ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
80°
Clear
H 80° L 62°
  • clear-day
    80°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 80° L 62°
  • clear-night
    70°
    Evening
    Clear. H 80° L 62°
  • clear-day
    63°
    Morning
    Sunny. H 79° L 52°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National

    The widow of the Grateful Dead's longtime lawyer is auctioning off treasures from their long strange trip with the psychedelic rock-and-roll band.Hal and Jesse Kant's memorabilia collection includes signed artwork by the band's late leader, Jerry Garcia, and backstage passes from concerts spanning 30 years.The Reno Gazette-Journal reports some of the items are expected to go for as much as $100,000 when they're sold online by a Reno art gallery and auction house from Nov. 22 through Dec. 9.In addition to the Dead, Hal Kant represented a number of musicians dating to the 1960s, including Janis Joplin and Sonny and Cher.The Kants moved to Reno during the 1980s. He died in 2006. She's putting the memorabilia up for sale through Stremmel Auctions.Highlights among the more than 100 items include a colorful set of banners used as the backdrops for 88 concerts around the world and a poster from a Lake Tahoe show in 1968, when tickets cost $3.50 at the door.Jesse Kant says she's keeping some valuables with personal meaning, including letters from the band. But she's parting with a wedding invitation from Garcia and his wife, Deborah Koons, as well as a framed, dried rose from the couple's wedding the year before his 1995 death.She's also selling her living room replica of the Dead's conference table, complete with hand-carved skulls and ornate 'GD' signatures on each chair.'I spent my time very happily and grateful with all of these items,' and it was time to let someone else enjoy them, she told the Gazette-Journal.Hudson Stremmel, gallery spokesman, said Hal Kant was responsible for keeping the band's copyrights and introduced Garcia to the makers of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, which resulted in one of their most popular flavors, Cherry Garcia.The collection is one of the rarest the auctioneer family has seen, Stremmel said. The business typically deals with high-end estate sales and bankruptcy cases.'It's amazing. It's kind of a story of his life that hasn't been told,' Stremmel said of Hal Kant.Jesse Kant, who recently moved to the Pacific Northwest, said the band members were close to her husband, an avid skier and World Series of Poker champion. She said they used to cheer him on during card games and gave him many one-of-a-kind tokens of gratitude, including a letterman jacket with embroidered stitching reading, 'Many Thanks from Grateful Dead, Hal.'Besides the jacket, the auction includes two 'LimitDead Edition' golf bags, one signed by Alice Cooper, and two sets of unused Grateful Dead skis, both decorated with the trademark skulls and roses that often appear on their official merchandise.Jesse Kant said her favorite Grateful Dead performance was outside the Great Pyramid in Egypt in 1978.'People actually came to the show on camels; some people sat on their camels and watched,' Kant said. 'And that night, there was an eclipse of the moon, and the children were running through the streets banging pots and pans trying to scare away the shadows. By far, my favorite show.'She said she's often wondered why the band was so loved.'They're such a strange and interesting phenomenon,' she said. 'It was during the time where drugs were a very large part of that culture. The music was always different, they didn't play a set routine, but I really couldn't tell you why Grateful Dead fans are fans. It's a very personal thing.'___Information from: Reno Gazette-Journal, http://www.rgj.com
  • An Ohio Supreme Court justice and Democratic gubernatorial candidate says he deleted a Facebook post outlining his sexual history after being criticized in part for potentially identifying some of the women.Justice William O'Neill tells The Associated Press on Saturday he agreed with a commenter who said he was being 'insensitive.'He initially edited the post Friday to remove details about the women before deleting it altogether. He tells people to 'lighten up' in a new post.The initial post caused a furor, leading to condemnation by members of both parties and the court's chief justice.O'Neill's post said he was speaking out while 'the dogs of war' were calling for Democratic U.S. Sen. Al Franken to resign after groping accusations.Social media commenters say he was trivializing sexual assault.
  • A jury has found that a businesswoman must pay $5 million to singer Katy Perry and the archdiocese of Los Angeles, finding that the woman intentionally interfered with the sale to Perry of a hilltop property that was once a convent.The jury found Friday that entrepreneur Dana Hollister should pay the archdiocese $3.47 million and Perry $1.57 million for interference with contractual relations and other misdeeds.The 33-year-old pop star has sought to buy the 8-acre property and its Roman-villa style buildings in the city's Los Feliz neighborhood for $14.5 million, and to relocate an adjoining house of prayer used by priests. Her bid has the approval of Los Angeles' archbishop.But Hollister stepped in and attempted to purchase the property from two nuns who had lived there. A judge voided that sale earlier this year, saying the archdiocese had the right to sell the property, not the nuns.The jury found that her actions led to Perry and the archdiocese having to pay exorbitant lawyer fees and other costs, which Hollister should get the bill for.An after-hours message left with Hollister's attorneys seeking comment was not immediately returned.Her lawyer Michael Geibelson said in court that she thought she had a correct and legal contract, and intended no harm.'I don't think Dana Hollister did anything wrong as to either of these parties,' Geibelson said during the trial.Perry and the archdiocese are still working out the terms of the sale. The archdiocese needs permission from the Vatican to finalize it.The trial moves to a second phase in December, when the jury will decide if Hollister should pay punitive damages.The Sisters of the Most Holy and Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary have owned the property for more than 40 years, but they haven't lived in the convent for several years. Only five sisters, who are in their 70s and 80s, remain, and their order has bickered with the archbishop for years on various issues.They objected to the sale to Perry. The nuns watched the 'Roar' singer's music videos and met with her, but that only hardened their opposition to her turning their convent into her home.
  • A popular deduction targeted in the GOP's overhaul of the tax code is used by more than a quarter of all filers in a majority of states, including many led by Republicans where some residents eventually could see their federal tax bills rise.The exact effect in every state isn't known, in part because of differences in the Senate and House versions of the bill. But the change to the deduction for state and local taxes could alter the bottom lines for millions of taxpayers who itemize.Residents in high-tax, Democratic-led states appear to be the hardest hit. But some filers also could be left paying more in traditional Republican states, such as Georgia and Utah where about a third of taxpayers claim the deduction.'It's a bad deal for middle class families and for most Georgians,' said Georgia state Rep. Bob Trammell, leader of the House Democrats.He said Republicans are eliminating the state and local deduction to help pay for tax cuts for businesses and the wealthy.How many winners and losers are in each state depends in large part on another aspect of the Republican tax overhaul that would nearly double the standard deduction — to about $12,000 for individuals and about $24,000 for married couples.Republicans say that provision would be a net benefit for most tax filers.The Tax Policy Center, run by the Urban Institute and Brookings Institution, has estimated that the number of people itemizing deductions would drop by three-quarters. Some of those taxpayers could get a larger deduction under the Republican plan, even though they no longer could claim a break for state and local taxes.'Based on what I have seen, it might actually help some Georgians' to replace the state-and-local tax break with a higher standard deduction, said Georgia state Rep. Terry England, the Republican chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.Yet estimates by the Tax Policy Center and a nonpartisan congressional analysis say some taxpayers eventually will end up owing more in federal taxes under the GOP plans.The left-leaning Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy said changes to the state and local tax deduction under the House bill would contribute to one of every five taxpayers in the hardest hit states getting a higher tax bill. While most of those states are led by Democrats, Republican-led Georgia and Utah, and the swing state of Virginia were among them.Democratic lawmakers said that any initial tax relief felt by the middle class or working-class families will eventually disappear. In Georgia, for example, an estimated 9 percent of filers would pay higher taxes in 2018, rising to 22 percent by 2027, according to an analysis by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.The state and local tax deduction is just one of many provisions targeted for change under legislation that passed the House earlier in the week and is pending in the Senate. The House version would repeal the deduction for income and sales taxes while capping the property tax deduction at $10,000. The Senate bill would end deductions for all state and local taxes.Most tax filers currently take the standard federal deduction of $6,300 per individual or $12,600 for married couples. But some reap larger tax breaks by itemizing deductions for state and local taxes, medical expenses, charitable contributions and interest paid on home mortgages.The state and local tax break is the largest of those. About 44 million taxpayers claimed deductions totaling around $550 billion for state and local taxes paid in 2015, according to the most recent IRS data.The top 10 states with the highest average state and local tax deductions all voted for Democrat Hillary Clinton in last year's election. New York led the way with an average state and local tax deduction of more than $22,000, followed by Connecticut, California, New Jersey and Massachusetts.But when analyzed by the percentage of taxpayers claiming the deduction, several states won by Trump rank in the top third nationally. In reliably Republican Utah, 35 percent of taxpayers claimed the deduction for state and local taxes. That figure was 33 percent in Georgia and 31 percent in Wisconsin. Thirty-five states had at least one-quarter of their taxpayers claim the deduction.Because of its widespread effect, debate over curtailing the deduction already is creeping into competitive 2018 elections.Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin has warned that repealing the deduction could lead to a tax increase for many state residents.The left-leaning Wisconsin Budget Project has estimated that the Senate plan overall eventually would leave nearly 300,000 Wisconsin taxpayers with higher federal income taxes. Baldwin said the plan will disproportionally benefit corporations and the wealthiest.'That's not right and it's not fair,' she said during a news conference Friday in Milwaukee.One of her Republican challengers, state Sen. Leah Vukmir, has signed a letter encouraging the tax repeal. Republican Gov. Scott Walker, a tax overhaul supporter who is seeking re-election, has been criticized by the liberal advocacy group One Wisconsin Now. The group says repealing the deduction would have 'the net effect of a massive property tax increase for Wisconsin homeowners.'Utah state Sen. Howard Stephenson is a strong supporter of repealing the state and local tax deduction, even though a comparatively high percentage of residents there claim it.Stephenson, a Republican who is president of the Utah Taxpayers Association, said he believes the deduction generally favors high-tax states to the detriment of states with a lower tax burden, such as his own.'We don't like paying for the excesses in other states,' he said.___Lieb reported from Jefferson City, Missouri, and Cassidy from Atlanta.___Associated Press writer Scott Bauer in Madison, Wisconsin, contributed to this report.___Follow David A. Lieb at: http://twitter.com/DavidALieb and Christina A. Cassidy at https://twitter.com/AP_Christina
  • An advanced U.S. weather satellite designed to improve the accuracy of extended forecasts has been launched into polar orbit from California.The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 1:47 a.m. PST Saturday atop a United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket.The satellite is the first of four next-generation spacecraft for NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.Circling the Earth from pole to pole 14 times a day, JPSS-1 carries a suite of five instruments intended to make global observations that will improve forecasts of severe weather events three to seven days beforehand.The satellite also will contribute to near-term weather forecasts, climate and ocean dynamics research, among many other uses.
  • A priest who wasn't allowed to preach instead turned his ears and heart to the needy. Now, decades after his death, Solanus Casey is on a path to sainthood, celebrated as an incredibly humble man who brought people to God.Father Solanus, as he was known, will be beatified Saturday at a Mass attended by 65,000 people at a stadium in Detroit where he spent much of his ministry. Pope Francis said he met the requirements to earn the title of 'blessed,' especially after a woman from Panama was instantly cured of a chronic skin disease while she prayed at his tomb in 2012.Father Solanus can be made a saint in the years ahead if a second miracle is attributed to him. He'll be only the second U.S.-born man to be beatified by the Roman Catholic Church, joining the Rev. Stanley Rother, a priest killed in Guatemala's civil war, who was beatified in Oklahoma in September.One U.S.-born woman has been beatified and two others have been declared saints.'It's a great event,' Archbishop Allen Vigneron, who leads the southeastern Michigan church, said of the honor for Father Solanus. 'It's hard to communicate how vivid and real the presence of Father is to our community.'Even 60 years after his death, 'people don't say, 'I'm going to Father's tomb,'' Vigneron told The Associated Press. 'They say, 'I'm going to talk to Father.''Father Solanus, a native of Oak Grove, Wisconsin, joined the Capuchin religious order in Detroit in 1897 and was ordained a priest seven years later. But there were conditions: Because of academic struggles, he was prohibited from giving homilies at Mass and couldn't hear confessions.'He accepted it,' said the Rev. Martin Pable, 86, a fellow Capuchin. 'He believed whatever God wants, that's what he would do.'He served for 20 years in New York City and nearby Yonkers before the Capuchins transferred him back to the St. Bonaventure Monastery in Detroit in 1924. Wearing a traditional brown hooded robe and sandals, Father Solanus worked as a porter or doorkeeper for the next two decades, but his reputation for holiness far exceeded his modest title.The unemployed shared their anxieties with Father Solanus, the parents of wayward kids sought his advice, and the ill and addicted asked him to urge God to heal them. As he listened, he took notes that were later turned into typewritten volumes of his work.Later in life, when Father Solanus was stationed at a seminary in Huntington, Indiana, Detroiters boarded buses for a four-hour ride just to see the man with a wispy white beard. Mail piled up from across the country.'He had a gentle presence. He left people with a wonderful feeling of peace inside their hearts,' Pable said. 'He would say, 'Let's just pray about this and see what God wants to do.' Some people were not healed. He told them to bear their problems with God's help.'Father Solanus, who died in 1957, also co-founded the Capuchin Soup Kitchen, which serves up to 2,000 meals a day to Detroit's poor.The Capuchins built a center that bears his name and explains his life story. The public is invited to pray and leave handwritten pleas atop his tomb. Father Solanus' name is invoked by many people who attend a weekly service for the sick.Shirley Wilson, 78, said she regularly prayed to Father Solanus to help her nephew get a kidney. He got one a few weeks ago.'It was a perfect match,' she said. 'I believe in miracles.'Vigneron hopes Father Solanus will inspire people to show mercy toward others.'We need to care for the poor and give them a high priority,' the archbishop said. 'Father was very loving and understanding to people who came to him with their troubles.'___Follow Ed White at https://twitter.com/edwhiteap
  • New York SoundCloud rapper Lil Peep — whose real name was Gustav Åhr — passed away on Wednesday at the age of 21. He was reportedly found in an unresponsive state by his manager on his tour bus, according to The Guardian. >> Read more trending news In a video posted on Instagram just a few hours before his death, he said he had consumed some prescription drugs as well as some other substances, saying: “I’m good, I’m not sick.” In the wake of the young artist’s untimely death, tributes poured in from fans and peers alike. “I am shocked and heartbroken,” said Sarah Sennett — the CEO of First Access Entertainment, a management company that represented Lil Peep last — in a statement released on Twitter. “I do not believe Peep wanted to die, this is so tragic. He had big goals and dreams for the future which he had shared with me, his team, his family and his friends. He was highly intelligent, hugely creative, massively charismatic, gentle and charming. He had huge ambition and his career was flourishing.” Fellow rapper Post Malone said Åhr was “a great friend to me and a great person. your music changed the world and it’ll never be the same.” EDM composer Diplo wrote on Twitter that Åhr “had so much more to do man he was constantly inspiring me,” and fellow producer Marshmello said, “We were just talking last week about working on a song together and now you’re gone. You will be missed, R.I.P.” British pop stars Charlie XCX and Sam Smith also shared their sympathies:
  • You can tell from Blake Shelton’s reaction to winning People’s “Sexiest Man Alive” honors that the award is one to be taken lightly. The tall and talented Okie has been appreciative yet modest about the recognition and, at times, he’s even self-deprecating. But his good friends, including Tim McGraw, have got his back. >> Read more trending news Sort of. McGraw and wife Faith Hill appeared on the nationally syndicated “Ty, Kelly & Chuck” radio show Thursday, and it turns out there are several country fans who would have liked to see the “Humble and Kind” singer win the magazine cover instead. And those country fans aren’t shy about sharing their feelings. McGraw read one tweet from a fan who said, “We all know that Blake Shelton is not the sexiest man alive, especially in country music. We know that nobody holds a candle to George Strait or Tim McGraw, so how about we redo the Sexiest Man Alive thing?” After a solid chuckle, McGraw admitted, “I think Blake is pretty sexy,” and Hill added, “He has a great sense of humor, and that is sexy.” No doubt! Host Ty Bentli also shared a tweet that read, “Blake Shelton looks like the dad in a drug commercial where they list the side effects at the end while you watch him build a birdhouse.” OK, we love Shelton to pieces, but that’s hilarious, y’all! And we imagine Shelton would find it funny, too, because as Bentli confirmed, “The best part is, he was just in here and he totally will take this and he loves it.” McGraw added, “When you’re the sexiest man alive, you can take anything.” Also true. Shelton is sexy, McGraw is sexy, Hill is sexy, Bentli, Kelly and Chuck are sexy … there’s just a whole lotta sexy goin’ on in country music. But of that group, only Shelton, McGraw and Hill are nominated for Rare Country Awards. Hill leads with four nominations, while Shelton and McGraw are tied with three apiece. It’s up to you to decide the winners! Vote now through Dec. 13 at RareCountryAwards.com. Winners will be revealed during a livestreamed concert event on Dec. 14 in Nashville.
  • Mass shootings have been becoming more common in America, with one happening nearly every week. But have you considered what to do if you're in a dangerous situation with someone opening fire and attacking you?  >> Read more trending news The U.S. Department of Homeland Security released a video recommending 'run, hide, fight' for active shooter situations. WPXI sat down with security expert Terrence Brown, who trains people and companies on how to handle emergencies. 'So, running's fine, but the issue with running ... is that you need to know where you're running to,' said Brown. Brown is retired from the U.S. military and is a former Pittsburgh police officer. He said a lot of people instinctively 'fight, flight and freeze' in a crisis, which is understandable, but not good. 'You're fighting yourself. You're in disbelief that this is actually happening,' said Brown. Brown said it's important to be prepared and have a plan. That means before running, you should identify a safe place to shelter. David Johnson and Brown walked through WPXI, with Brown identifying what to look for: rooms and doors with no glass, and rooms that open to the inside, so they can be barricaded against an intruder. When it comes to going to large outdoor events, it's just as important to be prepared. 'Get to know the areas, get to know the buildings that will be open late,' said Brown. 'To my right, I see a parking garage ... multiple levels, so that's wonderful.' Good places to run and hide are thick and solid, and don't have glass. That provides you safety from someone firing a gun at ground level or from up above. And when you're at an event where everyone is focused on one thing, like a performer, force yourself to look away and scan the crowd every once in a while. Brown said it's all about awareness, whether in your workplace, in any other building or outdoors, especially where there are large crowds.  As for the last recommendation, fight, that's for when all else fails. In that case, you're trying to save your life, and the lives of others, in any way you can.
  • A Montana congressman misled investigators about his assault on a reporter the day before he was elected and claimed that the 'liberal media' was 'trying to make a story' out of it, according to documents released Friday.U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, told an officer in the aftermath of the attack that Guardian newspaper reporter Ben Jacobs had grabbed him by the wrist and pulled both of them to the floor, according to notes from a Gallatin County sheriff's officer who interviewed the politician the night of the attack.Multiple witnesses contradicted that account, and Gianforte later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault. The attack occurred the day before his victory in a May 25 special election, by which time many voters already had cast ballots by mail.More than 100 pages of documents, photos and audio from the investigation were released under a court order following requests from The Associated Press and other news organizations.The documents include interviews with members of a Fox News crew who were in the room with Gianforte and Jacobs at the politician's Bozeman campaign office. They said Gianforte became enraged over what he perceived as biased coverage before body-slamming Jacobs, throwing him to the ground and punching him.Gianforte staffer Josh Elle — the candidate's driver — told investigators that he was in an adjacent room when he heard a commotion and looked into the interview room. Elle told investigators that Gianforte appeared to be striking the reporter with closed fists before someone in the room closed the door.Another worker said Gianforte and others on the campaign had been complaining earlier in the day about 'duplicitous' campaign coverage by the Guardian and Buzzfeed.Gianforte told Sgt. Scott Secor in an interview that Jacobs had interrupted as the Fox crew set up for an interview and 'started interrogating in a very intensive way.'I probably shouldn't do it but I reached out for his phone ... he grabbed my wrist, he spun and we ended up on the floor ... so he pulled me down on top of him,' the sergeant quoted Gianforte as saying.In the hours after the assault, Gianforte's campaign spokesman, Shane Scanlon, issued a statement that also blamed the attack on Jacobs, saying the reporter had grabbed the candidate's wrist. The records released Friday show that Gianforte first gave the misleading account to authorities.He didn't appear in public until his victory party the next night, when some in the crowd cheered him over the confrontation. Gianforte publicly apologized to Jacobs and told supporters he wasn't proud of his actions.His spokesman, Travis Hall, insisted on Friday that the documents contained 'nothing new.'No one was misled, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken. Greg took responsibility for his actions and is focused on serving the people of Montana,' Hall said in an emailed statement.Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert said he was aware of Gianforte's comments to investigators but did not consider additional charges such as obstruction of justice because authorities were focused on the assault allegation.'When the police are investigating a case, suspects of crimes will say misleading things, and apparently that's exactly what happened here on the part of both Mr. Gianforte and his campaign,' Lambert said.'It is not a crime per se to lie to the cops,' added Lambert, a Republican. 'The main thing here is he was charged with assaulting Ben Jacobs and pled guilty to that.'Gianforte paid a $385 fine and completed 40 hours of community service and 20 hours of anger management counseling. He also donated $50,000 to the Committee to Protect Journalists.The assault happened too late in the campaign to affect the outcome of the election to replace Ryan Zinke, who resigned to become President Donald Trump's Interior Department secretary.Gianforte is up for re-election next year and has filed to run. Six Democrats have lined up to challenge him.The congressman unsuccessfully fought a judge's order for him to be booked by law enforcement and photographed like other defendants. In October, Gallatin County District Judge Holly Brown ordered the release of Gianforte's mug shot, which is sure to be used as fodder by Democrats in the run-up to the election.__Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at www.twitter.com/matthewbrownap .