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The Latest: Storm-felled trees kill 5, including 2 children

The Latest: Storm-felled trees kill 5, including 2 children

The Latest: Storm-felled trees kill 5, including 2 children
Photo Credit: AP Photo/Steven Senne
People stand at the entrance to a pizza shop as water floods a street, in Scituate, Mass., Friday, March 2, 2018. A major nor'easter pounded the East Coast on Friday, packing heavy rain and strong winds as residents from the mid-Atlantic to Maine braced for coastal flooding. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The Latest: Storm-felled trees kill 5, including 2 children

The Latest on a major late-winter storm pounding the East Coast (all times local):

5:45 p.m.

An 11-year-old boy in New York state is the fifth person reported killed by downed trees in a fierce winter storm bringing high winds and heavy rain to the East Coast.

A tree crashed through a house in New York's Putnam County shortly after noon Friday.

A 6-year-old Virginia boy and adults in Virginia, Rhode Island and Maryland also died Friday due to fallen trees or tree limbs.

Meanwhile, police in New York reported that several barges broke loose in the Hudson River during the storm.

The barges were part of the construction project for the new Mario Cuomo Bridge, formerly known as the Tappan Zee Bridge.

The Coast Guard and the New York City Fire Department as well as commercial tugs responded.


5 p.m.

Four people have died from falling trees amid a fierce winter storm pounding the East Coast, including a 6-year-old boy.

Police say the boy was killed when a tree fell on his Chester, Virginia home. Police say a man in James City County, Virginia, died after wind toppled a tree onto a vehicle.

Near Baltimore, a 77-year-old woman was struck and killed by a tree branch outside her home.

A man was hit and killed by a tree in Newport, Rhode Island.

The nor'easter has brought hurricane-force wind gusts to some parts of the region, reaching as much as 80 miles per hour on Cape Cod in Massachusetts.

The National Weather Service warns that pedestrians will face very hazardous conditions and travel is dangerous, especially for tractor-trailers and buses.


4:15 p.m.

More than 1.6 million homes and businesses are without power amid a winter storm stalled over the eastern U.S.

From North Carolina to Maine and westward to Michigan, the storm has felled trees, downed power lines and blown down buildings under construction.

The poweroutage.us website, reports the most outages in Pennsylvania, where 376,000 homes and businesses had no power Friday afternoon.

The Tappan Zee Bridge in New York and bridges in Rhode Island were closed to heavy trucks because of high winds.


3:45 p.m.

The National Weather Service says a winter storm hitting the Northeastern U.S. is becoming a storm "we will never forget."

In Boston's Seaport district, roads and sidewalks flooded and waves of several feet kicked up tree branches, plastic bottles and even a wooden chest. Several roads were closed because of flooding.

Meteorologist Bill Simpson of the National Weather Service in Massachusetts says the nor'easter has been causing wind gusts over 80 mph on Cape Cod and is stalling over the region, rather than moving up the coast.

New York City's airports were disrupted. About a third of the flights at Kennedy Airport were cancelled by mid-afternoon. Airport officials say flights were departing and arriving on a "limited basis" because of high winds. All inbound traffic to LaGuardia airport was also being held.


2:15 p.m.

A fierce storm bringing high winds and heavy rain is causing problems around the northeast.

The National Weather Service says some of the highest gusts Friday had been observed in Rhode Island, where the wind toppled a container truck as it crossed the Newport Pell Bridge. The span and two other bridges in the state were closed to high-profile vehicles.

Outside Philadelphia, a tree crashed onto the roof of a commuter bus, halting traffic on one of the area's busiest highways. No injuries were reported.

The weather service says it was aware of hurricane-force wind gusts on Cape Cod, including a report of 78 mph in Wellfleet, Massachusetts.

Boston has reached its third highest tide since records began in 1928, at 14.67 feet. It expects the tide to crest higher during the second high tide of the storm at midnight.


1:30 p.m.

The fierce nor'easter battering the Northeast is causing havoc with rail travel.

Amtrak announced Friday that all services along the Northeast Corridor "are temporarily suspended due to multiple weather related issues."

Service between New York City and Boston was suspended earlier due to flooding and multiple downed trees.

Amtrak also announced that one track on the Washington-Maryland corridor was out service for repairs due to weather damage. That forced trains to reduce speeds for safety.

Trains already en route will continue to Washington, New York City and Boston and hold.

In New Jersey, a downed tree that hit overhead wires has suspended some New Jersey Transit service.

NJT says the tree toppled in the area of Morris Plains on Friday, causing the suspension of service on the Morris and Essex Line in both directions between Dover and Convent Station.

It wasn't immediately known if the service would resume in time for the evening commute.


12:50 p.m.

More than 700,000 electric customers across the Northeast are without power as a late-winter nor'easter pummels the region with high winds and driving rain.

The poweroutage.us website, which tracks utilities across the nation, reported early Friday afternoon that New York was the hardest hit state with more than 208,000 homes and businesses without electricity.

About 180,000 Pennsylvania customers and 140,000 Virginia customers were without power.

The New England area was not hit as hard, with Massachusetts experiencing nearly 27,000 outages.


12:20 p.m.

Heavy rains are aggravating problems that Pittsburgh has been having with landslides in recent days

One home was destroyed and the back wall of another was crushed in a landslide Friday in Kilbuck Township, about 12 miles (19 kilometers) northwest of Pittsburgh.

Tom Tomaro has lived in the 3,000-square-foot, three-bedroom house his entire life. The landscape contractor said he noticed signs that the land was shifting several days ago, and started to move out his belongings then. The landslide has so far plowed through his fence, yard and deck and crushed the 70-year-old home's back wall.

For now, he and his wife are staying with his mother-in-law.

Officials say all the rain is causing the clay soil underneath to move quickly.


11:55 a.m.

A major nor'easter is combining with high tide to cause flooding along coastal areas of the Eastern Seaboard.

Water flooded onto the streets near Boston's Long Wharf just before noon Friday, while flood waters closed roads and threatened homes in Quincy just south of Boston

Firefighters in Quincy and Duxbury rescued drivers from stranded cars. Quincy police warned drivers on Twitter not to try and drive down flooded streets.

Flooded roads were also reported on Long Island, New York, and in Connecticut.

Nancy Bennett, owner of Milford Boat Works in Milford, Connecticut, says there is couple of feet of water in the yard where there is usually none.

High winds were also causing havoc across the region. In Watertown just west of Boston, police say eight utility poles were knocked over, blocking a major artery through town.


11:30 a.m.

High winds and driving rain are causing thousands of flight cancellations at East Coast airports.

Flightaware.com was reporting more than 2,000 cancellations late Friday morning.

An American Airlines spokesman says the company has canceled about 18 percent of its flights in the Northeast, with Boston's Logan Airport and Reagan Washington National Airport the hardest hit.

Delta, Southwest, JetBlue and American were allowing travelers to change their Friday and Saturday flights to avoid delays and cancellations.


11:30 a.m.

High winds are causing power outages, school and work closures and traffic problems across Virginia.

The winds are part of a major nor'easter that was pounding the East Coast on Friday, also packing heavy rain and intermittent snow further north.

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel was closed to all traffic Friday morning. Some roads were blocked by downed trees.

Dominion Energy was reporting power outages across the state, but the numbers were highest in northern Virginia. Nearly 141,000 customers there were without power Friday morning.

In central Virginia's Hanover County, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports fire-EMS crews were dispatched to a home around 2:45 a.m. for a tree that had fallen into a two-story house. Four children were trapped inside.

Authorities say there were no injuries.


10:20 a.m.

A major nor'easter packing wet, heavy snow has sent tree limbs crashing down, closed schools and left more than 100,000 customers without power across upstate New York.

The National Weather Service says Buffalo had received more than 8 inches (20 centimeters) of snow by 7 a.m. Friday, a record for March 2. Areas south of the city were under 20 inches (50 centimeters) or more. The Rochester area was closing in on a foot of snow.

Accumulations were lower in eastern parts of the state, but the heavy mix of snow and rain made traveling hazardous, especially in the high-elevation areas like the Catskill Mountains.


10 a.m.

The National Weather Service is warning of possible record high tides in Massachusetts from a nor'easter hitting the East Coast.

The service says seas could top 15.5 feet (4.7 meters) at a tidal gauge in Boston Harbor, but it is anticipating a high tide of 14.5 feet (4.4 meters) to 15.1 feet (4.6 meters) in the harbor.

A storm earlier this winter brought a record high tide of more than 15 feet (4.5 meters) to Boston.

Authorities are urging residents of coastal communities to be prepared to evacuate if necessary in advance of Friday's noon high tide. The National Weather Service says all of Rhode Island is under flood and high wind watches through Sunday morning.

Wind gusts exceeding 50 mph (80 kph) are expected as the storm moves up the Eastern Seaboard.


9:35 a.m.

President Donald Trump is traveling out of Dulles International Airport, rather than Andrews Air Force Base, because of the late-winter storm battering the East Coast.

Trump is heading Friday to North Carolina for the Rev. Billy Graham's funeral. He was scheduled to leave out of Dulles midmorning.

Trump usually travels out of Andrews, but his departure location was moved due to high winds in the area.

A major nor'easter was starting to slam the East Coast with heavy rain, intermittent snow and strong winds.


9 a.m.

The front edge of the storm expected to pound the East Coast dropped as much as a foot of snow on parts of northeast Ohio, with heavy winds leading to power outages and school closings.

Cleveland-based National Weather Service meteorologist Marty Mullen says wind gusts from the storm passing through Thursday night into Friday morning reached 55 mph near the Lake Erie shoreline with sustained winds of 20-30 mph.

Mullen says areas in Ashtabula County in the far northeast corner of the state received 10-12 inches of wet, heavy snow while temperatures hovered around freezing. Areas west of Cleveland reportedly received less than an inch.

Winds caused power outages throughout the area with numerous school closings reported east of the city.


7:30 a.m.

The powerful coastal storm moving along the East Coast is set to bring high winds to New Jersey, where some rain is already switching to wet snow in some areas.

The National Weather Service says winds are expected to increase drastically during the day, peaking Friday afternoon. Gusts of 50 mph to 60 mph are expected, as are downed trees and power lines.

Some flights have already been canceled at Newark Liberty International Airport.

Significant snow accumulation is expected at higher elevations in northwest New Jersey and the Poconos.

The storm could take a chunk out of Jersey shore beaches that are still being repaired following damage from previous storms.

There's no guarantee that all the sand that washes away over the next few days will be replaced.


7:10 a.m.

The powerful coastal storm moving along the East Coast is bringing high winds to Pennsylvania, where some rain is already switching to snow in some areas.

The winds are expected to pick up Friday afternoon and continue into the evening. Some flights have already been canceled at Philadelphia's airport.

Gusts of up to 60 mph are possible. Property owners are being urged to secure items like trash cans and patio furniture.

The change from rain to wet snow during the evening rush could cause travel issues from Harrisburg to Allentown and Philadelphia, and officials urge drivers to be cautious.

The heaviest snow could fall in the Poconos and Lehigh Valley.

The storm is affecting the entire eastern seaboard, from New England all the way down to northern Georgia.


12:05 a.m.

A major Nor'easter is starting to slam the East Coast with heavy rain, intermittent snow and strong winds.

Gusts exceeding 50 mph are expected as the storm moves up the Eastern seaboard on Friday.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker has activated 200 National Guard members.

In New Jersey, officials are worried the storm could take a chunk out of beaches just south of Atlantic City that are still being repaired because of damage from previous storms.

Authorities are urging residents of coastal communities to be prepared to evacuate if necessary in advance of Friday morning's high tide.

The National Weather Service says all of Rhode Island is under flood and high wind watches from Friday through Sunday morning.

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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

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It also shows that, while the two officers involved ordered Clark to show them his hands, neither identified themselves as police officers.  Clark’s aunt, Saquoia Durham, told The Sacramento Bee that her nephew did not stand a chance. “As soon as they did the command, they started shooting,” Durham told the newspaper. “They said, ‘Put your hands up, gun’ and then they just let loose on my nephew. They didn’t give him a chance to put his hands up or anything, and then when they shot him down, they knew they messed up.” Family members and local activists also wondered why one of the videos shows, about six minutes after the shooting, an officer saying, “Hey, mute.” Officers are then seen muting the microphones on their body cameras for the rest of the recording released to the public.  A police spokesman told the Bee there are a number of reasons officers may choose to mute their microphones, but did not go into detail. The officers who shot at Clark said they believed he was armed, but all that was found with his body was a cellphone. The killing has sparked protests and demands from Clark’s family and friends, as well as Sacramento officials, for answers about why an unarmed man was killed outside his own home.  The Bee reported that the Rev. Al Sharpton has been in touch with Clark’s family and plans to travel to Sacramento to help ensure that Clark has a proper burial. The family has established a GoFundMe page to help fund his funeral arrangements, which include being buried next to a brother also cut down by gun violence, the Bee reported. >> Related: 20 bullets fired: Police kill unarmed black man holding cellphone in own backyard Clark’s grandparents and other family members were inside the house as the shooting took place. His grandfather called 911 after hearing the gunshots, and his grandmother, Sequita Thompson, said she only learned the dead man was her grandson when she looked out the window after hours of police questioning on what she heard that night.  “I opened that curtain and he was dead. I started screaming,” Thompson told the Bee.  The shooting and the events surrounding it are laid out in the audio and video released Wednesday night, beginning with a 911 call from a resident in Clark’s neighborhood. The caller tells a dispatcher that there is a man going through the neighborhood and breaking vehicle windows, including those on the caller’s truck.  “What did he use to break the windows?” the dispatcher asks. “I have no idea,” the man responds. “I heard the noise and I came outside and he was standing right there on the side of my truck, and I grabbed my ball bat … (unintelligible) … I didn’t hit him, or nothing like that.” The caller tells the dispatcher that the man is now in another yard, trying to get over a fence, but that he is trapped because of a neighbor’s dogs.  The dispatcher asks for a description of the man, and the caller tells her he could not determine the man’s race because of the dark hoodie he was wearing. The suspect was wearing pants that appeared to have white stripes or dots on them, he says.  During silent periods in the call, at least one dog can be heard barking in the background. The dispatcher continues to get the scant details of the vandal’s appearance: he’s tall, at more than 6 feet, and thin.  The dispatcher tells the caller that the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office is sending a helicopter to search for the man and keep an eye on him until city police officers arrive. The weekend was a busy one because of St. Patrick’s Day, she says.  The caller, a mechanic, tells the dispatcher that he keeps his tools in his truck, so the sound of his windows being broken alarmed him.  “He’s lucky to be alive, if I would have gotten a hold of him,” the caller says, laughing.  At that point in the 911 call, the officers who would shoot and kill Clark were about a block and a half away, according to the dispatcher.  Audio from the dispatch office gives a glance into the same time frame from the viewpoint of law enforcement officers. The dispatcher relays a description of the accused vandal, and a male voice from the helicopter overhead mentions two large dogs as the only heat sources he can see on the infrared camera.  A few minutes later, the deputy in the helicopter comes back on, telling the responding officers below he sees a man looking in the window of a home.  “Two yards to the south of you, I’ve got a guy in a backyard looking into their window,” the deputy says. “He’s picking up a -- looks like a toolbar, or some sort of thing. He might be trying to break the window. Stand by.” A moment later, the deputy says, “Okay, he’s breaking the window! Running south! Running to the south!” The footage from the circling helicopter does not show Clark smashing the window, but picks up immediately afterward. The deputy is relaying his movements as Clark, seen only as a white figure in the camera’s infrared vision, jumps onto what appears to be a shed and vaults over the fence into his grandparents’ yard.  At that point, he stops running and walks up to a vehicle between the fence and his grandparents’ home, briefly looking inside.  As the helicopter continues to circle, the two police officers on the ground can be seen on the road in front of Clark’s grandparents’ home. One of the officers spots Clark and begins to run toward him, gun drawn.  His partner follows and, as both officers run in his direction, Clark goes around the corner into the backyard of the house. Both officers follow, with one running into the open for a second before grabbing his partner and taking cover at the corner of the house.  The officers huddle there and, as the helicopter’s camera gets a full view of the backyard, shots can be seen fired from the officers’ guns.  Clark falls to the ground on his grandparents’ patio as the bullets ricochet off the pavement around him. He appears to try crawling away before becoming still.  “Shots fired! Shots fired!” the deputy in the helicopter says.  “Copy, shots fired,” the dispatcher responds.  One of the officers on the ground, sounding out of breath, tells the dispatcher that the man is down, with no movement. He requests that backup officers arrive from a specific direction and asks that fire medics be en route.  The officers have been criticized for waiting five minutes, until backup arrived, before rendering aid to Clark. Fire medics pronounced him dead at the scene.  At one point, the dispatcher asks the officers if they also need medics.  “Negative,” an officer responds. “Neither one of us are hit, we’re okay. Suspect’s down.” The footage from the officers’ body cameras prior to the gunfire starts out quiet, as they make their way through the neighborhood, searching for the man suspected of vandalizing people’s vehicles. In the videos, the officers are seen asking a neighbor’s permission to search her backyard for the man.  As they search, the dogs heard in the original 911 call are much closer. The officers clear a shed before heading back onto the street.  A few moments later, the officers begin running toward the area where the deputy in the helicopter spotted Clark looking into the vehicle window next to his grandparents’ house.  “Show me your hands! Show me your hands! Stop!” one officer screams at Clark when he spots him. He runs after Clark, who is heading around the corner toward the patio. As the officer rounds the corner, he again screams, “Show me your hands!” and, “Gun!” before pushing his partner back. As both officers huddle at the corner, the same officer yells, “Show me your hands! Gun! Gun! Gun!”  They then both open fire. See the body camera footage from both officers, beginning when they first spot Clark, below. Warning: The images and language may be disturbing for some readers. Footage from the second officer’s body camera shows his hands holding his service weapon around the corner of the house as he and his partner unleash a barrage of bullets. It is not clear from the location of his body camera, which would be attached to his chest, if the second officer could see who he was shooting at.  The second officer’s body camera captured the fiery blasts from his partner’s gun as the gunshots rang out.  “Five seven, shots fired,” the first officer breathlessly tells the dispatcher. “Subject down.” Over the next few minutes, the officers continue ordering Clark to show them his hands, with no response. The second officer says that Clark was “still pointing” when he saw him prior to the shooting. They both spend a few moments quietly trying to catch their breath, during which time the officers determine that neither of them was shot. The officers agree to do a “tactical reload,” a maneuver in which law enforcement officers reload recently-fired weapons with fresh, full magazines to ensure they don’t run out of ammunition. The second officer estimated that he fired his weapon about five times, though his body camera footage shows more. Hahn has previously said that each officer fired 10 times.  The second officer’s body camera footage shows that additional police officers began to show up about that time, with one officer asking if the suspect had a gun.  “We haven’t secured it,” the second officer said. “We’re not moving in until we have more (backup).” The first officer is also heard saying, “(Clark’s) still down, he’s not moving. We can’t see the gun.” >> Read more trending news The officers tell their colleagues that Clark walked toward them with his hands out in front of him and that he held something that looked like a gun.  As the officers speak, their flashlights highlight Clark’s body, lying face-down on the patio. They continue to search from a distance for a gun. They also continue to try to get a response from Clark.  “Hey, can you hear us?” one officer yells.  “We need to know if you’re okay,” a female officer says. “We need to get you medics, but we can’t go over there to get you help unless we know you don’t have your weapon.” They continue trying to speak to the motionless Clark as sirens are heard in the background.  “Sir, can you move?” the female officer asks. “Can you hear us?” At least one officer keeps a gun trained on Clark the entire time and, for a few moments, the second of the first two officers on the scene suggests firing a non-lethal weapon at his body to ensure he isn’t faking unconsciousness, the footage shows. It does not appear that the officers did so. A few minutes later, the footage shows the officers finally approaching Clark’s body.  “Hey, if one of you guys want to go hands, cover him … oh, (expletive),” the second officer says as they get to Clark. The body camera shows the edge of something flat and light-colored peeking out from underneath his body. As they handcuff his limp hands behind his back and turn him over to start CPR, their flashlights show what the item is. It is the iPhone Clark was carrying.