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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    Pope Francis drew appreciative laughter Sunday when he addressed cloistered nuns in a Peruvian church, Reuters reported. The nuns were given special permission to leave their convents to see the pontiff speak in Lima. >> Read more trending news Francis spoke to the 500 nuns, known as “contemplatives” because they rarely venture away from their convents, on his final day in Peru. “Seeing you all here an unkind thought comes to my mind, that you took advantage (of me) to get out of the convent a bit to take a stroll,” he said at the Cathedral San Juan Apostol y Evangelista in Lima, drawing roars of laughter from the nuns, Reuters reported. Francis also urged the nuns to avoid gossiping in their convents, likening it to “terrorism.” “You know what a gossiping nun is?” he asked. “A terrorist.” The nuns laughed again, Reuters reported. “Because gossip is like a bomb. One throws it, it causes destruction and you walk away tranquilly.” Francis said. “No terrorist nuns! No gossip, and know that the best remedy against gossip is to bite your tongue.”
  • A Kenyan official says four more children have been killed by an explosive device that went off in a field where they grazing livestock.Mandera Governor Ali Roba is blaming devices that Britain might have planted during its colonial occupation of Kenya for the deaths on Saturday. He asked security agents to clear the fields of any devices from before Kenya gained independence in 1963.Five children between the ages of 12 and 17 were killed in the same area of northern Kenya on Dec. 20 while playing with an explosive device they found while grazing livestock.Many children living in the arid and semi-arid regions of Kenya often tend to their family's livestock after school. Some are forced to drop out of school to do so.
  • Deaths resulting from a diphtheria outbreak in Yemen are 'likely to rise' if the naval blockade imposed by a Saudi-led coalition fighting to defeat Shiite rebels in war-torn Yemen remains in place, an international aid group warned on Monday.Save the Children said in a statement that Yemeni children are bearing the brunt of what it described as a 'the worst diphtheria outbreak for a generation.' It also said that its aid workers have been struggling to cope with the disease which has killed at least 52 people, mostly among children under 15, and is believed to have infected some 716 others since August. Diphtheria is a contagious and potentially fatal disease that primarily infects the throat and airways.There's so little help right now that families are carrying their children for hundreds of miles to get to us,' Mariam Aldogani, the group's field coordinator in Hodeida, said. 'But they're arriving too late and infecting people on the way.'The outbreak has hit Ibb and Hodeida provinces the hardest, the aid group said.Yemen has been embroiled in a civil war since March 2015, pitting Iran-backed Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, against the coalition backing the internationally recognized government of Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi. The near three-year stalemated war in Yemen has damaged its infrastructure, crippled the health system and pushed the Arab world's poorest country to the brink of famine.The U.N. has called Yemen the world's worst humanitarian crisis with more than 22 million people in need.Save the Children said that aid efforts have been largely hampered due to the blockade on the key Red Sea port of Hodeida, a lifeline for most of Yemen's population as it handles about 70 percent of the country's imports. The Saudi-led coalition has imposed a blockade on Yemen since the beginning of the war but has recently eased it on ports allowing access for commercial vessels.The aid group said the partial easing of the blockade is still far from enough to meet the Yemenis' dire humanitarian needs. 'Any tightening of the blockade could have a devastating impact on children,' it added.The impoverished country is already grappling with a cholera epidemic since October 2016. The outbreak, which escalated in April, killed some 2,000 people and infected over a million others
  • An Ethiopian police official in the restive Amhara region in the north confirmed Sunday evening that seven people were killed when worshippers celebrating the Epiphany holiday clashed with security forces.The killings on Saturday in the town of Woldiya, some 500 kilometers (310 miles) north of the capital Addis Ababa, happened on the second day of the colorful Epiphany celebrations in this East African nation.Amare Goshu, a police official in the region, told the state-owned Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation that seven people died, including one security officer, during the confrontation. He said that the security forces responded with force when youths in the town tried to attack officers who were patrolling the holiday procession areas. 'More than 15 citizens and 2 police officers were also injured and are now receiving treatment,' he said.Two Woldiya residents, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisal, said the measures taken by the security forces were excessive and feared the death toll was higher. One claimed police fired on demonstrators who were throwing stones. The other said the death toll could rise further as gunshots could be heard until midday Sunday. Both added that a number of hotels, restaurants and shops were burned down by angry protesters.Ethiopia's Amhara and Oromia regions have seen violent anti- government protests since November, 2015, when people took to the streets demanding political freedom and the release of political prisoners. Hundreds have been killed and more than 11,000 arrested, although most have since been released.Ethiopia is an ally of the U.S. but it is often accused by rights groups of stifling dissent and arresting opposition figures and journalists critical of the government. A prominent opposition politician, Merera Gudina, was released on Wednesday as part of a pledge by the government to open up the political space and create a national consensus.
  • Thousands of people poured into a football stadium in Las Vegas on Sunday, the anniversary of women's marches around the world, to cap off a weekend of global demonstrations that promised to continue building momentum for equality, justice and an end to sexual harassment.'This is a birthday party for a movement that has only begun to flex its power to change this democracy,' Anna Galland, the executive director of the progressive group moveon.org, told the boisterous crowd.Following marches that drew huge crowds across the U.S. on Saturday, one year after President Donald Trump's inauguration, protesters gathered Sunday on multiple continents, including in London, Paris, Sydney, Madrid and Buenos Aires. The events culminated with the Las Vegas rally, which launched an effort to register 1 million voters and target swing states like Nevada in the U.S. midterm elections later this year, which could shift control of Congress.Paula Beaty, 53, a tech worker from Durham, North Carolina, attended the Las Vegas rally wearing an outfit recalling the women's suffrage movement of the early 20th century. She cited the difference women made in helping Democrat Doug Jones upset conservative Republican Roy Moore for a Senate seat in Alabama in December.'For us it's all about women's rights and we're seeing them be eroded with Trump in office,' Beaty said. 'The women made a difference in Alabama and we're hoping we can flip the House and Senate with the power of women.'There was also a push for women to not just register as voters, but as candidates. Democratic Idaho state Rep. Paulette Jordan, a member of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, drew an immense cheer when she told the crowd she was running to be not only Idaho's first female governor, but the first Native American woman to be governor in any state. She implored other women to join her in running for office.'This is Idaho's future. This is the future of America,' she said.The demonstrations came at a time of reckoning for many men in Hollywood, the media and other industries as women speak out about sexual misconduct and inequity in general.Those who took part in this year's events said they were galvanized by an avalanche of political and gender issues over the past year, as well as the #MeToo movement, which has been credited with countering widespread sexual abuse and misconduct.Many of the marchers not only supported women's rights, but also denounced Trump's views on issues including immigration, abortion and LGBT rights. Demonstrators denounced Trump's views with colorful signs and even saltier language.Trump dismissed the suggestion that his presidency has been bad for women. He tweeted Saturday that it was a 'perfect day' for women to march to celebrate the 'economic success and wealth creation' of his first year in office.'Get out there now to celebrate the historic milestones and unprecedented economic success and wealth creation that has taken place over the last 12 months,' the Republican wrote. 'Lowest female unemployment in 18 years!'In Palm Beach, Florida, home to Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, several hundred people marched Saturday carrying anti-Trump signs. A group of women wearing red cloaks and white hats like the characters in the book and television versions of 'The Handmaid's Tale,' which imagines a future in which women's rights have been strictly limited, walked in formation with their heads bowed.In the British capital Sunday, demonstrators carried placards reading 'We Are Powerful' and 'Time's Up' and chanted outside Prime Minister Theresa May's office as they raised grievances ranging from workplace inequities to misogynistic abuse on social media.'Today is a call for action to bring about change,' London protest co-organizer Shola Mos-Shogbamimu said. 'This is so much more than Trump.''The London event drew thousands of people despite sleet and snow. Heavy rain fell on Paris protesters who gathered near the Eiffel Tower, which could have been a factor in the small number of participants compared to the U.S. marches on Saturday.'It doesn't matter if the weather is like this,' Maggie Kim, who was one of the more than 100 people who didn't let the rain and cold deter them. 'We're still coming together, and we're going to still fight against Trump and his agenda.'___This story has been updated to correct the last name of a protester to Kim, not Kan.___Gene Johnson in Seattle, Danica Kirka in London, Sylvie Corbet in Paris, Chris Blake in Sydney and Jo Kearney in London contributed to this story.
  • The Latest on Pope Francis' visit to Peru (all times local):4:45 p.m.Police say more than 1 million people are gathered at an airbase for Pope Francis' final Mass in Peru as he concludes a restive trip to Latin America.Juan Rivera is a 31-year-old computer engineer in attendance. He says he is hoping to hear 'words of encouragement' that can help Peruvians reconcile their differences.Many in the country are upset over the recent pardon of former strongman Alberto Fujimori, who had been sentenced to 25 years for his role in the killings of 25 people by security forces while he was president.The nation has also been jolted by a region-wide political corruption scandal involving the Brazilian construction giant Odebrecht.Several women cried as Francis left the Apostolic Nunciature and blessed their rosaries.At the airbase on Lima's southern outskirts, firefighters streamed water at the crowds under a hot sun and fluttering Vatican and Peruvian flags.Police spokesman Veronica Marquez said 1.2 million people showed up. The pontiff is scheduled to return to Rome later Sunday.___4:25 p.m.The American cardinal who publicly rebuked Pope Francis over his remarks about Chilean sex abuse victims is concelebrating Francis' final Mass in Peru.Cardinal Sean O'Malley is the archbishop of Boston and Francis' top abuse adviser.He is one of dozens of bishops and cardinals celebrating the Sunday service under a huge, tented altar set up on a dusty Lima airfield, the last event of the pontiff's weeklong visit to Chile and Peru.O'Malley publicly rebuked Francis on Saturday for accusing victims of Chile's most notorious pedophile priest of slandering another bishop with their claims.The cardinal said the pope's words were 'a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse.'Francis is likely to face questions about the issue on his in-flight news conference while returning to Rome.___12:55 p.m.Pope Francis is telling young Peruvians that God loves them as they are and there's no need to 'Photoshop' their hearts to make them seem perfect.At a noon prayer from Lima's Plaza de Armas, Francis sought to speak to young people in their own language in encouraging them in their faith.He said: 'I know we all like to see digitally enhanced photographs, but that only works for pictures; we cannot Photoshop others, the world or ourselves.'He added that 'there are pictures that are very nice, but completely fake. Let me assure you that the heart can't be Photoshopped, because that's where authentic love and genuine happiness can be found.'Francis is known for his blunt speaking style. Earlier Sunday he told Peruvian bishops they need to speak the language of young people to help them understand the message of the Gospel, just as Roman Catholic missionaries learned the languages of indigenous peoples as they worked to convert them.___12:30 p.m.Pope Francis is demanding that Congo authorities do everything in their power to avoid violence amid deadly anti-government demonstrations.Francis made the appeal from the Peruvian capital, where he led thousands of young people in prayer.He said of Congo: 'I ask the authorities and those responsible and all those in this beloved country that they use maximum commitment and effort to avoid all forms of violence and look for solutions in favor of the common good.'Congolese police used tear gas and gunfire to disperse thousands of demonstrators Sunday in clashes that left five people dead and injured more than 33. The protesters had marched after church services calling for President Joseph Kabila to step down.The United States and others have condemned Congolese security forces' response to the protests at more than 160 churches, which included tear gas being fired inside and altar boys being arrested.Kabila, whose mandate ended in December 2016, had agreed to hold an election by the end of 2017. But Congo's election commission later said the vote could be held until December 2018.___12:15 p.m.Pope Francis says the sprawling Odebrecht bribery scandal that has rippled across Latin America is 'just a small anecdote' in a scourge of corruption throughout the region.Francis said Sunday in remarks to bishops in Peru that politics in much of Latin America is in a state of 'crisis' because of graft.It is the second time he has addressed corruption during his visit to Peru, one of the countries embroiled in the Odebrecht scandal.President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski narrowly escaped impeachment over his ties to the Brazilian construction giant in December. Two former presidents are accused of accepting bribes, and a third is under investigation.Odebrecht had admitted to paying hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes to politicians throughout the region in exchange for lucrative public works contracts.___9:45 a.m.The controversy over Pope Francis' accusations of slander against victims of Chile's most notorious pedophile priest has followed him to Peru.A banner hanging from a building near the Lima church where Francis prayed on Sunday read 'Francis, here there is proof' and featured a photo of the disgraced founder of a Peru-based Catholic lay movement, Sodalitium Christianae Vitae.The Vatican last week took over the movement after Peruvian prosecutors announced they wanted to arrest the founder, Luis Figari. An independent investigation found Figari sodomized recruits and forced them to fondle him and one another, liked to watch them 'experience pain, discomfort and fear,' and humiliated them in front of others.In Chile, Francis accused victims of the country's most notorious sexual abuser, the Rev. Fernando Karadima, of slandering another bishop by saying he knew of Karadima's abuse but did nothing. Francis said there was 'not one shred of proof' implicating the bishop and that the accusations against him were 'calumny.'The comments caused such an outcry that Francis' top sexual abuse adviser issued a highly unusual public rebuke of the pope.___9:30 a.m.Pope Francis has had a special group of visitors call on him at the Vatican's residence in Peru: four prisoners who were released for a brief spell to greet him.Vatican spokesman Greg Burke said the three men and one woman came from prisons in Arequipa, Ayacucho, Cuzco and Castro.The greeting took place before Francis presided over a morning prayer Sunday with hundreds of contemplative and cloistered nuns at the Lord of Miracles sanctuary, which features an icon of Christ that survived a devastating earthquake in 1655 and is revered by many Peruvians.Francis urged them to dedicate their prayers to those who are 'thrown away' by society, including prisoners, migrants and drug addicts.He told them: 'By your prayers you can heal the wounds of many.'Francis frequently meets with prisoners during his foreign trips and visited a women's prison in Santiago, Chile on his seven-day trip to that country and Peru. He uses the meetings to encourage those deprived of their freedom to not lose hope.
  • Ethiopia's leader has rejected arbitration by the World Bank on a disagreement with Egypt over the hydroelectric dam that Ethiopia is building on the Nile River.Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn on Saturday refused the suggestion made by Egypt in late December that the World Bank should be brought in to resolve the dispute with Ethiopia over the construction of the dam on the Nile River that Egypt says threatens its water security. Sudan is also part of the negotiations because the Nile flows through it on the way to Egypt.'Ethiopia will not accept Egypt's request to include the World Bank in the tripartite technical committee's talks on the dam,' Desalegn told the state run Ethiopian News Agency after visiting Egypt on Friday where he met with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi. 'There is an opportunity for the three countries to resolve possible disputes by themselves.'Egypt's suggestion came amid a 10-month impasse over technical negotiations for the dam, which will be Africa's biggest hydro-electric plant. Egyptian officials have called the World Bank 'neutral and decisive' and said the organization could facilitate negotiations 'devoid of political interpretation and manipulation.'But the Ethiopian leader said that 'seeking professional support is one thing; transferring it to an institution is another thing. So we told them (Egypt) that this is not acceptable with our side.' Desalegn said that Egyptians are not getting accurate information about the source of Nile waters and how Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam will operate.The $5 billion dam is about 63 percent complete. When finished it will generate about 6,400 megawatts, more than doubling Ethiopia's current production of 4,000 megawatts. The dam will also help to spare Ethiopia from drought and famine.Ethiopia maintains that the dam's construction will not reduce Egypt's share of the river's water. It insists the dam is needed for development, pointing out that 60 million of its citizens don't have access to electricity.But Egypt fears that if the reservoir behind the dam is filled quickly and if too much of the Nile waters are retained each year, the reduction of the river's flow would have negative effects on Egypt's agriculture.Desalegn tried to reassure Egyptian during his visit to the country. 'The people of Ethiopia did not nor will ever subject Egyptians to danger,' said Desalegn, in Cairo Saturday on his first visit to Egypt as prime minister. 'We will not hurt your country in any way and will work closely together to secure the life of the people of the Nile basin and take them out of the cycle of poverty.'While Ethiopia has said the dam is a 'matter of life or death' for its people, Egypt has said water is a 'matter of life or death' for its people.
  • The Latest on efforts to create a new coalition government in Germany (all times local):4:30 p.m.Germany's Social Democrats have voted to enter coalition talks with Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives, a key step toward ending political gridlock and forming a new government.Delegates in Bonn voted 362 to 279 on Sunday in favor of opening the coalition talks.Once a coalition agreement is reached with Merkel's Union bloc, the Social Democrats' membership still would have to approve it before a government can be formed.Ahead of the vote, party leader Martin Schulz told delegates he would push for more concessions from the conservatives on labor, health and migration policies.___3:20 p.m.The leader of Germany's Social Democrats is urging party members to vote for opening coalition talks with Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives, saying a stable German government was needed as a bulwark against right-wing extremism.The center-left party has governed with Merkel's Union bloc since 2013, but party leader Martin Schulz initially vowed not to renew the so-called 'grand coalition' after his Social Democrats took a beating in September's election.Schulz told party members gathered in Bonn that his view of the political situation changed after Merkel failed to form a coalition with two smaller parties.He said: 'Europe is waiting for a Germany that knows its responsibility for Europe and can act decisively.'___12:05 p.m.Germany's center-left Social Democrats are debating whether to enter coalition talks with Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives, and help break the political deadlock since September's election.If the Social Democrats reject entering the talks, the only options left are for Merkel to form a minority government or for new elections.Social Democrat deputy leader Malu Dreyer, the Rhineland-Palatinate governor, told delegates in Bonn on Sunday that since Merkel's Union bloc has indicated it wouldn't form a minority government, their vote will either be for entering talks on forming a new so-called 'grand coalition' with the chancellor, or new elections.Urging the delegates to vote for entering coalition talks, she told them 'we can't force the Union into a minority government, that's an illusion.'The vote is expected later Sunday.
  • Vice President Mike Pence, weighing in from the Middle East on the shutdown in Washington, accused the U.S. Congress of playing politics with military pay, and told American soldiers stationed near the Syrian border that the Trump administration would demand that lawmakers reopen the government.Pence said they deserved their pay and benefits and service members and their families 'shouldn't have to worry about getting paid.'Despite bipartisan support for a budget resolution, a minority in the Senate has decided to play politics with military pay,' Pence said at the base, speaking in front of a large U.S. flag and a line of soldiers dressed in military fatigues. 'But you deserve better.'The vice president spoke as Democrats and Republicans in Congress showed little indication of progress on negotiations to end the government shutdown in a feud over immigration and spending. While Pence did not identify the culprits by party affiliation, Republicans argue that Democrats are blocking additional funding for the Pentagon by keeping the government closed.During a government shutdown, all military members are required to report for work as usual. Troops cannot be paid for duty performed after the shutdown began Saturday, but their paychecks will be delayed only if the government closure lasts beyond Feb. 1. That's because pay is issued only twice a month, on the first and the 15th.On Sunday, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney also complained about the shutdown's potential impact on the military but acknowledged that troops were all but certain to get their pay.'Traditionally every single time there's a shutdown, Congress has voted to go and pay them retroactively and we support that,' Mulvaney told CBS' 'Face the Nation.'Pence said the Trump administration would 'demand that they reopen the government' and will not reopen negotiations 'on illegal immigration' until Congress reopens the government. 'We're going to get this fixed. We're going to meet our obligations to you and your families,' Pence said. He added, 'I urge you, on behalf of your commander in chief, set aside any distractions, mind your mission, take care of one another.'Landing aboard a C-17 military aircraft, Pence visited the undisclosed military base in the Middle East following his meetings in Amman with Jordan's King Abdullah II. Journalists covering the vice president were asked to withhold the name and location of the base, and the number of troops stationed here, because of security and diplomatic concerns.The 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing is stationed at the base and has dropped nearly half of the munitions during the operation to destroy the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Pence credited the troops' 'heroic actions' to dismantle terror organizations in the region.'We will not rest, we will not relent, until we hunt down and destroy ISIS at its source,' he said.__Associated Press writer Lolita C. Baldor in Washington contributed to this report.___On Twitter follow Ken Thomas at @KThomasDC.
  • Hundreds of protesters have rallied in the Lebanese capital demanding that Islamist prisoners be part of a discussed general amnesty.The rally in central Beirut Sunday was attended by hundreds of families of Islamist prisoners. They were pressing the government to include their relatives in a general amnesty expected to come ahead of the country's first election in ten years. The elections are scheduled for May. Lebanon had one general amnesty after the end of the civil war in 1990.Lebanese authorities have rounded up hundreds of Sunni Islamists over the last years, including some who clashed with the military, following clashes between Sunnis and Shiites in northern Lebanon. They also include extremists believed to belong to al-Qaida-linked groups and the Islamic State group.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • The National Women's March continued over the weekend, and people started showing up at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando as early as 8 a.m. on Sunday to join the cause.   Some of those in attendance include people from the Time's Up and Me Too Movements. Demonstrators held up signs about women's rights and say they're fed up with sexual harassment and assault. They also are calling for racial equality and environmental reform.      Hundreds of women and women also attended a Women's March in Melbourne Saturday afternoon. Demonstrators of all ages marched along the Eau Gallie Causeway, across the Indian River Lagoon.    Many carried signs with quotes of empowerment, along with some obscenities.    This is the second year for the march, which also lands on the one year mark that President Trump has been in office.
  • At least 48 people have been displaced after a fire occurred at the Windsor Cove apartments Saturday morning.   Firefighters say the fire broke out at 1470 Mercy Drive around 10am. Investigators say it started on accident when a child was using a space heater to light a paper on fire. 30 of the 48 displaced residents were children. One of those children were treated for smoke inhilation, but no one was injured.      The American Red Cross was notified and deployed an emergency response vehicle and supplied 11 families with personal hygiene kits, support to replace medication and money to find a hotel to stay in temporarily.    The Fire Department says all 12 units in the building were evacuated because the power was turned off due to fire damage to the electrical system.    Some residents will be able to return home once the system is fixed, but for others, it may take longer.
  • Two people were shot, leaving one dead and another in the hospital in Southwest Orlando on Saturday night.    At 8:47 p.m., deputies responded to the 1000 block of 23rd Street in reference to a report of gunshots. Upon arrival, deputies located two victims, a white female and a black male, who were suffering from gunshot wounds.    Both victims were transported by Orange County Fire Rescue to ORMC, but the female, identified as 51 year old Kelly Lee Foley, died from her injuries. Detectives are seeking information on a vehicle that looks like this. It is reference to an older model red or maroon Dodge Ram van with a camper top and possible damage to the right tail light area. The suspect is described as a black or Hispanice male, bald with light complexion, between the ages of 45 to 50, and is 5’9’’ weighing 180 pounds with black plastic framed glasses. If you have any information about this case, you are asked to contact Crimeline at 1-800-423-TIPS(8477). There is a reward up to 5,000 dollars.
  • A new ad released by President Donald Trump's campaign is claiming that Democrats are “complicit” in killings by undocumented immigrants. The ad was released after Senate Democrats opposed a short-term spending bill to keep the government from shutting down. >> Click here to watch “President Trump is right — build the wall, deport criminals, stop illegal immigration now,” the ad said, showing clips of top Democrats. “Democrats who stand in our way will be complicit in every murder committed by illegal immigrants.” >> Trump cancels Florida trip as government shutdown looms “President Trump will fix our border and keep our families safe,” the ad concluded. The ad was released on the one-year anniversary of Trump’s inauguration. >> Government shutdown: What closes; will you get your Social Security check; what happens to SNAP, WIC On Friday, Senate Democrats opposed a short-term spending bill to fund the government and keep it from shutting down after Republicans refused to include a provision to protect thousands of immigrants brought here as children. >> Read more trending news  President Trump bashed Democrats after the failed vote, saying that they wanted “unchecked illegal immigration.” “Democrats are holding our Military hostage over their desire to have unchecked illegal immigration. Can’t let that happen!” he tweeted Saturday morning. Earlier on Saturday, he again bashed Democrats, tweeting that they were more “concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border.” (H/t: The Hill)
  • David and Louise Turpin are facing a string of charges, including torture, after police say the couple kept their 13 children locked away in subhuman conditions in their Perris, California, home. On Thursday, the Turpins made their first court appearance. >> Watch the video here >> On Rare.us: Here’s what the children in the California torture house did to cope with the alleged abuse David Turpin appeared in chains, wearing a lavender shirt and black jacket while his wife sat nearby, also in chains and a black jacket. The Turpins entered not guilty pleas to all of the charges, some of which date back to 2010. The district attorney says the couple is facing 94 years to life in prison if convicted on all counts. >> Dogs found in perfect condition in home where 13 siblings held captive During the arraignment, the Turpins were quiet and spoke only to say they acknowledged their right to a speedy preliminary hearing, CBS reports. They will appear in court again on Feb. 23, and their bail was set at $13 million. District Attorney Mike Hestrin said in a press conference, “As a prosecutor, there are cases that stick with you, that will haunt you. Sometimes, in this business, we’re faced with looking at human depravity, and that’s what we’re looking at here.” Authorities said the parents were able to keep their children hidden away by listing their home as a private school. Some of the kids, who ranged in ages from 2 to 29, reportedly didn’t know what a police officer was. The children were only allowed to eat once a day and shower twice a year, authorities said. However, the parents reportedly did allow them to keep journals, and authorities said the kids filled hundreds of notebooks. Those have not been released and are still being reviewed by law enforcement. The children are currently being cared for in the hospital, authorities said. The Riverside University Health System has set up a fund for the children that will go to their long-term needs, according to a press release. The hospital said the children have already seen a tremendous outpouring of support. >> Read more trending news  Brian Rokos of the Press-Enterprise was present at the hearing and reported that David Turpin is being represented by a public defender, while Louise Turpin has outside counsel. During Thursday’s arraignment, the public defender requested that media be banned from the trial, but the judge shot that down. Rokos said reporters from around the world were in the courtroom. The Turpins' lawyers have not announced whether they will try to have the case moved out of Riverside County.