ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
80°
Clear
H 80° L 62°
  • clear-day
    80°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 80° L 62°
  • clear-night
    70°
    Evening
    Clear. H 80° L 62°
  • clear-day
    63°
    Morning
    Sunny. H 79° L 52°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Ana Espinosa

    Protesters in black masks started fires and damaged property in an attempt to stop controversial speaker Milo Yiannopoulos from speaking at the University of California-Berkeley in February. >> Read more trending news It is situations like those that have U.S. senators on the Judiciary Committee discussing free speech on college campuses. In the past several months, universities have canceled speakers after threats of violence. Many of the speakers have been conservative, prompting concern among Republican senators about universities potentially silencing controversial voices. “That is an open invitation to discriminate based on viewpoint,” Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, said she’s worried universities lack equipment and security to protect students from violence at speeches. “I do believe that the university has a right to protect its students from demonstrations once they become acts of violence,” Feinstein said. Zachary Wood, a student at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, testified in front of the committee. He said it is important to have your beliefs challenged. “Instead of nurturing thoughtful debates of controversial topics, many college educators and administrators discourage free debate by shielding students from offensive views,” Wood said. “Yet one person’s offensive view is another person’s viewpoint.”
  • New legislation on Capitol Hill aims to equip cars with technology that could help save the lives of children. >> Read more trending news  More than 800 children have died from heatstroke in hot cars since 1990, according to Kidsandcars.org. A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced the Hot Car Act this week. “Our legislation would move us one step closer to getting this inexpensive technology in every car on the road to help save the lives of children nationwide,” said U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, R-Ohio. Parents and families who have been affected by hot car deaths and safety advocates joined members of Congress to push the bill.The bill would require cars to visually alert drivers to check rear seating once the car has been turned off. The alert must also include a noise to remind the driver to check the back seat. The alert system could also include a vibration system to physically alert the driver. The technology would be similar to the alert a car gives when keys are left in the car or the headlights are still on. The bill would also educate the public on the risks of leaving a child unattended in a car after it has been turned off. Nine children have died so far this year from being left in a back seat. 
  • Restaurants and bars in Washington, New York and other U.S. cities are treating James Comey's long-awaited Senate testimony like the Super Bowl. >> Related: Comey expected to confirm Trump asked him to drop Flynn investigation: reports Several will open early Thursday with food and drink specials while tuning televisions to coverage of what the fired FBI director has to say about President Trump and questions surrounding Russia and the 2016 election. >> Related: Trump told Russian officials firing 'nut job' Comey relieved pressure on him: report Shaw’s Tavern in Washington, D.C., is set to host a watch party called “The Comey Hearing Covfefe,” named for the mysterious word President Trump tweeted about the press.  >> Read more trending news The event begins at 9:30 a.m.  The tavern will feature $5 Russian-flavored vodka specials and an 'FBI' sandwich. Shaw’s tavern isn’t the only bar offering a special event. Duffy’s Irish Pub in D.C. will also open early for the testimony. The restaurant will feature special drinks including a Bloody Mary and a 'covfefe cocktail.'  Senators can go just a block away if they'd rather watch Comey at a bar. Capitol Lounge, just a block from Capitol Hill, will open at 9 a.m. for the hearing.
  • The 90th Scripps National Spelling Bee is this week, with the finals airing Thursday at 8:30 p.m. >> Read more trending news Since 2014, the spelling bee has ended in a tie, with co-champions. But this year is different, with new rules to prevent a draw. Now, spellers must take an extra written exam. The tiebreaker test consists of 24 items: 12 spelling and 12 multiple-choice vocabulary questions. How would you do on a tiebreaker test? Here are examples of vocabulary questions provided by the Scripps National Spelling Bee.   1. Which of these would be most dulcet?  a. a jet engine b. a popular lullaby c. a poorly written essay d. a red-colored seaweed 2. If something is baneful, it is: a. healthful b. plentiful c. fruitful d. harmful 3. Which of the following is closest in meaning to schlepp? a. tell a lie b. knock down c. haul d. taste 4. What is a cutpurse? a. a pickpocket b. a small, collapsible knife c. a fringed handbag d. a noxious weed 5. Something said succinctly is: a. legalistic b. flowery and nostalgic c. vague d. brief and exact 6. An example of an ergogenic activity is: a. taking a course on public speaking b. cutting expenses to increase savings c. trying bungee jumping as a hobby d. increasing sleep time by an hour   7. A jurisprude is: a. a failed bill in a legislative body b. a person who likes to show off their legal knowledge c. a judge who hands down an unusually stiff sentence d. an officer in a courtroom 8. A pennate object is shaped like a: a. wing b. boat c. tube d. ring   This quiz comes from the Scripps National Spelling Bee website. The answers can be found at the bottom of this article. The spelling bee had 291 contestants hoping to be named champion. This is the largest amount of contestants ever. This year, if there are two winners at the end of the championship round, the scores for the tiebreaker tests will be revealed. The speller with the highest score will be named the champion.   Answers for the quiz: B D C A D D B A    
  • Osceola county has now created designated parking spaces as a way to honor wounded veterans.  The County Commissioner Fred Hawkins Jr. said, “It’s important to take care of our wounded warriors, who have sacrificed so much to protect our freedoms. The signs that read 'combat Wounded' and have a Purple Heart medal symbol on them have been place at the Beaumont complex where the county’s office for veterans is located. More signs will be placed in the courthouse, government center and other properties. The board agreed to put up the signs after the idea was pitched to Hawkins by a resident, Peter Olivo, who served in Vietnam where he lost both his legs. Commissioner Hawkins said, 'this is one small way to show our gratitude.” The Wounded Warriors Family Support project, which provides the signs for free, is happy to help the over 1.8 million Purple Heart recipients. “It is just something to say thank you,” Olivo said. “When I shed blood for my country it made me feel proud. I would do it all over again. I lost both my legs but I gained a whole country. It is a great for me to see these things go up. To me it’s a very, very big thank you.”
  • Lego announced a new collection of Disney mini-figures.  18 characters ranging from the classic Mickey Mouse to the superhero Mr. Incredible.  This is the first time the company debuts a collection of Disney characters.  The new mini-figures will hit stores starting May and sell for a suggested price of $3.99.  Like most Lego figures, the beloved character will be sold in blind package. 
  • An Orlando man was arrested for stealing over 300 vases from Highland Memory Gardens cemetery.  Robert Christopher Jacobsen, 34, was arrested and charged with three counts of grand theft and three counts of injuring or removing a tomb or monument. WDBO contacted the cemetery that said that they replaced all the vases at no cost to the families.  It also increased security at the cemetery by adding fences and security cameras.   The thefts began last November when the cemetery discovered that 67 vases were missing last November. Weeks later another 268 vases were reported missing but were thought to have been stolen.  An alert later came from a scrap metal dealer that contacted law enforcement after he turned down a man that wanted to sell a unusually large amount of bronze vases.  The dealer was able to write down the suspect license and tag information that later led to an arrest by the Seminole County Sheriff's Office. 
  • Governor Rick Scott wants Yale University to move to Florida.  Lawmakers in Connecticut have proposed a tax on the profit on investments to Yale's $25.6 billion endowment.  The governor said, 'With news that the Connecticut Legislature wants to unfairly tax one of the nation’s most renowned universities to deal with the state’s budget shortfall, it is clear that all businesses in Connecticut, including Yale, should look to move to Florida.' He continued on to say, 'since I took office in 2011, we have not raised any taxes or fees in Florida.  In fact, we have cut taxes 55 times, including $1 billion in tax cuts over the last two years, which saved Floridians $5.5 billion.'  Scott has previously told businesses to get away from high-taxes in Connecticut and move to low-tax Florida.  This probably won't prompt one of the country's most prestigious colleges to move to the sunshine state. Yale's Press Secretary, Tom Conroy, responded by saying, 'It’s wonderful to be recognized as an outstanding asset, but Yale, New Haven, and Connecticut have been on common ground to great mutual benefit for 300 years. We’re looking forward to reaching even greater heights in education, research and civic engagement over the next three centuries and more.' The Governor of Connecticut, Dannel Malloy, said that Scott's comments are nothing more than gimmicks and not real economic strategies. 
  • We've learned that two people died in the plane crash this morning at Peter O. Knight Airport in Tampa. Officials tell us one plane, a twin-engine Cessna 340, was headed to Pensacola, and was taking off from the airport when the crash happened near the seawall.  We have heard the plane possibly hit another plane, which was attempting to take off at the same time.  Large clouds of smoke could be seen coming from the airport.    Fire officials confirmed the two people were found dead at the crash scene.  (Video from News Channel 8-Tampa) ------------------------------------- A small plane crashed Friday morning at Peter O. Knight Airport. The Peter O. Knight Airport is on Davis Islands in Tampa.  The fire crews responded when the plane caught fire.  Airport crew was notified of the crash at around 11:30 a.m. on Friday.  Two planes were involved in the crash but it is unclear exactly what happened.  There is no word if there were any injuries or how many were on board. 
  • Central Florida is holding early voting from now through March 13th.  Early voting centers are open from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Alafaya Branch Library 12000 East Colonial Drive Orlando, FL 32826 Southwest Branch Library 7255 Della Drive Orlando, FL 32819 Apopka Community Center & VFW 519 S. Central Ave. Apopka, FL 32703 Supervisor of Elections Office 119 W. Kaley Street Orlando, FL 32806 Renaissance Senior Center(South Econ Community Park) 3800 S. Econlockhatchee Trail Orlando, FL 32829 Washington Park Branch Library 5151 Raleigh Street, Suite A Orlando, FL 32811 South Creek Branch Library 1702 Deerfield Blvd. Orlando, FL 32837 West Oaks Branch Library 1821 E. Silver Star Road Ocoee, FL 34761 Southeast Branch Library 5575 S. Semoran Blvd. Orlando, FL 32822 Winter Park Library 460 East New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 Hiawassee Branch Library 7391 W. Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL 32818 Herndon Branch Library 4324 E. Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL 32803 Chickasaw Branch Library 807 N. Chickasaw Tr. Orlando, FL 32825  Edgewater Branch Library 5049 Edgewater Dr. Orlando, FL 32810  Maitland Community Park 1400 Mayo Ave. Maitland, FL 32751 Orange County National Golf Center 16301 Phil Ritson Way Winter Garden, FL 34787 Acacia Florida Centro Borinqueno 1865 N. Econlockhatchee Tr. Orlando, FL 32817 
  • Ana Espinosa

    Ana Espinosa

    Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • An Orlando Police department officer is in the hospital after crashing their pickup truck into a toll booth on State Road 408 Saturday morning.   The truck crashed into a collapsible safety barrier at the toll plaza on the East/West Expressway eastbound near Andes Avenue.    The truck catapulted into the guardrail and caught fire, prompting the officer to flee from the scene. Police are investigating this as a hit and run.    The pay lanes were closed and traffic was diverted into the E-pass lanes. Tolls were waived by the Expressway Authority while the scene was being cleared. All lanes are now open.    Police have not released the name of the officer driving the vehicle, but were able to locate him and took him to the hospital for his injuries. No other vehicles were involved in the crash.    The officer involved in the crash has been relieved of duty and an internal investigation is underway.    The identity of the officer, as well as whether or not they will face charges has not yet been released.
  • A Montana congressman misled investigators about his assault on a reporter the day before he was elected in May, claiming that “liberal media” were “trying to make a story,” the Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported Saturday, citing audio and documents. >> Read more trending news U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, told an officer in an audio interview after the attack that reporter Ben Jacobs of The Guardian newspaper had grabbed him by the wrist and pulled both of them to the floor. Audio of Gianforte’s interview with Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Scott Secor was released along with documents requested by the Chronicle and other news organizations after Gianforte was cited for assaulting Jacobs on May 24. Gianforte later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault.  The Chronicle requested the documents in June. After Gianforte, Jacobs and Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert did not object to the release, Gallatin County District Court Judge Holly Brown ruled this week that the documents could be released. \The audio of the interview with Gianforte comes from a recording made by Sgt. Scott Secor outside of Gianforte’s headquarters shortly after the 5:07 p.m. call Jacobs made to 911, a minute after he posted on Twitter, “Greg Gianforte just body slammed me and broke my glasses.” Once at the scene, Secor spoke with Jacobs first. “This is the weirdest day,” Jacobs told Secor.  The documents include interviews with members of a Fox News crew who were in the room with Gianforte and Jacobs at the politician’s Bozeman campaign office.  Gianforte told Secor that he was preparing for an interview with Fox News when “this man broke into a private room in the back and stuck a microphone in my face and started asking me obnoxious questions.” Gianforte said he tried to explain to him that he was in the middle of an interview, but that Jacobs kept “waving” the microphone in his face, the Chronicle reported. “I probably shouldn’t do it but I reached out for his phone ... he grabbed my wrist, he spun and we ended up on the floor ... so he pulled me down on top of him,” Secor quoted Gianforte as saying. After the incident Gianforte’s campaign spokesman, Shane Scanlon, issued a statement that also blamed the attack on Jacobs, saying the reporter had grabbed the candidate’s wrist.  Gianforte publicly apologized to Jacobs and told supporters he wasn’t proud of his actions. His spokesman, Travis Hall, insisted on Friday that the documents contained “nothing new.” “No one was misled, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken. Greg took responsibility for his actions and is focused on serving the people of Montana,” Hall said in an emailed statement to The Associated Press.
  • Two men are recovering in the hospital after a shooting incident took place in Pine Hills.   Around 1 a.m., deputies responded to 4919 West Colonial Drive for a possible shooting.  When they arrived at the scene, they located a 40 year old man with a gunshot wound. The other victim, a 39 year old male was found nearby with an injury to his hand. His 29 year old girlfriend was found with him as well.    Both men were transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries and remain in stable condition. The victim's girlfriend is considered a suspect by investigators and was taken into custody.    It is not yet known how the man's hand was injured or if the woman would face charges.
  • District 4 Orlando City Commissioner, Patty Sheehan, Veterinarian Geoffrey Gardner and specially trained volunteers showed up to participate in the City of Orlando's 10th Annual Lake Eola Swan Round-Up.   The round up began at 7:00 a.m. where trained volunteers arrived on foot and took to their kayaks in the water to safely corral the famous Lake Eola swans to the west end of the park. From there, the volunteers brought the swans to a temporary clinic where they would be weighed, inoculated, and checked by the Veterinarian. The swans would also be given a a name and fitted with a microchip, along with having their wings clipped. They would then be released back into the lake and free to go about their business. Each swan has its own health record that will continue to be updated.    Lake Eola is home to over 50 swans from over five different breeds including Trumpeter swans, Black Neck Swans, Whooper swans, Royal Mute swans and Australian black swans.    The quarters that are collected from swan food feeders around the lake also help to generate annual income each year to help insure that these swans receive proper medical care.
  • As the House voted along party lines on Thursday to approve a sweeping package of GOP tax reforms, one peculiar part of the floor debate came when a number of Republicans – who voted for the bill – took to the floor to request changes in the their party’s plan, as some highlighted unintended consequences, while others objected to the basics of the measure. Known in parliamentary parlance as a “colloquy,” the scripted exchanges between lawmakers are often done to clarify the legislative intent of a bill, or in this case, to urge action in a specific way in House-Senate negotiations. And for some Republicans in this week’s tax reform debate, it was clear they wanted some provisions altered. Some requests were specific, like Rep. David McKinley (R-WV), who made the case for historic preservation tax credits, which were eradicated by the House GOP tax reform bill. “Without the credit, projects that transform communities in all 50 states, from West Virginia to Texas, to Wisconsin, simply will not happen,” McKinley said on the House floor, as he asked for Brady’s word that he would help reverse the decision. That didn’t happen. “I commit to working with him and continuing to work with him on this issue because I know the importance of it,” Brady responded, making sure not to guarantee anything in some of these floor exchanges. For Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-FL), a staunch advocate of the GOP bill, he was assured by the Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee that more would be done in terms of tax help for the people of Puerto Rico, whose island was devastated by Hurricane Maria. “I look forward to working with you on ideas to best serve the people of this island,” said Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), who thanked fellow GOP lawmakers for their concerns, but made no promises. For Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY), the issue was with a new excise tax from Republicans that would be levied on the endowments of private colleges and universities. Barr said that would harm Berea College in his district, a ‘work college’ that uses its endowment money to pay the tuition of all students. It was noted in press stories back home. Barr Fights for Berea College in Tax Reform Bill – https://t.co/YoBgs5CWvp – — BereaOnline.com (@bereaonline) November 16, 2017 “I was pleased to learn that the Senate version of the bill exempts schools with fewer than 500 tuition-paying students from the excise tax,” Barr said, urging Brady to accept that position in any House-Senate negotiation. Brady said he would try. “Mr. Speaker, we will work together for a mutually accepted solution to make sure we exempt work colleges to use their endowments to provide tuition-free education,” the panel chairman responded. For Rep. Don Young (R-AK), the problem he brought to the House floor was under the heading of unintended consequences, as the GOP tax bill would subject native settlement trusts in Alaska to a higher rate of taxation. “This would make it more difficult for Alaska Native Settlement Trusts to provide long-term benefits to Alaska Natives,” Young said on the House floor, asking Brady to include provisions of a bill to remedy that and more. Unlike some of the other requests, Brady acknowledged that the GOP tax bill would “unintentionally” change the tax rate for the Alaskan settlements, agreeing to focus on this in conference as we finalize individual rate structures between the House and the Senate.” Others weren’t so lucky to get a guarantee of action, as they pressed for changes in maybe the most controversial part of the GOP plan, which limits a deduction for state and local taxes. “I am concerned about its impact on some of my constituents in Maryland who pay high state and local income taxes,” said Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD), the only Republican member of the House from that state, which would be one of the biggest losers on the SALT issue. That subject also drew two California Republicans to make the same appeal to Brady later in the debate; Rep. Mimi Walters (R-CA) and Rep. Steve Knight (R-CA) echoed the concerns of Harris – all of them got a murky assurance of help. “I am happy to commit to working with both of them to ensure we reach a positive outcome for their constituents and families as we reconcile our differences with the Senate,” Brady said, making no promises. Other Republicans brought up education, and a provision in the GOP tax reform bill that would hinder colleges and universities from providing tax free tuition waivers and reimbursements, a matter that has drawn more and more attention in recent days. Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH) – whose district includes Dayton University – and Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL) – whose district includes the University of Illinois – both appealed to Brady to make a change. “I believe that an unintended consequence of this bill would hinder middle class Americans pursuing a higher education degree in an attempt to better their lives,” Turner said. “I am worried it is going to have an impact on the custodians and the assistants in the Registrar’s Office who are just working at these institutions to be able to send their son or daughter to college,” said Davis. There was no guarantee that the provision would be changed. “I have a keen interest in this issue,” Brady told Turner and Davis. “I will work with you toward a positive solution on tuition assistance in conference with the Senate.” Democrats noted the exchanges on both days of the House tax reform debate, arguing that it showed off the haphazard nature of how the bill was put together. “I also was intrigued by the colloquy where Members came to ask the leadership if they will work with them to take out egregious elements of this tax proposal,” said Rep. Dan Kildee (D-MI). “We get this sort of, “Yes, I will work with the gentleman,” answer,” Kildee added, raising his voice on the floor. “Why did you put it in in the first place?” Kildee yelled. “Why are you cutting historic tax credits in the first place? Why did you put it in in the first place? You just wrote the bill. You just wrote it,” he said. GOP lawmakers said this past week that anyone can find a reason to vote against a big bill like this tax reform plan – we’ll see in coming weeks whether these publicly voiced concerns become an issue for the final version of tax reform in the Congress.