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The Latest National News

    Florida prisons were placed on lockdown Thursday following reports of security threats.  >> Read more trending news The Florida Department of Corrections announced that it canceled weekend visitation at all institutions for Saturday and Sunday because of a possible security threat. Correction officials said they received information that indicated small groups of inmates at several institutions would try to disrupt prison operations. The lockdown affects more than 97,000 inmates in Florida’s 151 correctional facilities, including major institutions, work camps and annex facilities. The move affects recreational and educational programs, but inmates are not confined to their cells, officials said. The cancellation does not apply to work release centers, department officials said.  
  • A Cleveland father is upset after he says his son was left on the school bus for hours on his first day of classes. WJW reported that Trevelle Hargrove’s 6-year-old son, Trevelle Jr.,  has special needs. Hargrove said his son fell asleep on the bus. >> Read more trending news Trevelle Jr.  said he was found after he honked the horn of the bus and jumped up and down. A spokesperson for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District said Trevelle Jr. fell asleep on the bus Monday and was there for less than an hour. His father says otherwise. “After an hour and they couldn't tell me what was going on I started to get extremely worried,” Hargrove told WJW. 'I couldn't understand why no one could tell me where my son was.” Hargrove said his son was back four hours later, at 6:30 p.m. “You can’t just forget to do things,” he said. “This isn’t like a normal job where you forget to put the straw in the bag or you forget to clock in or whatever it is you do at a normal job. You can’t do that when it comes to kids.” Hargrove said his son won’t be riding the bus again any time soon. The district is is investigating. Cleveland Metropolitan Schools Chief Communications Officer Roseann Canfora issued the following statement to WJW: “Drivers are trained to follow strict protocols for inspecting every seat at the beginning and end of their routes, and CMSD has a zero tolerance for any violation of these safety guidelines.” The bus driver has resigned. WJW reported they may be terminated pending the outcome of the district’s investigation.
  • Authorities said a terror attack in Barcelona claimed at least 13 lives on Thursday and left 80 others injured after a van slammed into pedestrians on Barcelona's popular La Rambla street. >> Read more trending news Mossos d'Esquadra, the Catalonia police force, confirmed the attack in a Twitter post around 5:10 p.m. local time.
  • Officials scoured the waters off the coast of Hawaii for a second night Wednesday in search of five soldiers who were on board a U.S. Army helicopter Tuesday night when it went down during a training exercise. >> Read more trending news Two UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters were conducting a nighttime training mission around 9:30 p.m. local time on Tuesday when one of the helicopters lost contact with the other, according to the 25th Infantry Division. Officials with the U.S. Coast Guard said the helicopter crews were participating in a training exercise between Kaena Point, off the coast of Oahu, and Dillingham Airfield. A search was immediately launched. 'As we do this work, the soldiers and their families are in the forefront of our minds,” Lt. Col. Curtis Kellogg, a spokesman for the 25th Infantry Division, told The Associated Press. “That's what we're doing this for.” Officials did not identify the soldiers on board the UH-60 when it went down, although Kellogg told the AP the helicopter had two pilots and three crew members on board and that the Army had notified their families. Police confirmed to East Kentucky Broadcasting that Letcher County, Kentucky, native Abigail Milam was among the missing. In a news release obtained by the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Maj. Gen. Christopher Cavoli, commander of the 25th Infantry Division, said the families of the missing crew members are being kept up-to-date on the search efforts. “Our thoughts and prayers are with our missing soldiers and their families. They can count on our full support during this difficult time,” Cavoli said. “We are proud of their loved ones’ service and will bring them home.” Army and Coast Guard officials spotted a debris field just before 11:30 p.m. Tuesday near Oahu’s Kaena Point, according to Coast Guard officials. >> Related: 5 missing after Army helicopter reported down off coast of Hawaii Honolulu Fire Department search and rescue crews found and collected pieces of helicopter fuselage and a helmet in a debris field about 2 miles off Kaena Point on Oahu. The search later moved to an area about 5 miles offshore where currents moving in different directions converge. Officials closed the state park at Kaena Point while the search was underway. Kaena is a remote spot northwest of Honolulu where Oahu's northern and western coasts meet to form a small peninsula. The park's sandy coastline is home to a seabird colony and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Multiple agencies have joined the Coast Guard and the Army’s search efforts, including the Navy, Honolulu Fire Department and Honolulu Ocean Rescue, the Star-Advertiser reported.  The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A Texas man faces multiple charges after police say he beat his girlfriend because someone else ate some of the brownies she had baked for him. Jason Eric Gonzales, 35, of Odessa, is charged with continuous violence/assault against a family member causing bodily injury and retaliation, as well as failure to pay child support, according to KOSA-TV in Odessa.  The news station reported that Odessa police officers were called July 16 to a local hospital, where they found a 42-year-old assault victim. The woman told police she had baked brownies for Gonzales, her boyfriend. >> Read more trending news Another person ate some of the chocolatey treats, which angered Gonzales, police officials said. He allegedly retaliated by punching his girlfriend several times in the chest and kicking her in the ankle, causing a serious injury.  A witness confirmed what happened, the news station reported.  KOSA-TV reported that the woman has filed assault complaints against Gonzales multiple times in the past. He was accused of assault against her at least twice in the past 12 months.  In one instance, Gonzales allegedly threatened to kill the woman and her family for filing a complaint about a previous assault, the news station said. 
  • President Donald Trump on Thursday again criticized recent decisions to remove Confederate monuments across the country, calling the moves “so foolish” and the monuments irreplaceable. >> Read more trending news “Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monuments,” Trump wrote in the first of a series of tweets. “You can’t change history, but you can learn from it.” He echoed comments he made at a fiery news conference in New York earlier this week, in which he wondered whether monuments remembering former presidents George Washington or Thomas Jefferson would be next to fall. >> Related: Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville  “The beauty that is being taken out of our cities, towns and parks will be greatly missed and never able to be comparably replaced!” the president wrote. His comments came amid continued criticism from across the political spectrum over his insistence that “both sides” were to blame for deadly, racially-charged violence that took place over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. >> Related: Heather Heyer's parents preach love, action after daughter's death: 'You just magnified her' Police said 32-year-old Heather Heyer was killed Saturday during a counterprotest of a rally organized by white supremacists. The rally was aimed at protesting the removal of a Confederate statue from the city’s Emancipation Park. Authorities arrested James Alex Fields Jr., 20, on charges including second-degree murder and malicious wounding in connection with Heyer’s death. Police said he slammed a car into two stopped vehicles and rammed counterprotesters. Fields, from Ohio, participated in the rally and was described by a former high school teacher as a fan of Adolf Hitler.
  • A Florida woman was arrested Tuesday after a school resource officer at a Fort Myers middle school spotted her snorting cocaine as she sat in the parent pickup line at the school, police said.  WBBH reported that Christina Hester, 39, of Fort Myers, was sitting in her car when a school resource officer, who was standing near a second-floor window, saw her using what appeared to be a credit card to chop up a white substance on the back of her cellphone case. The officer said he then saw her use a straw to snort the substance. The SRO, who is also a Lee County sheriff’s deputy, asked Hester to come to his office until school dismissal was over, according to WFTX in Cape Coral. At that point, he got her purse out of her car and performed a field test on the substance, which indicated it was cocaine.  The baggie of cocaine weighed about half a gram, the news station reported.  Lee County jail records show that Hester was booked on charges of felony cocaine possession and possession of drug paraphernalia, which is a misdemeanor. Her bond was set at $6,500.  She was released after posting bond.  >> Read more trending news Parents and students at Lexington Middle were equally shocked by the arrest.  “She’s responsible for other people’s lives, and she’s driving a car where my kids are walking, and other kids,” parent Katie Lindsay told WBBH. “Just (a) lack of responsibility.” Sara Millican, 13, told WFTX that the incident was “crazy.” “People come to school to learn, and not to see people doing drugs in their cars,” Sara told the news station. “Like, why would anyone do that? Especially when there’s kids of all ages here.” It was not immediately clear if Hester is the parent of a child or children at the school. 
  • A 17-year-old Texas girl who stepped up during a family emergency has earned praise from social media users across the globe after a tender photo of her with her baby brother went viral.  Candice Curry, of San Antonio, told ABC News that a family emergency kept her and her husband from being able to pick up 3-year-old James from his school on May 25. They called their teen daughter, Stiles Parish, and asked her to step in for them.  Curry said it was the first time they’d asked Stiles to pick up one of her younger siblings.  “I figured she had gone to get him, and (had) taken him home,” Curry told ABC News. “Later that day, I saw the picture on her Instagram and realized that she had taken him back to school.” >> Read more trending news Stiles, who is studying to become a nurse, took James back to class with her. In the Instagram photo, which bore the caption, “Take your kid to school,” James is sleeping peacefully in his big sister’s arms as she listens to the day’s lesson.  “She told me that she didn’t want to be counted absent, and that she didn’t want to miss any work,” Curry said of her daughter. “She not only helped our family out, but returned to her responsibility at school.” The teacher was unfazed by Stiles’ small guest, Curry said.  The mom, who said the photo “made (her) heart want to explode,” soon shared the image on her own Facebook page, where it received thousands of reactions and was shared across the social media platform.  “I'm not sure on the legalities here or what kind of rules were broken but I also just don't care,” Curry wrote in the Facebook post. “My sweet teenager helped her family out and returned to her other responsibility while snuggling her baby brother.  “I'm either the worst mom in the world or totally nailing it. Please don't tell me which one. Let me live in ignorant bliss while I stare at this picture.  “Life is short. These are the moments that make it so incredibly sweet.” Curry told ABC News that the photo showed her that despite the 14-year age difference between the two siblings, they still have a close bond.  “The fact that he is sleeping so comfortably on her in the middle of a class full of teenagers tells me how much he trusts her,” Curry said. “As a mom, it makes me so thankful that they have this kind of relationship, and I pray it will always stay that way.”
  • Update:  Sen. Lindsey Graham has responded to President Donald Trump’s tweets Thursday morning. Graham, also using Twitter as a forum, has challenged the president, saying, “Mr. President, like most I seek to move our nation, my state and our party forward - toward the light - not back to the darkness.” Original story: President Donald Trump took to Twitter early Thursday to respond to the backlash over his comments on the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, slamming Sen. Lindsey Graham and the media. >> Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville 'Publicity seeking Lindsey Graham falsely stated that I said there is moral equivalency between the KKK, neo-Nazis & white supremacists ... and people like Ms. Heyer,' he wrote, referring to Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman killed Saturday while protesting the white supremacist Unite the Right rally. 'Such a disgusting lie. He just can't forget his election trouncing. The people of South Carolina will remember!' Trump added: 'The public is learning (even more so) how dishonest the Fake News is. They totally misrepresent what I say about hate, bigotry etc. Shame!' On Wednesday, Graham, R-S.C., issued the following statement: 'Mr. President, I encourage you to try to bring us together as a nation after this horrific event in Charlottesville. Your words are dividing Americans, not healing them,' Graham said, according to CNN. 'Through his statements yesterday, President Trump took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist neo-Nazis and KKK members who attended the Charlottesville rally and people like Ms. Heyer.' >> Read more trending news In a news conference Tuesday, Trump blamed 'both sides' for the violence. “You had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists,' he said. 'The press has treated them absolutely unfairly.” He added: 'You also had some very fine people on both sides.
  • A 13-year-old boy found dead in June in New Jersey died from a deadly mixture of heroin and fentanyl, the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office has announced in a press release. According to KYW, how the teen, Vincent Weiner, came into possession of the drugs is unclear. His mother, Jamie Lund, pleaded for the public to find answers about who is supplying such young children with deadly drugs. “Anyone, anyone who has any information on where he got it, please please please contact me or Chief Leusner or [any] of the officers of the Middle Township Police Department. Whoever is supplying these babies with drugs, needs to be stopped!” Lund wrote in a Facebook post. “My heart is broken, shattered into a million pieces. Thank you all for your continued support.” >> Mom shares heartbreaking photo after daughter dies from heroin overdose The Middle Township Middle School student was found unresponsive in bed on June 4 in a Rio Grande home, Ocean City Patch reported. Lund said her son had been bullied in the weeks leading up to his death. He was on his school’s wrestling team and was a Cub Scout. “The two weeks or so prior [to Vincent’s death] there had been unusual behavior at school, it was discovered that he had been cutting [himself to self-harm],” Lund told news station WCAU. “And stories of bullying in school began to surface.” >> Doctor saves woman overdosing on flight Fentanyl is showing up more and more in overdose deaths as a drug being mixed with heroin. The prosecutor’s office said in a news release that fentanyl is an extremely powerful and deadly controlled substance, approximately 100 times more potent than heroin. Fentanyl is legally available in different forms such as intravenous injections, skin patches, dissolving oral films, lozenges or pills. In its most common illegal use, the substance is converted into a powdered form by drug distributors and mixed at dangerous and unmeasured levels with heroin, authorities said. >> Read more trending news According to Cape May County Prosecutor Robert Taylor, there has been an increase in the number of heroin bags submitted to the county, which have tested positive for the presence of fentanyl, WCAU reported. Prosecutors said in their statement that “no one is immune from this epidemic, whether young or old.”

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Florida prisons were placed on lockdown Thursday following reports of security threats.  >> Read more trending news The Florida Department of Corrections announced that it canceled weekend visitation at all institutions for Saturday and Sunday because of a possible security threat. Correction officials said they received information that indicated small groups of inmates at several institutions would try to disrupt prison operations. The lockdown affects more than 97,000 inmates in Florida’s 151 correctional facilities, including major institutions, work camps and annex facilities. The move affects recreational and educational programs, but inmates are not confined to their cells, officials said. The cancellation does not apply to work release centers, department officials said.  
  • A group of storms east of the Caribbean has developed into Tropical Storm Harvey.   Harvey is approaching the Lesser Antilles and it is forecast to continue traveling west, officially arriving in the Caribbean Friday afternoon. It has been given a 100 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next two days.   It’s also expected to become a hurricane by Monday morning. At this point it is no threat to Florida.   “We have entered the peak of Hurricane season, which is mid-August through late October,” said Dennis Feltgen, spokesman for the National Hurricane Center.
  • A Cleveland father is upset after he says his son was left on the school bus for hours on his first day of classes. WJW reported that Trevelle Hargrove’s 6-year-old son, Trevelle Jr.,  has special needs. Hargrove said his son fell asleep on the bus. >> Read more trending news Trevelle Jr.  said he was found after he honked the horn of the bus and jumped up and down. A spokesperson for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District said Trevelle Jr. fell asleep on the bus Monday and was there for less than an hour. His father says otherwise. “After an hour and they couldn't tell me what was going on I started to get extremely worried,” Hargrove told WJW. 'I couldn't understand why no one could tell me where my son was.” Hargrove said his son was back four hours later, at 6:30 p.m. “You can’t just forget to do things,” he said. “This isn’t like a normal job where you forget to put the straw in the bag or you forget to clock in or whatever it is you do at a normal job. You can’t do that when it comes to kids.” Hargrove said his son won’t be riding the bus again any time soon. The district is is investigating. Cleveland Metropolitan Schools Chief Communications Officer Roseann Canfora issued the following statement to WJW: “Drivers are trained to follow strict protocols for inspecting every seat at the beginning and end of their routes, and CMSD has a zero tolerance for any violation of these safety guidelines.” The bus driver has resigned. WJW reported they may be terminated pending the outcome of the district’s investigation.
  • Authorities said a terror attack in Barcelona claimed at least 13 lives on Thursday and left 80 others injured after a van slammed into pedestrians on Barcelona's popular La Rambla street. >> Read more trending news Mossos d'Esquadra, the Catalonia police force, confirmed the attack in a Twitter post around 5:10 p.m. local time.
  • Many scientists and groups across the U.S. aren’t taking Monday’s eclipse for granted - they want to learn things! There will be lots of experiments happening during the 90-minute event.  Here are just a few: 1. The eclipse movie - Volunteers from national labs and education groups will track the sun along its path using identical telescopes, which will take continuous digital pictures.  The pictures will be later spliced together to make a 90-minute movie.  So don’t fret if you can’t watch on Monday! 2. Sounds - college students at Tennessee’s Austin Peay State University, along with NASA< will measure the sound of the eclipse by setting up low-frequency radio experiments in bean fields.  They’ll capture the noise the eclipse creates and figure out how its different from normal conditions. 3. Animal behavior - Also at Austin Peay State University, scientists will be watching how crickets and cows act when the Moon covers the sun and darkens the sky.  During a solar eclipse in 1991, spiders were seen taking down their webs.  4. Solar flares - We know solar flares happen when the sun’s magnetic field causes a brief burst of intense radiation, but we don’t know enough to protect our technology from them.  During the eclipse, a group of scientists in Wyoming will attempt to take some measurements of the sun’s outer atmosphere.  Usually the sun is too bright to do this, but the eclipse should provide a good view. Want to watch the eclipse?  CLICK HERE to see where you can get free glasses.