opponents of construction of a high-speed train line between France and Italy, known as TAV. Salvini has been blasting his coalition partner, the 5-Star Movement, for opposing the TAV project. On Sunday, he suggested that its opposition to TAV construction could put the year-old populist government's very survival at risk. Whatever the cause of fire turns out to be, 'we expect from all parties and the entire government a harsh condemnation of the violence and a 'yes'' to TAV, Salvini tweeted. Besides the cancellation of both state trains and private Italo high-speed trains, it also caused many regional trains to be canceled or delayed, the state railway said. The railway said work began to repair the electrical cables damaged by the fire. The disruptions took place as many Italians and tourists were heading off to or returning from vacation destinations. Italy faces more travel chaos this week. Train, ferry and mass transit workers as well as taxi drivers are striking on Wednesday and an air travel strike is set for Friday.
  • Microsoft is paying more than $25 million to settle federal corruption charges involving a bribery scheme in Hungary and other foreign offices. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said Microsoft will pay about $16.6 million to settle charges that it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. While the case centered on Hungary, the SEC said it also found improprieties at Microsoft offices in Saudi Arabia, Thailand and Turkey. The Justice Department said Microsoft will also pay an $8.75 million criminal fine stemming from the Hungarian bid-rigging and bribery scheme. Federal prosecutors said that from 2013 through 2015, a senior executive and other employees at the Hungary office took part in a scheme to 'inflate margins in the Microsoft sales channel' in connection with Microsoft software licenses sold to Hungarian government agencies. Savings were falsely recorded as discounts and used for corrupt purposes, the prosecutors said. Microsoft President Brad Smith said in a letter to employees Monday that the misconduct was 'completely unacceptable' and involved a small number of employees. Smith outlined changes to prevent public sector discounts from being used improperly and said the company is expanding its use of artificial intelligence to flag suspicious transactions.
  • British Airways pilots voted overwhelmingly to take strike action amid a long-running dispute over pay, their union said Monday. The British Airlines Pilots Association accused the airline of making massive profits on the back of sacrifices made during hard times. No potential dates have been set for industrial action, and the union said it remained hopeful the dispute could be resolved. The association says pilots backed industrial action by more than 9-1 on a turnout of 90%. 'We do not wish to inconvenience our customers, which is why we have tried to resolve this matter through negotiation starting last November - it is BA who has regrettably chosen to drag this out into the summer months,' union leader Brian Strutton said. The airline is seeking an injunction Tuesday in the High Court to halt industrial action. It said its offer was worth 11.5% over three years. 'We are very disappointed that BALPA, the pilots' union, has chosen to threaten the travel plans of thousands of our customers, over the summer holidays, with possible strike action,' the airline said in a statement.? 'We remain open to working with BALPA to reach an agreement.
  • The European Central Bank could take action including a possible rate cut at its policy meeting on Thursday, as central banks around the globe rev up stimulus to support the world economy through a period of heightened uncertainty from trade wars and Brexit. The ECB, which sets interest rates for the 19 European Union member countries that use the euro, is expected by many analysts to at least tweak its promise to keep interest rates at rock-bottom levels into next year. The new wording would emphasize that the next move down the road could be a cut. But a rate cut Thursday is not out of the question either — even though one of the rate benchmarks is already below zero. That would see the ECB moving ahead of an expected rate reduction from the U.S. Federal Reserve, which has an outsized role due to the size of the U.S. economy and the dollar's status as an international currency for borrowing and trade. Fed officials have signaled they may cut rates at their July 30-31 meeting, from the current benchmark federal funds rate of 2.25-2.5 percent. Central banks in South Korea, Indonesia and South Africa have already cut rates in recent days. Analysts at bank Morgan Stanley predict the ECB will cut its deposit rate from minus 0.4% to minus 0.5% at the bank's Sept. 12 meeting or before and 'wouldn't be surprised if this was to happen already' at Thursday's meeting. The negative rate means banks pay to keep cash overnight at the ECB, a penalty aimed at pushing them to lend the money. 'The main question is whether the ECB can afford to wait six more weeks before delivering new monetary stimulus or whether it should surprise financial markets by frontloading new measures,' Carsten Brzeski, chief economist for Germany at bank ING, wrote in a note to investors. The shift in policy comes even though the global economy continues to grow - including in Europe and the U.S. - and unemployment has fallen. The central banks would be moving to pre-empt the economic impact from risks including slowing trade and investment due to the U.S.-China trade dispute. For the ECB, there's also Britain's impending departure from the European Union, which is set to happen by Oct. 31 and could result in disruption to trade if it occurs without a negotiated exit agreement. Central banks like the Fed and the ECB had earlier been in the process of withdrawing a decade of monetary stimulus deployed in the wake of the Great Recession and financial crisis of 2008-09. The Fed had raised rates and the ECB only in December halted a 2.6 trillion euro ($2.9 trillion), four-year bond purchase stimulus that pumped newly created money into the economy. With rates already low and those 2.6 trillion newly printed euros still in the financial system it's an open question how much additional stimulus would result from the ECB's moves. Yet consumers, investors, businesses and governments are all likely to be affected by the shift. For one, savers may see an even longer period of paltry interest returns on bank deposits and other low-risk holdings. On the other hand, stimulus measures tend to buoy stocks and real estate, cheering markets in the short term but raising questions about whether some assets might rise too far and then fall painfully. Low rates also mean less pressure on Europe's indebted governments such as Italy. Low rates make it easier for businesses to borrow but raise the prospect that cheap money is keeping alive inefficient 'zombie firms' that would otherwise go bust and permit the economy to shift investment to more productive use. Companies have taken on more debt, an ominous sign for some economists. The ECB's minimum tweak Thursday could be adding the word 'or lower' to its promise to keep rates unchanged at least through mid-2020. Beyond a possible interest rate cut, many analysts think the bank could re-start the bond purchases later this year if things do not start looking up. Brzeski said that waiting until September would mean the bank could gather more data and use new quarterly staff projections to support any move. He cautioned that 'Draghi's track record of over-delivering and trying to be ahead of the curve, however, could bring new ECB action at the July ECB meeting. It's a very close call.
  • With earthquakes in California and Hurricane Barry striking states along the Gulf of Mexico and in the Midwest, small business owners should look at their insurance policies and determine how well covered they'd be in the event of a natural disaster. Damage from tornadoes and the wind and rains of hurricanes are covered by standard business insurance policies. But some insurers won't sell policies in coastal areas that are at a high risk for a hurricane. And coverage for flooding, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions is likely to need separate, and often expensive, policies. Standard business policies are for real property, and don't cover cars or other vehicles. Owners need to buy business auto insurance, and be sure that it will reimburse for damage from disasters in addition to the standard collision and liability coverage. The basics of business coverage for natural disasters: HURRICANES A standard business policy will cover losses from wind damage like broken windows and roofs that are torn away. And if rain gets inside the building, the damage from the water is also covered. But if the water is due to a flood, entering a building from ground level, that damage isn't covered. A company will need separate flood insurance, which is regulated by the federal government. It can be expensive for companies that are located in or near flood zones, but businesses can lower their premium costs if they take steps to make their property less vulnerable to flood water. TORNADOES Standard business insurance policies cover wind damage and therefore will reimburse for losses from tornadoes. These policies also cover rain and hail, and damage from both. EARTHQUAKES Earthquake policies cover a variety of damage from tremors, and each insurer decides what kind of damage they're willing to cover. Some charge high deductibles, as much as 20%. Earthquake coverage is sold separately from a standard business policy. VOLCANOES There are 169 volcanoes in the U.S., although major eruptions like last year's Mount Kilauea lava flow are rare. Most business insurance policies provide coverage for damage caused by a volcanic explosion, shockwaves, ash, dust or lava, according to the Insurance Information Institute. But like flood zones, most insurers won't sell volcano coverage inside what are known as lava flow hazard zones. The state government in Hawaii, however, has created the Hawaii Property Insurance Association, a group of insurance companies that will cover volcano damage. Volcano insurance won't cover land, trees and property that's left out in the open. And if an eruption sets off earthquakes or mudslides, that also won't be covered; owners can, however, purchase separate earthquake insurance. You can get information about the types of business insurance and the disasters that are covered at the website for the Insurance Information Institute, a trade group. Visit www.iii.org . _____ Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg . Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com
  • U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General does not say whether patients suffered because of the hospitals' practices. But all five Indian Health Service hospitals that were reviewed had patients who were given opioids in amounts exceeding federal guidelines, the report said. 'There are vulnerabilities with this particular population in the opioid prescribing and dispensing practices,' said Carla Lewis, one of the auditors. The overdose epidemic that has killed more people than any other drug epidemic in U.S. history has hit indigenous communities hard. Native Americans and Alaska Natives had the second-highest rate of opioid overdose out of all U.S. racial and ethnic groups in 2017, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez called the audit's findings 'very concerning' and said the tribe plans to reach out to its congressional members and the Indian Health Service to ensure the recommendations are addressed. New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall, vice chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, said the report 'is a deeply troubling indication that structural issues at the IHS are potentially worsening the opioid crisis in Indian Country.' The report made more than a dozen recommendations to the Indian Health Service to better track patients' health records and pain management, ensure opioids are stored under tighter security and update its information technology systems. The agency agreed on every point and said changes are coming. The Indian Health Service, the federal agency that administers primary health care for Native Americans, has put an increased focus on opioids lately with a new website and the creation of a committee focused on decreasing overdose deaths, promoting culturally appropriate treatments and ensuring that communities know how to respond. The audit covered five of the 25 hospitals directly run by the Indian Health Service: the Phoenix Indian Medical Center in Phoenix; Northern Navajo Medical Center on the Navajo Nation in Shiprock, New Mexico; the Lawton Indian Hospital in Lawton, Oklahoma; the Cass Lake Indian Hospital on the Leech Lake reservation in Cass Lake, Minnesota; and the Fort Yates Hospital on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Fort Yates, North Dakota. Auditors considered the amount of opioids each hospital dispensed and the percentage increase over three years when deciding which ones to review. They looked at 30 patient records at each hospital, visited the facilities and interviewed staff. The auditors found that the hospitals strayed from guidelines in the Indian Health Manual in reviewing treatment for patients and their causes of pain every three months. Patients also must sign a written consent form and an agreement to treat chronic pain with opioids so they know the risks and benefits, as well as the requirement for drug screenings. More than 100 patient records did not include evidence of informed consent, and dozens did not have evidence that providers adequately educated patients. The Centers for Disease Control recommends that patients be prescribed no more than 90 morphine milligram equivalents per day, a measure used to compare an opioid dose with morphine. The audit found that each hospital met or exceeded that amount at times. At the Shiprock hospital, the daily dosage was more than four times as high. The auditors also found some patients were prescribed opioids and benzodiazepines — commonly used to treat anxiety and insomnia —at the same time, which 'puts patients at a greater risk of a potentially fatal overdose.' The Indian Health Service said all of its facilities now submit that data so the agency's top leadership can track it. Among the report's other findings: —More than two dozen records showed no evidence patients were screened for drugs with urine tests when they started opioid treatment and periodically after. Providers did not have an alert system to know when patients were due for the urine tests. The Phoenix hospital has since implemented one. —Pharmacists are supposed to review patients' files before filling prescriptions from an outside provider, but that was not done at four of the hospitals. In one case, Fort Yates filled a prescription from an outside provider despite the hospital discontinuing treatment because the patient violated a pain management agreement. The Indian Health Service said it would issue a directive in December for prescribers to track that information. —Only the Lawton hospital had opioids secured in a storage cabinet requiring employee authentication for access. One photo attached to the report showed the combination to a safe listed on the safe itself. The Indian Health Service said it has revised its manual to require opioids awaiting pickup to be locked up. —Agreements with their states require that hospitals report daily on opioid prescriptions that are filled so patients do not seek the drugs from multiple providers at the same time. Fort Yates and Phoenix now are complying. The Indian Health Service said the reporting would be automated by June 2020. At all hospitals, auditors noted that providers did not always review the data before seeing new patients or during the time patients were on opioids for pain. 'Part of it is to ensure the holistic approach of providing care,' Lewis said. Hospital officials and providers often said they were overwhelmed by the number of patients or could not control how regularly they came in — sometimes due to the long distances between patients' homes and the hospitals. Lewis said auditors try to be reasonable in their requests. 'We try to make recommendations that are going to be actionable and cost-effective for an organization,' she said.
  • Tech stocks were the standouts in an otherwise sluggish day of trading on Monday, as investors gear up for the arrival of the heart of earnings reporting season. Apple, Intel and several chip makers jumped more than 2%, and technology stocks in the S&P 500 climbed 1.2%. But the other 10 sectors that make up the index were evenly split between gainers and losers, and none moved by more than 0.5%. All the mixed trading left the S&P 500 up 8.42 points, or 0.3%, at 2,985.03. The index is back within 1% of its record, which was set a week earlier. The Dow Jones Industrial Average edged up 17.70, or 0.1%, to 21,171.90, and the Nasdaq composite rose 57.65, or 0.7%, to 8,204.14. More action may arrive in the next two weeks, when a tidal wave of earnings reports is on the schedule. Roughly three-fifths of S&P 500 companies are set to update investors on how much profit they made from April through June, and expectations are generally low. A slowing global economy and rising costs are weighing on companies, and many investors are more interested in what CEOs say about how President Donald Trump's trade war will affect their future profits than in their results for the spring. The last couple earnings reporting seasons have been so volatile for stocks that Craig Hodges, portfolio manager at Hodges Funds, said he's recently raised how much cash he's holding in anticipation of bargain-hunting opportunities. Particularly among small stocks that don't get as much attention from Wall Street, Hodges said he's seen steep, overdone drops in price following earnings reports. 'We're sitting on cash right now, knowing that in the next few weeks, there will be a lot of stocks that we like that get hit by 10, 15 or maybe even 20% if they have a miss,' he said. 'We're not market timers, but after seeing the last two earnings periods, we wished we had a cash balance to take advantage of some of the names that we liked that got hit.' So far this reporting season, which is still in its early going, stocks have dropped a bit more than usual when a company falls short of Wall Street's earnings expectations. Among the 16% of big S&P 500 companies that have already reported their second-quarter results, the average decline has been 2.7% following an earnings miss, slightly more than the 2.6% average over the last five years, according to FactSet. On the winning end Monday was Halliburton, which reported a bigger profit than Wall Street expected and surged 9.1% for the biggest gain in the S&P 500. Health care company DaVita jumped 4.7% after it raised its profit forecast for this year and gave a preliminary report on its second-quarter results. The other big looming event for markets is the Federal Reserve's meeting at the end of the month, when investors expect the central bank to cut interest rates for the first time in more than a decade. Some investors have recently scaled back their expectations for how much the Fed may cut rates, down to a quarter of a percentage point from a half point. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note slipped to 2.04% from 2.05% late Friday. The two-year Treasury yield, which is more affected by changes in Fed policy, inched up to 1.82% from 1.81%. The price of crude oil also continued to climb amid heightened tensions in the Persian Gulf area. Iran on Monday announced the arrest of 17 people it accused of spying for the United States, something Trump called 'totally false.' On Friday, Iran said it seized a British oil tanker. Benchmark crude oil rose 46 cents to settle at $56.09 a barrel. Brent crude oil, the international standard, rose $79 cents to close at $63.26 a barrel. Wholesale gasoline fell 1 cent to $1.83 per gallon. Heating oil climbed 1 cent to $1.90 per gallon. Natural gas rose 6 cents to $2.31 per 1,000 cubic feet. Gold rose 20 cents to $1,425.30 per ounce, silver rose 22 cents to $16.34 per ounce and copper fell 3 cents to $2.71 per pound. The dollar rose to 107.86 Japanese yen from 107.81 yen on Friday. The euro weakened to $1.1211 from $1.1219. European stock indexes were modestly higher, while Asian markets were weaker. The FTSE 100 in London added 0.1%, France's CAC 40 rose 0.3% and the DAX in Germany gained 0.2%. Japan's Nikkei 225 index fell 0.2%, the Hang Seng in Hong Kong dropped 1.4% and the Kospi in South Korea was virtually flat. Besides earnings reports from more than a quarter of all the companies in the S&P 500, investors this week will also be getting updates on the housing industry, manufacturing and the overall U.S. economy. Economists expect a Friday report to show that the U.S. economy slowed to 1.8% annualized growth in the spring from a 3.1% rate in the first three months of the year.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Oviedo Mayor Dominic Persampiere announced that he will not seek reelection today, after more than 20 years in city government. Persampiere said the decision is because he wants to spend more time with his family, and work on growing his business. Previously, he had served as an Oviedo city councilman before running for mayor. He’s been serving as Mayor since 2011.  Two months ago, Persampiere was involved in a dispute with a neighbor that led to police involvement, but a judge dismissed an injunction filed against him.
  • Disney World is hiring part-time workers to operate it's Disney Skyliner, set to debut in late September. The new transportation system will connect Epcot, Disney's Hollywood Studios and four nearby resort hotels.  Skyliner workers will be responsible for greeting guests, loading and unloading the gondolas, as well as, monitoring the gondola system and providing audience control, according to a job posting.  The starting pay will be $12 an hour according to the posting, but Skyliner workers will be eligible for Disney's new starting rate of $13 as of September 29, 2019  Click here to apply
  • Aaron Carreto was enjoying his 10th birthday, playing outside his Compton home on July 6 when two neighbors tossed a lit, homemade firework at him, his family said. The boy reflexively grabbed the illegal firework, which exploded in his left hand, destroying four fingers and most of his palm, the Los Angeles Times reported. Aaron also lost a finger on his right hand and suffered burns on both hands, his face and his torso. One of the neighbors, Walter David Revolorio, 27, was arrested and charged with felony child cruelty and possession of a destructive device, the Times reported. The investigation is ongoing, but no charges had been filed against a second neighbor as of Monday. Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department officials had no immediate comment on the status of the investigation. Aaron told Fox 11 in Los Angeles he was playing outside in his neighborhood when he walked over to the neighbors to say hello. At one point, the men called out his name. “They said my name, and then I turned and my hand flipped over, so that’s when they handed the firework to me,” Aaron said. “I was about to throw it and it exploded in my hand.” The explosion was so great, it rocked nearby cars, Fox 11 reported. >> Read more trending news The Times reported that Aaron was immediately taken to Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, where he underwent a series of emergency surgeries. Doctors at UC Irvine Medical Center attached his left arm to his stomach to hopefully preserve nerve and skin tissue they can use to reconstruct his hand. Aaron’s older sister, Adriana Carreto, said doctors also reattached the finger her brother lost on his right hand. Carreto wrote on a GoFundMe page set up to help with Aaron’s medical expenses that he has a long recovery ahead, including at least two additional surgeries. Photos and video of the boy on the fundraising page, as well as on social media, show him with burns on his face and his left arm hidden under a hospital gown. Pain is etched on the boy’s face. “This incident changed his life, (his) way of living, but not his spirits,” Carreto wrote. “Everyone knows him as a social butterfly, always friendly to his teammates on the soccer team. He’s very caring and aware of other people’s needs.” Carreto wrote that her brother loves riding his bike with neighborhood friends and playing the popular online video game 'Fortnite' with classmates over their summer break. “Now with his new disability, he’ll find it difficult to adjust to his day to day lifestyle,” Carreto wrote. As of Monday afternoon, donors had raised more than $47,000 of the page's $50,000 goal to help Aaron and his family. Carreto said along with the physical pain her brother is in, he is also psychologically scarred. “He tells his family how he feels betrayed by those people around us and wants to start a new life far away from where he grew up,” Carreto wrote on the GoFundMe page. As of Monday, Aaron had been released from the hospital to continue his recovery at home. “I been reading all the positive and kind words to Aaron from his donors and he said he appreciates all the help and support,” Carreto wrote. “He said he feels happy with each and every one of you guys.” The distraught sister told ABC 7 she, however, is angry. “I’m angry because those two guys are adults and one of them has kids,” Carreto told the news station. “I’m pretty sure if it was his kid, he wouldn’t have let that happen.” Aaron told KTLA he wants to see both men punished for what they did to him. “Those guys who did this, I don’t want to see them no more,” Aaron told the news station. “I just wish that they could be in jail.” Revolorio remained Monday at the Los Angeles County Jail, where records show he is being held in lieu of $630,000 bond. The second neighbor accused in the incident has not been publicly identified.
  • President Trump continues his public criticism of House democrats Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar. He tweets, “The “Squad” is a very Racist group of troublemakers who are young, inexperienced, and not very smart. They are pulling the once great Democrat Party far left, and were against humanitarian aid at the Border...And are now against ICE and Homeland Security. So bad for our Country!” These comments come after President Trump last week said those four freshman House Democrats should 'go back to the crime infested places' from which they came. This also comes after a crowd at a Trump campaign rally in North Carolina chanted 'send her back.
  • A California woman and her boyfriend have been charged in connection with their newborn son’s death after investigators learned they strangled the boy at the hospital shortly after he was born, authorities said. Andrea Torralba, 20, and David Villa, 21, both of Oxnard, are being held in the Ventura County Jail on suspicion of felony assault on a child causing death, Oxnard Police Department officials said. Jail records show Villa, who is described as a field worker, is being held in lieu of $5 million. ABC 7 in Los Angeles reported that Torralba’s bail was set at $1 million. >> Read more trending news  Oxnard police investigators said officers were called just before 8 a.m. Friday to St. John’s Medical Center, where they learned a newborn boy was in critical condition with serious injuries. The boy was found unresponsive and despite all medical efforts, he died of his injuries. Detectives from the department’s Family Protection Unit learned that Torralba and Villa strangled the newborn until he lost consciousness, police officials said. Oxnard police Sgt. Brandon Ordelheide told ABC 7 that the couple, when questioned by detectives, admitted they did not want the baby. Both were arrested and charged in the boy’s death.

Washington Insider

  • President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders in Congress agreed on Monday to a two-year budget plan which will increase spending in 2020 and 2021, and allow the national debt to go up for a two year period, while including little in the way of budget savings, continuing a trend of higher government spending and larger deficits under the Trump Administration. 'If this deal passes, President Trump will have increased discretionary spending by as much as 22 percent over his first term, and enshrine trillion-dollar deficits into law,' said Maya MacGuineas, head of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, who labeled the deal a 'total abdication of fiscal responsibility.' The agreement includes only $77.4 billion in budget offsets to pay for an estimated $320 billion in extra spending over two years. While the President tweeted his support, joined by Congressional leaders in both parties, a handful of lawmakers said the deal made no sense, because it guaranteed more deficit spending. With the White House already forecasting deficits above $1 trillion for the next four years, this agreement would do nothing to ease that tide of red ink, which had dropped to $438 billion in 2015 - but has steadily increased over the past three years. 'With more than $22 trillion in debt, we simply cannot afford deals like this one,' said Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA), the head of the conservative Republican Study Committee. 'It’s not too late to reject the Pelosi-Mnuchin spending deal and strike a better deal for all Americans that cuts spending,' argued Jessica Anderson, a former Trump budget official. But those voices have faded into the wilderness in recent years in the GOP, as deficits have steadily increased under President Trump. “It’s pretty clear that both houses of Congress and both parties have become big spenders, and Congress is no longer concerned about the extent of the budget deficits or the debt they add,” said the Club For Growth, which has seen its influence on Capitol Hill dwindle in recent years.