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The Latest Political Headlines

    President Donald Trump's re-election campaign released a provocative new ad accusing Democrats of being 'complicit' in the slayings of law enforcement officers by people in the U.S. illegally.The 30-second ad was released Saturday on the anniversary of Trump's inauguration and amid a government shutdown. Democrats are refusing to support a spending plan unless Republicans agree to a deal to protect some 700,000 immigrants known as 'Dreamers' from deportation.The ad touts Trump's pledge to build a border wall and to strengthen border security.'Democrats who stand in our way will be complicit in every murder committed by illegal immigrants,' the ad said.Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders called the spot 'really unbelievable and so sad for our country,' in an interview with CNN's 'State of the Union.'Republicans — and even a White House official — tried to distance themselves from the spot.'It's done from a political organization,' White House legislative affairs director Marc Short told NBC's Meet the Press. 'It's not done from people working inside the White House.'Speaker of the House Paul Ryan told CBS' 'Face the Nation' Sunday that 'I don't know if that's necessarily productive.'The ad features Luis Bracamontes, who is in the U.S. illegally and allegedly killed two Northern California sheriff's deputies in an October 2014 rampage. Bracamontes' violent court outbursts have included regrets that he did not harm more officers.The ad closes with a recorded endorsement by Trump.
  • House Speaker Paul Ryan is still being non-committal about whether he'll seek re-election to an 11th term.The Republican says that's a decision he always makes with his wife 'each and every term' before Wisconsin's filing deadline. The deadline this year is June 1.Ryan adds 'I'm not going to share my thinking with you before I even talk to my wife.'Ryan is being asked about his future on CBS's Face the Nation.Ryan will be a heavy favorite to win re-election, but mid-term elections are historically difficult for the party in power. Democrats are voicing increasing confidence about their prospects of winning the House.Ryan has made clear he's not going anywhere anytime soon, telling The Associated Press last month: 'I've got no plans to do anything different.
  • On day two of the U.S. government shutdown, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republicans would not adopt President Donald Trump’s call for a “nuclear option” to pass a budget with a simple majority, The New York Daily News reported Sunday. >> Read more trending news “The Republican Conference opposes changing the rules on legislation,” a spokesman for McConnell (R-Ky.) said in a statement to the Daily News. The Senate is set to reconvene at 1 p.m. Sunday. In a tweet Sunday morning Trump had called for the Senate to change the rules on filibusters, which requires a 60 votes to advance a bill. Trump’s “nuclear option” calls for a simple majority of 51 votes. “Great to see how hard Republicans are fighting for our Military and Safety at the Border. The Dems just want illegal immigrants to pour into our nation unchecked. If stalemate continues, Republicans should go to 51% (Nuclear Option) and vote on real, long term budget, no C.R.'s!” Trump tweeted. The government officially shut down just after midnight Saturday when the Senate could not muster enough votes to advance a new spending bill.  Republicans have branded the deadlock the “Schumer Shutdown,” blaming the impasse on Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). Democrats. meanwhile, have called it the “Trump Shutdown.”
  • Former Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke's run-in with a 25-year-old man who shook his head at him while boarding a flight last year is headed to trial.Daniel Black sued the sheriff for having deputies detain him and question him at Milwaukee's airport, but Clarke's taunting social media posts remain the focus of the case. Here's a look at history of the case and the legal issues that will play out in federal court. The trial starts Monday.___THE PLANE CONFRONTATIONClarke and Black were boarding a flight from Dallas to Milwaukee on Jan. 15, 2017 — the day Clarke's beloved Dallas Cowboys were facing the Green Bay Packers in the playoffs. The sheriff was clad in Dallas gear without his trademark cowboy hat and Black said he didn't immediately recognize him because of that. He asked Clarke if he was Milwaukee's sheriff, according to his lawsuit, and when Clarke said yes, Black shook his head disapprovingly.Black said he made the gesture because Clarke was supporting a rival team. Clarke, who attracts controversy because of his provocative and brash personality, didn't see the gesture as harmless and asked deputies to meet Black at the airport and question him.___THE AFTERMATHBlack said deputies questioned him for about 15 minutes but didn't cite or arrest him. When Black publicized the encounter and filed his lawsuit, Clarke responded with a series of Facebook posts. Clarke said at the time he 'reserves the reasonable right to pre-empt a possible assault,' and also posted that the next time someone pulled the same 'stunt on a plane they may get knocked out.' Later, making fun of Black, Clarke wrote on Facebook: 'Cheer up, snowflake ... if Sheriff Clarke were to really harass you, you wouldn't be around to whine about it.'___WHERE THE LAWSUIT STANDSBlack's lawsuit initially made several claims. He contended that Clarke's directive for his deputies to detain him amounted to unconstitutional search and seizure, and that the sheriff's actions violated his due-process rights and infringed on his free speech.But earlier this month, Judge J.P. Stadtmueller dismissed all but one of Black's claims — whether Clarke's Facebook posts were threatening enough to be considered a deterrent to future speech.Stadtmueller said the posts could be interpreted in different ways: On one hand, the posts could be seen as 'intentionally hyperbolic (and juvenile) attempts at mockery and self-promotion' and not intimidating. But, he also said 'the Court cannot say Clarke's posts were so trivial that no jury could find them to be sufficiently threatening.'___WHAT HAPPENS NOWThe trial is expected to last all day Monday. While Black is likely to testify, it's less clear whether Clarke will take the stand.Black wants a jury to award him a compensation amount that they choose for emotional distress and other damages, as well as attorneys' fees.Although Clarke is no longer sheriff, the county is paying his legal bills and ultimately will be liable for any damages. Clarke resigned Aug. 31 to join a political action committee that supports President Donald Trump.
  • The Justice Department has turned over to Congress additional text messages involving an FBI agent who was removed from special counsel Robert Mueller's investigative team following the discovery of derogatory comments about President Donald Trump.But the department also said in a letter to lawmakers that its record of messages sent to and from the agent, Peter Strzok, was incomplete because the FBI, for technical reasons, had been unable to preserve and retrieve about five months' worth of communications.New text messages highlighted in a letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray by Sen. Ron Johnson, the Republican chairman of the Senate's Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, are from the spring and summer of 2016 and involve discussion of the investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server. They reference Attorney General Loretta Lynch's decision to accept the FBI's conclusion in that case and a draft statement that former FBI Director James Comey had prepared in anticipation of closing out the Clinton investigation without criminal charges.The FBI declined to comment Sunday.Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence agent who also worked the Clinton email case, was reassigned last summer from the team investigating ties between Russia and Trump's Republican presidential campaign after Mueller learned he had exchanged politically charged text messages — many anti-Trump in nature — with an FBI lawyer also detailed to the group. The lawyer, Lisa Page, left Mueller's team before the text messages were discovered.The Justice Department last month produced for reporters and Congress hundreds of text messages that the two had traded before becoming part of the Mueller investigation. Many focused on their observations of the 2016 election and included discussions in often colorful language of their personal feelings about Trump, Clinton and other public figures. Some Republican lawmakers have contended the communication reveals the FBI and the Mueller team to be politically tainted and biased against Trump — assertions Wray has flatly rejected.In addition to the communications already made public, the Justice Department on Friday provided Johnson's committee with 384 pages of text messages, according to a letter from the Wisconsin lawmaker that was obtained by The Associated Press.But, according to the letter, the FBI told the department that its system for retaining text messages sent and received on bureau phones had failed to preserve communications between Strzok and Page over a five-month period between Dec. 14, 2016, and May 17, 2017. May 17 was the date that Mueller was appointed as special counsel to oversee the Russia investigation.The explanation for the gap was 'misconfiguration issues related to rollouts, provisioning, and software upgrades that conflicted with the FBI's collection capabilities.'In Johnson's letter to Wray, he asks whether the FBI has any records of communications between Strzok and Page during that five-month window and whether the FBI had searched their non-FBI phones for additional messages. He also asks for the 'scope and scale' of any other records from the Clinton investigation that have been lost.One of the messages references a change in language to Comey's statement closing out the email case involving Clinton, Trump's Democratic opponent in the 2016 presidential election. While an earlier draft of the statement said Clinton and President Barack Obama had an email exchange while Clinton was 'on the territory' of a hostile adversary, the reference to Obama was at first changed to 'senior government official' and then omitted entirely in the final version.In another exchange, the two express displeasure about the timing of Lynch's announcement that she would defer to the FBI's judgment on the Clinton investigation. That announcement came days after it was revealed that the attorney general and former President Bill Clinton had an impromptu meeting aboard her plane in Phoenix, though both sides said the email investigation was never discussed.Strzok said in a July 1 text message that the timing of Lynch's announcement 'looks like hell.' And Page appears to mockingly refer to Lynch's decision to accept the FBI's conclusion in the case as a 'real profile in courag(e) since she knows no charges will be brought.'Days later, on July 5, Comey announced the FBI's recommendation that no criminal charges were merited.___Follow Eric Tucker on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/etuckerAP___This story has been corrected to show that the five-month period in which communications were not preserved ended May 17, 2017, not May 7, 2017.
  • The sequel to President Donald Trump's first year in office is opening with the lead player hamstrung by a government shutdown and hunkering down amid investigations, crises and political unease.After 365 days in the Oval Office, Trump has found that his drive to deliver quickly on campaign promises has yielded to the sobering reality of governing — and the prospect of an electoral rebuke in November. Administration aides, outside allies and Republicans on Capitol Hill see the Trump White House continuing to face many of the same challenges it wrestled with last year, with fresh plot twists to boot.Special counsel Robert Mueller's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election keeps moving ever closer to the Oval Office. The government shutdown highlights the legislative challenges that persist even with Republicans controlling the White House and both the House and Senate, and makes clear the administration's need to more carefully target its political capital on specific agenda items. And the fall elections are shaping up as a referendum on Trump's tenure.'In the second year, you no longer are one-dimensional,' said Ari Fleischer, press secretary when George W. Bush was president. 'There's an inevitable pivot that every administration makes, and that is to recognize that it's no longer about future events and promises, it's now about defending and promoting last year's accomplishments.'No administration comes into office fully ready for the task of leading the government, and Trump's team has taken disruption to a new extreme. Republicans outside the White House are now hoping the Trump administration will be more politically savvy. But the 71-year old president has proved set in his ways, trusting his instincts over the advice of his aides, and there is no reason to expect that won't continue.Yet Trump has been changed by the experiences of the past year, according to aides and outside advisers, most of whom spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss internal dynamics. The president has grown more fearful of leaks. His inner circle of friends is smaller, most recently with the banishment of former chief strategist Steve Bannon. This smaller group of informal advisers has seen Trump favor those who tell him what he likes to hear, according to several people who talk to him regularly. And that, combined with chief of staff John Kelly's determination not to manage the president, is furthering the Trump's impulsive streak.What comes next?Personnel changes are afoot to streamline the West Wing political and legislative affairs teams in preparation for the November elections, and Trump and Vice President Mike Pence are preparing aggressive campaign and fundraising schedules.Despite a booming economy, Trump's approval rating is at historic lows for a first-year president, weighed down by partisan controversy and his own divisive actions and statements. The fall contests represent a make-or-break moment for Trump and could influence his pursuit of a second term, an effort that will begin in earnest next year.GOP lawmakers frame the importance of keeping control of the House and Senate in self-serving terms for Trump: Democratic control would grant subpoena power to the president's fiercest critics.Wary of potentially losing the Senate, the White House plans to continue its aggressive push to appoint conservative judges before Congress breaks for campaign season.For all the legislative ambition of the first year, Trump's second stands to be a more muted affair.Immigration, the sticking point in the current shutdown, stands as the most promising option after the president provoked a crisis by setting up the March 5 expiration of protections for roughly 700,000 young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children. He's hoping to use it as leverage to pass his hard-line immigration priorities.Before the State of the Union address Jan. 30, the White House has been preparing much-delayed policy proposals on infrastructure and welfare, but little progress is anticipated as lawmakers have begun turning their focus to their own re-elections.White House officials said Trump is looking forward to spending much of the year promoting his achievements on judicial nominations, deregulation and passage of the tax overhaul.'If year one is about tallying campaign promises,' said White House spokesman Hogan Gidley, 'in year two, we can talk about results.'Administration officials pointed to Trump's speech Thursday in Pennsylvania, where he highlighted the benefits of his tax plan, as an example of his efforts to sell his first year to the public.Overseas, many of the same challenges remain. The nuclear threat from North Korea occupies an ever-growing focus inside the West Wing. And while the Islamic State group's foothold in Iraq and Syria has been diminished, Trump is facing new questions about the role of U.S. troops in the region.___Follow Miller on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@ZekeJMiller.
  • Vice President Mike Pence, weighing in from the Middle East on the shutdown in Washington, accused the U.S. Congress of playing politics with military pay, and told American soldiers stationed near the Syrian border that the Trump administration would demand that lawmakers reopen the government.Pence said they deserved their pay and benefits and service members and their families 'shouldn't have to worry about getting paid.'Despite bipartisan support for a budget resolution, a minority in the Senate has decided to play politics with military pay,' Pence said at the base, speaking in front of a large U.S. flag and a line of soldiers dressed in military fatigues. 'But you deserve better.'The vice president spoke as Democrats and Republicans in Congress showed little indication of progress on negotiations to end the government shutdown in a feud over immigration and spending. While Pence did not identify the culprits by party affiliation, Republicans argue that Democrats are blocking additional funding for the Pentagon by keeping the government closed.During a government shutdown, all military members are required to report for work as usual. Troops cannot be paid for duty performed after the shutdown began Saturday, but their paychecks will be delayed only if the government closure lasts beyond Feb. 1. That's because pay is issued only twice a month, on the first and the 15th.On Sunday, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney also complained about the shutdown's potential impact on the military but acknowledged that troops were all but certain to get their pay.'Traditionally every single time there's a shutdown, Congress has voted to go and pay them retroactively and we support that,' Mulvaney told CBS' 'Face the Nation.'Pence said the Trump administration would 'demand that they reopen the government' and will not reopen negotiations 'on illegal immigration' until Congress reopens the government. 'We're going to get this fixed. We're going to meet our obligations to you and your families,' Pence said. He added, 'I urge you, on behalf of your commander in chief, set aside any distractions, mind your mission, take care of one another.'Landing aboard a C-17 military aircraft, Pence visited the undisclosed military base in the Middle East following his meetings in Amman with Jordan's King Abdullah II. Journalists covering the vice president were asked to withhold the name and location of the base, and the number of troops stationed here, because of security and diplomatic concerns.The 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing is stationed at the base and has dropped nearly half of the munitions during the operation to destroy the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Pence credited the troops' 'heroic actions' to dismantle terror organizations in the region.'We will not rest, we will not relent, until we hunt down and destroy ISIS at its source,' he said.__Associated Press writer Lolita C. Baldor in Washington contributed to this report.___On Twitter follow Ken Thomas at @KThomasDC.
  • Mick Mulvaney stormed Washington as a tea party lawmaker elected in 2010, and he hasn't mellowed much as director of the Office of Management of Budget at the White House.In both spots, he's been at the center of a government shutdown. But this time he is arguing against it and is faulting Democrats for seeking to use the very kind of leverage he tried to utilize in 2013.Then a congressman, Mulvaney was among a faction on the hard right that bullied GOP leaders into a shutdown confrontation by insisting on lacing a must-pass spending bill with provisions designed to cripple President Barack Obama's signature health care law.Then, the fast-talking South Carolina Republican downplayed the impact of a government shutdown, noting that critical government services would continue and Social Security benefits would be paid. He said about 75 percent of the government would remain open, and he noted that Congress arranged for the military to continue to get paid.'In many ways, then, this is a government 'slowdown' more than it is a 'shutdown,'' Mulvaney said back in 2013, though he added, 'I know that is not much consolation for folks who are personally affected.'Mulvaney voted against legislation to reopen the government and was unapologetic over his role as a ringleader in 2013, saying the GOP's political beating — and eventual retreat — was the product of bad messaging.Now, as the federal official in charge of managing government operations during the lapse in funding, Mulvaney is taking steps to ameliorate the shutdown, giving agencies more flexibility to remain open by using, for instance, previously appropriated money to keep their doors open. He accused the Obama White House of purposefully closing high-profile federal sites to reap political gain. The Trump administration will do what it can to keep national parks open and accessible, he said.'We are going to manage the shutdown differently. We are not going to weaponize it,' Mulvaney said Friday. 'We're not going to try and hurt people, especially people who happen to work for this federal government.'Mulvaney is quick-witted and possesses a disarming frankness, and he's not afraid of being impolitic, even as he has risen to a Washington power post.For instance, on Friday, just hours before the shutdown began, Mulvaney told conservative radio host Sean Hannity, 'I found out for the first time last night that the person who technically shuts the government down is me, which is kind of cool.'Mulvaney isn't apologizing for the shutdown tactics he employed in 2013, saying he opposed that year's stopgap spending measure because it funded agencies that were implementing 'Obamacare.' But he is blaming Democrats for trying to use the same kind of leverage now that he failed to exploit back then.'When Republicans tried to add a discussion about Obamacare to the funding process in 2013, we were accused by Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer of inserting a non-fiscal — a non-financial — issue into the spending process in order to shut the government down,' Mulvaney said. 'How is that not exactly what is happening today?'On Sunday, he defended himself against accusations of hypocrisy in his attacks on Democrats over the government shutdown, given his own role at the center of the 2013 shutdown.'Everything that was in the bill Democrats support and have voted for previously,' Mulvaney said on CNN's 'State of the Union.' ''This is pure politics.'He reiterated that the administration won't negotiate with Democrats on immigration or a longer-term spending bill until they vote to reopen the government.'They need to open the government tonight or tomorrow and then we can start talking,' Mulvaney said on CNN.
  • The Latest on the government shutdown (all times local):4:30 p.m.The White House says President Donald Trump has spoken with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Senate GOP Whip John Cornyn on the second day of a government shutdown.The White House put out a brief statement Sunday detailing the president's activities, saying the administration was hard at work. Trump has also received updates from staff and has spoken to aides about the impact of the shutdown.Chief of Staff John Kelly has spoken with House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. And the director of legislative affairs, Marc Short, has spoken to Republican and Democratic members and staffers.___1:40 p.m.Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pushing back against President Donald Trump's calls to end Senate filibusters.When filibusters of legislation are underway, it takes 60 votes in the 100-member Senate to halt them.Republicans now control the chamber 51-49. But strong Democratic opposition and some defecting GOP senators have kept Republicans from getting the votes needed to end the shutdown — now in its second day.McConnell has long defended the filibuster. He says Republicans will welcome it whenever they are returned to the Senate minority.As the Senate began a rare Sunday session, the Kentucky Republican said: 'I support that right from an institutional point of view.' But he also said, 'The question is, when do you use it.'Trump has made repeated calls this year to end that rule, and did it again Sunday in a tweet.___11:30 a.m.House Speaker Paul Ryan says that if Democrats want to protect young immigrants in the country illegally, they should vote for a short-term spending bill.The Wisconsin Republican says, 'Open the government back up and then we'll get back to negotiating.'The federal government entered the second day of a shutdown Sunday.Appearing on CBS' 'Face the Nation,' Ryan says good-faith negotiations on an immigration deal are taking place, though Democrats take issue with that assessment.As a citizen, Donald Trump criticized President Barack Obama during the 2013 government shutdown for failing to 'lead' and getting everyone in the room.Ryan says on the current shutdown, 'you can't blame Donald Trump for the Senate Democrats shutting down the government.'___10:05 a.m.Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is calling on Republicans to 'sit down and talk' with Democrats on immigration in an effort to reopen the government.The former Democratic presidential candidate said Sunday on CNN's 'State of the Union' that the reality is that it takes 60 votes in the Senate to get anything done.He says, 'What we should be doing is negotiating.'Sanders maintains that government funding legislation must provide legal status for the roughly 700,000 young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children.The White House has said it won't negotiate on immigration until Democrats vote to reopen the government.Sanders is unapologetic about his own criticism of Republicans for shutting down the government in 2013, saying President Barack Obama wasn't going to repeal his health care law.___9:55 a.m.Vice President Mike Pence is blasting Congress for playing politics with military pay by failing to keep the government open.Pence told U.S. soldiers stationed near the Syrian border on Sunday: 'You deserve better.' He says the soldiers and their families 'shouldn't have to worry about getting paid.'Pence spoke to troops in the Middle East as Democrats and Republicans in Congress show few signs of progress on negotiations to end the government shutdown.The vice president says President Donald Trump's administration will not reopen negotiations 'on illegal immigration' until Congress reopens the government and until soldiers and their families receive 'the benefits and wages you've earned.'Uniformed service members and law enforcement officers are among the essential government employees who will be working without pay until the federal government reopens.___9:50 a.m.Republican Sen. Rand Paul is calling the shutdown blame game 'ridiculous on both sides.'The senator from Kentucky said Sunday on CNN's 'State of the Union': 'It's gamesmanship and it's partisanship.'Paul was among a handful of Republicans who voted with most Democrats against the House bill to keep the government open. He says he's opposed to short-term fiscal bills.Paul called on Republican leadership in both chambers of Congress to commit to a week of debate and a vote on immigration legislation in the next month, to win over Democratic votes to reopen the government.But Democrats are insisting that long-term funding legislation include protections for roughly 700,000 young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children — not just a vote on their status.___9:40 a.m.President Donald Trump says if the government shutdown drags on, Republicans should consider changing the rules in the Senate to make it easier to pass legislation without votes from Democrats.But Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois says that would mean the end of the Senate as the Founding Fathers envisioned it.The shutdown is now in its second day. Lawmakers are set to return to work on Capitol Hill later Sunday but there's no sign of a possible deal.The Republican president is floating the idea of doing away with the 60-vote threshold to advance legislation and deny the minority party the chance to stall.Senate Republicans now hold a 51-49 edge.Durbin tells ABC's 'This Week' that 'we have to acknowledge a respect for the minority.'___9:20 a.m.White House budget director Mick Mulvaney is defending himself from charges of hypocrisy in his attacks on Democrats over the government shutdown, given his own role at the center of the last fiscal clash in 2013.Mulvaney said Sunday on CNN's 'State of the Union: 'Everything that was in the bill Democrats support and have voted for previously.' He says, 'This is pure politics.'Mulvaney was a conservative member of the House in 2013 when a showdown over 'Obamacare' funding led to the last shutdown.Mulvaney reiterated Sunday that the administration won't negotiate with Democrats on immigration or a longer-term spending bill until they vote to reopen the government.He says, 'They need to open the government tonight or tomorrow and then we can start talking.'___12:45 a.m.Feuding Democrats and Republicans in Congress are trying to dodge blame for a paralyzing standoff over immigration and showing few signs of progress on negotiations needed to end a government shutdown.The finger-pointing played out in both the House and Senate, where lawmakers were eager to show voters they were actively working for a solution — or at least actively making the case the other party was at fault. The scene highlighted political stakes for both parties in an election-year shutdown.Democrats refused to provide votes needed to reopen government until they strike a deal with President Donald Trump protecting young immigrants from deportation, providing disaster relief and boosting spending for opioid treatment and other domestic programs.The Senate planned a vote by early Monday on a spending extension.
  • A new ad released by President Donald Trump's campaign is claiming that Democrats are “complicit” in killings by undocumented immigrants. The ad was released after Senate Democrats opposed a short-term spending bill to keep the government from shutting down. >> Click here to watch “President Trump is right — build the wall, deport criminals, stop illegal immigration now,” the ad said, showing clips of top Democrats. “Democrats who stand in our way will be complicit in every murder committed by illegal immigrants.” >> Trump cancels Florida trip as government shutdown looms “President Trump will fix our border and keep our families safe,” the ad concluded. The ad was released on the one-year anniversary of Trump’s inauguration. >> Government shutdown: What closes; will you get your Social Security check; what happens to SNAP, WIC On Friday, Senate Democrats opposed a short-term spending bill to fund the government and keep it from shutting down after Republicans refused to include a provision to protect thousands of immigrants brought here as children. >> Read more trending news  President Trump bashed Democrats after the failed vote, saying that they wanted “unchecked illegal immigration.” “Democrats are holding our Military hostage over their desire to have unchecked illegal immigration. Can’t let that happen!” he tweeted Saturday morning. Earlier on Saturday, he again bashed Democrats, tweeting that they were more “concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border.” (H/t: The Hill)

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • The National Women's March continued over the weekend, and people started showing up at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando as early as 8 a.m. on Sunday to join the cause.   Some of those in attendance include people from the Time's Up and Me Too Movements. Demonstrators held up signs about women's rights and say they're fed up with sexual harassment and assault. They also are calling for racial equality and environmental reform.      Hundreds of women and women also attended a Women's March in Melbourne Saturday afternoon. Demonstrators of all ages marched along the Eau Gallie Causeway, across the Indian River Lagoon.    Many carried signs with quotes of empowerment, along with some obscenities.    This is the second year for the march, which also lands on the one year mark that President Trump has been in office.
  • At least 48 people have been displaced after a fire occurred at the Windsor Cove apartments Saturday morning.   Firefighters say the fire broke out at 1470 Mercy Drive around 10am. Investigators say it started on accident when a child was using a space heater to light a paper on fire. 30 of the 48 displaced residents were children. One of those children were treated for smoke inhilation, but no one was injured.      The American Red Cross was notified and deployed an emergency response vehicle and supplied 11 families with personal hygiene kits, support to replace medication and money to find a hotel to stay in temporarily.    The Fire Department says all 12 units in the building were evacuated because the power was turned off due to fire damage to the electrical system.    Some residents will be able to return home once the system is fixed, but for others, it may take longer.
  • Two people were shot, leaving one dead and another in the hospital in Southwest Orlando on Saturday night.    At 8:47 p.m., deputies responded to the 1000 block of 23rd Street in reference to a report of gunshots. Upon arrival, deputies located two victims, a white female and a black male, who were suffering from gunshot wounds.    Both victims were transported by Orange County Fire Rescue to ORMC, but the female, identified as 51 year old Kelly Lee Foley, died from her injuries. Detectives are seeking information on a vehicle that looks like this. It is reference to an older model red or maroon Dodge Ram van with a camper top and possible damage to the right tail light area. The suspect is described as a black or Hispanice male, bald with light complexion, between the ages of 45 to 50, and is 5’9’’ weighing 180 pounds with black plastic framed glasses. If you have any information about this case, you are asked to contact Crimeline at 1-800-423-TIPS(8477). There is a reward up to 5,000 dollars.
  • A new ad released by President Donald Trump's campaign is claiming that Democrats are “complicit” in killings by undocumented immigrants. The ad was released after Senate Democrats opposed a short-term spending bill to keep the government from shutting down. >> Click here to watch “President Trump is right — build the wall, deport criminals, stop illegal immigration now,” the ad said, showing clips of top Democrats. “Democrats who stand in our way will be complicit in every murder committed by illegal immigrants.” >> Trump cancels Florida trip as government shutdown looms “President Trump will fix our border and keep our families safe,” the ad concluded. The ad was released on the one-year anniversary of Trump’s inauguration. >> Government shutdown: What closes; will you get your Social Security check; what happens to SNAP, WIC On Friday, Senate Democrats opposed a short-term spending bill to fund the government and keep it from shutting down after Republicans refused to include a provision to protect thousands of immigrants brought here as children. >> Read more trending news  President Trump bashed Democrats after the failed vote, saying that they wanted “unchecked illegal immigration.” “Democrats are holding our Military hostage over their desire to have unchecked illegal immigration. Can’t let that happen!” he tweeted Saturday morning. Earlier on Saturday, he again bashed Democrats, tweeting that they were more “concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border.” (H/t: The Hill)
  • David and Louise Turpin are facing a string of charges, including torture, after police say the couple kept their 13 children locked away in subhuman conditions in their Perris, California, home. On Thursday, the Turpins made their first court appearance. >> Watch the video here >> On Rare.us: Here’s what the children in the California torture house did to cope with the alleged abuse David Turpin appeared in chains, wearing a lavender shirt and black jacket while his wife sat nearby, also in chains and a black jacket. The Turpins entered not guilty pleas to all of the charges, some of which date back to 2010. The district attorney says the couple is facing 94 years to life in prison if convicted on all counts. >> Dogs found in perfect condition in home where 13 siblings held captive During the arraignment, the Turpins were quiet and spoke only to say they acknowledged their right to a speedy preliminary hearing, CBS reports. They will appear in court again on Feb. 23, and their bail was set at $13 million. District Attorney Mike Hestrin said in a press conference, “As a prosecutor, there are cases that stick with you, that will haunt you. Sometimes, in this business, we’re faced with looking at human depravity, and that’s what we’re looking at here.” Authorities said the parents were able to keep their children hidden away by listing their home as a private school. Some of the kids, who ranged in ages from 2 to 29, reportedly didn’t know what a police officer was. The children were only allowed to eat once a day and shower twice a year, authorities said. However, the parents reportedly did allow them to keep journals, and authorities said the kids filled hundreds of notebooks. Those have not been released and are still being reviewed by law enforcement. The children are currently being cared for in the hospital, authorities said. The Riverside University Health System has set up a fund for the children that will go to their long-term needs, according to a press release. The hospital said the children have already seen a tremendous outpouring of support. >> Read more trending news  Brian Rokos of the Press-Enterprise was present at the hearing and reported that David Turpin is being represented by a public defender, while Louise Turpin has outside counsel. During Thursday’s arraignment, the public defender requested that media be banned from the trial, but the judge shot that down. Rokos said reporters from around the world were in the courtroom. The Turpins' lawyers have not announced whether they will try to have the case moved out of Riverside County.