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3rd Annual Mount Dora Blueberry Festival

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Blueberry Fest Poster

  • What: Third Annual Mount Dora Blueberry Festival 
  • When: April 29-30, 2017 from 9am-5pm 
  • Where: Elizabeth Evans Park 100 N. Donnelly Street, Mount Dora, FL

The 3rd Annual Mount Dora Blueberry Festival comes to the shores of Lake Dora at Elizabeth Evans Park in Mount Dora, FL April 29-30, 2017. Long known as The Festival City for its many and varied festivals, Mount Dora will host what is destined to become a large, economically important festival celebrating the growing agricultural importance of blueberries to the Central Florida economy. Since the demise of citrus throughout much of Florida, blueberry fields full of berry varieties developed specifically for the Florida climate have supplied the growing demand for fresh home-grown fruit on consumers' tables. With a current crop totaling about 17 million pounds, we have a long way to go to equal the 100 million pounds produced in neighboring Georgia. We will catch up and, in time, exceed Georgia. Help in the effort to make blueberries a major agricultural crop in Florida. Visit the Mount Dora Blueberry Festival.

Click HERE for more details!

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

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  • A 3-year-old boy vacationing with his family in the Florida Keys died after he wandered off and ended up in a canal, according to news reports. >> Read more trending news The family had arrived at Key Colony Beach near Marathon on Saturday evening after traveling from their home in Gainesville, Georgia, the Miami Herald reported. While they were unpacking, Andrew Williams got out of the home they were renting and headed toward a canal, the paper said. A neighbor started screaming when she found him in the water around 6:45 p.m. The neighbor’s husband pulled Andrew out, and by then his parents, Erica and Jeffrey Williams, arrived, according to a Monroe County Sheriff’s Office report obtained by the Miami Herald.  The boy’s father started to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation on his son until Marathon Fire-Rescue paramedics arrived and took over, the report said.  Andrew was taken to a hospital where he died just before 10 p.m., according to officials. Read more at the Miami Herald
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