ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
50°
Sunny
H 68° L 32°
  • clear-night
    50°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 68° L 32°
  • clear-day
    65°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 68° L 32°
  • clear-night
    53°
    Evening
    Clear. H 68° L 32°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Local
O'Mara: Zimmerman concerned for wife’s safety
Close

O'Mara: Zimmerman concerned for wife’s safety

O'Mara: Zimmerman concerned for wife’s safety

O'Mara: Zimmerman concerned for wife’s safety

The attorney for George Zimmerman says the former neighborhood watch volunteer who killed Trayvon Martin is concerned for the safety of his wife, after her arrest for lying to the judge about the couple's finances during a bond hearing.

WFTV talked to Zimmerman's attorney, Mark O'Mara, as he left a late night meeting with a client on Tuesday.

There have already been threats against George and even his attorney O'Mara, so now they are both concerned that Shellie is in the spotlight and out on bond.

The 25-year-old Shellie Zimmerman was arrested because investigators from special prosecutor Angela Corey's office issued an arrest warrant, charging her with one count of perjury.

They said she lied under oath at her George's original bond hearing in April about how much money the couple had to pay his bond.

She was arrested on Tuesday but has since bonded out of jail.

O'Mara is angry because he asked prosecutors to tell him about the arrest first, but he did not hear until after Shellie posted a $1,000 bond.

"You know, I am just disappointed at the state that they did not feel the need to at least offer me that professional courtesy," said O'Mara.

In the warrant, state prosecutors wrote that Shellie Zimmerman not only knew how much money was in her husband's PayPal account, which he set up to pay for his defense, but that she also transferred more than $74,000 from his account to hers before the bond hearing.

WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer is not surprised prosecutors went after her.

"(I'm) not surprised," said Sheaffer. "You can't perpetrate this kind of fraud on the court and expect there's not going to be consequences."

"This is too high-profile of a case to let someone get away with lying to the court," said Sheaffer.

George Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder in the shooting. He was granted $150,000 bond at that hearing and released.

The alleged lies that got George Zimmerman's wife arrested also got his bond revoked earlier this month. State attorneys argued that both Zimmerman and his wife had lied to the judge about their finances, especially about money raised from a website.

In his written order, Judge Kenneth Lester called the evidence against Zimmerman strong.

He also said he considered Zimmerman's prior record that included a pre-trial diversion, as well as a past domestic violence injunction.

The judge said Zimmerman's failure to disclose the thousands he raised for his defense online, "demonstrated that he does not properly respect the law or the integrity of the judicial process."

O'Mara will not defend Shellie Zimmerman because it would be a conflict of interest. There's no word from prosecutors if George will also be charged with perjury.

Sheaffer said he believes Shellie Zimmerman could face up to five years in prison if convicted.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A chaotic crowd seemingly fueled by unruly teenagers trampled a 67-year-old grandmother late Jan. 6 as she left a South Florida movie theater.   Someone yelled “gun,” Sheryl Cohen said last week, and when she turned to run from the Cinemark’s lobby in Boynton Beach the crowd quickly caught up with her.   “I saw people running at me initially, then the next thing I knew I was on the ground,” she said. The Boynton Beach resident broke multiple bones, bruised her face and lost a $3,000 hearing aid.   That unruly Saturday night led to 11 juveniles’ arrests, Boynton Beach police said. Authorities were first called to the Boynton Mall due to reports of as many as 300 juveniles loitering. One teen later told police they’d gathered due to an Instagram post that told people to meet for a fight.   When the mall closed at 9 p.m. the juveniles meandered to the Cinemark, where they planned to see “Insidious: The Last Key,” records state. But the next showing of the horror film wasn’t until 10:30 p.m., and the theater wouldn’t open until 10 p.m. so the gaggle of teens and 17 police officers waited.   “I could hear young people yelling and screaming at each other,” Cohen said. She’d been at an evening showing of “All the Money in the World” with her husband; it let out shortly after 9 p.m. Her husband headed toward the bathroom. She told him she’d meet him outside.   According to police, multiple fights broke out inside and outside of the Cinemark building, prompting theater employees to cancel the 10:30 showing of the horror film and order the teens to leave.   Many of the teens ignored those initial orders, according to police records, so at least one officer pulled out pepper spray and threatened to use it if they didn’t leave the theater.   Despite a few who resisted arrest, most teens cleared the area and spilled over into nearby restaurants -- Buffalo Wild Wings, IHOP, Bru’s Room and McDonald’s -- and a 24 Hour Fitness, according to police records.   But at some point amid the commotion someone yelled “gun,” according to Cohen. Police at the scene did not report hearing anyone mention a gun, though Cohen is sure she did. She even remembers waiting to hear gunfire.   She never did.   Despite rumors of a shooting that night, Boynton police say they found no evidence of any gunfire.   They did, however, find evidence to arrest nearly a dozen juveniles on misdemeanor charges, mainly resisting arrest and disturbance-related offenses, police records show. All of the juveniles were released to their parents.   One of the teens was taken to a hospital first, though, for injuries sustained after falling face-first over a cement planter while running from authorities. At least four officers sustained cuts and other injuries while responding to the disturbances that night.   And Cohen was left with injuries that doctors expect will take months to heal.   She’s frustrated that moviegoers weren’t kept in their seats after the film ended while authorities cleared out the already chaotic lobby. Emptying the theaters only added to the disorder, she said.   Cinemark officials did not return The Post’s request for comment. It is unclear what the company’s policy for handling unruly crowds is.   “They were very, very lucky in this instance,” Cohen said. “Someone could have actually had a gun.”
  • This year’s deadly flu season continues to claim lives across the country and it has set records in Central Florida.   A doctor with Centra Care said the staff treated a never-before-seen number of patients in the Orlando area.   Doctors treated 874 people last week compared with 587 patients the week before, officials said.   The previous record--842 patients in one week--was set in 2015, officials said.   State health officials said they’ve seen an increase in the flu in the northern regions of the state.   One child recently has died from complications of the flu, state health officials said. The child was not vaccinated and had underlying health conditions, they said.   Flu is not a required reportable disease, so a spokesperson for the state said the numbers are tracked through monitoring reports of influenza-like illnesses, flu testing and hospital admissions for flu.   Flu activity is on the rise throughout the United States and in Florida.    Health officials are required to report any deaths of patients under the 18 who die of flu complications.   Health officials said that though the flu vaccine is not 100 percent effective, it’s still the best prevention method, particularly for people at high risk.   “Especially children under 5 years old, pregnant women, people 65 and older, and (those) with chronic conditions such as asthma,” said Mirna Chamorro of the Seminole County Health Department.
  • A Springfield, Ohio, man is facing multiple charges after he allegedly whipped a pregnant woman with a belt. Ethan S. Gavin, 20, is facing one count each of domestic violence, resisting arrest and obstructing official business. >> Read more trending news  The Springfield Police Division was called to the 2600 block of Lagonda Avenue at about 10 a.m. Monday about an argument between a man and a woman, according to a police report. A police officer took the victim to a back bedroom to get more information about the situation, the report said. Gavin then went outside, but later came back inside and attempted to enter the bedroom. A police officer had to stop him with his hand, but Gavin refused to leave the room. >> On SpringfieldNewsSun.com: Man accused of striking mom with cane over drug money Gavin was then placed under arrest but refused to cooperate, police said. He began wrestling with officers and was eventually stunned with a Taser, police said. Gavin allegedly choked the victim with both hands, punched her in the head and whipped her with a belt on the arms, legs and stomach, the report said. The victim also told police she is eight weeks pregnant. Gavin was placed in the Clark County Jail.
  • Waving off a push by Democrats to force action this week on a compromise over the future of illegal immigrant “Dreamers,” Republicans in Congress said they wanted to wait for further negotiations on DACA, as House GOP leaders unveiled a short term funding plan that would keep the federal government running into mid-February, but that plan faced immediate resistance from some more conservative Republicans. “There is no reason why Congress should hold government funding hostage over the issues of illegal immigration,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who said a resolution on DACA could wait until February or March. But even without DACA in the mix, a new temporary funding plan unveiled by House Republican leaders last night got a tepid embrace from GOP lawmakers, frustrated by the lack of an overall budget agreement for 2018. THE CHORUS FROM H GOP on another CR: 'it's better than shutting down government' — Lisa Desjardins (@LisaDNews) January 17, 2018 The biggest red flag came from more conservative members of the House Freedom Caucus, who argue the GOP should forge ahead with a plan to fully fund the military for 2018, while leaving all other government operations on a stop gap budget. After a meeting Tuesday night, Freedom Caucus chair Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) made it clear that the group was not ready to endorse the GOP funding plan, which would keep the government running through February 19. The goal is to use that extra time to reach a broader budget deal with Democrats, allowing the Congress to then approve a larger “Omnibus” funding plan for the 2018 budget year – which began back on October 1, 2017. Question now is will this resistance hold “Currently, just based on the number of “nos” and “undecideds” in the Freedom Caucus, there’s not enough support to pass it with GOP-only votes,” Meadows told reporters about short-term CR — Lauren Fox (@FoxReports) January 17, 2018 It was a replay of a familiar scenario on Capitol Hill, where House Republican infighting might lead to a shutdown at the end of the week. “It’s a possibility, yes,” said Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK), when asked about the chances of a shutdown. “But I don’t think it’s really going to happen,” Inhofe told reporters. “Nobody really wants it on either side.” The new GOP stopgap budget unveiled on Tuesday evening included a few sweeteners, as leaders added to the funding plan a provision that reauthorizes the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) through 2023. “Without immediate action to fund CHIP, millions of low-income children will receive notices in the coming weeks that they might lose their health coverage,” said Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR) and Rep. Mike Burgess (R-TX) in a statement. While the CHIP extension had been expected, the GOP stopgap budget included something else that was a big surprise – as the bill would suspend three different taxes from the Obama health law. While Republicans try to find the votes to support that plan, a bipartisan group of Senators will unveil the final details of their DACA compromise on Wednesday, in hopes of stirring more support. “I don’t know how this movie ends,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who very publicly said he thought the President had signed on to the compromise DACA plan last Thursday, but then had his mind changed by immigration hard liners in the White House, and the Senate. One of those opponents is Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR), who bluntly told the DACA group of six Senators not to even try to push ahead with their plan. “Might as well roll it straight into the trash can,” Cotton said of the DACA deal, which he has labeled a mass amnesty. Meanwhile, Democrats were hoping for a budget impasse, as they argue that a resolution on DACA could still be added into the mix this week. The ball is in the Republican Party’s court. They control the White House, Senate & House. Will they shut down the government to deport hundreds of thousands of our brothers & sisters? A deal is on the table. https://t.co/K1UHB5vWDf — Guy Cecil (@guycecil) January 17, 2018 Many Republicans say they also want action on DACA, but they understand in the current environment – after the blow up over what the President said – or did not say – last week, that no agreement can happen right now. “Unfortunately, about every time we get close to putting our toes in the water, something happens,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). The tentative plan is for the House to try to vote on a stop gap budget on Thursday. The Senate could then pass the same measure before a Friday night shutdown deadline.
  • President Donald Trump is in excellent health and likely to finish his term in office without any medical issues, a presidential doctor said Tuesday at a news conference, four days after the president underwent a physical exam. >> Read more trending news “The president's overall health is excellent,' White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson said Tuesday. Here are six things to know about the results of the president’s physical: Jackson: ‘He had great findings across the board’ Trump is in “very, very good health,” Jackson said Tuesday.  “(I have) no concerns for his heart health,” the presidential physician said. “There are many good things that came from his exam, I think he had great findings across the board. “ >> White House physician releases official report Jackson said Trump’s good health is likely to last through “the remainder of this tern, and even for the remainder of another term, if he’s elected.” He said he based his assessment on the president’s cardiac results. “He falls into a category that portends years of event-free living,” Jackson said. “He has incredibly good genes, and that’s just the way God made him.” Cognitive screening showed no issues Jackson said he conducted a cognitive screening on Trump at the president’s request, although he felt the test was unnecessary. “I’ve spent almost every day in the president’s presence,” said Jackson, whose office is near Trump’s. “I’ve got to know him pretty well and I had absolutely no concerns about his cognitive ability or neurological functions.” He said that in all his conversations with Trump, the president has been “very articulate.” “I’ve never known him to repeat himself around me,” Jackson said. “He says what he wants to say and speaks his mind.” Infamous slurred speech incident might have been caused by medication A December incident in which the president sounded as though he was slurring his speech while announcing a policy shift in Israel was probably due to a medication, Jackson said. >> Related: Trump’s slurred speech: Is it loose-fitting dentures, dry mouth or something else? “We evaluated him, we checked everything out and everything was normal,” Jackson said, adding that the incident was likely caused because the president needed water. He said prior to the Dec. 7 incident, he gave Trump Sudafed, which might have “inadvertently dried up his secretions.” Trump working to lose 10-15 pounds At 6-foot-3 and 239 pounds, the president has a body mass index of 29.9, just under the number that would designate him as obese, according to information released Tuesday. “The president, he and I talked and... I think a reasonable goal over the next year or so is (to lose) 10 or 15 pounds,” Jackson said, adding that a nutritionist would be meeting with White House chefs in the coming weeks and that Trump would be put on an exercise routine. “He’s more enthusiastic about the diet,” Jackson said. Jackson not concerned about Trump’s stress levels Despite concerns from the public and reports that have painted a chaotic White House, Jackson said that he has no concerns about the president’s stress levels. “I talk to him sometimes about stress just because I think it’s my job as his physician to bring it up on occasion,” he said. “I’ve never seen the president stressed out too much. ... He has a unique ability to push the reset button and he just gets up and he starts a new day. (I think it’s) made him healthier from a stress standpoint.” Jackson did not test Trump’s hearing Jackson said he didn’t have enough time to test Trump’s hearing, although he planned to conduct such a test in future physicals.