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Aaron Hernandez found hanged in cell, death ruled suicide
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Aaron Hernandez found hanged in cell, death ruled suicide

Aaron Hernandez Found Hanged In Cell

Aaron Hernandez found hanged in cell, death ruled suicide

Convicted killer and former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez was found hanged in his prison cell early Wednesday morning, according to officials.

Officials said Hernandez was found hanging in his cell by corrections officers at the Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center in Shirley around 3:05 a.m.

A source told Fox25Boston that Hernandez cut his finger and wrote "John 3:16" on his forehead. He left a Bible in his cell open to that verse.

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Officers immediately began to render life-saving techniques and Hernandez was taken to UMass Leominster where he was pronounced dead at 4:07 a.m.

Hernandez was in a single cell in a general population housing unit when he was found hanging from a bed sheet that he had attached to his cell window, according to officials.

Also, officials said, Hernandez tried to block his cell door from the inside by jamming it with several items preventing it from being opened.

Thursday news release from Worcester County District Attorney Joseph D. Early Jr., Col. Richard McKeon, superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police, and Secretary of Public Safety Daniel Bennett said the death of Hernandez has been ruled a suicide. 

“Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Henry N. Nields performed an autopsy on Mr. Hernandez on Wednesday and concluded today that the manner of death was suicide and the cause asphyxia by hanging," the release said.

“There were no signs of a struggle, and investigators determined that Mr. Hernandez was alone at the time of the hanging.”

Hernandez was serving a life-sentence for killing Odin Lloyd in 2013.

He was acquitted Friday in a 2012 double killing in the South End that prosecutors said Hernandez committed after one of the men allegedly spilled a drink on him.

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