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Latest from Joe Ruble

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions says the Justice Department will ask the Supreme Court to review an appeals court ruling that blocked President Donald Trump's travel ban.  The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday ruled 10-3 against the travel ban. The decision bars the administration from suspending new visas for visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.   Sessions says the Justice Department 'strongly disagrees' and will continue to vigorously defend Trump's order. He says the court's ruling blocks Trump's 'efforts to strengthen this country's national security.'    Sessions says Trump is not required to admit people from 'countries that sponsor or shelter terrorism until he determines that they can be properly vetted' and don't pose a security threat. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • Hurricane experts are not sure if we are coming out of a period of elevated storm risk, and that’s affecting their forecast going into the 2017 Atlantic season. Ben Friedman, acting administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, announced today that there is a 45% chance of an above average season, but also a 35% chance of an average storm season ahead. Models show only a 20% chance of a less active season. NOAA forecasts eleven to 17 named storms, with five to nine reaching hurricane status.  Two to four major hurricanes, with winds of at least 111 mph, are expected to form this year. “There is the potential for a lot of hurricane activity this year,” Friedman said during the agency’s annual forecast briefing at the NOAA National Center for Weather Climate Prediction. Last year, Hurricane Matthew skirted the Atlantic coast of Florida before making landfall in the Carolinas.  The storm killed 47 people in the U.S., mostly from flooding. The National Hurricane Center is emphasizing again this year that that storm surge is the biggest threat from any hurricane. 
  • Homicide investigators with the Orange County Sheriff’s Office released a video and a photo of a person of interest in the April 14th homicide of Dale Eric Floren. The 57-year-old man was found both stabbed and shot in a parking lot near Florida Mall. Detectives said he had arrived there to work at a construction site at that location. They believe the man captured on surveillance video from a nearby business is someone who may have information about the homicide. Detectives would like to identify him, and speak with him, according to OCSO Media Relations. Tips can be called in to Crimeline at 800-423-TIPS.
  • A 22-year-old student is accused of sneaking into a building and illegally logging into a Florida university's grading system to change his failing grade to a B.  Sami Ammar turned himself in at the Orange County Jail in Orlando on Wednesday and now faces a felony charge of accessing a computer without authorization.   His father declined to talk to the Orlando Sentinel, saying only that the charge is 'an allegation.'   University of Central Florida professor Chung Young Chan became suspicious when he got a confirmation from a program he uses to log grades on May 4. He checked the grades and saw Ammar suddenly had a B instead of an F in the Electronics I class.   University police later identified Ammar on surveillance video at the Mathematical Sciences Building. The Associated Press
  • It’s time to wear your Spider-Man costume, or maybe Harley Quinn. MegaCon is opening in Orlando today through Sunday at the Orange County Convention Center. “Over 100,000 thousand fans are expected for a jam-packed weekend of family-friendly entertainment,“ said promoter Andrew Moyes. While dressing up as a super hero or character out of a sci-fi movie is fun for some, others enjoy the people-watching and taking lots of selfies.  The show is for fans of comic books, sci-fi, horror, anime and gaming. Special guests will be available to take photos with or get autographs. Among them is the creator of the Marvel Universe, Stan Lee. This is expected to be the 95-year-old’s last convention appearance in Florida. “We are truly honored to be welcoming him to MegaCon again this year.” said Moyes. Click here to learn more about the event. Click here to see MegaCon’s latest tweets
  • It was tough being a tree in Central Florida on Wednesday afternoon as strong storms with wind gusts of 60 mph blew over a few. Perhaps the most shared photo on social media was of a tree that pulled up a carpet of grass in front of a house in Oviedo. It didn’t appear anyone was hurt. Another tree was toppled in Deltona (see below).  The storm that moved in from the southwest caused some power outages and delayed flights at Orlando’s airports. Guests at theme parks also had to run for cover when the fast moving systems arrived. 
  • Libyan authorities say they have a second brother of the Manchester, England suicide bomber in custody. Officials said 20-year-old Hashem Abedi was arrested in Tripoli for suspected links to ISIS. His older brother, 22-year-old Salman Abedi, is the man who pulled off the attack Manchester after an Ariana Grande concert, killing 22 people.  Another Abedi sibling, 23-year-old Ismail, was arrested in Manchester yesterday. Five people have been arrested in Britain in connection with the bombing. A Libyan security spokesman says the father of the Manchester bomber has also been arrested in Tripoli.  Special Deterrent force spokesman Ahmed bin Salem told the Associated Press that Ramadan Abedi, the father of Salman Abedi, was detained in Tripoli on Wednesday.   Bin Salem says the elder Abedi was detained for interrogations.   Before his arrest, the father told the AP that his son was innocent and had been planning a trip to Saudi Arabia for a pilgrimage. The Associated Press
  • A woman working at a Boost Mobile store on Old Pleasant Hill Road was showing two iPhone 7’s to a customer this week when he snatched them out of her hands, ran outside and fled in a waiting car, Osceola County Sheriff’s deputies reported.  Investigators have released surveillance photos of the suspect and the vehicle and are asking the public to call, if they know something. The theft suspect is described as an adult black male, with long dread locks, approximately 6 feet tall and 150 lbs., with a short beard and mustache. The vehicle appears to be a newer model gray Nissan.
  • Team owners have voted to move back the Los Angeles-hosted Super Bowl by one year, and awarding the 2021 game to Tampa. It would be Super Bowl LV.  NFL rules dictate that a venue must be open at least two years, before it could host the championship game. The new Los Angeles stadium would be home to both the Rams and Chargers.
  • It could be the end of the line for Amtrak in Florida. Senator Bill Nelson complains that President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would eliminate all Amtrak service in the state.  “This just doesn’t make sense,” said the Democrat. “Eliminating Amtrak service in Florida not only affects the nearly one million Floridians who ride the train each year, it would have a real impact on our tourism-driven economy by making it harder for folks to come visit our state.” According to Nelson’s office, the budget would end Amtrak’s long distance routes in Florida, including: • The Auto train, which runs daily from Lorton, VA to Sanford, FL;  • The Silver Meteor, which runs daily from Miami to Orlando to New York; and  • The Silver Star, which runs daily from Miami to Tampa to Orlando to New York. Nelson’s office reports that more than 950,000 people rode Amtrak in Florida during the last fiscal year,.
  • Joe Ruble

    Joe Ruble is a veteran radio reporter, afternoon anchor and baseball fan.

    He claims to have been to every spring training site in Florida over the last ten years. "Steinbrenner Field in Tampa is one of my favorites," he said.

    Before landing in Orlando a year after the hurricanes did, Joe reported for Newsradio 740 KTRH in Houston for 15 years. He also covered news in Denver at KOA and was a news director for KYGO AM-FM. He is now a Broncos fan after watching John Elway from the press box at Mile High Stadium for two seasons. 

    Joe was raised in Hawaii and began his reporting career there while still a student at the University of Hawaii. He has earned awards for his reporting from natural disasters like volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Not wanting to press his luck, he stayed away from high surf.  

    Joe has interviewed former presidents, professional athletes and music legends over the years. Most memorable chat? "Stevie Wonder, he joined me live on the radio in Hilo one night. He was touring and writing music for an album. I played his records while he sat on the other side of the turntable talking about his songs. Unforgettable."

    Ruble is married, raising two pups and living in Ocoee, Fla.

    Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A senior White House official is a person of interest in the investigation into ties between Russia and the Donald Trump campaign, the Washington Post has reported. >> Read more trending news Jared Kushner, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson are current Trump administration officials who have acknowledged contact with Russian officials, according to the report. >> RELATED: Who are the key players in the Russia/Trump saga?
  • On a Saturday morning 27 years ago, death knocked on Marlene Warren’s front door in Wellington, Florida, wearing a clown suit.  The murder has remained unsolved for nearly 30 years. Here’s a look back at what happened that rainy morning on Memorial Day weekend, May 26, 1990. >> Read more trending news Marlene Warren lived in the prosperous Aero Club neighborhood in Wellington, where many of the large homes on one-acre lots have backyard hangars for their owners’ private planes. An airstrip runs through the center of the community. The steamy season was beginning to settle in across South Florida that Saturday when a clown came to Warren’s door just before 11 a.m. Answering the door, a smiling Warren accepted the bundle of flowers and balloons the clown held. >> Related: Killer of Jupiter girl still at large 27 years later “Oh, how pretty,” her son remembered her saying. They were the last words she would speak. Wearing an orange wig, red nose and gloves, camouflaged with white paint creating a grotesque happy face, the death-dealing clown raised a pistol and delivered a single shot at point-blank range to Warren’s face. Her 21-year-old son, Joey Ahrens, in the living room with a group of friends, reached his mother as she collapsed amid a spreading pool of blood. He recalled seeing the clown’s brown eyes before it climbed into a white Chrysler LeBaron convertible. Warren, 40, died two days later. >> Related: Police serve warrant in brutal murder of Indiana teens Homicide investigators focused on Warren’s husband, Michael, 38, and Sheila Sheltra Keen, 27, whom Warren had hired to repossess cars for his West Palm Beach used car lot. Acquaintances told police Michael Warren and Keen were having an affair, which they denied. Read more here.
  • Montana Republican Greg Gianforte’s congressional campaign has raised $100,000 and counting in the hours since he allegedly “body-slammed” Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs. >> Read more trending news  That’s according to NBC News’ Peter Alexander, who cites a source close to the campaign operation. The incident occurred Wednesday at a campaign event for Gianforte, who is running in a Montana special election to replace the House seat vacated by now-Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Montana’s only House seat has been held by Republicans since 1996. >> RELATED: Montana congressional candidate Greg Gianforte allegedly body-slammed a reporter to the ground Guardian reporter, Ben Jacobs tried to get Gianforte to answer a question about the GOP health care bill when the candidate allegedly exploded on him. As Jacobs intended to record Gianforte’s answer to his health care questions, he recorded the entire incident. The alleged assault and battery was witnessed by reporters for Fox News and others. Jacobs called police and filed a report. While Gallatin County police allowed Gianforte to leave the scene (which he quickly did, not even telling the audience gathered what had happened), they later issued him a misdemeanor assault citation. Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin is a donor to Gianforte’s campaign. Publicly available Federal Election Commission records show he made a $250 donation in March.
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions says the Justice Department will ask the Supreme Court to review an appeals court ruling that blocked President Donald Trump's travel ban.  The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday ruled 10-3 against the travel ban. The decision bars the administration from suspending new visas for visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.   Sessions says the Justice Department 'strongly disagrees' and will continue to vigorously defend Trump's order. He says the court's ruling blocks Trump's 'efforts to strengthen this country's national security.'    Sessions says Trump is not required to admit people from 'countries that sponsor or shelter terrorism until he determines that they can be properly vetted' and don't pose a security threat. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • NASA is learning some of the secrets of the largest planet in the solar system, revealing data Thursday from the space agency’s Juno mission to Jupiter. >> Read more trending news Jupiter, the fifth planet from the sun, is a gas giant with an atmosphere mainly composed of helium and hydrogen, and characterized by towering clouds of ammonia and turbulent storms, including one that has raged for hundreds of years and is larger than Earth, known as the Great Red Spot. With the initial scientific information from Juno, researchers are realizing the planet is even more complex than scientists imagined.  The spacecraft’s camera, called the JunoCam, recorded images of Jupiter’s north and south poles that show colossus, swirling Earth-sized storms, knocking into each other as they rocket around the top and bottom of the planet. The storms covering the north pole are very different from those in the south, though. >> Related: Space travel is measured in light years, but what’s a light year anyway? “We’re puzzled as to how they could be formed, how stable the configuration is, and why Jupiter’s north pole doesn’t look like the south pole,” Juno’s principal investigator Scott Bolton said in a briefing about the new data. Bolton said it’s also unclear whether these are permanent storms at the poles. “We’re questioning whether this is a dynamic system, and are we seeing just one stage, and over the next year, we’re going to watch it disappear, or is this a stable configuration and these storms are circulating around one another,” Bolton said. Juno has also revealed new information about the planet’s irregular and lumpy magnetic field and its gaseous atmosphere. >> Related: Alien life possible on small Saturn moon, maybe on a Jupiter moon, too Researchers are hoping to learn more about the Giant Red Spot, too, one of the “most iconic features in the entire solar system. “If anybody is going to get to the bottom of what is going on below those mammoth swirling crimson cloud tops, it’s Juno and her cloud-piercing science instruments,” Bolton predicted. The Juno spacecraft launched on Aug. 5, 2011, and entered Jupiter’s orbit last summer on July 4. The results from Thursday’s briefing were collected in a Juno fly-by last August when the craft was within 2,600 miles of Jupiter’s cloud tops, NASA said.