ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day Created with Sketch.
85°
Clear
H 94° L 73°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    85°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 94° L 73°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    91°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Sunny. H 94° L 73°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    88°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 95° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest National News

    A pair of protective hawks has residents in one central Florida neighborhood ducking and running for cover this week. The birds are attacking people who get too near their nests in Oviedo in suburban Orlando, local news outlets reported. >> Read more trending news It hits me on the side of the head, not just hit, but grabbed, knocked me to the ground. I had to kind of shake my head loose,' resident Beverly Bonadonna told WPLG-TV.  'At that point, I started screaming for my husband ... then it flew away, it finally let go. >> Related: Man allegedly stuffed puppies into pillow cases, left them in drain Bonadonna had to go to the hospital for treatment of puncture wounds and a tetanus shot, but she said more than anything she was terrified during the attack. 'I have never been attacked by one; never even considered that I could be. I have never, I mean, they swoop real low over our head but never considered it was really a possibility,' she told WPLG. Bonadonna isn’t the only victim. Another resident in the same neighborhood, Don Cochran, has a hawk nest in tree next to his house and has been attacked twice. 'He scratched me right in the back of the head, but if you weren't thinking about him, he could have knocked you down because he weighs about 5, 6 pounds,' Cochran said.' >> Related: Florida Fish and Wildlife searches for monkey on the loose Cochran says he now uses an umbrella to go to the mailbox and hasn’t been attacked since. Hawks and their nests are protected under Florida law and can’t be moved or harmed.  Sarah Elsesser contributed to this story.
  • President Donald Trump has put a distinctive Florida stamp on his first 100 days in office by making seven trips to his Mar-a-Lago estate, mixing golf, statecraft and controversy. >> Read more trending news Trump has spent more time on presidential getaways than Barack Obama did in his first 100 days but not as much time away from the Washington as George W. Bush did at the beginning of his presidency. Much of the time Bush and Obama spent away from the White House in their first 100 days was at Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland that’s a short helicopter ride from Washington. Trump has yet to visit Camp David.  >> Related: Top galleries from President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office  Presidents routinely take breaks from Washington, but University of Virginia political scientist Larry Sabato says Trump’s early treks to Florida are different. “Here’s what’s unusual about it — it’s that he’s had such a concentrated period of travel in total during the first 100 days. Most presidents stick very close to the White House during that time. If they go anywhere, they go to Camp David,” said Sabato.  >> Related: President Trump’s first 100 tweets Trump as president has logged 419¼ hours — about 17½ days — in Palm Beach County, primarily at Mar-a-Lago and his nearby Trump International Golf Club in unincorporated West Palm Beach, according to a new Palm Beach Post analysis.  But how does that time compare to past presidents? Read the complete story from The Palm Beach Post.
  • A Kentucky doctor who made headlines earlier this month when he was dragged off a United Airlines flight in Chicago has settled with the airline, attorneys said Thursday in a news release. >> Read more trending stories Dr. David Dao suffered numerous injuries when he was dragged off a flight bound for Kentucky on April 9 after refusing to give up his seat. The confrontation between Dao, 69, and three Chicago Department of Aviation officers was caught on video by passengers on the flight. The footage quickly spread on social media. >> Related: United passenger suffered broken nose, teeth while being dragged from plane Attorneys for Dao declined to share details of the settlement, citing a confidentiality provision in the agreement. Attorney Thomas Demetrio praised Oscar Munoz, CEO of United's parent company, in a statement. 'Mr. Munoz said he was going to do the right thing, and he has,' Demetrio said. 'In addition, United has taken full responsibility for what happened on Flight 3411, without attempting to blame others, including the city of Chicago. For this acceptance of corporate accountability, United is to be applauded.' Dao was hospitalized for days after the incident on Flight 3411 with injuries that included a severe concussion, a broken nose and an unspecified injury to his sinuses. He lost two front teeth in the scuffle, Demetrio said. 'Dr. Dao has become the unintended champion for the adoption of changes which will certainly help improve the lives of literally millions of travelers,' Demetrio said. The settlement was reached on the same day United announced policy changes aimed at preventing a similar situation from happening to other passengers. Among the changes was the announcement that the airline will offer travelers as much as $10,000 to give up their seats on overbooked flights. >> Related:United unveils 10 policy changes, will pay bumped passengers up to $10,000 Previously, the airline would offer up to $1,350, according to Bloomberg. A number of other airlines also announced policy changes aimed at offering passengers more incentive to delay flights in cases of overbooking and to ensure that they are not taken off planes after boarding. United's response in the immediate aftermath of the confrontation was widely criticized. Munoz first defended the airline and described Dao as 'belligerent' before publicly apologizing days later and vowing to do better. The officers who pulled Dao from the United flight were placed on leave after the incident. >> Related: Police who dragged passenger from United flight stand by use of force The agency released a report on Monday in which the officer who pulled Dao from his seat, James Long, gave his version of events. Long said Dao was verbally and physically abusive and was flailing his arms before he lost his balance and struck his mouth on an armrest. The department's roughly 300 officers guard the city's two main airports but are not part of the regular Chicago police force. They receive less training than police officers do and cannot carry guns inside the terminals. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A handicapped Iowa man has received an apology from a store at which employees forced him to “walk” out of the store on his knees after confiscating the store-provided electric cart he was using.  Shane Zahn, a Garner resident who is missing his right foot, had completed his shopping at Mills Fleet Farm in Mason City and was attempting to take the cart out to his vehicle when he was stopped and told he could not use the cart in the parking lot.  “After I got out of the store, right in front of the door I was told I was not allowed to take the wheelchair out into the parking lot, and I said 'Huh?'” Zahn told KIMT News 3 in Mason City. “I said, 'I’ve done this before.' She said, ‘The wheelchair is to not be out. It needs to come back in.’ I said, 'What am I supposed to do, crawl out of the store?’” Ultimately, that’s what Zahn did, after returning all of the items he had purchased. He also had his son record his exit, which he posted to Facebook.  “Paid for all my items and went to leave, was told I couldn't use the wheelchair to go to the car,” Zahn wrote in the Facebook post. “Returned all my items and had to walk out on my hands and knees. Just trying to make people aware of how Fleet Farm treats handicapped customers.” >> Read more trending stories The photos and video footage exploded across social media, with more than 112,000 people sharing it, more than 36,000 people reacting to it and another 11,000 commenting on Zahn’s post as of Thursday morning. While most were horrified and sympathetic, some people questioned Zahn’s story, with one commenter asking how he got into the store in the first place.  Zahn told KIMT 3 News that his son dropped him off in front of the store before parking the car. He said he usually brings in his own manual wheelchair, except in stores like Fleet Farm that have electric ones for customers’ use.  Another man questioned Zahn’s handicap. “He’s not handicapped. If he was, he wouldn’t be walking on his knees so well,” the man wrote on Zahn’s post.  Others in the Facebook thread jumped to Zahn’s defense, pointing out that the video shows the right leg of his pants trailing on the floor where his foot and part of his leg should be.  “He’s missing a foot. Your knees still work without a foot,” one woman said.  Fleet Farm acknowledged the incident in a post on the company’s own Facebook page, admitting that an employee refused to allow Zahn to use the cart to access his car.  “While use of carts in the parking lot with the uneven terrain can pose a hazard, we feel that in this instance our team member made the wrong decision,” Fleet Farm CEO Wayne Sales said in the statement. “We apologize to the customer and to everyone who may be affected.” Sales told KIMT 3 News that, although the company has policies and guidelines in place to protect customers from accidents with the electric carts in the parking lots, those guidelines do not include denying customers the use of the carts.  Sales said the company failed to live up to its values and that employees “should have gone the extra mile and helped the customer use the cart to return to his vehicle after shopping.” He said the company wants to “make things right” with Zahn, though he did not say what that would entail.  Mills Fleet Farm is a chain of 35 stores across Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and North Dakota that sell sporting goods, lawn and garden supplies, hardware, clothing and other general merchandise, according to its website. 
  • An Ohio man is in federal custody, facing charges related to attempting to provide material support to terrorist group ISIS. FBI agents on the Joint Terrorism Task Force on Wednesday arrested Laith Waleed Alebbini, 26, at Cincinnati/Kentucky International Airport. Alebbini was on his way to Syria to join ISIS fighters, the FBI said. >> Read more trending news Authorities said in a news release that Alebbini is accused of attempting to “provide material support or resources to the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), a designated foreign terrorist organization.”  Alebbini arrived in the United States in July 2014 on a student visa from Jordan, according to the affidavit. Alebbini was arrested on Jan. 10 for unlawful entry into the Turkish Embassy in Washington, D.C., but the charges were dismissed.  Alebbini refused to say why he was on the property, but said, “You are going to regret this” when he was escorted from the property, authorities said.  He attempted to travel to Turkey via Amsterdam on Jan. 12, but was denied because his Jordanian passport had expired. He carried only a backpack and did not check luggage, according to the affidavit. He returned to the U.S. on Jan. 15. Alebbini, a citizen of Jordan and a legal permanent resident of the U.S. as of April 2014, will appear Thursday afternoon in federal court in Dayton. >> See the latest on WHIO.com
  • Connie Dabate’s Fitbit did more than record her daily activity on the last day of her life. Police allege that the fitness tracker implicated her husband in her 2015 shooting death. Richard Dabate, 40, of Ellington, Connecticut, was arrested earlier this month and charged with murder in his 39-year-old wife’s Dec. 23, 2015, slaying. He is also charged with tampering with evidence and filing a false statement, according to the Hartford Courant.  Dabate is free after posting a $1 million bond, the Courant reported.  Dabate’s arrest warrant, obtained by People magazine, said Dabate told police that a masked man broke into their home the morning of the slaying and that he walked in on him after returning home from work to retrieve his laptop and because he got a text message saying that the home’s alarm system had been activated.  Dabate claimed that he was struggling with the intruder when his wife came home from working out at the YMCA, and that he screamed for her to run. The masked man chased her into the basement and shot her to death before he could stop him, Dabate said.  Dabate said the man subdued him, tied him to a chair and tortured him by burning him with a blowtorch and stabbing him with a box cutter. He said he was able to grab the torch and burn the intruder’s face, causing him to flee the house. Dabate said he pressed a panic button on the house alarm and called for help, People reported.  Dabate’s leg and arm were attached to a chair with zip ties when police arrived.  The Courant reported that investigators were skeptical of Dabate’s story from the beginning. No one showed up at any medical clinic or hospital in the area with burns to the face, and police tracking dogs picked up only Dabate’s scent outside the house.  One dog tracked Dabate’s scent to the ambulance that took him for treatment of his own wounds, which were described as superficial.  The couple’s house showed no signs of a struggle and nothing was taken, the newspaper reported. Dabate’s wallet was found in the grass behind the home, but nothing was missing from it.  Evidence from Connie Dabate’s Fitbit, along with cellphone and computer records and house alarm logs, also contradicted Richard Dabate’s story, police said. The fitness tracker showed that she was alive and moving for nearly an hour after her husband claimed that she was dead.  The warrant obtained by Peopleand by the Courant included this timeline: 8:46 a.m.: Connie Dabate’s Fitbit showed that she left for a fitness class at the YMCA. 9:01 a.m.: Richard Dabate logged into a computer at his home. He sent his supervisor an email three minutes later saying that the house alarm had activated and he had to return home to check on it. Records showed that the email was sent from his laptop, not from his phone as he drove, as he told police.  9:18 a.m.: Richard Dabate visited the website of the YMCA where his wife worked out, looking at the group exercise schedule. He visited the ESPN website two minutes later, the last time he used his computer that morning.  At that same time, Connie Dabate used her cellphone to make a call. Surveillance cameras at the YMCA showed that she had left the building at that point.  9:23 a.m.: Connie Dabate’s Fitbit registered her moving around after remaining idle for the nine-minute drive home. At the same time, the house’s alarm system registered the garage door opening as she arrived home. According to her husband’s statements to police, the intruder was already inside. 9:40 to 9:46 a.m.: Connie Dabate’s Facebook page showed that she posted videos to her page, using her iPhone, from inside the home. She also messaged a friend through Facebook.  Her Fitbit last recorded her movements at 10:05 a.m., and the device showed that she had walked a total of 1,217 feet since arriving home. Investigators on the case found that it would have taken her no more than 125 feet to walk from her car to the basement, where she was killed, People said.  10:11 a.m.: The panic alarm for the couple’s security system was activated from Richard Dabate’s keychain fob, the Courant reported. Despite Dabate’s claim that the alarm had activated earlier that morning, the security company shows only the 10:11 a.m. alarm that day. 10:16 a.m.: Connecticut state police received a 911 call from the alarm company. Richard Dabate called 911 four minutes later.  >> Read more trending stories An in-depth report by the Courant showed that the Dabates’ marriage was marked by secrets, including the fact that Richard Dabate had a girlfriend whom he had gotten pregnant. Friends interviewed by Connecticut state police investigators said Connie Dabate never indicated that she knew of the affair or the pregnancy.  She also never talked about divorce, the friends said. Police found, however, that Richard Dabate texted his girlfriend a month before the homicide, assuring her that the couple had discussed divorce and were “on the same page.”  He told the woman that they were “getting a slow-moving divorce to make it easier on the kids.” A day after that text to her husband’s girlfriend, Connie Dabate sent her husband a photo of herself wearing lingerie, telling him, “I’m ready for u big boy,” the Courant reported.  While Connie Dabate’s friends knew nothing about a divorce, a friend of Richard Dabate’s told police that Richard had confided in him about the affair and pregnancy. Dabate told the man that he was afraid Connie would divorce him.  When police confronted Richard Dabate about the pregnancy, Dabate told them that he and Connie wanted to have another child, but that she couldn’t get pregnant, the Courant said. He said his wife was all right with his girlfriend’s pregnancy and planned to “co-parent” the child.  Detectives found evidence that the Dabate marriage was troubled even before the affair and pregnancy. A note on Connie Dabate’s cellphone from December 2014 -- a year before she was killed -- listed reasons why she wanted to divorce her husband.  Those reasons included him “(acting) like a kid constantly,” being uncaring toward her, being an unfit parent and taking money “from a lot of accounts that don’t belong to him,” the Courant reported.  The investigation into Connie Dabate’s death showed that Richard Dabate attempted to cash in his wife’s $475,000 life insurance policy five days after she died, but the insurance company denied his claim. Dabate stopped making payments on his own life insurance policy two years before the shooting.  A month after Connie Dabate’s death, Richard Dabate withdrew more than $90,000 from a Fidelity investment account that belonged to his wife. 
  • A 1-year-old boy was found wandering in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, after his mother overdosed in a car, WPXI learned. Police said the boy’s mother, Marissa Bailey, overdosed on Harrison Street. The boy was then able to get out of the car and wander around. >> Read more trending news Video surfaced on social media of police and paramedics responding to the scene where Bailey was found slumped over. “If this isn’t a lesson to her, well then she’s in for a ruder awakening. She might not be so lucky next time, and my grandson might not be so lucky either,” Terri Letner, the boy’s paternal grandmother, said. “It just broke my heart, and I haven’t been able to keep myself together since.” Bailey is charged with endangering the welfare of a child. Police said she admitted to being on heroin and crack, and she hadn't slept in three days. WPXI learned that drug charges were filed in June 2014 against Bailey by Glassport police. She pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced to six months’ probation.
  • “Narcan parties” are starting to pop up and WPXI has learned that they are becoming a trend in Pennsylvania. According to investigators, addicts and dealers are taking advantage of the heroin-reversal drug by having parties where they sell heroin and Narcan as a package deal. >> Read more trending news  'You can party and use the opioids to whatever degree you want, and with the intent that you can be saved by the use of the Narcan,' Chief Jack Soberick of the Landsford, Pennsylania police said. >>Click here for a list of states where Narcan is available over the counter Police stressed that while Narcan does save lives, it is not a guarantee. WPXI looked learned that Pittsburgh paramedics used Narcan on 2,300 overdose patients in 2016. That's nearly double from the year before.
  • A semi in Tacoma hit a stroller with a baby sitting inside it while her family walked on the sidewalk. The baby and her 3-year-old sister had to be pulled out from under the truck. >> Read more trending news The 3-year-old was in serious condition at Mary Bridge Children's Hospital. The mother and baby suffered minor injuries, police said. Police report the driver did not see the family as he was about to leave the parking lot. 
  • A North Carolina Army veteran and her soldier boyfriend are facing animal cruelty charges after they allegedly tied her PTSD therapy dog to a tree and filmed themselves shooting and killing the animal. According to the Fayetteville Observer, Marinna Rollins, 23, and Jarren Heng, 25, laughed on video as they shot Rollins' dog, Cam, with a rifle, said Cumberland County District Attorney Clark Reaves. >> Read more trending news Rollins shot Cam, previously named Huey, in the head before firing at him multiple times, the arrest warrant said. Heng also shot the dog on video, the Observer reported. Rollins, who retired from the Army earlier this year for medical reasons, implied in an April 17 Facebook post that she had found a new home for Cam, the Observer reported. 'Sad he has to go, but he will be much happier where he is heading off to,' she wrote, to which Heng replied, 'He's gonna have such a great new life,' according to the Observer. Bail was set for $25,000 each for the pair. Read more here.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • As if traffic on I-4 near the attractions isn't enough on it's own, a depression opened up in the median near World Drive Thursday, causing additional slow downs.   As emergency personnel arrived to investigated the incident, drivers slowed down to get a better look as well.   The depression, which is about 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep, was reported just before 5 p.m. rush.   The Florida Department of Transportation was evaluating the situation and had not released any information on what would be done to mitigate the depression.   No other details were immediately released.
  • Prosecutors are building a money trail of deposits, withdrawals, and lavish spending allegedly benefiting former Congresswoman Corrine Brown, through the testimony of an FBI Special Agent. But Brown’s defense says, at no time, did she have control of the account in question. Deputy Chief of the Department of Justice Public Integrity Section Criminal Division Eric Olshan’s questioning of FBI Special Agent Vanessa Stelly has spanned two days of Brown’s federal fraud trial. Stelly was assigned to this investigation as part of her work in the white collar crime division. She told the court she had worked through bank and business records for Brown, as well as the alleged sham charity One Door For Education, which Brown and a few others are accused of funneling money through. Stelly confirmed that at no time was One Door registered in either Virginia- where it was incorporated as a business- or Florida to solicit charitable donations as a 501(c)(3) organization. One Door’s President, Carla Wiley, opened a bank account for the organization in 2011, but it closed about a year later because of a negative balance. Wiley opened another account with a $250 initial deposit, and there was no activity until August 2012, when Stelly says there was a $25,000 check deposited by a Political Action Committee based in Virginia. That PAC is backed by a lobbying firm where Brown’s daughter, Shantrel Brown, works. Corrine and Shantrel Brown share a home in Virginia. One of the points that prosecutors are trying to hammer in is that there was a habit of using One Door donations for the personal expenses of Brown and a few others. To do that, Olshan first walked Stelly through repeated instances where bank records show hundreds of dollars at a time being taken from the One Door account at an ATM near the home of Brown’s Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons, with a like sum soon after deposited in one of Brown’s accounts- also in Laurel, Maryland, where Simmons lived. Prosecutors further showed surveillance of Simmons making at least one withdrawal and deposit. Prosecutors alleged Simmons would sometimes withdraw the cash and give it directly to Brown, and there was a surveillance photo of Brown herself making one deposit. Another focus is a trip by Brown and her daughter to the Bahamas, and later Los Angeles. A July 2013 check for $3,000 from the One Door account made out to a specific Bank of America bank account said in the memo line that it was for children’s summer camps. Stelly says bank records show $3,000 being deposited around the same time in to Shantrel Brown’s bank account, and $1,000 being transferred from Shantrel Brown’s account to that of her mother. At the same time, Stelly says bank records show several cash withdrawals from One Door’s account in Simmons’ city of residence amounting to $3,000, the same sum which was then deposited in to Brown’s account as well. This all happened as Brown and her daughter first spent time at a resort in the Bahamas and then traveled to the Los Angeles-area, where they did a significant amount of shopping, according to Stelly’s analysis. When Stelly’s testimony resumed Thursday, the focus turned to more than $330,000 in One Door funds that the US Attorney’s Office says funded events hosted by Brown or in Brown’s honor which didn’t actually result in any kind of scholarship fundraising. There were several events Stelly says were represented as being paid for by another group, like Friends of Corrine Brown, but actually had at least some One Door dollars. Still other events were almost entirely funded by One Door, but raised no scholarship dollars. Brown’s attorney, James Smith III, led questioning where Stelly admitted that at no time did One Door apparently solicit donations claiming it would only be for scholarships. He added that some of those events, including an annual reception held in DC, could provide for good networking opportunities with lawmakers and other important parties. Additionally, Stelly confirmed that Brown herself did not have control over the One Door accounts and was not ever formally affiliated with the organization. This is a developing story that will be updated as testimony continued in to the afternoon. WOKV is inside of the federal courtroom and will bring you new information as it comes in.
  • A pair of protective hawks has residents in one central Florida neighborhood ducking and running for cover this week. The birds are attacking people who get too near their nests in Oviedo in suburban Orlando, local news outlets reported. >> Read more trending news It hits me on the side of the head, not just hit, but grabbed, knocked me to the ground. I had to kind of shake my head loose,' resident Beverly Bonadonna told WPLG-TV.  'At that point, I started screaming for my husband ... then it flew away, it finally let go. >> Related: Man allegedly stuffed puppies into pillow cases, left them in drain Bonadonna had to go to the hospital for treatment of puncture wounds and a tetanus shot, but she said more than anything she was terrified during the attack. 'I have never been attacked by one; never even considered that I could be. I have never, I mean, they swoop real low over our head but never considered it was really a possibility,' she told WPLG. Bonadonna isn’t the only victim. Another resident in the same neighborhood, Don Cochran, has a hawk nest in tree next to his house and has been attacked twice. 'He scratched me right in the back of the head, but if you weren't thinking about him, he could have knocked you down because he weighs about 5, 6 pounds,' Cochran said.' >> Related: Florida Fish and Wildlife searches for monkey on the loose Cochran says he now uses an umbrella to go to the mailbox and hasn’t been attacked since. Hawks and their nests are protected under Florida law and can’t be moved or harmed.  Sarah Elsesser contributed to this story.
  • A wildfire has grown to 250 acres this afternoon in Volusia County, crossing State Road 44 after the wind shifted. Called the Damascus Fire, it forced the Florida Highway Patrol to close a section of the road between DeLand and Samsula, so fire plows could safely work in the area. Julie Allen with the Florida Forest Service said 14 tractor plows are trying to keep the flames from spreading further, with assistance from local fire departments. Federal personnel are also on the scene. “We had a sudden wind shift in the midst of the battle, and it caused a little bit of an issue with spotting over,” she explained. Cause of the fire is not known, but gusty winds help it to spread in the mostly rural area.
  • Its not clear why he went up there, but a naked man spent hours on a 140-foot utility tower in New Orleans East. Firefighters were able to raise a ladder and rescue him about 3 p.m. He was seen being placed in ambulance. Power was cut off to prevent him being electrocuted during the rescue.  The tower is near a Luzianne plant, but on Entergy property.