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Latest from Joe Kelley

    Paper airplanes just got a big boost, thanks to toymaker Power Up Toys.  What started as a Kickstarter campaign is now a reality as Power Up Toys takes flight with the PowerUp 3.0 Smartphone Controlled Paper Airplane.  Amazon is selling the airplanes for $49.99.  (app users can see video here)
  • It’s Tuesday.  My favorite day of the week.  Because tacos.  The rumors are true - I love tacos.  Crispy tacos. Soft tacos. Beef tacos. Chicken tacos. Even shrimp tacos. They’re all my favorites.  But what does Tuesday have to do with tacos? At some point in our US culinary culture, someone put the word “taco” in front of “Tuesday” and created a benchmark dietary staple on a memorable day with a nice alliteration for the title - Taco Tuesday! But, don’t plan on using that for a theme for your new taco business, lest you have a strong legal team.  While most people know about Taco Tuesday, they’re considerably less aware of who actually OWNS the ‘Taco Tuesday’ copyright.  And that distinction belongs to Wyoming-based restaurant Taco John’s.  (app users can see tweet here) (app users can see Facebook post here) We’ve even found what we’re told is the very first ‘Taco Tuesday’ radio commercial from Taco John’s.  Behold: (app users can hear the commercial here) Priceonomics has an entire report on the history of ‘Taco Tuesday,’ that starts with this piece of startling information for a restaurant owner who dared use “taco Tuesday” as a promotion: When the owners of the Old Fashioned Tavern and Restaurant received a cease and desist letter demanding they stop holding Taco Tuesdays, they thought it was a joke.  For almost a decade, the restaurant had sold $2 tacos on Tuesday night. Other restaurants and bars in the area had similar promotions, and in cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles, Taco Tuesday specials are as plentiful as yoga classes.  But the author of the letter claimed that “Taco Tuesday” was a federally registered trademark that belonged to Taco John’s, a chain of around 400 Mexican-style fast food restaurants. And as Old Fashioned manager Jennifer DeBolt told the local Cap Times, they quickly realized that “the law firm is completely legit.”  So, like hundreds of restaurant owners and managers who have received letters from Taco John’s lawyers in the last two decades, they stopped using the term Taco Tuesday.
  • It's great to take pride in your work and want to show it off, but not if it's a person's foot you just amputated. Two intern doctors have been fired and face a court probe for doing just that. One of the interns, 24-year-old Carolina Dominguez, posted the photo on Twitter with the caption, 'My first leg dad. Sorry if these images upset you.' Local reports said that as well as the amputated foot, Carolina also posted a photo showing her with what appeared to be a piece of someone's stomach. The photos have since been removed from Twitter.  (app users can see tweet here) (app users can see tweet here)
  • Police in Sanford tweeted this morning about a shooting there with “multiple injuries.”  Six people were shot early Monday in Sanford, including 2 children, Seminole County Fire Rescue said. One adult was found dead inside a home there.  The shooting was reported shortly before 6:30 a.m. along Hays Drive, firefighters said. Of the five people who were wounded, officials said one person died and four others were taken to a hospital. Firefighters said two children were among the injured.
  • It’s said that an animal in fear has two options - fight or flight.  And in the case of an escaped cow in Temple, Texas, the trigger from one to the other was the simple act of a police officer closing a gate on a runaway cow.  As seen from the officer’s dash mounted camera, the police officer seems to have been handed an obvious solution to capturing the runaway bovine when she runs into a gated yard - just close the gate.  But the cow surely felt endangered by the act of closing the gate and charges at the officer.  As of Saturday (March 25th), KTRK is reporting the cow is ‘still on the run.’  (app users can see video here) (app users can see video here) The Orlando Police Department even joins the discussion of the fast-acting officer in the video.  (app users can see tweet here)
  • A student in Portland, Oregon, has been designated ‘genderless’ by a judge, making for a first in the United States.  Patrick Abbatiello walked into Multnomah County Judge Amy Holmes Hehn’s court as a boy, but walked out without a gender,  or ‘agender.’  The Ore­gon judge, who last year ruled that a transgender person can legally change their sex to 'non-binary' gave the OK for Patch to be genderless.  People who are agender see themselves as neither a man nor a woman and have no gender identity. (app users can see tweet here) The 27-year-old student was also granted a name change to the single name of ‘Patch.’  'It's not that I decided I was genderless — that's just how it is,' Patch said. 'I never felt like I fell within any part of the gender spectrum. None of the binary options, nothing in-between. 'I don't consider myself non-binary because that's an umbrella term for anything that isn't binary, which is gender identity.' (Read more from Daily Mail) The AP Style Book, considered the bible of writing guides for journalists, gives updated guidance on writing about genderless people.  In a presentation to journalists this weekend, the curators of AP‘s style guide urged writers to start thinking of “gender” and “sex” as separate concepts, noting that while gender is “a person’s social identity,” “sex” refers to their “biological characteristics.” You can only be one sex, it turns out, but you can be quite a few genders. “Not all people fall under one of two categories for sex or gender, according to leading medical organizations, so avoid references to both, either or opposite sexes or genders as a way to encompass all people,” the update noted. “When needed for clarity or in certain stories about scientific studies, alternatives include men and women, boys and girls, males and females.” (Read more at Heatstreet) (app users can see tweet here) (app users can see tweet here)
  • A zoo is taking drastic measures to protect their rhinos from poachers who’d otherwise seek to break into the zoo and harm the animals for their horns.  The Dvur Kralove Zoo in the Czech Republic will remove the horns from its 21 rhinos as a precaution. The drastic decision was made following the brutal killing of a rhinoceros at a wildlife park near Paris by assailants who stole the animal’s horn. (App users can see tweet here) (Tweet) With their horns considered a cure in Asia for everything from cancer, colds and fevers to high blood pressure, hangovers, and other ailments, poachers have decimated rhino populations in Africa and elsewhere. (See Metro for more)
  •  Actor Alec Baldwin thinks that kids should get education in school about the good and the bad of social media and safety while using it, just like they're taught sex education and about the dangers of drug use. Speaking to Refinery29 in an interview along with his wife Hilaria, with whom he has three young children, Baldwin explained: 'Beyond bullying, the obvious issues about bullying online and so forth, I want eventually for schools to teach about [social media]. What it is, what it isn't. What the pitfalls are, what the benefits are. . . . I think that like sex education and drug education, this is the next thing we need to teach kids about in schools.
  • Cody Gribble gave new meaning to a risky play on the par-5 sixth hole over water at Bay Hill on Thursday. Not with a club, but with his hand. And it didn't involve an eagle, rather an 8-foot alligator. Gribble, already 4-over par for his round, was walking along the edge of the lake when he saw the gator sunning himself on the bank. Instead of walking around it, the Texan reached over and swatted its tail his left hand. Startled, the gator took off for the water. 'The gator looked like he needed some exercise,' Gribble said after opening with a 77. 'But he was sitting right there in the way and, you know, I guess I was trying to get some adrenaline going somehow. But I wasn't really afraid of it.' App users can see video here. 
  • NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) is very excited about the continued growth and opportunity presented by social media such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and others. NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) encourages comments, critiques, questions, and suggestions and will make every effort to respond to questions posed to NEWS 96.5 (WDBO).  By posting comments to the NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) Facebook page, you are agreeing to the NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) Social Media Comment Policy.  NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) reserves the right to delete (or mark as spam) postings and comments that:  i. Contain spam, or links to other sites  ii. Are clearly off topic   iii. Advocate illegal activity  iv. Promote particular services, products, political organizations or competitors  v. Infringe on copyrights or trademarks  vi. Contain sexual content or links to sexual content    Additionally:   vii. We will not allow personal attacks or vulgar, abusive, offensive, threatening or harassing language. This includes creative spellings of swear words using asterisks or spaces between words   viii. We will not allow comments that promote, foster or perpetuate discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, age, religion, gender, national origin, physical or mental disability or sexual orientation   ix. We will not allow the same content to be posted multiple times. Any subsequent posting of identical information will be deleted. Your criticisms of News 96.5 (WDBO) are welcome and encouraged, but posting the same criticisms repeatedly will be deemed a campaign and campaigns are not permitted. Engaging in a campaign of criticism will warrant blocking of the poster.  x. We will not allow comments that promote or oppose any person campaigning for election to a political office or that promote or oppose any ballot measure xi. The intentional posting of inaccurate comments or content is not allowed  xii. Comments made by individuals deploying inappropriate profile photos will be deleted   xiii. NEWS 96.5 (WDBO)’s Facebook page is a troll-free zone. Comments specifically designed to elicit a negative emotional response or anger are prohibited.  NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) welcomes comments/criticisms about on-air and online programming but comments viewed as harassment or heckling will be deleted. NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) has no compelling reason to entertain anti-NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) rants on our NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) Facebook page.  NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) reserves the right to delete (or mark as spam) any and all comments. NEWS 96.5 (WDBO) reserves the right to block (without warning) any repeat violator of these terms.    There is no First Amendment right to post comments on anyone’s Facebook page. Abuse your privileges, expect to be deleted, banned and reported to Facebook.   All comments and posts must comply with Facebook’s Terms of Service.
  • Joe Kelley

    News Director

    Joe Kelley has joined the staff of News 96.5 as News Director and host of Orlando's Morning News. Joe comes to Orlando from News 96.5’s sister-station KRMG in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he also held both positions.

    Joe has been recognized many times over for his successes as an on-air radio personality and community leader. He has received awards from Radio and Records Magazine, Radio Ink Magazine, the Dallas Press Club, and Las Vegas Women in Communications, the Tulsa Press Club, the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters and more. In 2007, Joe was named to the "Top 40 Under 40" achievers in Tulsa People Magazine, The Journal Record Newspaper and the Tulsa Business Journal.

    More than just a broadcaster, Joe has been a writer for Tulsa Kids Magazine since 2005. His monthly column focuses on the observational humor he enjoys while raising his three young children with his wife of 16 years, Nicole. Joe's now featured in Orlando Family Magazine with his Twitter MoMENts column.

    Joe has been active in the Rotary Club and has served on the board of directors and as sergeant-at-arms. Joe is also a long-time volunteer, board member and former chairman of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oklahoma. Joe has raised more than $1.4 million in the last 7 years for Make-A-Wish.

    Radio was a calling for Joe.

    Literally.

    His broadcast career began in 1982, in the small southeast Texas town of Nederland.

    The phone in his high school journalism class rang. The teacher was out of the room at the moment, so Joe reached for the phone.

    “Hey, you wanna be on the radio?” the voice on the phone asked.

    Unbeknownst to Joe at that moment, on the other end of that phone line was a 30-year-plus career in broadcast journalism.

    Calling was a local radio station program director in need of free help.

    Joe jumped at the chance.

    For most people, opportunity knocks.

    In Joe’s case, it called.

    And while his initial introduction to radio was entirely unexpected, Joe's ascension to his level of professional success is quite deliberate and the result of three decades of thoughtful and creative performances on award-winning radio stations across the country.

    On the personal side, Joe has been married to the woman of his dreams, Nicole, since 1996. Joe and Nicole were winners on TV’s “The Newlywed Game” later that year.

    Nicole and Joe adopted an 11-year-old son from the state of Texas in 2001, after seeing his story on the Dallas TV news. Nicole gave birth in Dallas to their only daughter, Sierra, in 2003. The always-rambunctious Kelley twins, Hudson and Brooks, were born in Tulsa in 2006.

    Joe and Nicole are thrilled to move the family to Orlando and are very excited about making new friends in their new home.

    Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • April is the month that downtown Orlando will welcome a new entertainment spot, geared especially for motorheads and those who like the feel of bugs in their teeth. Ace Cafe Orlando is completing construction at the corner of West Livingston Street and Garland Avenue, by renovating and refurbishing the old Harry P. Leu supply company site.  “Since 1938, Ace Cafe London has been a mecca for those passionate about cars, bikes and rock ’n roll culture. The original location on London’s North Circular Road began as a simple roadside cafe for truckers, then evolved into a popular destination for rock ‘n roll-loving teens riding motorbikes during the '50s and '60s. Today, the Ace has a multi-generational appeal from motorsports enthusiasts from all over the world,” according to a company news release. Ace Cafe plans to offer a dining and drinking experience with patio seating, live outdoor entertainment, while offering a meeting place for car clubs to show off their prized possessions. Plans also call for retail shops at the location, with a summertime opening.
  • The lionfish has a venomous reputation with its ability to multiply like crazy, gobble up numerous crustaceans and fish, and swim around the waters off Florida without any predator in sight.  Well, they may soon meet their match.  >> Read more trending news A group called Robots in Service of the Environment, or RISE, said it has created a robot that will help to eliminate these zebra-striped invasives, according to Mashable. Colin Angle, who co-founded RISE with his wife Erika, told Mashable that the robot will be unveiled next month. However, they did provide a few tidbits on how it will operate. Essentially the robot will stun the fish, suck them into its ‘belly’ and then rise to the surface once it has a full load. The idea is to then deliver the fish to restaurants and stores, Angle said.  Most scientists and environmentalists are worried about lionfish because they can produce up to 30,000 eggs every four to five days, according to RISE. That’s about 2 million eggs a year.  Each lionfish can eat 20 fish in 30 minutes. 
  • When it comes to the Donald Trump administration, the president is keeping it in the family, including his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who serves as his senior adviser. >> Read more trending news In the coming weeks, he’ll speak to the Senate Intelligence Committee as a part of an investigation into the Russian’s involvement with the U.S. election. Additionally, he’ll be organizing American Innovation, a new office charged with using ideas from the business world and applying them to government functions. But aside from his political endeavors, what else do you know about the politician? From his alma mater to his career background, test your knowledge with these six facts: 1. He’s a Harvard and NYU grad. He graduated from Harvard in 2003 with a bachelor’s degree in government. In 2007, he earned his J.D. and MBA from New York University. 2. He and Ivanka began dating in 2005.  The pair wed in 2009 in a Jewish ceremony. They have three children together -- Arabella, Fredrick and Theodore -- who range from the ages of 1 to 5.  3. He’s an Orthodox Jew. Ivanka converted to Judaism from Presbyterianism before they wed. They are both shomrei Shabbos, who observe the Sabbath. From sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, they turn off their phones and walk instead of drive. 4. He was in an episode “Gossip Girl.” In 2010, he and his wife appeared on the show as themselves in season four. Ivanka tweeted, “Jared & I had a ball on the set of #GossipGirl this AM.” 5. He had a stake in the Observer. Kushner bought the New York publication in 2006 for $10 million at age 25. Last year, he stepped down as publisher to accept a job with the Trump administration as a senior adviser to the president. He has no prior political experience. 6. He was previously a Democrat. He was a registered Democrat for years, making donations to the organization regularly. At the start of the 2016 election, he became an Independent to support his father-in-law. 
  • A man being interviewed by a BBC documentary film crew was mauled to death by his own dog earlier this month.  The Guardian reported that Mario Perivoitos, 41, was working with the film crew in his north London home March 20 when his Staffordshire bull terrier attacked him. The crew called an ambulance, which took Perivoitos to a hospital.  Perivoitos, who had severe neck wounds, died a couple of hours later.  Neighbors, who said Perivoitos had lived in the building for about 20 years, told the Guardian that they heard the attack. “I heard shouting. ‘Get him off! Get him off me!’” Geoff Morgan said. “He was shouting really loudly. He was bleeding from his neck. There was a lot of blood.” An autopsy showed that Perivoitos died of hypovolemic shock, a condition that occurs when a person loses more than a fifth of their blood volume. The lack of blood or fluid causes inadequate blood circulation and, subsequently, organ failure.  The medical examiner also cited damage to his airway in the autopsy, the Guardian reported.  >> Read more trending stories Perivoitos’ dog was seized by police and is being kept in a secure kennel, the paper reported. Staffordshire bull terriers are not one of the breeds banned under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act of 1991.  According to the BBC, the Dangerous Dogs Act puts restrictions on ownership of four breeds -- the pit bull terrier, the Japanese tosa, the fila brasileiro and the dogo argentino -- which were traditionally bred for fighting. The law requires owners of those breeds to obtain an exemption from the courts. They must register and insure their dogs and keep them muzzled and leashed when in public. The dogs must also be spayed or neutered and must be tattooed and microchipped for identification purposes if they get loose.  A BBC report last year indicated that, of the 30 dog-related deaths in the UK since the ban, 21 involved dog breeds that did not fall under the ban’s restrictions. National Health Service data also showed a 76 percent increase in hospital admissions for dog bites over the span of a decade.  It was not clear for what documentary the BBC film crew was interviewing Perivoitos, the Guardian said. The network released a brief statement following the attack.  “A crew making a BBC documentary were present -- but not filming -- at the time of the incident and called an ambulance,” the statement read. “Given the ongoing inquiries, it would not be appropriate to comment further.”
  • A Florida Missing Child Alert has been issued for a boy and a girl from Marion County. According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, 12-year old Destiny Decker and 15-year old Caleb Bacallao were last seen in Ocala. Destiny has blonde hair, blue eyes, is 5 feet 4 inches tall and weights 125 pounds. Caleb has brown hair, brown eyes, is 5 feet 7 inches tall and weights 150 pounds. FDLE says they could be traveling in a blue 2013 Honda Fit, with Florida tag 026HYU. Anyone with information is asked to call the Marion County Sheriff’s Office at 352-732-9111.