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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    The Latest on the status of the Palestinians' office in Washington (all times local):1:05 p.m.The Palestinians are threatening to cut off all communication with the Trump administration if it goes through with plans to shutter the Palestine Liberation Organization office in Washington.Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat (sah-EEB' EHR'-ih-kaht) says the U.S. administration's decision is — in his words — 'very unfortunate and unacceptable.'He's accusing the U.S. of bowing to pressure from the government of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (neh-ten-YAH'-hoo), just as he says the Palestinians are 'trying to cooperate to achieve the ultimate deal.'Erekat says the Palestinians have conveyed their intention to cut off talks if the office is closed in a letter to the Trump administration. The threat comes as the U.S. is trying to broker an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal.Netanyahu's office says the closure is a 'matter of U.S. law.'___12:30 p.m.The State Department says the Palestine Liberation Organization's office in Washington will close.Officials say the Palestinians have ran afoul of a U.S. law by calling for Israelis to be prosecuted by the International Criminal Court.Only a day earlier, department officials had said the office could stay open if President Donald Trump determined that the Palestinians were in serious peace negotiations with Israel.But now, those same officials are saying the office must close regardless — at least for some time. It could reopen in the future, if the Palestinians are in talks with IsraelisIt's unclear when the office will close. And it's not clear whether the Palestinians must evacuate or simply close the office to the public.The officials weren't authorized to publicly discuss the situation and spoke on condition of anonymity.—Associated Press writer Josh Lederman.___5:10 a.m.The Palestinian foreign minister says the Palestinians won't give in to what he calls 'extortion' after a U.S. threat to close their diplomatic mission in Washington.Riad Malki tells Palestine Radio that the Palestinians are waiting for further communication from the U.S. government. He says 'the ball is now in the American court.'U.S. officials — citing an American law — say the Trump administration has put the Palestinians on notice that it'll close their office in Washington unless they've entered serious peace talks with Israel. President Donald Trump has 90 days to make a decision.Malki says the U.S. move may be aimed at putting pressure on the Palestinians. But he says 'the Palestinian leadership will not accept any extortion or pressure.
  • Ukraine's intelligence agency said Saturday it has detained a man wanted for the high-profile murder of an American journalist in Russia 13 years ago.Paul Klebnikov, the U.S.-born editor of Forbes magazine's Russian edition, was gunned down outside his Moscow office in July 2004.Many people believed the killing was connected to the 41-year-old Klebnikov's work investigating corruption in Russia and the country's shadowy business world.Ukraine's State Security Service said in a statement Saturday that it has detained a Russian man who was wanted for several slayings, including Klebnikov's. The Ukrainian agency did not identify the suspect.Three people were charged with the journalist's murder in 2006 and later acquitted. A higher court ordered a retrial for the main suspect, but he absconded before the proceedings could be held.Prosecutors have alleged Klebnikov's killing was contracted by a Chechen warlord who was the subject of Klebnikov's 2003 book 'Conversations With a Barbarian.'Klebnikov, a New Yorker of Russian descent, investigated corruption and sought to shed light on the closed, sometimes violent world of Russian business. His family said after the 2006 acquittals they were distressed that Klebnikov's killers remained at large.
  • An Egyptian court has ordered a prominent activist to remain in custody pending trial on charges of participating in an illegal protest against the government's transfer of two strategic Red Sea islands to Saudi Arabia, a rights lawyer said on Saturday.Mahinour el-Masry, a rights lawyer herself and notable activist from the country's 2011 uprising, and another defendant attended Saturday's trial in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, said Taher Aboelnasr.The court ordered that they remain detained until it reconvenes on Dec. 30.Aboelnasr said el-Masry and four other activists are on trial over charges of protesting illegally in June against the surrender of the islands of Tiran and Sanafir at the mouth of the Gulf of Aqaba to Saudi Arabia. The presidency has since ratified the transfer of the islands.After the islands agreement was first announced in 2016, Egypt saw the largest anti-government protests since President Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi took office in 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators and activists were arrested, with most later released.In 2015, Egypt's top court sentenced el-Masry and two others to 15 months in prison on charges of attacking a police station in Alexandria in Dec. 2013.She and her co-defendants were given two-year prison terms. They appealed and lost, but were given reduced sentences.El-Masry, 31, is a member of the Revolutionary Socialists movement. She is widely known for her activism in many labor movements, and on behalf of Syrian and Palestinian refugees in Egypt. She has been outspoken on the rights of detainees and political prisoners.El-Masry was awarded the Ludovic Trarieux Human Rights Prize in 2014 for her work as a 'defender of human rights.' At the time she was serving a six-month sentence in a separate case in which she faced charges of illegally protesting in 2013 in solidarity with Khaled Said, whose brutal 2010 death while in state custody helped spark Egypt's 2011 uprising.All unauthorized demonstrations in Egypt are illegal under a law adopted in late 2013 and security forces have previously used lethal force against peaceful demonstrators.
  • The Holy See says a fresh investigation has been opened into allegations a future priest had sex with a fellow student when they were teenagers at its youth seminary in Vatican City.The Vatican on Saturday said there were 'signals' starting in 2013, some of them provided anonymously, about the case at St. Pius X Pre-Seminary, which serves middle- and high school students.It said officials at the seminary and the bishop of Como investigated, but didn't find 'adequate' confirmation.Italian journalists recently reported that the older student was 14 years old when he started demanding sex at night from a 13-year-old.The Vatican says 'a new investigation is underway to shed full light on what really happened.'Students at St. Pius X serve as altar boys for papal Masses in St. Peter's Basilica.___This story has been corrected to show the allegations are that the older student was 14 and the younger student 13 when the alleged sex started.
  • LaVar Ball downplayed President Donald Trump’s role in having his son and two other UCLA basketball players released from custody after a shoplifting incident in China, ESPN reported. >> Read more trending news/ “Who? What was (Trump) over there for? Don’t tell me nothing,” Ball told ESPN. “Everybody wants to make it seem like he helped me out.” LiAngelo Ball, Jalen Hill and Cody Riley had been detained in China for the past week on suspicion of shoplifting. The three players returned to Los Angeles on Tuesday and were indefinitely suspended by the team. Trump, who returned from Asia late Tuesday, said he raised the question of releasing the players when he spoke with China’s president, Xi Jinping, during a trip to Beijing last week, ESPN reported. The players were questioned about allegedly stealing from three stores in Hangzhou, including sunglasses from a Louis Vuitton store next to the team’s hotel. They were released on bail on Nov. 8, ESPN reported. 'As long as my boy's back here, I'm fine,' Ball told ESPN. 'I'm happy with how things were handled. A lot of people like to say a lot of things that they thought happened over there. Like I told him, 'They try to make a big deal out of nothing sometimes.' I'm from L.A. I've seen a lot worse things happen than a guy taking some glasses.  “Everybody gets stuck on the negativity of some things and they get stuck on them too long. That's not me. I handle what's going on and then we go from there.”
  • Hundreds of people formed a human chain between the United States and North Korean embassies in downtown Berlin during a protest of the rising tensions and harsh words between the two nations.Demonstrators also banged oil drums painted to resemble atomic waste containers, waved banners with slogans like 'Make Peace, Not War' and posed in front of a faux nuclear missile wearing masks of U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.International organizations taking part in Saturday's protest in Germany's capital included Greenpeace and International Pediatricians for the Prevention of Nuclear War.Demonstrator Alex Rosen says that with the U.S. and Russia possessing thousands of nuclear weapons, 'the current crisis on the Korean peninsula only raises the threat of war.
  • Rhythm guitarist Malcolm Young, the co-founder of the rock ’n’ roll group AC/DC, died Saturday, Rolling Stone reported and the band announced on its website. He was 64. >> Read more trending news Young had been suffering from dementia for the past three years, which forced his retirement from the band that he founded with his brother Angus Young in 1973. 'Today it is with deep heartfelt sadness that AC/DC has to announce the passing of Malcolm Young,' AC/DC wrote on its site. “Malcolm, along with Angus, was the founder and creator of AC/DC. With enormous dedication and commitment he was the driving force behind the band. As a guitarist, songwriter and visionary he was a perfectionist and a unique man. He always stuck to his guns and did and said exactly what he wanted. He took great pride in all that he endeavored. His loyalty to the fans was unsurpassed.” Angus Young added, 'As his brother it is hard to express in words what he has meant to me during my life, the bond we had was unique and very special. He leaves behind an enormous legacy that will live on forever. Malcolm, job well done.” The Young brothers lost their older brother, George Young, who was the band’s longtime producer and a guitarist for the Easybeats, on Oct. 23. George Young was 70 when he died. >> AC/DC producer, Easybeats guitarist George Young dead at 70 In a statement to Australia's SBS, the band said that Malcolm Young died peacefully Saturday with his family by his side. “Renowned for his musical prowess, Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many,” the statement said. “From the outset, he knew what he wanted to achieve and, along with his younger brother, took to the world stage giving their all at every show. Nothing less would do for their fans.” Malcolm Young was last featured on the band's Black Ice tour, which ran from 2008 to 2010 and is the fourth-highest grossing tour of all time, SBS reported. Malcolm Young, like his older brother George and younger brother Angus, was born in Glasgow, Scotland before the whole Young family emigrated to Sydney, Australia in the early 1960s, Rolling Stone reported. Malcolm and Angus named the band after the “AC/DC” electrical current marker that they observed on their sisters sewing machine, Rolling Stone reported. The brothers were the creative forces behind hits like “Highway to Hell,” “Back in Black,” “Highway to Hell,” “Thunderstruck,” “You Shook Me All Night Long,” and “For Those About to Rock (We Salute You).” Megadeth’s Dave Mustaine tweeted that he was “losing it that Malcolm is gone,  I hate this.” David Coverdale of Whitesnake tweeted that Young was “a great guy” and “a pleasure to know.” “Truly missed,” he added. The Young brothers and AC/DC were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003, Rolling Stone reported. The band sold more than 110 million albums worldwide. In September 2014 the band said Malcolm Young had left the group because of the onset of dementia, The Guardian reported. In November 2014, Angus Young told The Guardian that his brother had developed symptoms when the group recorded the “Black Ice” album in 2008, and that he had to relearn songs between shows. “It was hard work for hih,” Angus Young said. “He was relearning a lot of those songs that he knew backwards; the ones we were playing that night he’d be relearning.”
  • The Israeli military says it has fired a tank shell into Syria as a 'warning shot' after the Syrian military conducted construction along their border.The military says Syria violated the 1974 cease-fire agreement on the Golan Heights Saturday by using heavy tools to fortify a military post in the demilitarized zone between the countries.In response, the military says it complained to the United Nations peacekeeper force station on the Golan and fired a tank shell as a warning.The incident comes as Israel has voiced concerned about the growing presence of Iran and its proxy Hezbollah in Syria as that country appears to be transitioning into a post-civil war reality, in which Israel says it will defend its interests.
  • German regulators have banned certain types of smartwatches marketed to children, saying the devices have been used to listen in on school classrooms and run afoul of Germany's surveillance restrictions.The Bundesnetzagentur, or Federal Network Agency, said in a statement issued Friday that watches that would allow parents to 'listen unnoticed to a child's environment' constitute an unauthorized transmitting system.The agency said parents have been using watches marketed to children between the ages of 5 and 12 to monitor teachers.It didn't name specific brands, but advised schools to be on the lookout for such devices.The agency also says that if buyers of the products become known to authorities, they will be told to destroy the watches.The Bundesnetzagentur regulates telecommunications, power and other networks
  • Turkish prosecutors launched an investigation Saturday of two United States prosecutors involved in putting a Turkish-Iranian businessman on trial for allegedly violating U.S. sanctions against Iran, according to the country's official news agency.The Istanbul prosecutor's office said it us investigating Preet Bharara, the former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, and Bharara's successor, Acting U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim.A statement from the Istanbul prosecutor's office claimed that the sources of the documents and wiretaps being used as evidence in the U.S. case against gold trader Reza Zarrab were unknown and violated international and domestic laws.Turkey's official Anadolu Agency published the statement Saturday.Zarrab, 34, has been charged in the U.S. for allegedly evading sanctions on Iran. An executive of Turkey's state-owned bank, Halkbank, also faces charges and is due to appear in court in New York on Nov. 27.Former Turkish Economy Minister Zafer Caglayan is also among the nine defendants indicted in the case.Turkish officials allege the case is politically motivated. They have accused Bharara, the former U.S. attorney, of links to a Pennsylvania-based Muslim cleric, Fethullah Gulen, whom the Turkish government blames for a failed July 2016 military coup.Bharara has vehemently rejected the allegation. Gulen denies involvement in the coup attempt.The U.S. case was built on work initially performed by Turkish investigators who targeted Zarrab in 2013 in a sweeping corruption scandal that allegedly led to Turkish government officials.Since the July 2016 coup attempt, Turkey has arrested more than 50,000 people and fired over 100,000 state workers for alleged links to Gulen's network.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • An Orlando Police department officer is in the hospital after crashing their pickup truck into a toll booth on State Road 408 Saturday morning.   The truck crashed into a collapsible safety barrier at the toll plaza on the East/West Expressway eastbound near Andes Avenue.    The truck catapulted into the guardrail and caught fire, prompting the officer to flee from the scene. Police are investigating this as a hit and run.    The pay lanes were closed and traffic was diverted into the E-pass lanes. Tolls were waived by the Expressway Authority while the scene was being cleared. All lanes are now open.    Police have not released the name of the officer driving the vehicle, but were able to locate him and took him to the hospital for his injuries. No other vehicles were involved in the crash.    The officer involved in the crash has been relieved of duty and an internal investigation is underway.    The identity of the officer, as well as whether or not they will face charges has not yet been released.
  • A Montana congressman misled investigators about his assault on a reporter the day before he was elected in May, claiming that “liberal media” were “trying to make a story,” the Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported Saturday, citing audio and documents. >> Read more trending news U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, told an officer in an audio interview after the attack that reporter Ben Jacobs of The Guardian newspaper had grabbed him by the wrist and pulled both of them to the floor. Audio of Gianforte’s interview with Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Scott Secor was released along with documents requested by the Chronicle and other news organizations after Gianforte was cited for assaulting Jacobs on May 24. Gianforte later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault.  The Chronicle requested the documents in June. After Gianforte, Jacobs and Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert did not object to the release, Gallatin County District Court Judge Holly Brown ruled this week that the documents could be released. \The audio of the interview with Gianforte comes from a recording made by Sgt. Scott Secor outside of Gianforte’s headquarters shortly after the 5:07 p.m. call Jacobs made to 911, a minute after he posted on Twitter, “Greg Gianforte just body slammed me and broke my glasses.” Once at the scene, Secor spoke with Jacobs first. “This is the weirdest day,” Jacobs told Secor.  The documents include interviews with members of a Fox News crew who were in the room with Gianforte and Jacobs at the politician’s Bozeman campaign office.  Gianforte told Secor that he was preparing for an interview with Fox News when “this man broke into a private room in the back and stuck a microphone in my face and started asking me obnoxious questions.” Gianforte said he tried to explain to him that he was in the middle of an interview, but that Jacobs kept “waving” the microphone in his face, the Chronicle reported. “I probably shouldn’t do it but I reached out for his phone ... he grabbed my wrist, he spun and we ended up on the floor ... so he pulled me down on top of him,” Secor quoted Gianforte as saying. After the incident Gianforte’s campaign spokesman, Shane Scanlon, issued a statement that also blamed the attack on Jacobs, saying the reporter had grabbed the candidate’s wrist.  Gianforte publicly apologized to Jacobs and told supporters he wasn’t proud of his actions. His spokesman, Travis Hall, insisted on Friday that the documents contained “nothing new.” “No one was misled, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken. Greg took responsibility for his actions and is focused on serving the people of Montana,” Hall said in an emailed statement to The Associated Press.
  • Two men are recovering in the hospital after a shooting incident took place in Pine Hills.   Around 1 a.m., deputies responded to 4919 West Colonial Drive for a possible shooting.  When they arrived at the scene, they located a 40 year old man with a gunshot wound. The other victim, a 39 year old male was found nearby with an injury to his hand. His 29 year old girlfriend was found with him as well.    Both men were transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries and remain in stable condition. The victim's girlfriend is considered a suspect by investigators and was taken into custody.    It is not yet known how the man's hand was injured or if the woman would face charges.
  • District 4 Orlando City Commissioner, Patty Sheehan, Veterinarian Geoffrey Gardner and specially trained volunteers showed up to participate in the City of Orlando's 10th Annual Lake Eola Swan Round-Up.   The round up began at 7:00 a.m. where trained volunteers arrived on foot and took to their kayaks in the water to safely corral the famous Lake Eola swans to the west end of the park. From there, the volunteers brought the swans to a temporary clinic where they would be weighed, inoculated, and checked by the Veterinarian. The swans would also be given a a name and fitted with a microchip, along with having their wings clipped. They would then be released back into the lake and free to go about their business. Each swan has its own health record that will continue to be updated.    Lake Eola is home to over 50 swans from over five different breeds including Trumpeter swans, Black Neck Swans, Whooper swans, Royal Mute swans and Australian black swans.    The quarters that are collected from swan food feeders around the lake also help to generate annual income each year to help insure that these swans receive proper medical care.
  • As the House voted along party lines on Thursday to approve a sweeping package of GOP tax reforms, one peculiar part of the floor debate came when a number of Republicans – who voted for the bill – took to the floor to request changes in the their party’s plan, as some highlighted unintended consequences, while others objected to the basics of the measure. Known in parliamentary parlance as a “colloquy,” the scripted exchanges between lawmakers are often done to clarify the legislative intent of a bill, or in this case, to urge action in a specific way in House-Senate negotiations. And for some Republicans in this week’s tax reform debate, it was clear they wanted some provisions altered. Some requests were specific, like Rep. David McKinley (R-WV), who made the case for historic preservation tax credits, which were eradicated by the House GOP tax reform bill. “Without the credit, projects that transform communities in all 50 states, from West Virginia to Texas, to Wisconsin, simply will not happen,” McKinley said on the House floor, as he asked for Brady’s word that he would help reverse the decision. That didn’t happen. “I commit to working with him and continuing to work with him on this issue because I know the importance of it,” Brady responded, making sure not to guarantee anything in some of these floor exchanges. For Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-FL), a staunch advocate of the GOP bill, he was assured by the Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee that more would be done in terms of tax help for the people of Puerto Rico, whose island was devastated by Hurricane Maria. “I look forward to working with you on ideas to best serve the people of this island,” said Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), who thanked fellow GOP lawmakers for their concerns, but made no promises. For Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY), the issue was with a new excise tax from Republicans that would be levied on the endowments of private colleges and universities. Barr said that would harm Berea College in his district, a ‘work college’ that uses its endowment money to pay the tuition of all students. It was noted in press stories back home. Barr Fights for Berea College in Tax Reform Bill – https://t.co/YoBgs5CWvp – — BereaOnline.com (@bereaonline) November 16, 2017 “I was pleased to learn that the Senate version of the bill exempts schools with fewer than 500 tuition-paying students from the excise tax,” Barr said, urging Brady to accept that position in any House-Senate negotiation. Brady said he would try. “Mr. Speaker, we will work together for a mutually accepted solution to make sure we exempt work colleges to use their endowments to provide tuition-free education,” the panel chairman responded. For Rep. Don Young (R-AK), the problem he brought to the House floor was under the heading of unintended consequences, as the GOP tax bill would subject native settlement trusts in Alaska to a higher rate of taxation. “This would make it more difficult for Alaska Native Settlement Trusts to provide long-term benefits to Alaska Natives,” Young said on the House floor, asking Brady to include provisions of a bill to remedy that and more. Unlike some of the other requests, Brady acknowledged that the GOP tax bill would “unintentionally” change the tax rate for the Alaskan settlements, agreeing to focus on this in conference as we finalize individual rate structures between the House and the Senate.” Others weren’t so lucky to get a guarantee of action, as they pressed for changes in maybe the most controversial part of the GOP plan, which limits a deduction for state and local taxes. “I am concerned about its impact on some of my constituents in Maryland who pay high state and local income taxes,” said Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD), the only Republican member of the House from that state, which would be one of the biggest losers on the SALT issue. That subject also drew two California Republicans to make the same appeal to Brady later in the debate; Rep. Mimi Walters (R-CA) and Rep. Steve Knight (R-CA) echoed the concerns of Harris – all of them got a murky assurance of help. “I am happy to commit to working with both of them to ensure we reach a positive outcome for their constituents and families as we reconcile our differences with the Senate,” Brady said, making no promises. Other Republicans brought up education, and a provision in the GOP tax reform bill that would hinder colleges and universities from providing tax free tuition waivers and reimbursements, a matter that has drawn more and more attention in recent days. Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH) – whose district includes Dayton University – and Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL) – whose district includes the University of Illinois – both appealed to Brady to make a change. “I believe that an unintended consequence of this bill would hinder middle class Americans pursuing a higher education degree in an attempt to better their lives,” Turner said. “I am worried it is going to have an impact on the custodians and the assistants in the Registrar’s Office who are just working at these institutions to be able to send their son or daughter to college,” said Davis. There was no guarantee that the provision would be changed. “I have a keen interest in this issue,” Brady told Turner and Davis. “I will work with you toward a positive solution on tuition assistance in conference with the Senate.” Democrats noted the exchanges on both days of the House tax reform debate, arguing that it showed off the haphazard nature of how the bill was put together. “I also was intrigued by the colloquy where Members came to ask the leadership if they will work with them to take out egregious elements of this tax proposal,” said Rep. Dan Kildee (D-MI). “We get this sort of, “Yes, I will work with the gentleman,” answer,” Kildee added, raising his voice on the floor. “Why did you put it in in the first place?” Kildee yelled. “Why are you cutting historic tax credits in the first place? Why did you put it in in the first place? You just wrote the bill. You just wrote it,” he said. GOP lawmakers said this past week that anyone can find a reason to vote against a big bill like this tax reform plan – we’ll see in coming weeks whether these publicly voiced concerns become an issue for the final version of tax reform in the Congress.