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The Latest from News 96.5 WDBO

    A group of storms east of the Caribbean has developed into Tropical Storm Harvey.   Harvey is approaching the Lesser Antilles and it is forecast to continue traveling west, officially arriving in the Caribbean Friday afternoon. It has been given a 100 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next two days.   It’s also expected to become a hurricane by Monday morning. At this point it is no threat to Florida.   “We have entered the peak of Hurricane season, which is mid-August through late October,” said Dennis Feltgen, spokesman for the National Hurricane Center.
  • Many scientists and groups across the U.S. aren’t taking Monday’s eclipse for granted - they want to learn things! There will be lots of experiments happening during the 90-minute event.  Here are just a few: 1. The eclipse movie - Volunteers from national labs and education groups will track the sun along its path using identical telescopes, which will take continuous digital pictures.  The pictures will be later spliced together to make a 90-minute movie.  So don’t fret if you can’t watch on Monday! 2. Sounds - college students at Tennessee’s Austin Peay State University, along with NASA< will measure the sound of the eclipse by setting up low-frequency radio experiments in bean fields.  They’ll capture the noise the eclipse creates and figure out how its different from normal conditions. 3. Animal behavior - Also at Austin Peay State University, scientists will be watching how crickets and cows act when the Moon covers the sun and darkens the sky.  During a solar eclipse in 1991, spiders were seen taking down their webs.  4. Solar flares - We know solar flares happen when the sun’s magnetic field causes a brief burst of intense radiation, but we don’t know enough to protect our technology from them.  During the eclipse, a group of scientists in Wyoming will attempt to take some measurements of the sun’s outer atmosphere.  Usually the sun is too bright to do this, but the eclipse should provide a good view. Want to watch the eclipse?  CLICK HERE to see where you can get free glasses.
  • As part of the I-4 Ultimate Improvement Project, more downtown roads are closing for construction. Starting at 10 pm on August 17th, two lanes on Hughey Avenue will be closed between Church Street and South Street, until mid-September. After that, all lanes of Hughey Avenue between Church Street and South Street will be closed following the initial closure, and remain in place for up to 18 months. The city is recommending drivers taking a number of alternate routes. Westbound I-4 drivers are asked to exit at Colonial Drive, take a left onto Colonial Drive, then a right onto Orange Avenue. Washington Street is being recmmonded as the main alternate route for all southbound access around downtown. The city of Orlando is also asking drivers to use alternative forms of transportation, and to carpool when possible to prevent traffic delays  Our reporter Gene Wexler did a live drive-through on Hughey Avenue on Thursday, the last day we will see all three lanes of Hughey open for quite some time.
  •  A state senator in Missouri said in a now-deleted Facebook post that she hopes President Donald Trump is assassinated. Maria Chappele-Nadal on Thursday wrote a post reading: “I hope Trump is assassinated!” It was made in an exchange with a left-wing activity claiming his cousin is in the Secret Service. According to The Daily Caller, Chappelle-Nadal later confirmed to a reporter with KMOX in St. Louis that she posted the comment. “I put something up on my personal Facebook page and it has now been deleted,” she is reported as saying.
  • During its research last week, the University of Central Florida’s Marine Turtle Research Group found a two-headed turtle. Researchers said the two-headed loggerhead turtle appeared to be healthy, and was released into the ocean. Three days after the turtles hatch, the UCF group excavates nests to determine how many sea turtles were born, how many eggs were laid, and to release straggler turtles into the ocean. The group said, this isn’t the first two-headed turtle they’ve found, but they are extremely uncommon.
  • The line wraps around orange cones and security guards at Disney Springs.  News 96 five wdbo’s Samantha Jordan is walking the line talking to people hoping to wow the judges enough to make the cut and the reality TV show.  One contestant is just 17.  He says he’s always wanted to sing to make people happy.  She also spoke with singer Summer Moon who is standing in line with her Ukulele hoping to get a shot at the show.  Another young woman near the front of the line tells Jordan she just needs the courage and strength for the audition and she knows she can do it. 
  • A look at monuments that have been removed, covered up or vandalized in recent days: ___ DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA A statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee at Duke University was found defaced on Thursday. The statue in the entryway to Duke Chapel had damage to its nose. Another monument of a Confederate soldier that stood in front of a government office building in town was pulled down by protesters Monday night. Four people have been arrested and authorities say more arrests are planned. Earlier, two statues in Wilmington were defaced with spray paint. ___ LEESBURG, VIRGINIA A statue outside a courthouse dedicated to Confederate soldiers has been vandalized. Obscenities and other graffiti were spray-painted on the 1908 monument sometime before dawn Thursday. The damage was repaired. ___ MADISON, WISCONSIN A plaque honoring confederate soldiers was removed Wednesday from a cemetery and a second monument will be taken down later. The plaque lauded 'the valiant' Confederate soldiers buried there. Mayor Paul Soglin said the Civil War was 'a defense of the deplorable practice of slavery.' ___ PHOENIX A Confederate monument on U.S. 60 near Gold Canyon was found covered in tar and feathers on Thursday. Earlier, the Confederate Troops Memorial outside the Arizona Capitol was spray-painted white. It was the second time in a week that the memorial had been vandalized. ___ NEW YORK Plaques honoring Gen. Robert E. Lee were removed from the property of a now-closed Episcopal church in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Meanwhile, Gov. Andrew Cuomo also called on the Army to rename two streets at nearby Fort Hamilton that honored Lee and Gen. Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson. ___ BALTIMORE Four Confederacy-related monuments were hauled away on trucks under cover of darkness late Tuesday night and early Wednesday. Mayor Catherine Pugh said she was concerned that such statues might spark violence. ___ KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE A 1914 monument honoring fallen Confederate soldiers was splattered with paint earlier this week. Opponents are signing a petition to have it removed from a neighborhood near the University of Tennessee campus. ___ BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA A 52-foot-tall obelisk honoring Confederate soldiers and sailors was covered by wooden panels at the mayor's order. The 1905 monument is in a downtown park. The cover-up Tuesday prompted a lawsuit by Alabama's attorney general, who argues that it violates a new law prohibiting the removal of historical structures, including rebel memorials. ___ LOS ANGELES Hollywood Forever Cemetery, where many movie legends are interred, removed a 6-foot Confederate monument that was erected in 1925. The stone and attached plaque stood near the graves of more than 30 Confederate veterans and their families. ___ SAN DIEGO The city removed a plaque naming Confederate President Jefferson Davis from a downtown plaza Wednesday. The 1926 plaque honored San Diego as the Western terminus of the Jefferson Davis Highway between Virginia and California.
  • They’re calling it - “Two balls and a STRIKE!” A ceremonial first pitch Wednesday night may go down in history as possibly the worst ever.  The errant pitch hit a photographer, who happened to snap a photo of the ball moments before the strike.  (App users can see video here) (App users can see the image here)
  • A woman from Boynton Beach, Florida is facing child abuse and DUI charges after a tow truck driver spotted her weaving all over the road. 'I was afraid she was going to kill someone,' said Juan Martinez in a statement to detectives with the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office. Martinez told deputies he saw a woman at the wheel of a gold Chevrolet Malibu, driving all over the place down Haverhill Boulevard near Belvedere Road on Saturday afternoon. He said she nearly hit four cars and looked drunk or under the influence of something. According to the arrest report, he also saw a child in the back seat.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Florida prisons were placed on lockdown Thursday following reports of security threats.  >> Read more trending news The Florida Department of Corrections announced that it canceled weekend visitation at all institutions for Saturday and Sunday because of a possible security threat. Correction officials said they received information that indicated small groups of inmates at several institutions would try to disrupt prison operations. The lockdown affects more than 97,000 inmates in Florida’s 151 correctional facilities, including major institutions, work camps and annex facilities. The move affects recreational and educational programs, but inmates are not confined to their cells, officials said. The cancellation does not apply to work release centers, department officials said.  
  • A group of storms east of the Caribbean has developed into Tropical Storm Harvey.   Harvey is approaching the Lesser Antilles and it is forecast to continue traveling west, officially arriving in the Caribbean Friday afternoon. It has been given a 100 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next two days.   It’s also expected to become a hurricane by Monday morning. At this point it is no threat to Florida.   “We have entered the peak of Hurricane season, which is mid-August through late October,” said Dennis Feltgen, spokesman for the National Hurricane Center.
  • A Cleveland father is upset after he says his son was left on the school bus for hours on his first day of classes. WJW reported that Trevelle Hargrove’s 6-year-old son, Trevelle Jr.,  has special needs. Hargrove said his son fell asleep on the bus. >> Read more trending news Trevelle Jr.  said he was found after he honked the horn of the bus and jumped up and down. A spokesperson for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District said Trevelle Jr. fell asleep on the bus Monday and was there for less than an hour. His father says otherwise. “After an hour and they couldn't tell me what was going on I started to get extremely worried,” Hargrove told WJW. 'I couldn't understand why no one could tell me where my son was.” Hargrove said his son was back four hours later, at 6:30 p.m. “You can’t just forget to do things,” he said. “This isn’t like a normal job where you forget to put the straw in the bag or you forget to clock in or whatever it is you do at a normal job. You can’t do that when it comes to kids.” Hargrove said his son won’t be riding the bus again any time soon. The district is is investigating. Cleveland Metropolitan Schools Chief Communications Officer Roseann Canfora issued the following statement to WJW: “Drivers are trained to follow strict protocols for inspecting every seat at the beginning and end of their routes, and CMSD has a zero tolerance for any violation of these safety guidelines.” The bus driver has resigned. WJW reported they may be terminated pending the outcome of the district’s investigation.
  • Authorities said a terror attack in Barcelona claimed at least 13 lives on Thursday and left 80 others injured after a van slammed into pedestrians on Barcelona's popular La Rambla street. >> Read more trending news Mossos d'Esquadra, the Catalonia police force, confirmed the attack in a Twitter post around 5:10 p.m. local time.
  • Many scientists and groups across the U.S. aren’t taking Monday’s eclipse for granted - they want to learn things! There will be lots of experiments happening during the 90-minute event.  Here are just a few: 1. The eclipse movie - Volunteers from national labs and education groups will track the sun along its path using identical telescopes, which will take continuous digital pictures.  The pictures will be later spliced together to make a 90-minute movie.  So don’t fret if you can’t watch on Monday! 2. Sounds - college students at Tennessee’s Austin Peay State University, along with NASA< will measure the sound of the eclipse by setting up low-frequency radio experiments in bean fields.  They’ll capture the noise the eclipse creates and figure out how its different from normal conditions. 3. Animal behavior - Also at Austin Peay State University, scientists will be watching how crickets and cows act when the Moon covers the sun and darkens the sky.  During a solar eclipse in 1991, spiders were seen taking down their webs.  4. Solar flares - We know solar flares happen when the sun’s magnetic field causes a brief burst of intense radiation, but we don’t know enough to protect our technology from them.  During the eclipse, a group of scientists in Wyoming will attempt to take some measurements of the sun’s outer atmosphere.  Usually the sun is too bright to do this, but the eclipse should provide a good view. Want to watch the eclipse?  CLICK HERE to see where you can get free glasses.