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Latest from Marsha Taylor

    This is one video you'll want to see today.  A male orangutan at the Greenville zoo escaped his enclosure prompting a brief lock down. 'Kumar' managed to snap a wire holding together the net at the top of the enclosure.  Then he unraveled the net enough to squeeze through. Of course someone got it on a cell phone  Fox News Carolina posted the cell phone video.  There is a happy ending, Kumar never made it out to where zoo guests are in the park and zoo workers fixed the netting. Thirty minutes later the lock down was lifted and the drama ended.
  • And for the truly fanatic Game of Throne fans:   Someone posted a YouTube video teasing the new season seven characters with Sand Art. The two minute and 18 second video promises no leaked scenes just sand animation.     Of course last week we learned one of the leads - Emilia Clarke is over it.  The 'Khaleesi' says she is ready for one more season, which would be season eight and that's it despite all the expected prequels and sequels.  Season 7 starts July 17.
  • Actor Johnny Depp is joining a chorus of arts types stoking controversy over President Trump.   At a festival to celebrate the opening of his new movie, The Libertine.   Depp can be heard asking “when was the last time an actor assassinated a president? ” after a cheer from the crowd Depp continues, “however, it’s been awhile maybe it’s time”.   Depps comments come after comedian Kathy Griffin lost her CNN gig when she taped a video holding what looked like the severed head of President Trump, and a Shakespeare performance lost financial backers after using a Trump look alike to play a character murdered on stage. 
  • Queen Elizabeth has had a busy day.  First she stopped by the hospital to see her husband Prince Phillip.  The 96 year old is suffering from an infection.  Then she opened Parliament in a striking blue outfit.  But it’s the hat that’s generating all the tweets.  People say it is remarkably similar to the European Union flag.  You’ll have to judge for yourself.
  • Ten new dolls are out and five more will be released in the coming weeks to stores.  Mattel says the dolls include seven skin tones, a variety of hair styles and lots of plaid. The original Ken came out five decades ago with a buzz cut, red swim shorts and sandals.  He’s Barbie’s date and his look has changed over the years.
  • Alot of eyes are watching the race in Georgia to replace Congressman Tom Price.  Price is now serving in the Trump administration.  Republican Karen Handle faces Democrate John Ossoff.  Ossoff does not live in District six so he can’t even cast a ballot for himself today.  He tells CNN he is living outside the district with his girlfriend while she finishes school.  This race is a big talk topic for former presidential contender Herman Cain.  He is  urging Republicans to get out and vote in what developed into the most expensive Congressional race in U.S. history.  An estimated 50 million dollars flooded into Georgia to pay for ads in this race.  The race also has the attention of President Trump.  He’s tweeting about it this morning.
  • You will hear a new warning about 'fake news' today from the guy who reccommended firing former FBI director, James Comey. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will issue a statement urging americans to exercise caution before accepting as true, any stories attributed to anonymous 'officials' particulary when they do not identify the country let alone the branch or agency of the government, with which the alleged sourses supposedly are affiliated. Americans should be skeptical of anonymous allegations. The Department of Justice the statement reads, has a long established policy to neight confirm or deny such allegations.
  • Uber is having a tough time with it's fresh start. Now three top officials are out.  The exodus started Monday when the company's number two man resigned. Emil Michael visited an escort bar in South Korea with employees in 2014. Then the CEO said he needs time off to grieve the death of his mother. And late last night investor and Uber board member David Bonderman resigned after leaked audio showed he made a joke,  saying having more women on the board would just lead to more talking.  The board meeting was about sexism at the compnay and in the room at the time?  The Huffington Posts editor Arianna Huffington.  Bonderman later sent an apology to employees in an email.  
  • Sometimes you have to give the  marketing men and women credit for making us laugh.  Smirnoff Vodka’s ad pokes fun at the debate over Russia and manages to add a twist of lime.
  • Many in Central Florida woke up last year to news of the massacre at Pulse.  This one year anniversary is remembered by Orlando tatoo artist Robby Chareco.  He quickly learned about what happened with news reports and watching Social Media.  He was stunned.  Later a friend who works as a dispatcher and took some of the 911 calls that night asked for a tatoo.   “That’s what tattooing does, it transorms the tragedy into an art piece.”   Chareco gave her splashes of rainbow color on her ankle surrounded by the outline of a 911 dispatcher’s headset.   Others wanted their own memories.  Chareco and other tatto shops including The Devine Canvas and it’s owner Roly,  decided to donate the profits from any Pulse tatoos.  Chareco is not sure how much money the inkwork raised, four or five thousand dollars  was donated to the One Orlando Fund.  But that was not the point.  “You see something beautiful growing from something ugly.”   Other shops including Anarchy Tatoos and Art Co. didn’t want any money.  They gave their Pulse or LGBT themed tatoos away for free.
  • Marsha Taylor

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    Marsha Taylor is co anchor of Central Florida's morning news.  She's no stranger to Orlando - she moved here when her father was a navigator on B-52's stationed at what was then Mccoy Air Force Base.  (It's now Orlando International Airport)  Marsha is a radio-TV graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.  After graduating she came home and started looking for a job!  Her first job was WDIZ - 100.3 - a rock station - after 3 years there Marsha moved to public radio - 90.7 in Orlando.  She arrived at WDBO in 1986-lured by a combo job reporting and anchoring...and a chance to say WDBO - 60 times a minute.  Or at least it sounded like that after public radio.  Marsha anchored - midday - the afternoon news...and has spent the last 17 years co- anchoring Central Florida's Morning News.  During her tenure as News Director - she won countless awards - including the 2012 Best Radio News Operation in the state - from the  Associated Press.

      She's married with 3 children.   Her oldest son is in the Army - her daugher is an RN with Orlando Health and her youngest son is an  8th grader.  Marsha keeps up with Longwood Babe Ruth baseball and middle school.  She enjoys reading and getting up REALLY early to join the show every morning at 5am.

     

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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • GOP leaders in the U.S. Senate seem ready to push ahead with a showdown procedural vote on a bill to overhaul the Obama health law, even without any assurance that they have enough votes to simply start debate, and without a final decision on what changes Senate Republicans might offer to a health care bill narrowly approved by the House in early May. While most of the attention this week will be on the machinations involving health care legislation in the Senate, the House will take the first steps on spending bills for next year’s budget, and vote on a revised plan for new sanctions against Russia, as the House gets ready to head home for an extended summer break. Here’s the latest from Capitol Hill: 1. Senate GOP bill on health care still in limbo. GOP leaders are still vowing to press ahead this week on a procedural vote that would begin debate on a House-passed bill to overhaul the Obama health law, but it’s not clear that Republicans have enough votes to take that first step. The absence of Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) – diagnosed last week with brain cancer – is a big deal, since the White House needs every vote possible. Some still wonder if Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) might be convinced to at least vote to start debate – though he has made clear he is against the options that have been floated so far by top Republicans on health care legislation. As for Democrats, they’re still worried about a late rush to victory by the GOP. We saw what happened in the House of Representatives. They passed a bill after everyone thought it was dead. We can’t let that happen again. — Sen Dianne Feinstein (@SenFeinstein) July 23, 2017 2. Senate Parliamentarian knocks some holes in GOP plan. Because Republicans chose to use the expedited procedure known as budget reconciliation, the Senate rules play a much larger than normal role, and that has resulted in problems for a series of provisions in the bill. On Friday, the Parliamentarian said a dozen pieces of the Senate bill could be subjected to parliamentary points of order, which could only be overridden by a 60 vote super majority, something the GOP does not have. That includes provisions designed to block any federal dollars from going through the Medicaid program to Planned Parenthood. And the bill may have more holes poked in it on Monday, when the Parliamentarian goes over four other provisions. 3. Trump keeps pressing GOP on health care. While President Trump again pushed GOP Senators over the weekend to act on health care, his call for action doesn’t seem to be making Republicans in the Congress tremble at the thought of being the target of his ire – and for now, the votes aren’t there to get this Senate health care bill over the finish line. As I type this, it’s not even clear what the GOP might be voting on in the Senate as early as this week – if enough Senators decide to begin debate on the Senate floor. It’s a big week for Republican leaders in the Congress on health care – watch to see what the President says in public about the process, as well as GOP holdouts, and what he does behind the scenes to twist some arms of GOP Senators. Don’t count him out just yet. The Republican Senators must step up to the plate and, after 7 years, vote to Repeal and Replace. Next, Tax Reform and Infrastructure. WIN! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 22, 2017 4. House to pass Russia sanctions bill. After sitting on the measure for a few weeks, Republicans in the House will approve a plan that steps up sanctions on Iran and Russia – it was approved on a vote of 98-2 in the Senate. The House though, will add provisions dealing with North Korea, and send that back to the Senate for further action. It’s expected to be approved swiftly there. Behind the scenes, the White House has expressed frustration about the sanctions bill, because it would not allow President Trump to unilaterally roll back economic sanctions against Moscow. The vote comes as there has been more talk that the Trump Administration wants to give two compounds back to Russia, which were confiscated by the Obama Administration last December, in the first punishment for election interference in 2016. The only thing Republicans have fought Trump on are Russian sanctions… is he that upset that the GOP isn't protecting Trump through Putin? https://t.co/Ufvo9pqXDc — Josh Jordan (@NumbersMuncher) July 23, 2017 5. House will leave town without passing all 12 funding bills. For weeks, House GOP leaders and rank-in-file lawmakers have told reporters that they were certainly going to have action on all twelve funding bills for the federal government. Reporters tried not to laugh out loud, knowing full well that was not likely. After this week, the House will be gone from Washington until Labor Day, and the plan is to jam four of the twelve funding bills into one package, and pass them in what’s known as a ‘minibus’ (the smaller version of the omnibus). Funding bills for the military, VA, energy and water programs, and the Legislative Branch (Congress) will be in that plan – but eight other bills will not voted on this week. And yet, the House will go home for five weeks. As you can see, a lot of budget work has not been done in both the House and Senate. Unfortunately, that has become standard procedure no matter which party is in charge. How many spending bills each chamber has passed — House got the last of its bills through cmte yesterday. 2.5 months until govt $$ runs out pic.twitter.com/TlwXVgspWa — Sean McMinn (@shmcminn) July 20, 2017 6. One odd provision in the minibus. One interesting choice made by Republicans this week is that the House will vote on money to build the border wall backed by President Trump – but not the underlying bill that funds the Department of Homeland Security. A provision for $1.6 billion to start work on the wall along the border with Mexico is part of the “Make America Secure” minibus appropriations bill – but the plan to actually fund Homeland Security operations won’t be voted on by the House – until after Labor Day. You can see the House schedule – a rare five day legislative work week is scheduled this week for the House, and then lawmakers head back home for five weeks. 7. Democrats look to force votes on Trump hotels. It wouldn’t be a debate on spending bills without some nettlesome votes being forced by the minority. This week, Democrats have asked for amendments that would prohibit government workers from staying at hotels owned or operated by President Trump’s family. One amendment gives the Defense Secretary the right to waive that on national security grounds; another amendment from Rep. Don Beyer (R-VA) gives a list of 40 different Trump hotels that would be off limits for federal government official business. Just one of the votes to look forward to this week in the ‘minibus.’ Democrats in the House try to stop federal workers from staying at Trump hotel properties https://t.co/ASJrKVr51q — Jamie Dupree (@jamiedupree) July 23, 2017 8. Not on the schedule – the GOP budget blueprint. While the House Budget Committee last week was finally able to approve a budget outline for 2018, that budget resolution won’t be on the House floor this week. Why? Because it doesn’t have the votes to pass at this point in time. That means any talk you hear from GOP leaders and/or President Trump about action on tax reform needs to be taken with a grain of salt, because that budget blueprint has to be approved by both the House and Senate before any votes on can take place on a tax bill – and since the House isn’t going to be back until after Labor Day, that means tax reform remains on hold in the Congress. So what’s next? Three important agenda items now loom –tax reform, debt ceiling and budget resolution. Path to each is somewhat unclear. — Charlie_Commodities (@lfucha) July 22, 2017 9. Tax reform must be ‘budget neutral.’ One story that didn’t get much play last week because of the GOP troubles on health care is a wonky type of detail from the GOP budget resolution – but it has a big impact on tax reform plans for Republicans. At issue is a provision that says any tax bill must be budget neutral; in other words, if you cut taxes – and therefore raise the deficit by cutting revenue – then you must offset that lost revenue. That most likely would mean getting rid of tax deductions and tax breaks, a plan that sounds great in theory, but is difficult in practice to get through the Congress. Eliminate or cut back on the mortgage interest deduction? Make health care benefits through your job into taxable income? Get rid of the business interest deduction? Lots of difficult choices. If you think health care is hard, tax reform will be even more difficult. 'Budget neutral' tax reform could mean some difficult choices for Republicans in the Congress https://t.co/BcWNLAIlPo — Jamie Dupree (@jamiedupree) July 22, 2017 10. Infrastructure – the missing Trump agenda item. Along with tax reform, there has been talk for months by the President, top Administration officials, and GOP lawmakers in Congress about voting for a bill to spur the construction of new roads and bridges. Mr. Trump has talked repeatedly about a $1 trillion public-private plan, but no proposal has been sent to the Congress, and none is expected until after Labor Day. Some thought the President should have started with this idea, since increased infrastructure spending is something that Democrats favor – but for a number of Republicans, that wasn’t a good idea, as they repeatedly opposed plans from the Obama Administration for more highway dollars. For now, this is going nowhere fast. Nobody knew infrastructure could be so complicated, complains President Trump https://t.co/QKpBhPMIhL pic.twitter.com/TMXjDW44xy — David Frum (@davidfrum) July 23, 2017
  • Tyler Swantek, 24, was already in custody on drug charges when police tacked on a first-degree murder charge. Police said he killed his father, Todd Swantek, and left the corpse on the couch for weeks. The Standard-Speaker reported that Swantek allegedly shot his father in the head with a rifle. >> Read more trending news Police reportedly were called to the scene in Frackville, Pennsylvania, in late May by a friend of Todd Swantek’s, who had not heard from the father for a month. When police entered the house, they found a gruesome scene: The badly decomposed body was on the couch, covered in blankets and a sleeping bag, the Standard-Speaker reported. Police said they searched the house and found the rifle, which they believe to be the murder weapon, in Tyler Swantek’s bedroom. There were a number of candles and air fresheners in the house, apparently put out in an attempt to mask the smell, the Standard-Speaker reported. Police said that when they interviewed Tyler Swantek about his father’s death, he showed no emotion. An autopsy report suggested that the body may have been on the couch for months before it was discovered. Swantek appeared in court where he asked for reduced bail for drug charges, but the judge didn’t agree to the deal. The judge reportedly said, “He’s a danger to himself and society.” Read more here.
  • As House Republicans move to consider the first bills to fund the operations of the United States government next year, Democrats are hoping to force votes on plans that would prohibit federal workers from staying at hotels and other properties in which President Donald Trump has a financial interest. The plans are being pushed by Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA), a frequent critic of Mr. Trump, as Beyer hopes to bring them up for debate on four different funding bills that are scheduled to be voted on this week by the full House. The format is the familiar “funding limitation” amendment, in which ‘none of the funds’ can be used by the feds for certain purposes – in this case, staying at a hotel that is either owned or operated by the Trump family. The effort comes after press reports earlier this month, that the State Department spent over $15,000 to book rooms at the new Trump Hotel in Vancouver; the information was obtained by the Washington Post in a Freedom of Information Act request. For the bill that funds the operations of Congress, and programs of the Department of Veterans Affairs and Military Construction, the language spelled out above would block government workers from spending money to “pay or reimburse lodging expenses of a Federal employee or official in the course of official Government travel or business at any hotel or property in which the President maintains a financial interest.” For the spending bill that funds the operations of the Pentagon, Beyer’s plan would give the Secretary of Defense the power to waive those same prohibitions, “on a case-by-case basis,” on the grounds of national security. But in the funding bill for Energy and Water programs, Beyer’s amendment gets specific, listing over three dozen different Trump properties in the U.S. and around the world. It’s not clear if the plans will be considered during debate this week on these four funding bills, which are being grouped together into one ‘minibus’ funding measure, officially known as the “Make America Secure Appropriations Act.” The House Rules Committee will meet on Monday to sort through amendments proposed to the bill by lawmakers, and determine which ones should be debated.  
  • Multiple people were found dead early Sunday inside a semi-trailer in the parking lot of a San Antonio Walmart. >> Read more trending news >> Click here or scroll down for more
  • A 5-year-old Massachusetts boy whose story gained national attention when he learned he was getting a long-awaited heart transplant has died. Ari Schultz was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and had to undergo two heart surgeries before he was even born. Earlier this year, after waiting nearly 200 days for a new heart, the family learned Ari would be getting one. >> Read more trending news On June 16, Ari came home from the hospital. On Thursday morning, the family posted on its Facebook page that Ari was taken to the emergency room for a seizure. After over a half-hour of CPR, he was placed on life support in the cardiac intensive care unit. The family posted on Friday evening that Ari passed away peacefully while listening to the Red Sox. Ari has two siblings, his sister Lexi and his brother Eli.