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    A lawyer for Gen. Ratko Mladic said Monday it is not certain the former Bosnian Serb military commander will show up in a United Nations courtroom when judges deliver their verdicts in his long-running trial for allegedly masterminding atrocities during Bosnia's 1992-95 war.Mladic's attorneys have filed a flurry of recent motions to have the ailing 75-year-old's health assessed before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia announces it decisions Wednesday.He was tried on 11 counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.Mladic's trial is the last to end at the ground-breaking tribunal before it closes down by the end of the year. The court last year convicted his political master, former Bosnian Serb President Radovan Karadzic, on near-identical charges and sentenced to 40 years. Karadzic has appealed.Defense attorney Dragan Ivetic said lawyers for the former military leader were not attempting to stall the case and have been trying for weeks to have Mladic's health checked, fearing a court appearance might kill him.'We've had a medical doctor that has said, actually based on his diagnosed condition, any form of stress, including a trial proceeding, may increase his chance of having a stroke, a heart attack or dying,' Ivetic told The Associated Press.Judges at the court have so far rejected the lawyers' requests for doctors to visit Mladic, who survived two strokes and a heart attack before he was arrested and imprisoned in 2011. The former general is under close medical supervision at the United Nations detention facility where he has been held since his arrest.'General Mladic wants to be present because he believes that he is not guilty,' Ivetic said. 'But I don't know whether the medical circumstances allow him to be present....That's why I need a medical doctor to assist us all in finding that information out.'The possibility of Mladic dying before the judges deliver their verdicts recalls former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, who died in 2006 before judges could pass judgment in his trial. Milosevic was accused of fomenting violence across the Balkans as Yugoslavia crumbled.Mladic is charged with overseeing atrocities including the 1995 massacre of some 8,000 Muslim men and boys in the eastern Bosnian municipality of Srebrenica, the deadly shelling and sniping of Sarajevo and purges of Muslims and Croats early in the war from towns and villages Serbs wanted to turn into part of a Greater Serbia.His lawyers have urged the judges to acquit, arguing that he did not give orders for atrocities and was not even in Srebrenica during the 1995 massacre.It remained unclear if Wednesday's long-awaited public hearing for announcing the verdicts could go ahead if Mladic does not attend.His absence would be a disappointment to survivors who traveled to The Hague on Monday to watch the culmination of the trial of the man they hold responsible for killing their loved ones.One of them, Ramiza Burzic, who lost two sons during the Srebrenica massacre, said she is still hunting for the remains of her second son and blames Mladic.'We have only found half of the body of my first son. He was not born without a head and arms,' Burzic said as she prepared to board a flight in Sarajevo. 'Mladic was there, and he ordered mass graves to be dug and spread all over Bosnia. His intention was that a mother would never find the whole body of her son in those graves.'Burzic said she expected judges to hand Mladic a life sentence, 'so all of his progeny will know what he was doing and what kind of man he was.'The U.N. tribunal has, in the past, convicted officers under Mladic's command of involvement in the Srebrenica massacre and the deadly campaign of sniping and shelling in the Bosnian capital, Sarajevo.If the court does convict Mladic, an appeal is inevitable.'There are many things that give rise to a potential claim for unfair trial that troubled us during the work that we did and that might require additional filings or action,' Ivetic said.____Associated Press video journalist Eldar Emric in Sarajevo contributed to this story.
  • The Latest on the death in Texas of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent (all times local):8:50 a.m.Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and Sen. Ted Cruz have characterized it as an attack that caused the weekend death of a border agent and injuring of a second.The Republican senator said in a statement Sunday that 36-year-old Agent Rogelio Martinez died as a result of the attack earlier that day near Van Horn, which is about 30 miles from the Mexico border and 110 miles southeast of El Paso. He said the nation is grateful 'for the courage and sacrifice of our border agents.'Abbott also described the incident as an attack in a tweet Sunday.The Border Patrol hasn't released many details about what happened. It said in a statement that the agents 'were responding to activity' while on patrol near Interstate 10.The FBI has taken over the investigation.___12:30 a.m.The FBI is investigating after one U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent died and another was seriously injured while on duty in South Texas.Border Patrol spokesman Douglas Mosier says Agent Rogelio Martinez and his partner were taken to a hospital Sunday after they were hurt while responding to activity in the Big Bend area. The 36-year-old Martinez died at the hospital.The agency has not released details about how the two agents were injured.Border Patrol records show Big Bend accounted for about 1 percent of the more than 61,000 apprehensions its agents made along the Southwest border between October 2016 and May 2017. The region's mountains and the Rio Grande make it a difficult area for people to cross illegally into the U.S. from Mexico.
  • The Latest on Zimbabwe's political turmoil (all times local):5:30 p.m.A Zimbabwean Cabinet minister close to first lady Grace Mugabe who went silent after the military moved in last week has reappeared on Twitter, saying he is 'relatively fine outside the country.'Minister of higher education Jonathan Moyo had been said to be detained along with a number of other ministers as the military pursued people it called 'criminals' accused of hurting the country's economy.Moyo, the most outspoken of the unpopular first lady's allies, says he is outside Zimbabwe with 'at least 50 others' who include lawmakers and ruling party officials.Opposition to Grace Mugabe's positioning to succeed her husband led the military to move in last week and put the president under house arrest.___4:40 p.m.A Zimbabwe ruling party official says it should take Parliament two days to impeach longtime President Robert Mugabe, who is resisting calls to step down.The party's deputy secretary for legal affairs Paul Mangwana is speaking to reporters as ruling party lawmakers gather.He says they will move a motion for impeachment on Tuesday and set up a committee and on Wednesday it will report back and 'we vote him out.'Mangwana says the main charge against the 93-year-old Mugabe is 'allowing his wife to usurp government powers' and that 'he is too old and cannot even walk without help.'He says the ruling party needs the backing of the MDC opposition group to have enough votes in Parliament but 'they are supporting us.'___4:25 p.m.Lawmakers with Zimbabwe's ruling party are gathering to meet on the fate of longtime President Robert Mugabe, who has resisted efforts to step down.A portrait of the world's oldest head of state looks down on the ZANU-PF lawmakers as they prepare to discuss their threat of impeaching Mugabe when Parliament resumes Tuesday.The party's chief whip Lovemore Matuke is refusing to answer reporters' questions until after the meeting.Mugabe astonished Zimbabweans with his defiance in a national address Sunday night after being fired as party leader. He ignored the party's deadline of midday Monday to resign as president or face impeachment.It is not clear how long impeachment would take.___3:40 p.m.Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai says he doubts the ability of the ruling party to solve the country's challenges amid efforts to oust President Robert Mugabe.Tsvangirai says on his party's website Monday that the ruling ZANU-PF party has been hurt by factional battles and that it appears to have differences with the military over how to handle the confusing situation. Mugabe has defied calls to resign immediately. The ruling party is discussing impeachment.The opposition leader says the upheaval could undermine the opportunity for a 'fresh start' after moves by the military and others against Mugabe. 'It would be inimical to progress and the future of the country if all this action was about power retention at all costs,' Tsvangirai says.He adds that elections scheduled for next year should be internationally supervised as a way to ensure political legitimacy.___2:50 p.m.British Prime Minister Theresa May's spokesman says Robert Mugabe has lost the support of Zimbabwe's people.James Slack says that 'we don't yet know how developments in Zimbabwe are going to play out. What does appear clear is that Mugabe has lost the support of the people and of his party.'Slack told reporters that Britain 'would appeal for everyone to refrain from violence and hope to see a peaceful and swift resolution to the situation.'Mugabe ignored a midday deadline by the ruling party to resign and now faces impeachment.— Jill Lawless in London.___1:30 p.m.Zimbabwe's state-run broadcaster says ruling party members are summoned to a meeting Monday afternoon as talk of impeaching longtime President Robert Mugabe continues.Mugabe ignored a midday deadline by the party's Central Committee to resign. He now faces impeachment when Parliament resumes Tuesday.Meanwhile, government ministers are being urged to go about their work as usual as the political confusion continues.___12:10 p.m.The deadline set by Zimbabwe's ruling party for longtime President Robert Mugabe to resign or face impeachment has passed.The 93-year-old Mugabe remained defiant in a national address Sunday night. He has been fired as ruling party leader but says he will preside at a party congress next month.Activists and the influential war veterans association are vowing more protests to pressure the world's oldest head of state, who is under military house arrest, to resign.___10:30 a.m.Zimbabwe's influential war veterans association says the military should step back and let the people, and politics, remove longtime President Robert Mugabe from power.Chris Mutsvangwa says more protests are planned as Mugabe faces a midday deadline set by the ruling party to resign or face impeachment proceedings.Zimbabweans were astonished that Mugabe, flanked by the military, in a national address Sunday night did not announce his resignation.'Your time is up,' Mutsvangwa says, and he suggests that the military, even though it put Mugabe under house arrest days ago, is still beholden to him and compelled to protect him because he is officially their 'commander in chief.'He also says the war veterans' association is going to court to argue that Mugabe is 'derelict of his executive duty.'___8:45 a.m.Zimbabweans are worried about their country's fate after the increasingly isolated President Robert Mugabe did not resign in a televised speech as many had expected.'Arrogant Mugabe disregards Zanu PF,' a newspaper headline says, a reference to the ruling party that has demanded he resign by noon Monday or face impeachment.Opposition activists plan more protests to pressure Mugabe.Some ruling party members say an impeachment process likely wouldn't lead to Mugabe's immediate resignation and could take days to complete. Mugabe has been stripped of his party leadership but said in Sunday night's speech he would preside over a party congress next month.Some people in the capital, Harare, are now more cautious about talking to reporters. That contrasts with the jubilation and open condemnation of Mugabe over the weekend.
  • A second woman has accused Minnesota Sen. Al Franken of inappropriate touching, saying Monday that he put his hand on her bottom as they posed for a picture at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010 — after he had begun his career in the Senate.Lindsay Menz told CNN that the interaction made her feel 'gross.' She said she immediately told her husband that Franken had 'grabbed' her bottom, and she said she posted about it on Facebook.Menz's allegation comes days after a Los Angeles broadcaster, Leeann Tweeden, accused Franken of forcibly kissing her during a 2006 USO tour. Franken already faced a Senate ethics investigation over Tweeden's allegation, but the Menz allegation is potentially more damaging for Franken because it would be behavior that occurred while he was in office.Franken, a Democrat, told CNN he didn't remember taking the photo with Menz, but said in a statement to the network that he feels badly that she felt disrespected.'I take thousands of photos at the state fair surrounded by hundreds of people, and I certainly don't remember taking this picture,' Franken told CNN. 'I feel badly that Ms. Menz came away from our interaction feeling disrespected.'Franken's office did not immediately respond to Associated Press messages seeking comment.Menz, 33, who now lives in Frisco, Texas, said her father's business was sponsoring a radio booth at the Minnesota fair and that she took photos with several elected officials and political candidates as they stopped at the booth.She said as she posed with Franken, he 'pulled me in really close, like awkward close, and as my husband took the picture, he put his hand full-fledged on my rear,' Menz said. 'It was wrapped tightly around my butt cheek.'Menz said she told her husband, Jeremy Menz, and father Mark Brown about it right away. Both men affirmed that to CNN. Menz also said she posted the photo with Franken on Facebook on Aug. 27, and when her sister commented on the photo, she replied: 'Dude -- Al Franken TOTALLY molested me! Creeper!'The AP was not able to immediately view her account to verify the post.Franken, 66, is the latest public figure to be caught in the deluge of revelations of sexual harassment and misconduct that have crushed careers, ruined reputations and prompted criminal investigations in Hollywood, business and beyond.He has apologized to Tweeden, and she has accepted the apology, but a handful of Democrats have called for him to resign. Republicans, still forced to answer for the multiple allegations facing Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, joined in pressing for an expected investigation by the Senate Ethics Committee. Franken said he would welcome it.Franken canceled a sold-out book festival appearance scheduled for Monday in Atlanta to speak and promote his book, 'Al Franken, Giant of the Senate.' He hasn't appeared in public since Tweeden's allegation.
  • New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie may be deeply unpopular in his state, but in his home county he's getting a road named after him.Christie on Monday will be on hand when a new access road to Central Park of Morris County is christened Governor Chris Christie Way.The Republican lives in nearby Mendham Township and served in the county government in the mid-1990s. He's the first governor to hail from the county since the 1800s.Christie easily won re-election in 2013 and was viewed as a top 2016 presidential contender. But his approval rating has plummeted in the wake of the George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal and his failed presidential bid.He leaves office in January, when Democratic Gov.-elect Phil Murphy takes over.
  • European Union nations are making their last-moment pitches for who should get to host two key EU agencies that are due to leave Britain in 2019 because of Brexit.EU ministers headed into several rounds of voting on Monday to decide where to move the London-based European Medicines Agency and the European Banking Authority.Even though rules were set up to make it a fair decision, the process has turned into a deeply political contest.Dutch Foreign Minister Halbe Zijlstra said that 'in the end it is a very strategic game of chess.' He added that beyond bartering, 'Every now and then in politics, I hope that content can be decisive.'The EMA is responsible for the evaluation, supervision and monitoring of medicines while the EBA monitors the banking sector.
  • Santa Claus may be coming to town, but you'll need a reservation to see him.At Macy's flagship store on 34th Street in New York, a chance to sit on Saint Nick's lap is by appointment only this year, for the first time ever.Starting Monday, eager families can go online to sign up for a time slot from 30 minutes to five days in advance. No walk-ins are allowed. Admission is free to Santaland Herald Square and runs from the day after Thanksgiving through Christmas Eve.Macy's says the new arrangement is intended to cut down on wait times and make it easier to see the man in the red suit.'Santa's a popular guy, so the wait times to meet him have been quite long in previous years, especially on our busiest days,' the company said.Santaland is a 13,000-square-foot North Pole village complete with live elves and a train display, plus the world-famous Santa, immortalized in the film 'Miracle on 34th Street.' The store opened in 1902.The department store says families can cancel a reservation and make a new one at any time.And they say don't be too early or late for the time slot, and be sure to check in with an elf when arriving.'Santa's day is packed! To help keep him on schedule, please arrive within your time slot,' the company said.___This story has been corrected to say North Pole, not North Police.
  • Britain marked the 70th wedding anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip on Monday with a peal of bells, a set of portraits and some commemorative stamps.The then-Princess Elizabeth married naval officer Lt. Philip Mountbatten at Westminster Abbey on Nov. 20, 1947, in a Britain physically and economically ravaged by World War II. Wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill described the ceremony as 'a flash of color on the hard road we travel.'Elizabeth became queen in 1952. Now 91, she is the first British monarch to reach a platinum anniversary.Philip, who is 96 and also holds the title Duke of Edinburgh, has spent the ensuing decades supporting his wife in her role as head of state. At their 50th wedding anniversary, Elizabeth praised her husband as 'quite simply... my strength and stay all these years.'The royal family is reportedly holding a gathering at Windsor Castle to celebrate Monday's anniversary. The royal couple has four children, eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.Buckingham Palace marked the occasion by releasing several new portraits of the couple, taken in the White Drawing Room at Windsor Castle by photographer Matt Holyoak.The Royal Mail has issued a series of commemorative stamps. And at Westminster Abbey, bell-ringers sounded a full celebratory peal — lasting more than three hours — in tribute.
  • German police say they have arrested a man suspected of handling stolen objects from the estate of John Lennon, including diaries.Berlin police said the 58-year-old suspect, whom they didn't identify, was arrested in the German capital on Monday. They said another suspect lives in Turkey and is currently 'not available' for law enforcement authorities, without elaborating.Police said in a statement that the objects, including diaries written by the late Beatle, were stolen from Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, in New York in 2006.They reappeared in Berlin, and authorities this year launched an investigation of suspected fraud and handling stolen goods and the objects were seized.
  • Belarus' domestic security agency says it has arrested a Ukrainian journalist on spying charges.The agency, which still goes under its Soviet-era name, KGB, said that Ukrainian Radio correspondent Pavel Sharoiko has been in custody since his arrest in Minsk on Oct. 25.KGB spokesman Dmitry Pobyarzhin said Monday that Sharoiko is accused of setting up a network of agents collecting military-political information. He added the KGB found incriminating evidence during a search in Sharoiko's apartment, but wouldn't elaborate on what Belarusian secrets he was trying to obtain.Pobyarzhin said that Sharoiko confessed that he was a Ukrainian spy agency officer working under journalistic cover.Ukraine has refrained from commenting on the case. A Ukrainian diplomat accused of working as Sharoiko's handler has been ordered to leave Belarus.