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The Latest Headlines From Around the World

    The Philippine military on Sunday began observing an eight-hour halt in its air and ground offensive against Islamic militants in southern Marawi city to allow residents, most of them displaced by the monthlong fighting, to celebrate the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Military spokesman Brig. Gen. Restituto Padilla said the 'humanitarian pause' in military assaults took effect at 6 a.m. Sunday in predominantly Muslim Marawi but will be lifted immediately if the militants open fire or threaten troops and civilians. 'If the enemy starts firing ... anyone can exercise their right to self-defense,' Padilla said in a statement. It's the first planned respite in the massive offensive after a month of daily street battles and military airstrikes that have left at least 280 militants, 69 soldiers and police, and 26 civilians dead. The intense fighting has turned large swaths of the mosque-dotted city, a bastion of Islamic faith in the south of the largely Roman Catholic nation, into a smoldering war zone. About 500 gunmen aligned with the Islamic State group, including several foreigners, stormed the lakeside city of 200,000 people, occupied buildings, burned schools and hoisted IS-style black flags on May 23. Faced by his worst crisis, President Rodrigo Duterte responded by declaring martial law in the south and ordering a massive offensive. Padilla said the cease-fire will be observed by the military 'as a gesture of our strong commitment and respect to the Muslim world,' particularly to Marawi's Muslim residents. The fighting has forced more than 300,000 people to abandon their homes in Marawi and outlying towns and flee to evacuation centers, which rapidly became overcrowded, making it difficult for them to celebrate the Eid el-Fitr holiday.
  • Crews searching through the night in the rubble left by a landslide that buried a mountain village under tons of soil and rocks in southwestern China found 15 bodies, but more than 100 more people remained missing. About 3,000 rescuers were using detection devices and dogs to look for signs of life in an area that once held 62 homes and a hotel, the official Xinhua News Agency reported. 'We won't give up as long as there is a slim of chance,' the agency quoted an unidentified searcher as saying. The provincial government of Sichuan on Sunday released the names of the 118 missing people. It's unclear if the 15 bodies have been identified. Relatives were sobbing as they awaited news of their loved ones. A woman in a nearby village told The Associated Press that she had no information on her relatives in Xinmo, the mountain village that was buried. She said she had only heard that body parts were found. Xu Zhiwen, executive deputy governor of the Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture of Aba, the region where the landslide struck early Saturday, said that all 142 tourists who were visiting a site in Xinmo have been found alive. Three members of one family were located five hours after the landslide. Qiao Dashuai, 26, said he and his wife awoke to cries from their 1-month-old son around 5:30 a.m. 'Just after we changed the diaper for the baby, we heard a big bang outside and the light went out,' said Qiao. 'We felt that something bad was happening and immediately rushed to the door, but the door was blocked by mud and rocks.' Qiao told state broadcaster CCTV his family was swept away by water as part of a mountain collapsed. He said they struggled against the flood of water until they met medical workers who took them to a hospital. His parents and other relatives were among the missing. 'It's the biggest landslide to hit this area since the Wenchuan earthquake,' Wang Yongbo, an official leading one of the rescue efforts, told CCTV. Wang was referring to China's deadliest earthquake this century, a magnitude 7.9 temblor that struck Sichuan province in May 2008, killing nearly 90,000 people. Mao County, or Maoxian, sits on the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau and is home to about 110,000 people. Most residents are of the Qiang ethnic minority. The landslide buried 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) of road and blocked a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) section of a river. The provincial government said on its website that an estimated 8 million cubic meters (282 million cubic feet) of earth and rock — equivalent to more than 3,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools — slid down the mountain. Experts told CCTV that the landslide was likely triggered by rain. Search may be made easier Sunday as the weather service forecast a sunny day.
  • Egypt's president has ratified a disputed 2016 agreement under which his country would transfer control of two Red Sea islands to Saudi Arabia. News of President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi's ratification of the maritime border demarcation agreement came in a Cabinet statement issued Saturday.  The ratification followed the June 14 approval of the agreement by parliament, despite court rulings to annul the transfer.   The government says the two islands have always been Saudi but were placed under Egypt's protection in the 1950's amid Arab-Israeli tension. Critics say the islands were transferred in exchange for billions of dollars of Saudi aid.  Authorities earlier this month arrested an estimated 120 people who voiced opposition to the agreement or demonstrated against it in street protests. Most have since been released.
  • A prominent independent newspaper in Bahrain earlier shut down by the government as part of a crackdown on dissent has laid off its staff. The daily Al-Wasat sent a statement Saturday to employees saying it had to let them go after the tiny island nation's rulers ordered it closed on June 4 . It marked the third time authorities have ordered it to stop publishing a print edition since the island's 2011 Arab Spring protests and comes just after officials briefly banned it in January from publishing online. The crackdown in Bahrain, home to the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, has seen activists arrested or forced into exile and political parties disbanded. Independent news gathering there has grown more difficult, with the government refusing to accredit two Associated Press journalists and others.
  • Hundreds marched in Warsaw on Saturday to protest widespread logging in Europe's last primeval forest, a project undertaken by Poland's conservative government. The ruling Law and Justice party has allowed increased logging in the Bialowieza Forest, a vast woodland that straddles Poland and Belarus, alarming environmentalists who say it threatens a natural treasure. The forest has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The government says it has increased logging to fight an outbreak of bark beetle, which has infected many spruce trees. But ecologists see that as a pretext to increase timber production for profit, saying authorities have been felling not only infected trees but also healthy ones, some 100 years old. Young trees are to be planted in their place. Speakers at the rally organized by Greenpeace and other groups said they want the entire forest to be declared a national park to ensure its protection. They fear the virgin forest, home to a complex ecosystem of bison, woodpeckers and many other species, is being transformed into what will be essentially a tree plantation. Robert Cyglicki, director of Greenpeace in Poland, called the logging 'a crime against our heritage.' Protesters rallied in central Warsaw and then marched to the Environment Ministry. Currently only the forest's core is protected as a national park on the Polish side. The march came several days after Environment Minister Jan Szyszko called for Bialowieza to lose its UNESCO natural heritage status. 'The Bialowieza forest was granted UNESCO natural heritage status illegally and without consulting the local community,' Szyszko said. He said a complaint was lodged with prosecutors over the decision, which occurred under a previous government. Last year he approved a decision to triple logging above a level that had been considered environmentally sustainable. The European Union says the increased logging is illegal under EU law. In recent days, protesters have sought to stop logging in the forest, at times by trying to block the heavy equipment.
  • Celebrating a decade at the creative helm of Dior Homme on Saturday, designer Kris Van Assche held court with Christian Slater, Jamie Bell and Kata Mara at his catwalk collection that paid homage to the iconic Dior suit. Here are some highlights of the spring-summer 2018 menswear collections at Paris Fashion Week. DIOR HOMME It was the suit, but not as we know it. Retracing the origins of Dior Homme without a hint of nostalgia, 41-year-old Belgian designer Van Assche took the house's bread-and-butter two-piece and deconstructed it to produce an edgy, celebratory show. Tailored in black Ottoman, the new double-breasted blazer was cut with an exaggeratedly nipped waist in a retro style. Long sleeveless coats had surreally bulbous hips and tail coats were cut on the bias. 'I've been here for 10 years now and I wanted to play with the DNA of the brand — the black suit and the white shirt. How can we reinvent it?' Van Assche told The Associated Press. In case guests momentarily forget what show they were attending, there were plenty of funky reminders: Silk scarves around the neck with the Dior Homme atelier address (3, Rue Marignan). Long angular-shouldered coats were also fastidiously patterned with micro text that repeated the house's name. Dior Homme defined the collection shown Saturday at Paris Fashion Week as a 'fusion of sport and suit.' Halfway through it was clear why, as the sartorial musings gave way to varsity styles such as silken American baseball jackets with Paris emblazoned on the front, and collegiate V-neck tank tops in flame red that ticked the box for the house's younger clientele. ___ DIOR HOMME FRONT ROW Looking slick in a black Dior Homme suit without a tie, actor Jamie Bell arrived with his actress fiancee Kate Mara at the Grand Palais venue to a flurry of camera flashes. Mara, who wore a white silk gown, joked that their highly-anticipated wedding would be taking place 'today,' since they both looked the part. 'Today. We're appropriately dressed. We'll be walking down this aisle,' Mara told The Associated Press. Although the 34-year-old actress would not disclose who would be designing her wedding dress, Bell was less coy. 'Well, I know who I'm wearing, Am I allowed to say this? Dior of course. They've always been good to me over the years. I'm going to wear a bow tie,' he said. 'And doesn't he look handsome in Dior?' Mara said. Mara's latest movie 'Megan Leavey,' a true life story about a young Marine corporal in Iraq, was released June 9. She said she was 'super honored and proud to be telling Megan Leavey's story because she's definitely a hero of mine. And it's rare that there are movies about females in the military.' ___ BALMAIN IN BLACK AND WHITE Designer Olivier Rousteign's fascination with Faberge eggs, couture and Russian imperial glamour seemed to make a bold return at Saturday's indulgent Balmain collection. The blue-and-gold Faberge egg that Richard Burton once gave to Elizabeth Taylor has been a touchstone for the 31-year-old designer in the past. Here, the iconic ornament — created for the Romanovs from 1885 to 1916, when the company was run by Peter Carl Faberge — seemed to be evoked in black and white. The result was a show of highly structured clothes — for men and women — with dazzling decorations. Embellished cross-over coats conjured up styles of Russian Tatars with belts nipping the waist. A black long-sleeved mini-dress bore thick tectonic plates on the torso and heavy threading that looked like a shell or protection for a warrior. And then black-and-white striped tuxedos, with lines in all directions, seemed to fast forward to the exuberance of the Jazz Age. The show was, predictably, a little over-the-top. ___ UNEXPECTED MR. ROBOT REUNION Fashion brings people together. American actors Christian Slater and Rami Malek — both of hit U.S. television series Mr. Robot — unexpectedly ran into each other during Paris Fashion Week. 'It honestly randomly happened, yeah. I did not know he was going to be here. He didn't know I was going to be here. And we actually bumped into each other on the street yesterday. So incredible,' Slater told the AP. Malek, who joined his co-star on the Dior front row, talked about the upcoming third season of the award-winning techno-thriller show. 'Take all that kind of excitement and frenetic energy of the first season. And all the information you get from the second one. Combine it together and it's a ... wild ride,' Malek said. ___ SACAI'S ASIA, FULL OF COLOR One of Japan's most lucrative fashion houses, Sacai has built a reputation for the avant-garde and quirky. This was on full display in Saturday's color-rich show. This season, Asia was in the air. An oversize tubular cuff that mirrored the sleeve of a kimono was a leitmotif in Sacai's 49-piece display that showcased both men's and women's designs. Asian styles were evoked in the multitudinous use of layers — a thick hybrid poncho in Cerulean blue with tassels, or an oversize coat covered in blurred text that looked like a decorative pattern. Models walked the runway on thick Geisha 'geta' clogs. Bright flashes of citrus yellow — a color that symbolizes courage in Japan — came on a bold silken shoulderless design with a billowing skirt and box pleating. It's a look that only a courageous fashionista could wear. And even the checked suits — normally a Western signature — were rendered here in the Madras fabric pattern. ___ CLASSY HERMES, ALWAYS IN STYLE Hermes has become a byword for simple, unpretentious luxury. With panache, veteran menswear designer Veronique Nichanian proved this again in a classy, masculine show Saturday for spring-summer 2018. Tasteful colors such as ruddy pink, steel, dusty brown, copper and cobalt blue set off the beautifully cut simple silhouettes. High-waisted baggy pants mixed with fitted bombers, or loose luxuriant sweaters rolled up at the sleeves. Metallic red shiny pants and hoodies provided this season's twist. Unlike most Paris fashion shows, the collection produced no far-flung concept, gimmick or muse, simply because none was needed. Nichanian — who's been at the helm of this family-run business for an incredible 29 years — is an expert at letting the clothes do the talking. ___ Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K
  • The U.N. health agency says there are now more than 200,000 suspected cases of cholera in an outbreak in war-torn Yemen, many of them children. UNICEF director Anthony Lake and World Health Organization chief Margaret Chan said in a statement Saturday, 'we are now facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world,' with an average of 5,000 new cases every day. The agencies say that more than 1,300 people have died — one quarter of them children — and the death toll is expected to rise. The U.N. says collapsing health, water and sanitation systems have cut off 14.5 million people from regular access to clean water and sanitation, increasing the ability of the disease to spread. In addition, an estimated 30,000 local health workers have not been paid for nearly 10 months.
  • Russia has told Norway that the extension of a U.S. military deployment in the country will hit diplomatic ties. The Russian Embassy in Norway warned on its Facebook page Saturday that the move could 'escalate tensions and lead to destabilization of the situation in the northern region.' It said 'this step contradicts Norwegian policy of not deploying foreign military.' Norway announced this week that 330 U.S. Marines will remain in the country until the end of 2018, a year longer than was originally planned. The U.S. force arrived in January and is based near the western city of Trondheim, 900 miles (1,450 kilometers) from the Russian border. Russia and members of NATO have accused each other of ramping up tensions in recent years with increased military activity by both sides.
  • Iran's Intelligence Ministry is saying that its forces have detained members of a group linked to the Islamic State group it says intended to carry out terrorist acts in holy cities across the country. The ministry says its forces confiscated three Kalashnikov rifles, night vision goggles, three suicide belts, three phones for remote detonation, a large amount of bullets and other technical tools for making bombs, in a statement issued Saturday. The report did not elaborate on the number of people detained, or where the arrests took place. Five attackers linked to IS stormed Iran's parliament and a shrine to revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini this month, killing at least 17 people and wounding more than 50.
  • Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has started a foreign tour that will include his first meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump. Modi met with Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa on Saturday during a six-hour stop in Lisbon. Modi will then continue on to Washington where he will meet with Trump on Monday. Modi and Costa announced the launching of the India-Portugal Start-Up Hub to encourage business ventures by entrepreneurs in the two countries, along with several other bilateral agreements on science, sport and taxation. India's key concerns include Trump's decisions to pull out of the Paris climate accord and to review the H1B visa program, under which thousands of skilled Indian workers go to the United States. Modi will make his last stop in the Netherlands on Tuesday.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Police in Georgia are hoping surveillance video that captured a violent attack will help them find the people responsible. Video shows a restaurant owner and her teenage daughter being beaten by two customers Thursday afternoon in Baxley, Georgia. >> Read more trending news The victims told police the suspects were unhappy with their order. The verbal argument turned violent when one of the suspects began punching the restaurant owner repeatedly. When the victim’s teenage daughter came out of the car to break up the fight, the male suspect punched her in the face. WJCL reported that Baxley police have issued warrants for the suspects, Nathaniel Smith and Latasha Smith. The pair could be charged with aggravated battery and cruelty to children. The suspects drove away from the restaurant in a cream or tan Cadillac Escalade with tag number REU8495. Officials said they headed north on Highway 144. Anyone with any information about the assault is asked to call the Baxley Police Department at 912-367-8305 or the 911 call center at 912-367-8111.
  • A dive team is searching a ditch along I-4 from which Orlando firefighters removed a car early Saturday, police said. A car flipped into the ditch near the Kirkman Road exit. Emergency services responded to the car around 8:15 a.m. App users click here to see the video. 
  • The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a small plane crash that occurred Saturday morning near Fort Meyers, the Lee County Sheriff’s Office said. Deputies said the plane crashed into an unoccupied day care building. >> Read more trending news One person died in the crash while another was taken to the hospital. The survivor’s condition has not been released.
  • A Transportation Security Administration agent has been arrested after he was accused of stealing money from a passenger at Orlando International Airport in Florida, Orlando police said. >> Read more trending news Alexander Shae Johnson, 22, was arrested Thursday night. Passenger Kathleen Duddleston entered the TSA checkpoint and was stopped for additional screening, police said. While she was patted down, Duddleston told TSA security officer Michelle Metz that she couldn’t see her luggage, so Metz moved her closer. Duddleston complained again that she couldn’t see her bag, and Johnson moved slightly. After the pat down, Duddleston reached for her bag and could not find her money, police said. She said she noticed a bulge in Johnson’s left front shirt pocket. Duddleston asked Johnson if that was her money, and he said he got the money from the bank, police said. The woman complained to Metz that she believed Johnson stole money from her. Metz contacted her supervisor. Duddleston has been charged with third-degree grand theft. TSA said in a statement to WFTV: TSA has a zero tolerance for misconduct in the workplace. The TSA immediately reported the allegation to OPD and we aggressively investigated the incident with our law enforcement partner. TSA officers represent a professional and honorable workforce that is trained to treat passengers and their personal belongings with care and respect. No exceptions will be tolerated. We immediately ended the federal career of this individual.
  • A scare happened at a Leominster, Massachusetts, supermarket after a 4-day-old newborn was left locked inside of a hot car while her mother was inside shopping. >> Read more trending news Mother Sharma Murphy said that on her way to Market Basket supermarket on Friday, she stopped by the fire house to make sure her baby’s car seat was properly installed. Less than an hour later, those firefighters helped rescue her 4-day-old baby, who was locked in her hot car. A shopper called Leominster police after spotting a newborn alone inside a car. It was Sharma Murphy's silver Chevy Malibu. >> A reminder of hot car dangers as temperatures climb Murphy said she was out for the first time with her newborn daughter, 4-day-old Katherine, and was nervous. “I went, I bought it. Came right out and this lady just starts screaming at me. Screaming at me,” said Murphy. Murphy said she brought her newborn inside with her to Market Basket and then returned to the car when Katherine fell asleep. She said that she ran back inside for two or three minutes to buy some baby formula. “I went (in and) I bought it,” Murphy said. “(I) came right out and this lady just starts screaming at me.” Related: Two toddlers dead after 15 hours in hot car, police say Police said the windows were rolled up. “I believe she locked her keys in the car because they had to use the jimmy to get the baby out,” witness John Casey told WFXT. According to WFXT meteorologists, the outside temperature was 84 degrees at the time. Murphy said she didn’t want to wake her newborn. “I thought, ‘OK, if I run in and run out...’ It was one of those things where she's gotta eat because I have nothing left for her and that's when everything happened and I'm like, oh my God,” Murphy said. Katherine was taken to the hospital to be checked out. Her mother said he is fine. The baby is currently in custody of DCF. No charges have been filed.