ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
69°
Mostly Cloudy
H 82° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    69°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 82° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    83°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 82° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    77°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 86° L 68°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Joe Kelley

    A crash involving two semi-trucks Friday morning shut down the east lanes of Interstate 4 near the State Road 528 on-ramp. Orange County Fire Rescue said live fish were on the road from one of the trucks. Fire Rescue officials said there was “heavy damage,” but did not say if anyone was injured. It's not clear what caused the crash.  No other details were released. Heavy fog was an issue on the roads throughout the morning. UPDATE: the fish are from a farm in Clewiston. They are tilapia. Crew was headed to Brooklyn. They were scheduled to get there Saturday morning at 4am.
  • A crane toppled Wednesday morning on the Division Avenue ramp onto State Road 408, Florida Department of Transportation officials said. Police said no one was hurt and that ramp closures were already anticipated for the area.  News 96.5 WDBO reporter Darrell Moody was the first reporter at the scene this morning in the pre-dawn hours.  Road closures are expected later Wednesday to upright the crane.  Power in the area was knocked out briefly.  The area has been under construction for the I-4 Ultimate project.  No other details were released.
  • News 96.5 WDBO adds a second hour of the Brian Kilmeade radio show starting today.  You’ll hear Brian weekdays from 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM.  The change comes as Herman Cain scales back his work schedule to produce only one hour of radio programming each day from his Atlanta studio.  Fans of Herman Cain will be glad to know that you’ll still be able to hear him weekdays from 11:00 AM - Noon.  “Brian’s been really popular with our listeners here in Orlando since we debuted one hour of his show four years ago,” says Drew Anderssen, News 96.5 WDBO Brand Manager and Program Director. 
  • SEOUL, South Korea - It's 3:11 p.m. on a cold, gray day on the North Korean side of the most heavily armed border in the world, and a lone soldier is racing toward freedom. His dark olive-green jeep speeds down a straight, tree-lined road, past drab, barren fields and, headlights shining, across the replacement for the Bridge of No Return, which was used for prisoner exchanges during the Korean War. The shock of soldiers watching the jeep rush by is palpable from the video released Wednesday, and no wonder: They're beginning to realize that one of their comrades is defecting to the South. They sprint after him. The jeep slows and turns at a monument to North Korean founder Kim Il Sung, the staging point for North Korean tours of the area. The border is near, South Korea just beyond it. (App users can see video here) ___ Four North Korean soldiers, weapons in their hands, race by the blue huts that straddle the line and are familiar to anyone who has toured the only spot on the border where North and South Korean soldiers face off within spitting distance of each other. There are no tourists this day. Right at the line that divides North from South, the defector crashes the jeep into a ditch. Seconds pass as he tries in vain to gun the vehicle out of the gully before leaping out and sprinting into the South. He kicks up leaves, ducking below a tree branch just as the North Korean soldiers skid into view. Muzzles flash. The North Korean soldiers, one of whom drops flat into the leaves, fire at the defector at close range with handguns and AK-47 assault rifles — about 40 rounds, the South says. Suddenly, two of the North Koreans run away while the soldier in the leaves jumps up and dashes across the dividing line into South Korean territory before stopping, turning on his heels and sprinting back to the northern side after his comrades. The defector falls stretched out and unmoving in a pile of leaves against a small wall on the South Korean side. The entire sequence, from the first appearance of the jeep to the soldier's frenzied crossing, lasts four minutes. It unfolded Nov. 13 in the Joint Security Area, which is overseen by both the American-led U.N. Command and North Korea and lies inside the 4-kilometer (2 1/2-mile) -wide Demilitarized Zone that has been the de facto border between the Koreas since the war. Forty minutes later, the video has switched to infrared to show the heat signatures of two South Korean soldiers as they crawl on their hands and knees, using a wall as cover, toward the prone defector. They grab hold of the defector and drag him to safety. Not far away, heavily armed North Korean troops begin to gather near the Kim Il Sung monument. For the moment, the border is quiet again. ___ Surprisingly, North and South Korean soldiers didn't exchange fire during the shooting, the first in the area in more than three decades. The bullets went in only one direction. The defection, subsequent surgeries and slow recovery of the soldier have riveted South Korea. But his escape is a huge embarrassment for the North, which claims all defections are the result of rival Seoul kidnapping or enticing North Koreans. Pyongyang has said nothing about the defection so far. North Korea's actions during the defector's escape at the Panmunjom border village violated the armistice agreement ending the Korean War because North Korean soldiers fired across and physically crossed the border in pursuit of the soldier, U.S. Col. Chad Carroll, a spokesman for the U.N. command, told reporters in a live TV briefing Wednesday. A U.N. Command statement said a meeting had been requested with the North's military to discuss the violations. After undergoing two surgeries last week to repair internal organ damage and other injuries, the soldier has now regained consciousness and is no longer relying on a breathing machine, according to hospital official Shin Mi-jeong. While his condition is improving, doctors plan to keep him at an intensive care unit for at least several more days to guard against possible infection. While treating the wounds, surgeons removed dozens of parasites from the soldier's ruptured small intestine, including presumed roundworms that were as long as 27 centimeters (10.6 inches), which may reflect poor nutrition and health in North Korea's military. The soldier is 1.7 meters (5 feet, 7 inches) tall but weighs just 60 kilograms (132 pounds). About 30,000 North Koreans have fled to South Korea, mostly across the porous border with China, since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. Now add one more to that tally — a man in uniform, fleeing gunfire toward a new life one overcast afternoon across the world's most uneasy border. ___ AP writers Hyung-jin Kim and Kim Tong-hyung contributed to this report.
  • The widow of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson, who was among four U.S. service members killed in Niger earlier this month, expressed a mix of blame and sorrow today on 'Good Morning America,' saying she was 'very angry' about President Donald Trump's condolence phone call and upset because she says he struggled to 'remember my husband's name.' ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos spoke to Myeshia Johnson, who criticized Trump's handling of the phone call that started a firestorm of controversy. (More from ABC News) (App users can see video here) 
  • Well this is awkward. A New Jersey family took their 15-year-old miniature pinscher to be euthanized back in May, but they just found out Caesar has been living with a veterinary worker for the last five months. The couple says the dog was suffering from a long-term illness and poor quality of life when they brought him to Briarwood Veterinary Hospital to be put down. A police investigation reveals Dr. George Menez, who recently sold the veterinary practice, allowed the technician to take the dog home. The dog was returned to his original owners, who spent some time with him before he was finally euthanized. The investigation is ongoing and could lead to theft and animal cruelty charges. 
  • Spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association, and talk radio host, Dana Loesch has abruptly moved her family out of her Texas home after receiving a series of violent threats to their safety.  Dana revealed the troubling information in a series of tweets Sunday.  Former First Daughter Chelsea Clinton ... an ardent gun control advocate ... tweeted in support of Dana. 
  • The trailer for 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' debuted in dramatic fashion during Monday Night Football halftime. Fireworks flashed and Stormtroopers marched onto Chicago's Soldier Field as the preview played onscreen. It featured new and familiar characters from the Star Wars universe. The clip opens with voiceover from the mysterious Supreme Leader Snoke saying, 'When I found you, I saw raw, untamed power — and beyond that, something truly special.' Then Rey (Daisy Ridley) is shown wielding her light saber and questioning her destiny as Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) observes, 'I've seen this raw strength only once before. It didn't scare me enough then. It does now.' John Boyega, Oscar Isaac and Carrie Fisher also appear in the trailer, as does Chewbacca and a new bird-like creature known as a Porg. 'The Last Jedi' is the latest installment in the Star Wars franchise since the Disney reboot that began with 2015's 'The Force Awakens.' It's set to hit theaters Dec. 15. (App users can see video here)
  • What was once America’s “favorite sport” is no longer and many fans and analysts alike credit the drop to the continuing and renewed protests and boycotts by a handful of players.  From the end of August to the end of September, the favorable ratings for the NFL have dropped from 57 percent to 44 percent, and it has the highest unfavorable rating – 40 percent – of any big sport. (Washington Examiner) Townhall.com: This is now the second major poll in recent weeks to show the NFL is losing fans en masse, disgusted with acts of perceived disrespect towards the flag and the country.  On September 28, Townhall reported on a Politico/Morning Consult poll which showed similar results. That poll showed 'The NFL's net favorability has dropped from 30% on September 21 to 17% on September 28.” As the New York Post notes, 'Jefferies analyst John Janedis drilled down further and estimated a 10 percent ratings drop for the season would cost game-carrying networks — CBS, ESPN, Fox and NBC — $200 million in lost operating income.
  • A Wyoming high school offered an apology and investigation after students at Jackson Hole High School were given a multiple choice test in their English class that gave as one option “He was shooting at Trump.”  The Jackson Hole News and Guide quotes an outraged parent who noted how poor the timing was for implying violence against the President of the United States.  The timing couldn't be worse to insinuate violence, McCollum said. Stephen Paddock's Sunday night shooting rampage in Las Vegas killed 58 people and injured more than 500.  'The Las Vegas thing still weights on us,' he said. 'We are absolutely devastated. Just like any other American, we are devastated by what happened.' Napoleon has the gun fired for a new occasion. What is the new occasion? He was shooting at Trump  His birthday  For completion of the windmill  To scare off the attackers of Animal Farm In a statement this morning, the district said, 'TCSD #1 administration learned late yesterday that a quiz was administered to a class of high school students that contained an inappropriate answer to a multiple choice question. Administration is investigating this incident and verifying the information we have received. “TCSD #1 takes seriously threats of any kind, regardless of the intent. We apologize to the students, families and community for this incident and will be addressing the issue with personnel.
  • Joe Kelley

    News Director

    Joe Kelley has joined the staff of News 96.5 as News Director and host of Orlando's Morning News. Joe comes to Orlando from News 96.5’s sister-station KRMG in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he also held both positions.

    Joe has been recognized many times over for his successes as an on-air radio personality and community leader. He has received awards from Radio and Records Magazine, Radio Ink Magazine, the Dallas Press Club, and Las Vegas Women in Communications, the Tulsa Press Club, the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters and more. In 2007, Joe was named to the "Top 40 Under 40" achievers in Tulsa People Magazine, The Journal Record Newspaper and the Tulsa Business Journal.

    More than just a broadcaster, Joe has been a writer for Tulsa Kids Magazine since 2005. His monthly column focuses on the observational humor he enjoys while raising his three young children with his wife of 16 years, Nicole. Joe's now featured in Orlando Family Magazine with his Twitter MoMENts column.

    Joe has been active in the Rotary Club and has served on the board of directors and as sergeant-at-arms. Joe is also a long-time volunteer, board member and former chairman of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oklahoma. Joe has raised more than $1.4 million in the last 7 years for Make-A-Wish.

    Radio was a calling for Joe.

    Literally.

    His broadcast career began in 1982, in the small southeast Texas town of Nederland.

    The phone in his high school journalism class rang. The teacher was out of the room at the moment, so Joe reached for the phone.

    “Hey, you wanna be on the radio?” the voice on the phone asked.

    Unbeknownst to Joe at that moment, on the other end of that phone line was a 30-year-plus career in broadcast journalism.

    Calling was a local radio station program director in need of free help.

    Joe jumped at the chance.

    For most people, opportunity knocks.

    In Joe’s case, it called.

    And while his initial introduction to radio was entirely unexpected, Joe's ascension to his level of professional success is quite deliberate and the result of three decades of thoughtful and creative performances on award-winning radio stations across the country.

    On the personal side, Joe has been married to the woman of his dreams, Nicole, since 1996. Joe and Nicole were winners on TV’s “The Newlywed Game” later that year.

    Nicole and Joe adopted an 11-year-old son from the state of Texas in 2001, after seeing his story on the Dallas TV news. Nicole gave birth in Dallas to their only daughter, Sierra, in 2003. The always-rambunctious Kelley twins, Hudson and Brooks, were born in Tulsa in 2006.

    Joe and Nicole are thrilled to move the family to Orlando and are very excited about making new friends in their new home.

    Read More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • An Uber Eats driver who police said shot and killed a customer in Atlanta turned himself in Monday afternoon and claims he acted in self-defense, his attorney said. >> Watch the news report here Only WSB-TV's Tom Jones was there when Robert Bivines, 37, arrived at the jail with his attorney. The Atlanta Police Department's Homicide Unit secured an arrest warrant for felony murder on Monday. The shooting happened at a condominium on Pharr Road in Buckhead on Saturday night. Police said Ryan Thornton ordered food from Uber Eats, and the driver delivered the food around 11:30 p.m. At some point, authorities said words were exchanged between Thornton and the driver. >> PREVIOUS STORY: Uber Eats driver accused of killing customer turns himself in The Uber Eats driver then shot the 30-year-old, police said. Thornton died at Grady Memorial Hospital.  Bivines' attorney, Jackie Patterson, calls this a case of self-defense. 'This is a case where my client had no choice but to defend himself,' he said. Patterson said Thornton was irate that it took a while for his food to arrive. He said Thornton was aggressive, and as Bivines walked away, Thornton made a threatening move.  'He turned around put his hand in his pocket and said, 'I'm going to [expletive] you up,'' Patterson said. Patterson said Bivines was afraid to wait to see what Thornton had in his pocket, so he said he defended himself. Jones asked Patterson why his client, who had only been on the job less than a week, didn't just drive away. >> Read more trending news  'You can't drive away when someone is coming at you with your window down,' Patterson said. Bivines will be taken to the Fulton County Jail. He will have a first appearance before a judge on Tuesday. Uber sent WSB-TV a statement on Monday saying Bivens no longer has access to the app: “We are shocked and saddened by this senseless act of violence and our hearts go out to Ryan’s friends and family. We have been working with the Atlanta Police Department, and the driver can no longer access the app” A spokesperson for Uber told WSB-TV that Bivens passed a background check and had only been an Uber Eats driver for about a week. Bivens was an Uber Eats delivery partner only and did not drive passengers. Uber is working closely with the Atlanta Police Department on this investigation. Morehouse College sent the following statement:  'The Morehouse College community is mourning the passing of Ryan Thornton who was was shot Saturday in Atlanta after ordering a late dinner from UberEATS, according to police reports. 'Thornton, 30, was a recent graduate of Morehouse College. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science in May 2017, and had started a new job. 'Morehouse faculty, staff, and administrators on Monday were shocked and saddened by the news of Thornton’s death. Employees in Morehouse College’s admissions office said they worked closely with Thornton and described him as being friendly, hard-working, and determined to become a Morehouse Man.  'President David A. Thomas said that the Morehouse community stands at the ready to support Thornton’s family during this difficult time. “ ‘The loss of another young life to gun violence is tragic,' Thomas said. 'Ryan was an ambitious student with so much promise. He was well-respected by his peers and highly regarded by his professors. We at Morehouse College will keep Ryan's family in our thoughts and prayers.’ ”
  • The man allegedly behind the fatal Florida high school shooting apparently has a disturbing past that is coming to light. A school fight that was captured on camera a little more than a year ago is the latest development. >> Click here to watch Authorities said 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. Cruz was formerly a member of the school’s JROTC program before being expelled. >> Florida school shooting: Teacher of the year's emotional Facebook post goes viral A September 2016 video shared by ABC News shows Cruz wearing a white shirt and khakis while fighting with other students. Cruz was reportedly handed a two-day suspension following the incident. >> Family who took in Nikolas Cruz: 'We just didn't know' According to ABC, the fight was one of five documented incidents that caused school administrators to expel Cruz, mandating his transfer to another high school in February 2017. >> WATCH: Florida school shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez slams politicians, NRA in emotional speech Another incident that reportedly contributed to Cruz’s expulsion was his alleged fight with his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend. Cruz was allegedly abusive toward her before they broke up. >> Read more trending news  The massacre at the high school marked the 25th U.S. school shooting in which someone was killed since the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School.
  • Orange County Fire Rescue will soon own an old Lynx Bus that they plan to use to help save lives during mass casualty incidents in the future.   On Tuesday, commissioners are expected to approve the $2,500 purchase of the bus and refurbish it into a large ambulance.    Fire Rescue officials will take out the bus seats and install rows of stretchers. They believe these new changes will be useful in saving lives during responses to things like wildfires, hurricanes, or any incidents like Pulse.    The bus will the only one of its kind in the Orlando Metro region, but can be requested for use around Central Florida.    The county also plants to stage the bus at large events like marathons and parades.
  • Two New York state troopers are being credited with an immense kindness after they paid for the flight of a young woman to Florida to say goodbye to her friend, one of the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre.  Jordana Judson, 23, told NBC News that she was devastated to learn that her childhood friend, Meadow Pollack, was among the victims of the Valentine’s Day shooting at her alma mater. Former Stoneman Douglas student Nikolas Cruz, 19, is accused of killing 14 students and three faculty members with an AR-15 rifle.  >> Read more trending news Pollack, an 18-year-old senior, and Judson were lifelong friends, NBC News reported. “They were like our second family our whole lives,” Judson said of the Pollacks. Judson said she showed up at LaGuardia Airport on Thursday, the day after the shooting, frantic to get a flight home to Florida, where she’d grown up.  “As soon as I got out of the car at the airport, I started hysterically crying,” she said.  Troopers Robert Troy and Thomas Karasinski spotted the distraught young woman and asked if she was all right. She tearfully explained that a friend was killed in the school shooting in Florida and that she needed help figuring out where to buy her ticket.  The troopers led her inside to the JetBlue counter, where an agent told her a one-way ticket to Florida would be almost $700, Judson told the news station. Unable to afford the cost, she begged the agent to lower the price or allow her a bereavement discount. The agent could not accommodate her, and was about to give the ticket to another passenger when Troy and Karasinski stepped in. “I look up, and the state troopers are standing there and they’re both handing over their credit cards,” Judson told NBC News. “I’m telling them that they don’t have to do this. This is crazy. They said, ‘It’s already done. We want you to be home with their families.’” A rabbi who sat Shiva with the Pollack family confirmed that Judson made it home to be with the family and to attend Meadow’s funeral on Friday, where the Miami Herald reported that she was described as a star with “a smile like sunshine.” Meadow’s father, Andrew Pollack, and her older brother, Hunter, both lamented the fact that they couldn’t protect her when she needed them. “This piece of (expletive) killed my kid, and I couldn’t do anything about it,” Andrew Pollack said, according to the Herald. “That’s never happened to me in my life. I’m always able to protect my family in any situation.” Hunter Pollack said he always looked out for his sister.  “I wanted to be the over-supportive brother my whole life, and I feel like I failed,” Hunter said. “So all I can do is hope that (her killer) gets what he deserves.” Judson told NBC News that the troopers’ gesture to get her to the funeral made her heart “full and heavy at the same time.” New York State Police Superintendent George P. Beach II told the news station in a statement that, as law enforcement officials, all troopers take an oath to protect and serve.  “We also instill in our members the importance of acting with respect and empathy for the people they encounter,” Beach said.  Troy told the news station that he sympathized with Judson’s dilemma. “The sense of just being there for your family and friends, you want to be there for them,” Troy said. “You’re going to go through anything to get there.” Explaining that he has five younger sisters, the trooper said it was a “sigh of relief” to be able to help Judson. “If that was one of them, I’d want someone to help them out,” he said. 
  • The White House on Monday signaled that President Donald Trump is willing to back at least one bipartisan measure to strengthen the national instant check system for those who buy firearms, as Democrats in the House and Senate continued to argue that action by the Congress on gun violence is long overdue. “While discussions are ongoing and revisions are being considered, the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. In a written statement sent to reporters, Sanders said the President spoke to Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) on Friday; the Texas Republican has a bipartisan bill with Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT), which would force states and federal agencies to submit more information into the instant gun check system. Our churches and schools should be refuges where children and parents feel secure. Many of these shootings can be prevented. There's no reason not to advance #FixNICS to help https://t.co/0JpZDiLPOr — Senator John Cornyn (@JohnCornyn) February 15, 2018 Interesting morning. Two quick thoughts: 1/ Trump's support for the FixNICS Act, my bill with @JohnCornyn, is another sign the politics of gun violence are shifting rapidly. 2/ No one should pretend this bill alone is an adequate response to this epidemic. — Chris Murphy (@ChrisMurphyCT) February 19, 2018 After a mass shooting last November in Sutherland Springs, Texas, where 25 people died, the Air Force acknowledged that the killer – who received a ‘bad conduct’ discharge from the military – should not have been able to buy guns, but those records were never placed in the instant check system. “For years agencies and states haven’t complied with the law, failing to upload these critical records without consequence,” Cornyn said in November when he introduced this bipartisan gun measure.” Democrats had hoped there would be action on that measure – just like they had hoped there would have been action to ban “bump stocks” after the mass shooting in Las Vegas, action on the “No Fly, No Buy” measure after the Orlando Pulse Nightclub shooting, and then the “FixNics” bill after the Texas shooting. I know assault rifles. I carried one in Iraq. They have no place on America's streets. #Orlando pic.twitter.com/ibKQE2PpqF — Seth Moulton (@sethmoulton) June 14, 2016 Last week’s shooting in Florida simply put all of those requests for legislation to deal with guns on repeat for Democrats. “We can’t ignore the issues of gun control that this tragedy raises,” said Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA). “And so, I’m asking – no, demanding – we take action now.” Democrats would certainly like to do much more than the ‘FixNics’ bill, or banning bump stocks, as other ideas have popped up in recent days, like not allowing anyone under age 21 to buy weapons like an AR-15. But as the President returned to Washington on Monday evening from a long weekend at his Florida retreat, it wasn’t clear if his support for one bipartisan plan would actually mean action – as GOP leaders have not put such measures on the fast track to a vote in the House and Senate. On Sunday, when the President met with House Speaker Paul Ryan in Florida, the two men discussed a series of issues, including “the recent tragedy in Parkland, Florida.” The White House statement on their meeting did not characterize whether legislative action was discussed. No action will happen on anything gun-related this week – as the Congress won’t be back on Capitol Hill for votes until February 26.