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    The general in charge of the military intervention in Zimbabwe that led to the resignation of longtime ruler Robert Mugabe is to retire from the defense forces, paving the way for him to be appointed as vice president.General Constantino Chiwenga 'is set to retire pending redeployment,' said chief secretary to the president and cabinet Misheck Sibanda in a statement Monday.Chiwenga has not stated his political ambitions, but is widely tipped to take up a one of the two vacant vice presidents' posts under President Emmerson Mnangagwa. Chiwenga must retire from the military to take up the position, according to the constitution.Police commissioner-general Augustine Chihuri, hugely unpopular with the public for heading a force known for mounting numerous roadblocks where bribes are demanded as well as allegations of corruption and human rights abuses, will also leave his post, according to the statement.Mugabe, 93, left in dramatic scenes that saw the military put him under house arrest, scores of thousands rally in the streets against him and lawmakers begin impeachment proceedings before he resigned last month, ending 37 years in power.Mnangagwa, a long-time ally turned rival after he was fired from the vice presidency in early November, succeeded Mugabe.Two former army generals already hold powerful posts in Mnangagwa's cabinet, while another general was appointed as ruling ZANU-PF party commissar at a congress on Nov.15.New defense forces commander Valerio Sibanda said the military intervention, dubbed Operation Restore Legacy, had officially ended Monday. Sibanda told reporters Monday that 'normalcy has returned to our country.' He said the military would hand back 'normal day-to-day policing duties' to the police.
  • Several hundred migrants were camping along Serbia's borders on Monday, sleeping rough in make-shift shelters from the cold as they look for a chance to cross into neighboring European Union countries.Amid biting wind and freezing temperatures, the migrants huddled around small fires in an abandoned factory near Croatia's border, as aid groups distributed food and warm drinks.'These people continue to stay outside in very inhumane and unsafe conditions.... There is no clear access to water or sanitation facilities,' said Andrea Contenta, a humanitarian affairs adviser in Serbia for Doctors Without Borders.Contenta added that while officials have closed off the so-called Balkan route — leading from Turkey to Greece or Bulgaria, and on to Macedonia and Serbia — migrants still use it to cross illegally and face dangers.'We cannot continue to say that the Balkan route is closed,' he insisted. 'We have to acknowledge that people are still (moving) along the Balkans, and we need to find the way to avoid,' putting them at risk.Though numbers of migrants in the Balkans have been reduced, Serbian officials said about 300 to 400 people have been staying out in the open, along with some 4,000 who are in asylum centers hoping to move on to wealthier European countries.Thousands of people have been stranded since the March 2016 closure of the Balkan route.Many migrants have since tried repeatedly to cross the borders with Croatia or Hungary, but have been pushed back to Serbia by police in those countries or have been stopped by a barbed-wire fence at Hungary's border.Forced to cross the borders illegally in most cases, migrants have turned to smugglers to guide them across.Wrapped in woolen blankets, caps and shawls, some of the migrants camping on Monday held their feet above the fire to keep warm. Others tried to wash mud off their shoes as aid workers brought water to the make-shift shelter.Ahmed Alloui, 20, from Algeria, said 'there is bad life' back home and he wants to find a peaceful country where he can have a future.'We are looking for better life,' he said.___AP Writer Jovana Gec contributed from Belgrade, Serbia.
  • Swedish prosecutors say an Uzbek man who rammed a stolen truck into a crowd in downtown Stockholm in April, killing five and injuring 14, is expected to stand trial in February.Prosecutor Hans Ihrman told Swedish broadcaster TV4 Monday that Rakhmat Akilov is the only suspect, and the trial is likely to take 'a couple of months.'Akilov was subject to deportation from Sweden ahead of the April 7 attack as his asylum application was rejected. He was captured soon after he drove a stolen beer truck into a crowd of shoppers outside a department store in Stockholm's city center.Akilov's lawyer has said earlier that the Uzbek construction worker, who was 39 at the time of the attack, has confessed to a terrorist crime and intends to plead guilty.
  • The Latest on the police response at a British air base used by U.S. Air Force (all times local):A British air base used by the U.S. Air Force was scouted out in 2015 by an Islamic extremist who eventually received a life sentence for plotting an attack against U.S. military personnel.Junead Khan was tried for using his job as a delivery driver to study RAF Mildenhall, the base in England that was locked down on Monday during a disturbance that resulted in a man's arrest.Authorities have not said if the incident at Mildenhall was suspected to be terror-related. Details have not yet been released.A jury convicted Khan last year of planning to travel to Syria as a support of the Islamic State group and preparing possible attacks at Mildenhall and a second English base, RAF Lakenheath.___3:20 p.m.British police say they have detained a man after a 'disturbance' at an English air base used by the U.S. Air Force.Suffolk Police said American service personnel fired shots during Monday's incident at the RAF Mildenhall base before the man was arrested. They say the man suffered cuts and bruises and was taken into custody.They say no one else was injured in the incident.It was not immediately clear what the nature of the incident was, but British media reported that a man allegedly tried to break into the facility.Staff Sgt. Rachelle Coleman, a spokeswoman for U.S. Air Force Europe, says a lockdown imposed at the base has been lifted. She referred all other questions to Suffolk police.The Mildenhall base is located 80 miles (130 kilometers) north of London.___3:00 p.m.U.S. Air Force Europe says there are reports of a security incident at British air base used by the U.S. Air Force and that the situation is ongoing.The U.S. has air-refueling assets stationed at RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk, England, located 80 miles north of London.The Royal Air Force base says it was locked down after reports of a disturbance at 1 p.m. Monday.It says emergency personnel are responding to the situation and that additional details would be provide when possible.British media are suggesting someone in a vehicle tried to force his way through a checkpoint, but this hasn't been confirmed.___2:50 p.m.British police say they are responding to a 'significant' incident at a Royal Air Force base used by the U.S. Air Force.Police say it happened at RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk and urged the public to stay away from the area for the time being. Police said Monday that further details would be released shortly.British media suggested an individual in a vehicle tried to force his way through a checkpoint, but this wasn't confirmed.RAF officials referred calls to police.
  • A court in northern Greece has sentenced 23 people to prison terms ranging from eight to 1,489 years for smuggling Iraqi and Syrian refugees into the country from the Turkish border in 2015 and 2016.The Thessaloniki court imposed the longest sentence on a 54-year-old Greek man convicted of running a smuggling ring that arranged the transport of more than 500 refugees in 43 separate cases. Under Greek law, the maximum prison term that can be served is 25 years, regardless of the length of the sentence.Another 23 people, mainly taxi drivers, were acquitted.The suspects were rounded up in a July 2016 police operation. Greece was the main entry point into the European Union of more than a million refugees at the height of the 2015 refugee crisis.
  • Six aid workers are missing in South Sudan after clashes broke out Sunday evening between government and opposition soldiers near the northwestern town of Raga.The government blames the opposition forces, known as IO, loyal to former Vice President Riek Machar for the abductions.'This kind of behavior is unbecoming,' said government spokesman, Ateny Wek Ateny, who demanded the release of the aid workers.The missing humanitarian workers are from three organizations, two international groups, HealthNet and Solidarity International, and one local aid group. Solidarity International's country director, Mainul Islam Opu from Bangladesh, is the only foreigner among the victims, the rest are South Sudanese nationals.South Sudan's opposition group, IO, confirmed that they have four of the aid workers but said they rescued the aid workers from being used as 'human shields' by the government.'They are currently safe and sound with our forces around Raga and will be handed over to the concerned third party as soon as possible,' opposition spokesman Col. Lam Paul Gabriel told The Associated Press. Gabriel said they found the aid workers when fighting a government-allied militia during which they killed 35 militia fighters between the towns of Wau and Raga in Western Bahr el Ghazal state.A statement put out by the local government of Raga said that two humanitarian cars were burned to the ground at the scene.The fighting comes while high-level peace talks have started in Ethiopia, which are aimed at bringing peace to the war-torn South Sudan.At least 95 aid workers have been killed in South Sudan since the start of the civil war in 2013, including 28 so far in 2017, said the U.N. Last month six aid workers were killed in a single attack in Duk County in Jonglei State.
  • A British military air base in England used by the U.S. Air Force was locked down Monday after a disturbance of some kind, but the emergency measure ended when a man was taken into custody, police and Air Force officials said.American service members fired shots during the incident at the Royal Air Force base in Suffolk, according to county police. No one was injured other than the detained man, who suffered cuts and bruises, police said.The nature of the disturbance was unclear, although British media reported that a car tried to ram the perimeter gates at RAF Mildenhall.Suffolk police said they were not looking for any other suspects at the site.The base located about 80 miles (130 kilometers) north of London is home to 3,000 military personnel and their families. The U.S., which has long made extensive use of air bases in Britain, has air-refueling assets stationed there.The Pentagon initially urged all individuals near RAF Mildenhall to avoid it, but the lockdown was lifted about an hour after the potential threat was reported. Suffolk police said nearby schools and businesses had resumed normal activities because there was no danger to the community.The Mildenhall base was scouted out in 2015 by an Islamic extremist who eventually received a life sentence for plotting an attack against U.S. military personnel.Junead Khan was tried for using his job as a delivery driver to study RAF Mildenhall and another Royal Air Force base.A jury convicted Khan last year of planning to travel to Syria as a supporter of the Islamic State extremist group and preparing possible attacks at Mildenhall and RAF Lakenheath, which is also used by U.S. personnel.Authorities have not said if the incident at Mildenhall was suspected to be terrorist-related. Details have not yet been released and the identity of the man in custody has not been made public.The Mildenhall base is home to the U.S. Air Force's 100th Air Refueling Wing, which is responsible for American refueling operations across Europe.Other units, including the 501st Combat Support Wing, the 352nd Special Operations Wing and the 95th Reconnaissance Squadron are also stationed there.Britain's official terrorist threat level has been set as 'severe' indicating that intelligence agencies believe an attack is highly likely.__David Rising in Berlin contributed.
  • A planned gas pipeline to link Russia with Germany that bypasses Ukraine and Poland threatens central Europe's security, Poland's new prime minister said Monday.The so-called Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline would be the second to carry Russian gas directly to Germany and Western Europe via the Baltic Sea instead of through Poland and Ukraine.Poland and other countries in the region that are dependent on Russian gas are strongly opposed to this project, which economically links Germany with Russia and bypasses them, and allows Russia's Gazprom to dictate prices.Morawiecki said Monday the planned pipeline could also add to instability in Ukraine. In the eastern part of the country that border the European Union, more than 10,000 people have been killed in fighting between Ukrainian troops and Russia-backed separatists since 2014.Seeking to cut the dependence on Russia, Poland is importing liquid gas from the United States and plans to open a pipeline with Norway. It wants to become a gas and energy distribution hub for the countries in the region.Morawiecki also denied reports that Germany was ready to give up the Nord Stream 2 project if Poland abandoned talk of World War II reparations from Berlin.'We are not linking these issues, absolutely,' Morawiecki said on Radio Szczecin.Poland's conservative ruling Law and Justice part has opened the issue of war reparations, arguing that Poland was the worst-hit victim of Nazi Germany during World War Two, and was later not allowed to receive reparations under the Moscow-imposed communist regime that followed.Polish lawmakers are weighing whether to empower the government to officially seek reparations from Berlin.
  • The U.N.'s human rights chief says China's Communist Party has taken a 'hostile position' on the universality of human rights and that 'the rhetoric from the White House' is heading in the same direction.U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein also told French Catholic daily La Croix in an interview published Monday that Europe faces a 'crisis of identity and integration policy.'Zeid says while governments must protect their citizens, he's 'worried about the tendency of authorities in Europe to overreact after terrorist attacks.'He pointed to a U.N. tribunal's genocide conviction of former Bosnian Serb army commander Ratko Mladic as a victory for human rights.Zeid also defended the U.N. and said his office's budget equaled 'one-tenth of what the Swiss spend on chocolate every year.
  • Six Ugandan opposition lawmakers have been suspended from the legislature amid heated debate over a bill to abolish the presidential age limit.The lawmakers were suspended Monday for allegedly disobeying the speaker's orders when they persistently questioned her decisions.Most other opposition lawmakers briefly walked out of the chamber, saying they wanted to consult, but later returned.The controversial bill seeks to jettison a constitutional clause that prevents anyone above 75 from being president. Critics say the bill would allow President Yoweri Museveni, who is 73 and ineligible to run again, extend his rule, possibly for life. Museveni has ruled since 1986.Uganda's ruling party has an overwhelming majority in Parliament and the bill is expected to pass when it is put to a vote.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • John Skipper, the president of ESPN, resigned from his position Monday citing a substance addiction problem, according to the sports network. >> Read more trending news The network announced that former ESPN president and executive chairman George Bodenheimer will serve as acting chair for the next 90 days. He worked for ESPN from 1981 to 2014. Check back for updates on this developing story.
  • Officials responded Monday morning after a train derailed over Interstate 5 near Mounts Road in Pierce County, Washington. >> Read more trending news All lanes were blocked on Monday morning.
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden is coming to Orlando next month. Biden will bring his American Promise Tour to the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts January 29 for a special one night event. Joe Biden has always believed that when given a chance, ordinary people can do extraordinary things. As a scrappy kid from Scranton who rose to the Office of Vice President, he is no exception. During his 45 years of public service, one of Vice President Biden’s greatest strengths has been his ability to bring people together, even in crisis, even across difficult divides, all the while, respecting everybody at the table. In 2018, Vice President Joe Biden continues his American Promise Tour, a series of conversations that will go beyond the 24-hour news cycle and 140-character arguments to connect friends and neighbors around the topics that matter most. Vice President Biden will reveal the big political moments of his career, the life-altering choices he made, and the key traits that have helped him persevere through challenges. He will share how the loss of his son Beau tested his resolve, and how he is finding new purpose in a time of uncertainty. Tickets to the event start at $68.  VIP packages are available for $128. For more information on the event, or to purchase tickets, click HERE.
  • The man infamously acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin has found himself in the middle of another feud -- this time with rapper Jay-Z. According to The Blast, George Zimmerman threatened to feed Jay-Z to an alligator after a production team harassed his family. The rap star is reportedly producing a documentary on the death of Trayvon Martin. “I know how to handle people who f*** with me, I have since February 2012,” Zimmerman told the publication. February of 2012 is the month of Martin’s death. Zimmerman claims his parents or family members are not being paid for their roles in Jay-Z’s documentary. To make matters even more controversial, the 6-part documentary is being produced by The Weinstein Company. The squabble even prompted a response from Snoop Dogg on Instagram.
  • This is heart-wrenching to watch: a bystander’s dash cam video captures a dog being dragged behind a car for at least two blocks in Hawaii. The dog appears to be tied by a leash to the back of an SUV as it drives down a road in Honolulu. YouTube user Johnny Chang noticed the dog and followed the SUV to try and catch up with the driver. When the vehicle stops, the dog stands up and limps around a little. That’s when the driver gets out slowly.  According to the Daily Mail, the 40-second clip ends with another woman running up to the scene. So far the driver has not been identified. It’s not known if the dog was injured. **WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT** (VIDEO) More stories: Atlanta airport employee slides down crowded escalator to help stranded passengers