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    The Latest on the meeting Thursday between French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Theresa May (all times local):6:40 p.m.French President Emmanuel Macron says Britain and France have signed a treaty to improve the management of their common border and to deal more humanely with migrants.Macron says the Sandhurst Treaty was signed by the two countries' interior ministers at a summit Thursday at Britain's Sandhurst military academy.He says it will cut the time it takes to process migrants who gather in the northern French port of Calais hoping to reach Britain, and to treat them more humanely and efficiently. Macron wants Britain to take more migrants from Calais but no figure was given Thursday.Macron says the border issue 'is a common challenge and we shall succeed together.'___12:05 p.m.In a significant gesture, British Prime Minister Theresa May has offered funds to ease French annoyance over a 2003 deal that placed British border controls in Calais, on the French side of the English Channel.The town has become a magnet for migrants hoping to reach Britain, and the accord puts the burden of blocking their entry to the U.K. on France.Britain agreed Thursday to pay 44.5 million pounds ($62 million) for fences, security cameras and other measures in Calais and nearby English Channel ports. France also wants Britain to take in more migrants from Calais, especially unaccompanied children, but there was no announcement on that issue.The U.K. also said it will send three Royal Air Force Chinook helicopters and dozens of personnel to join France's military mission against Islamic militants in Africa's Sahel region. France has led efforts to fight al-Qaida and IS-linked jihadi groups in the vast region south of the Sahara desert.___9:10 a.m.The leaders of Britain and France have met against a military backdrop, with the U.K. promising to help boost border security in France and support French military missions as part of moves to bind the countries closer together after Brexit.The announcement came as U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May and French President Emmanuel Macron held a bilateral summit Thursday intended to strengthen security and intelligence ties between the neighboring nations, and to build goodwill as Britain negotiates its exit from the European Union.The venue — the Sandhurst military academy southwest of London — was selected as a signal that the relationship between western Europe's two biggest military powers won't be weakened once the U.K. leaves the EU in 2019.It's Macron's first visit to Britain since he became president of France in May 2017.
  • The Latest on a case involving multiple killings in the Phoenix area (all times local):11:40 a.m.Police in Phoenix and two suburbs say they have evidence linking a 35-year-old man already charged with two killings to seven additional homicides that occurred in a three-week span late last year.Police officials for Phoenix, Glendale and Avondale said Thursday that Cleophus Cooksey knew some of the victims but investigators are still trying to determine motives for at least some of the killings.Cooksey was arrested Dec. 17 for the shooting deaths of his mother and another man and he's jailed on two counts of first-degree murder and one of being a felon in possession of a weapon.Officials say investigators were able to use evidence from shelling casings to connect at least some of the killings.Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says new technology allows police to get results of those checks within hours instead of weeks.___10:25 a.m.Phoenix police suspect a convicted felon charged with murder in the killing of his mother and stepfather may have committed seven other killings.Police plan a news conference Thursday to discuss the case involving 35-year-old Cleophus Cooksey.The other victims include his ex-girlfriend's brother as well as people who appeared to be random targets during a three-week period starting in late November.Cooksey was arrested Dec. 17 at the home where his mother and stepfather were killed.He faces two counts of premeditated first-degree murder and one count of weapon possession by a prohibited person.He previously served time in prison for manslaughter and armed robbery.
  • Several major not-for-profit hospital groups are trying their own solution to drug shortages and high medicine prices: creating a company to make cheaper generic drugs.The plan, announced Thursday, follows years of shortages of generic injected medicines that are the workhorses of hospitals, along with some huge price hikes for once-cheap generic drugs. Those problems drive up costs for hospitals, require significant staff time to find scarce drugs or devise alternatives, and sometimes mean patients get suboptimal medications.The not-for-profit drug company initially will be backed by four hospital groups — Intermountain Health, Ascension and two Catholic health systems, Trinity Health and SSM Health — plus the VA health system.Together, the five groups include more than 450 hospitals and many other health facilities. More health systems could join soon.
  • Actor and screenwriter Paul Rudd has been named 2018 Man of the Year by the nation's oldest collegiate theatrical organization at Harvard University.Hasty Pudding said Thursday it is honoring Rudd because his career has spanned many genres, from indies to mainstream films, from heartfelt comedies to superheroes.Hasty Pudding President Amira Weeks said the entire organization is in awe of Rudd, 'specifically, in his ability to have not aged since 1995.'Rudd co-wrote and starred in 'Ant-Man' and plays the lead in the upcoming 'The Catcher Was a Spy,' the real-life story of Ivy Leaguer and major league ballplayer Moe Berg, a spy with the forerunner of the CIA during World War II.Rudd will get his pudding pot during a roast at Harvard on Feb. 2.
  • The Latest on a U.N. Security Council meeting on confidence-building measures to tackle the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (all times local):2:10 p.m.Kazakhstan's president is calling on North Korea to follow his country's path and give up its nuclear ambitions.Nursultan Nazarbayev tells the U.N. Security Council that Kazakhstan has strengthened the country and its international reputation 'by renouncing nuclear weapons and obtaining non-aggression safeguards from nuclear powers.'Nazarbayev says the issue of North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons 'can be resolved by restoring trust among the United States, Russia and China.'He called Thursday for those three countries and the two other nuclear powers, Britain and France, to give North Korea security guarantees. He said that would be 'an important condition for creating an atmosphere of trust and Pyongyang's return to the negotiation table.'Kazakhstan holds the council presidency this month, and Nazarbayev was chairing a meeting on confidence-building measures to tackle the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.___1:30 p.m.The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations says the regimes that most threaten the world today with weapons of mass destruction — North Korea, Iran and Syria — also deny their people human rights, promote conflict and regional instability and 'aid terrorists and militant groups.'Nikki Haley told the U.N. Security Council Thursday that North Korea poses the greatest threat to nuclear proliferation and is continuing 'its reckless pursuit of nuclear weapons ... while its people starve and to threaten other nations while intimidating its own citizens.'Haley called Iran 'the leading cause of instability in an unstable part of the world.' She said it supports 'terrorists, proxy militants and murderers like Bashar Assad,' the Syrian president.And she accused Russia of vetoing three council resolutions and preventing the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons from holding Assad's government accountable for the use of chemical weapons in Syria.___12:15 p.m.Russia's foreign minister is warning that a failure of the Iran nuclear deal, especially as a result of action by the Trump administration, would send 'an alarming message' to North Korea and impact all international agreements.Sergey Lavrov told the Security Council on Thursday in a clear message to President Donald Trump that 'we cannot for the benefit of political agendas of certain countries abandon a genuine achievement of international diplomacy.'Last Friday, Trump kept the Iran agreement alive by extending sanctions waivers. But he warned that the U.S. would pull out in a few months unless 'terrible flaws' in the deal are fixed.Lavrov again pushed a Russian-Chinese 'roadmap for an exclusively peaceful settlement' of the North Korea nuclear issue.He also expressed grave concern at 'the growing threat of chemical terrorism in the Middle East, specifically on the territories of Iraq and Syria.'___11:10 a.m.U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres says the threat from weapons of mass destruction 'seems to be gathering force' and is urging expanded diplomatic efforts to tackle the security challenge posed by North Korea's nuclear ambitions.The U.N. chief told the Security Council on Thursday that the international community must build on the 'small signs of hope' from recent contacts between the two Koreas to pursue diplomacy and denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.Guterres said 'global anxieties about nuclear weapons are the highest since the Cold War,' and warned of 'unimaginable consequences' from 'the growing risk of military confrontation.'He also expressed concern at the 'ebb' in trust on nuclear and other weapons-related issues between the U.S. and Russia, and the use of chemical weapons in the Syrian conflict.
  • Hulk Hogan is set to be a homebody for WWE's All-Star bash. Banished in disgrace nearly three years ago from the wrestling organization, the Hulkster is holding out hope for a reunion this year with the sports entertainment giant. Hogan would love to bust out the red-and-yellow colors for the 'Raw' 25th anniversary show on Monday and join fellow wrestling greats in celebration of WWE's longest-running show. Hogan instead will likely flip on 'Raw' from his Florida home instead of flexing his now 22-inch pythons in New York. Hogan's bio is still scrubbed from WWE's website in the wake of his 2015 departure and he has not been advertised to appear among the list of former WWE champions that include 'Stone Cold' Steve Austin, Ric Flair and Shawn Michaels. 'Brother, if I'm not there, I'll definitely be there in spirit,' Hogan said. 'One way or the other, Hulk Hogan influenced each and every one of those guys you're going to see on TV Monday night. And that includes Vince McMahon, too.' Once a household name in wrestling, WWE terminated Hogan's contract in July 2015 on the heels of an audio release that contained him using repeated racial slurs to describe a man his daughter was dating at the time. 'It devastated me. The bottom dropped out,' Hogan said. 'It was just a situation that was unexpected; didn't even know it was going on at the time. I was blindsided by it.' Hogan, a 2005 WWE Hall of Famer, spent 30 years in the ring waging heavyweight battles against pro wrestling's unruliest giants, warriors and savages. Hogan's post-WWE fights had very real stakes. Hogan, whose legal name is Terry Bollea, went through years of legal wrangling with Gawker Media that landed in a civil trial and exposed lurid details of his private life. Hogan sued Gawker after it published parts of a sex video in 2012 and — after he won a $140 million verdict in his lawsuit — eventually settled with the company for $31 million. The years-long fight led to the media company's bankruptcy and the shutdown of Gawker.com. Hogan said he viewed the case as about protecting his right to privacy. 'Somebody had to draw the line somewhere,' Hogan said. 'I just made the decision that I was going to be the guy. If I lost everything, I was going to fight these people. It turned out great. There is justice.' Hogan has an active defamation lawsuit against Florida radio personalities he accused of playing a role in disseminating the sex tape. Hogan, who wasn't wrestled since his TNA Wrestling stint in 2012, wanted Hulkamania to run wild in 2018. 'I'm 64 years old and right now I could go out and tear WrestleMania down,' he said. 'I might have that one more match where I really beat the hell out of Vince. I've still got one in me.' But that would have to begin with reconciling with WWE, specifically McMahon, the chairman and CEO, and top executive Paul 'Triple H' Levesque. Through several stints with the company, Hogan and McMahon have best tight friends and bitter rivals. Hogan said he has occasional contact with McMahon but is closer with Levesque, the man credited with bringing former disgruntled greats such as The Ultimate Warrior and Bruno Sammartino back into the fold. 'I don't know if they want me back,' Hogan said. 'I think the fans want me back. I think that I'm part of that company from the ground up. Triple H I know is a huge fan of the guys that gave their blood, sweat and tears and their personal life to make this happen. I know Triple H would love to see me back on the inside again.' WWE sponsors would also have to be on board with Hogan's return. 'At this time, WWE remains committed to its decision,' the company said in a statement. That could leave Hogan to pursue a run outside WWE with the hottest act in pro wrestling: Kenny Omega, The Young Bucks, Cody Rhodes and the rest of the Bullet Club. 'I'm about ready to jump on a plane and fly to Japan and get involved with that Bullet Club, man. I'm so excited about those kids,' Hogan said. As much as Hogan wants to wrestle again, the reality is, he's had two hip, two knee and nine back surgeries and the man who slammed Andre the Giant and went 1-on-1 with The Rock has perhaps had his last bout. Hogan said he's busy with various business interests, including two beach shops in Florida that bear his name, and he plans to open a restaurant called Hogan's Hangout. He married his second wife, Jennifer, in 2010, and the couple have kept a low public profile after he spent four seasons with his ex-wife portrayed as the protective patriarch in the reality show, 'Hogan Knows Best.' 'I don't want that reality stuff ever in my house again,' Hogan said. 'I'd never take it to those personal levels I did before.' The question looms, will his next starring role again come on the WWE stage? 'The setback,' Hogan said, 'is never as great as the comeback.
  • A paper cup allegedly used by Elvis Presley six decades ago in Oklahoma is up for auction, and bids have already surpassed $1,200.North Carolina resident Wade Jones is a collector of all things Elvis. He tells the Tulsa World that the crumpled blue-and-white Dixie cup was snagged by a fan in April 1956, after Elvis performed at the Tulsa Fairgrounds Pavilion.Jones says a fan named June allegedly retrieved the cup the day after the performance, right before Elvis left town for a show in Oklahoma City. A letter accompanying the collector's item says June had asked to keep the cup 'as a little memento.'Bids for the now-yellowed paper cup had surpassed $1,280 on eBay by mid-day Wednesday. Jones says the auction closes Sunday evening.
  • Thousands of Haitian immigrants living in the U.S. legally will face employment and travel hurdles because President Donald Trump's administration delayed the process of re-registering those with temporary protected status, Haitian community leaders and immigrant activists say.U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services released details Thursday about the next steps for the 60,000 Haitians with the special status, an agency spokeswoman told The Associated Press.But the information comes too late to help the thousands of Haitians who hold immigration documents that show their legal and work status expiring Monday, said immigrants and advocates, some of whom wondered — in light of the president's recent remarks about Haiti — if the bureaucratic slowdown was deliberate.'They told me that if I don't bring the work papers, they will send me home because it is the law. You have to have work papers. I am under pressure,' said Edelyne Jean, a 35-year-old nursing assistant in Coral Springs, Florida, who supports four younger siblings still in Haiti. 'They say that if I don't bring anything new by Jan. 22 or the 23rd at the most, I am jobless.'Haitian workers like Jean will be left at the mercy of employers, who could simply choose to let them go, or hire someone else rather than wait for a process that could take months, says the Rev. Dieufort Fleurissaint, chairman of Haitian Americans United, a Boston-based community group.'They're putting a lot of people in a very, very difficult situation,' he says of federal officials. 'Employers are not going to take time to understand this. People will be in limbo come Monday.'Haitians were granted temporary protected status to live and work in the U.S. after a devastating earthquake struck their Caribbean homeland in 2010. The status has been renewed a number of times over the past seven years, to the chagrin of critics who say the humanitarian measure was never meant to allow immigrants to establish roots in the U.S.The Trump administration announced in November that Haitians living under the temporary status would have until July 2019 to get their affairs in order and return home.The problem is that officials didn't tell people with that status how to go about renewing it. Other groups eligible for similar status have received more lead time to re-register; the administration issued renewal guidelines for Nicaraguans and Hondurans in mid-December, before their status expired in January.U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services says it wasn't able to release details about the re-registration process for Haitians sooner because officials had to work out the work authorization language, among other things.But Thursday's announcement automatically extends the work permits for Haitians on temporary protected status through July, says U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services spokeswoman Sharon Scheidhauer. It acknowledges 'not all re-registrants will receive' the work authorization cards before the current ones expire on Monday.And Haitian workers will be able to simply show employers the agency's Thursday notice as proof their work status is still valid until their new employment documents arrive, she says.Nevertheless, the bureaucratic slowdown 'reinforces the message' that Haitians aren't welcome in America, says Geralde Gabeau, a Haitian immigrant who heads the Immigrant Family Services Institute, a Boston-based nonprofit that provides academic support to immigrant youths.'It goes hand-in-hand with what the president said last week,' she says, referring to the closed-door meeting Trump held with U.S. senators during which he is said to have profanely disparaged African countries and asked why the U.S. would want more Haitians. 'It's not just words. It's actions. They don't want Haitians here, so they're doing whatever they can to discourage them so that they go back to their country.'At least in Boston, which has the nation's third-largest Haitian community after Miami and New York, the delays have already led to job losses, Fleurissaint says. Some Haitians working as porters, janitors and food-service workers at Boston's Logan International Airport were let go this summer because they didn't receive new work permits before the most recent expiration date for temporary protected status, which was in July, he says.And a woman in Massachusetts was warned by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services this week that she wouldn't be able to re-enter the country if she attempted to attend her father's funeral in Haiti this weekend, Gabeau said.Haitians on temporary protected status could encounter other hurdles, such as renewing their driver's licenses, says Sarang Sekhavat, director of federal policy at the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition.Haitian community leaders are gathering lawyers to assist families as problems arise.'We're going to be fighting back,' Gabeau says. 'We will not stay silent. This is not acceptable.'___Follow Philip Marcelo at twitter.com/philmarcelo. His work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/philip_marcelo.___Gomez Licon reported from Miami.
  • Moving to solidify its standing with social conservatives, the Trump administration is creating an office to protect the religious rights of medical providers, including those who oppose abortion.The announcement Thursday by the Department of Health and Human Services drew immediate criticism from Democrats who said it could undermine the rights of women, gays and transgender people.The new division will be part of the HHS Office for Civil Rights, which enforces federal anti-discrimination and privacy laws. The administration said it will focus on enforcing conscience and religious protections already part of federal law. No new efforts to expand such protections were announced.'President Trump promised the American people that his administration would vigorously uphold the rights of conscience and religious freedom,' acting HHS Secretary Eric Hargan said in a statement. 'That promise is being kept today.'The HHS civil rights office gets a small number of complaints involving religious and conscience rights, but the number has grown since President Donald Trump was elected.Roger Severino, director of the HHS civil rights office, said that from 2008 to Nov. 2016, HHS received 10 such complaints. Since Trump won, the office has received new 34 complaints.Religious and social conservatives are a core constituency for the Trump administration. Trump will address via satellite Friday's annual anti-abortion march in Washington.Democratic Sen. Patty Murray of Washington was quick to criticize the administration's decision to create the new office.'This would be yet another attempt to let ideology dictate who is able to get the care they need,' Murray said in a statement. 'Any approach that would deny or delay health care to someone and jeopardize their wellbeing for ideological reasons is unacceptable.'Monday marks the 45th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion.
  • Scientists watching for baby right whales off the Southeast U.S. coast have yet to spot a single newborn seven weeks into the endangered species' calving season — the longest researchers have gone without any sightings in nearly 30 years.Bad weather that has limited efforts to look for whales could be to blame, rather than a reproductive slump. But scientists also worry it could point to another low birth year for the imperiled whales after a grim 2017, when 17 confirmed right whale deaths far outpaced a scant five recorded births.'We basically right now should be at the peak of the season and we haven't seen anything, so that's concerning,' said Clay George, a wildlife biologist who oversees right whale surveys for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. 'I'm going from being the optimist I normally am to being pretty pessimistic about it.'The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimates only about 450 North American right whales remain. The agency warned in December the species could face extinction without new protective actions.Researchers hoped for signs of a robust reproductive year soon after the right whale calving season began Dec. 1. But no calves have been reported off the Atlantic coasts of Georgia and Florida, where the whales typically migrate to give birth each winter. It's still relatively early in the calving season, which has about three months to go.Clay said it's the longest scientists have gone into the season without any calf sightings since 1989, when they began comprehensive surveys using trained spotters in planes to look for mother-and-calf pairs. Previously, the latest initial sighting was Jan. 1 — and that was during the dismal birthing season a year ago.Right whales have averaged about 17 births per year during the past three decades. Since 2012, all but two seasons have yielded below average calf counts. The five births recorded last year were the lowest since 2000, when surveys found only one newborn whale.The reason no calves have been spotted so far this season may have more to do with the weather. Planes used for aerial surveys have often been grounded this season because of high winds and cloudy skies. George said weather conditions have cut the number of survey flights per week roughly in half.Barb Zoodsma, who oversees the right whale recovery program in the U.S. Southeast for NOAA Fisheries, said that's why she isn't worrying too much yet.'I am not convinced that right whales aren't here, rather than we just can't see them because we can't get out,' Zoodsma said. 'We're all scrambling to find answers and figure out what's going on.'Right whale reproduction can fluctuate greatly, year-to-year. After births bottomed out in 2000, the whales rebounded with a baby boom of 31 newborns the following year. One reason the numbers can seesaw so significantly is that female right whales typically give birth only once every three years or so.Without an increase in births, right whales appear to be dying faster than they can reproduce. NOAA scientists said in December than the population has been declining since 2010, with females hit harder than males. Many whales die from being struck by ships or getting tangled in fishing gear.Also concerning to scientists has been the scarcity of adult whales off the Southeast coast during calving season. George said it was common to see 100 adults or more during winters a decade ago. Last year, a single male whale was the only adult spotted in addition to the few new mothers seen swimming with their calves.The only sighting so far this year was an adult whale photographed by a man from his condominium window overlooking the Gulf of Mexico in Panama City Beach, Florida. Zoodsma said it was the first right whale seen in the Gulf since 2006, but no sign of an accompanying newborn.Meanwhile, the Center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts reported a survey flight Tuesday identified 14 adult right whales in Cape Cod Bay, an important feeding habitat. While that's more whales than are typically seen in the bay this early in the winter, Zoodsma said it won't necessarily affect calving because pregnant females typically have already migrated south by now.'We're in a bad spot with right whales, there's no doubt about it,' Zoodsma said. 'Everybody's anxious to see more calves and the calves aren't coming.'She still hopeful newborn whales will turn up before the calving season ends in mid-April.