ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

heavy-rain-night
80°
Partly Cloudy
H 86° L 74°
  • heavy-rain-night
    80°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 86° L 74°
  • cloudy-day
    75°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 86° L 74°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    84°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 87° L 74°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment

    LONDON (AP) — Britain's Evening Standard newspaper has apologized to Solange Knowles for digitally altering an image of the singer on the cover of its magazine. Knowles — who had released a song called 'Don't Touch My Hair' — complained on Instagram that an elaborate braided crown on her head had been digitally removed from the cover photo. The magazine article featured the singer talking about her experiences spending time at her mother's salon as a child. She also discussed braiding's importance to her and praised it as 'its own art form.' The magazine said in a statement Saturday that the photo was altered for 'layout purposes' but it was sorry for the offense caused. The statement said: 'Plainly we made the wrong call and we have offered our unreserved apologies to Solange.
  • AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — All five living former U.S. presidents will be attending a concert Saturday night in a Texas college town, raising money for relief efforts from hurricane devastation in Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Democrats Barack Obama, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter and Republicans George H.W. and George W. Bush are putting aside politics in contrast with President Donald Trump, who has vowed to help Texas and Florida for as long as it takes but has criticized Puerto Rican leaders while suggesting aid there won't be unlimited. Puerto Rico was devastated by Hurricane Maria, which made landfall after Harvey and Irma had battered other areas. Having so much ex-presidential power in one place is unusual. George H.W. Bush spokesman Jim McGrath said all five of Saturday night's attendees haven't been together since the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas in 2013, when Obama was still in office. He didn't answer a question about whether Trump was formally invited. The concert features the country music band Alabama, Rock & Roll Hall of Famer 'Soul Man' Sam Moore, gospel legend Yolanda Adams and Texas musicians Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen. It's happening at Texas A&M University's Reed Arena in College Station, home to the presidential library of the elder Bush. At 93, he has a form of Parkinson's disease and uses a motorized scooter or a wheelchair for mobility, though he participated in the coin flip at February's Super Bowl in his hometown of Houston. George W. Bush was Texas governor before leaving for the White House and now lives in Dallas. There is precedent for former presidents joining forces for post-disaster fundraising. George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton raised money together after the 2004 South Asia tsunami and Hurricane Katrina the next year. Clinton and George W. Bush combined to seek donations after Haiti's 2011 earthquake. 'It's certainly a triple, if not a home run, every time,' said Brandon Rottinghaus, a political science professor at the University of Houston. 'Presidents have the most powerful and prolific fundraising base of any politician in the world. When they send out a call for help, especially on something that's not political, they can rake in big money.' Amid criticism that his administration was initially slow to aid storm-ravaged Puerto Rico, Trump accused island leaders of 'poor leadership,' and later tweeted that, 'Electric and all infrastructure was disaster before hurricanes' while saying that Federal Emergency Management Agency, first-responders and military personnel wouldn't be able to stay there forever. But Rottinghaus said those attending Saturday's concert were always going to be viewed more favorably since polling consistently shows that 'any ex-president is seen as less polarizing than the current president.' 'They can't get away from the politics of the moment,' he said of current White House occupants. 'Ex-presidents are able to step back and be seen as the nation's grandfather.' Hurricane Harvey slammed into Texas' Gulf Coast as a Category 4 hurricane on Aug. 25, eventually unleashing historic flooding in Houston and killing more than 80 people. Shortly thereafter, all five ex-presidents appeared in a commercial for a fundraising effort known as 'One America Appeal.' In it, George W. Bush says, 'People are hurting down here.' His father, George H.W. Bush, then replies, 'We love you, Texas.' A website accepting donations, OneAmericaAppeal.org, was created with 100 percent of proceeds pledged to hurricane relief. Hurricane Irma subsequently hit Florida and Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, while both affected the U.S. Virgin Islands. Organizers expanded the fundraising campaign to help those storm victims, too. ___ Sign up for the AP's weekly newsletter showcasing our best reporting from the Midwest and Texas: http://apne.ws/2u1RMfv
  • BANGKOK (AP) — A new documentary is set to stir fresh debate over one of Asia's most enduring mysteries: What happened to Jim Thompson, Thailand's legendary silk king. The former American intelligence officer turned textile tycoon went for a walk in the Malaysian jungle 50 years ago and never returned. Despite a massive search, no trace of Thompson was ever found. One of the most prominent Westerners in Asia had simply vanished. Theories abound: He was killed by a tiger; he got lost and perished in deep forest; he disappeared himself as part of a political intrigue. Those behind the documentary say they have new evidence that Thompson was killed. Their film, 'Who Killed Jim Thompson,' premiered Oct. 20 at the Eugene International Film Festival in the U.S. state of Oregon. 'There's been all sorts of theories and mostly silly theories, but I'm hoping that this will put some closure to, you know, the whole story,' said Barry Broman, the film's producer. The filmmakers, from Adventure Film Productions, said they got their break out of the blue: An old contact approached them with a tale of a death-bed confession. They eventually found a second source whose information dove-tailed with the first. Their conclusion: Thompson was slain by rebels from the Communist Party of Malaya who grew suspicious after he arrived in the jungle and began requesting a meeting with the party's secretary-general, at the time Malaysia's most-wanted man. Rather than vacationing, the filmmakers said, Thompson was on what turned out to be a final, fatal mission. Broman, who has decades of Asia experience as a photographer, U.S. marine and diplomat, said the conclusion is unequivocal: 'Jim was never going to be found. He was murdered.' The filmmakers acknowledged the murder theory's not new, but they believe their version is more substantial. While some of the film's conclusions are plausible based on what is known about Thompson's life, there is nothing definitive given that it relies on second-hand information from relatives of those allegedly involved and leaves many questions unanswered. During World War II, Thompson was a highly decorated operative with the Office of Strategic Services, the forerunner of the CIA. After the war, he was stationed in Thailand with the OSS and chose to make his home there after turning businessman and founding his silk firm in 1948. Thompson helped revive the Thai silk industry and his company has since grown into one of Thailand's flag-ship luxury brands. His former Bangkok home, once the site of legendary parties, is now a museum filled with his fabulous collection of Asian art and antiques. Both have become must-see attractions for the millions of tourists who visit Thailand each year. The company declined to comment on the new claims about the fate of its founder. Thompson had a $1.5 million a year business by 1967, when the Vietnam War was in full swing with Thailand playing an essential role, hosting bases from which the U.S. Air Force bombed communist-controlled areas of Indochina. Thompson decamped in March of that year to Malaysia's Cameron Highlands, a hill station dotted with tea plantations that was once popular with British colonists, for some rest and relaxation with Singaporean friends at their Tudor-style Moonlight Cottage vacation home. On March 26, Easter Sunday, as his hosts were taking a rest, they heard their guest from Bangkok leave the house, presumably to take a stroll in the area's crisp fresh air. Not a trace of Thompson was found after that. Hundreds of people were involved in the initial sweep to find him: soldiers, police, professional jungle trackers, native tribespeople. When no clues were unearthed, psychics and medicine men joined the fruitless quest. 'I still have questions. I'd like to have a couple of more sources,' Broman acknowledged. He hopes bringing the story to the screen may jog some memories, and perhaps someone, somewhere will be struck by a realization along the lines of, 'say, didn't Grandpa talk about that?
  • KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A jazz museum that's plagued by operating losses and bounced checks to musicians could be headed for a takeover by Kansas City. City Council members Jermaine Reed and Scott Wagner introduced an ordinance Thursday that asks officials to study the transfer of the American Jazz Museum to the Parks and Recreation Department by next spring, The Kansas City Star reported . The measure includes $225,000 to help the museum meet payroll. The 20-year-old museum located in the historic 18th and Vine district currently operates in a city-owned building but under an independent board. The institution has been unable to raise the money necessary to stand on its own financially. Wagner said the museum has already spent its annual city subsidy for the fiscal year that ends next April. Reed sent a letter this week to city and museum officials outlining a proposal to move the museum, the Blue Room jazz club and the Gem Theater to the Parks Department. He said the city has an obligation to safeguard its assets. 'It is clear business as usual will not suffice,' Reed said. 'The Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners has a long history of full collaboration with neighborhood groups and business leaders in managing certain city-owned assets and tourist sites such as the Kansas City Zoo, the Liberty Memorial, Starlight Theatre and the Kansas City Museum.' The museum's financial difficulties became apparent earlier this year when performers from a May jazz festival realized their checks from the museum had bounced. The performers were owed $150,000 at one point. 'They have issues of sustainability and economy. It can't be ignored anymore,' Wagner said. City Manager Troy Schulte said there are no legal obstacles to a city takeover of the museum. ___ Information from: The Kansas City Star, http://www.kcstar.com
  • iTunes Official Music Charts for the week ending October 19, 2017: Top Songs 1. Thunder, Imagine Dragons 2. rockstar (feat. 21 Savage), Post Malone 3. Perfect, Ed Sheeran 4. What About Us, P!nk 5. Feel It Still, Portugal. The Man 6. Havana (feat. Young Thug), Camila Cabello 7. Bodak Yellow, Cardi B 8. Sorry Not Sorry, Demi Lovato 9. Too Good at Goodbyes, Sam Smith 10. Every Little Thing, Carly Pearce Top Albums 1. Beautiful Trauma, P!nk 2. Colors, Beck 3. Mr. Davis, Gucci Mane 4. Southern Girl City Lights, Jessie James Decker 5. The Saga Continues, Wu-Tang 6. SWIM TEAM, Dirty Heads 7. MASSEDUCTION, St. Vincent 8. Yours, Russell Dickerson 9. Greatest Hits, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers 10. Evolve, Imagine Dragons __ (copyright) 2017 Apple Inc.
  • NEW YORK (AP) — Jason Aldean's moving rendition of 'I Won't Back Down' on 'Saturday Night Live' will soon be raising money to help victims of the Las Vegas shooting. The song was made available on Friday on various sites. Aldean's representative says all proceeds will be donated to the Direct Impact Fund dedicated to victims of the tragedy. Aldean was performing at the Route 91 Harvest Festival on Oct. 2 when a gunman fired on the crowd a hotel room, killing 58 people. Hundreds more were injured. The country star made his first public performance on 'SNL' five days later and sang the Tom Petty song. It was in part a tribute to the late rocker, who died that week, but also a show of resiliency in the face of tragedy.
  • PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A former district attorney who declined to press sexual-assault charges against Bill Cosby in 2005 has filed the beginnings of a lawsuit against Cosby's accuser in Philadelphia. An attorney for Bruce L. Castor says the personal-injury complaint will claim Andrea Constand sued Castor for defamation in 2015 so he would lose the prosecutor's race. The winner, Kevin Steele, had criticized Castor's handling of the Cosby case. Castor's lawyer James Beasley Jr. tells The Philadelphia Inquirer paperwork filed earlier this month will lead to a lawsuit seeking more than $50,000 in damages. A lawyer representing Constand's attorneys says the potential lawsuit sounds 'legally deficient.' Cosby is charged with knocking out Constand with pills and sexually assaulting her at his home near Philadelphia in 2004. He says the encounter was consensual.
  • BOSTON (AP) — Norman Rockwell's three sons were among several people who went to court on Friday seeking to halt a museum's plans to sell 40 works of art, including two by him. A complaint seeking a temporary restraining order filed in Berkshire Superior Court alleges the board of trustees at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield contracted with Sotheby's for a public auction of the works before it announced its plans publicly, acted in breach of its fiduciary duties and trust and acted without legal authority to sell the art. The planned sale is against Massachusetts laws establishing the museum, which requires the museum to maintain any gifts it receives 'for the people of Berkshire County and the general public,' the complaint says. 'Once sold, it is highly unlikely that any of the pieces will remain in Berkshire County or in a public institution where they can be seen and enjoyed,' the complaint says. Besides Thomas, Jarvis and Peter Rockwell, the plaintiffs include two local artists and several members of the museum. They are represented by the Boston law firm Foley Hoag LLP. The museum has consistently stood by its decision to sell the art. 'We believe we have strong legal grounds for our deaccessioning and we are confident in our new vision plan which will allow this important local museum to continue to contribute to the educational and cultural life of this region for another century,' trustees president Elizabeth McGraw said in a statement on Friday. The museum came under intense national and local criticism after it announced in July that is was auctioning the art. The American Alliance of Museums and the Association of Art Museum Directors said in a joint statement that the sale violated a sacred museum rule that collections are not to be sold to pay bills. The works for sale include Rockwell's 'Shaftsbury Blacksmith Shop' and 'Shuffleton's Barbershop,' both of which the illustrator gave as gifts to the museum when he lived in nearby Stockbridge. Works by Alexander Calder, Albert Bierstadt and George Henry Durrie also are on the auction block. Museum trustees and officials say the museum is in dire financial straits and may close for good if it doesn't sell the works. They say it is hoped that the sale will raise as much as $60 million, which will be used to boost the endowment by $40 million, with the other $20 million being used to renovate the museum as it changes its mission to focus more on natural history and science. The complaint says the museum's financial troubles are greatly exaggerated.
  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — A sketch of the Empire State Building drawn by President Donald Trump has sold at auction for $16,000. Julien's Auctions says the 12-inch-by-9-inch black marker depiction of the iconic New York City skyscraper was created by Trump for a charity auction in Florida during the time he opened his Mar-a-Lago estate as a private club in 1995. Julien's says the piece signed by Trump went for less than $100 the first time it was sold. It was estimated to go for $8,000 to $12,000 at the auction that took place in Los Angeles and online Thursday. The buyer has not been named. The auction house says a portion of the proceeds of the sale are going to benefit WHDD-FM, a National Public Radio station in Connecticut.
  • NEW YORK (AP) — Fox News Channel has removed a false story from its website, saying it was duped by an artist the network highlighted as a Vietnam veteran, a member of the first U.S. Navy SEAL team and a much-decorated war hero. The report, which aired Oct. 8, focused on 72-year-old glass artist John Garofalo, who 'despite health issues' emerged from semi-retirement to create a four-foot-high, 150-pound glass-and-bronze presidential seal he said he hoped to present to President Donald Trump. The report — captioned 'Decorated War Hero Hopes to Honor Trump With Glass Presidential Seal' — included numerous details of Garofalo's alleged military past. 'Unfortunately, all of Garofalo's claims turned out to be untrue,' Fox News said in a statement issued Thursday. 'The fact is that he did not serve in Vietnam. He was never a U.S. Navy SEAL. Even though he showed us medals, Garofalo was not awarded two Purple Hearts or any of the other nearly two dozen commendations he claimed to have received, except for the National Defense Service Medal.' The story, by Fox News correspondent Bryan Llenas, displayed Garofalo's work in progress which it described as a tribute to his hero, Trump, who 'woke something up in me,' Garofalo said. 'I have hope for him and I have hope for the country.' Host Eric Shawn closed the story by saying, 'God bless John Garofalo. We certainly hope the president is listening.' In the network's lengthy statement, which it characterized as a correction, not a retraction, Fox News said, 'It is true that Garofalo is a glass artist and a veteran. He served in Spain and he gifted two presidential seals to Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. 'Over the last two weeks, we've worked with Garofalo's family and the National Personnel Records Center to get to the bottom of a military past that Garofalo had claimed to be covert. We apologize to our viewers, especially veterans and servicemen and women,' Fox News said in its statement. Along with the statement posted on its website, the network said it planned to offer an on-air correction Friday.