ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day Created with Sketch.
85°
Clear
H 94° L 73°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    85°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 94° L 73°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    91°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Sunny. H 94° L 73°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    88°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 95° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

The Latest Business Headlines

    The Latest on Alex Acosta's confirmation as President Donald Trump's secretary of labor (all times EDT): 6:40 p.m. The Senate has confirmed law school dean Alex Acosta as President Donald Trump's secretary of labor. The 60-38 vote Thursday fills out Trump's Cabinet just ahead of the president's 100th day in office. Once sworn in, Acosta will be the nation's 27th secretary of labor, leading an agency that enforces workplace protections for about 10 million employers and 125 million workers. Acosta wasn't Trump's first choice for the job. That was former fast food CEO Andrew Puzder, who withdrew his name from consideration after becoming a political headache for the new administration. Acosta has been a federal prosecutor, a civil rights chief at the Justice Department and a member of the National Labor Relations Board. Democrats have complained that Acosta's positions on overtime pay and other issues are unclear. ___ 2:20 p.m. The Senate is poised to confirm Alex Acosta as President Donald Trump's secretary of labor. The vote expected Thursday would make Acosta the only Hispanic in the Cabinet and complete Trump's Cabinet as he approaches the 100-day mark of his presidency. But the drive to fill the labor position was rocky for a president who had promised to advocate for American workers. Trump nominated Acosta only after his first choice, Andrew Puzder, withdrew from consideration under a cloud of questions and criticism. The fast food CEO acknowledged having hired a housekeeper not authorized to work in the U.S. and belatedly paying the related taxes. The Senate already has approved Acosta, 48, three times previously, for positions in the Labor and Justice Departments.
  • Microsoft's cloud business propelled its fiscal third-quarter earnings above Wall Street's expectations, but revenue fell short, sending the software maker's stock lower in after-hours trading. Microsoft Corp. said Thursday that it earned $4.8 billion, or 61 cents per share, in the January-March period. That's up 28 percent from $3.76 billion, or 47 cents per share, in the same period a year earlier. Excluding one-time items, Microsoft earned $5.71 billion, or 73 cents per share. That's up 13 percent from $5.04 billion, or 63 cents per share, a year earlier. The company posted revenue of $22.09 billion, up 8 percent from $20.53 billion. Adjusted revenue, which is more closely followed by analysts, was $23.56 billion, up 6 percent from last year's $22.16 billion. Microsoft's earnings were above expectations, but revenue fell slightly short. Analysts, on average, were expecting Microsoft to report adjusted earnings of 70 cents per share on revenue of $23.65 billion, according to a poll by FactSet. As sales of Windows PCs decline, CEO Satya Nadella has been pouring money and resources into remote data centers that deliver the company's services online to smartphones, tablets and other devices. Businesses and government agencies are increasingly turning to such 'cloud computing' services, which is helping Microsoft move on from its old software business. Shares in Microsoft Corp., which is based in Redmond, Washington, slid about 1 percent to $67.65 in after-hours trading.
  • Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) on Thursday reported fiscal third-quarter earnings of $4.8 billion. On a per-share basis, the Redmond, Washington-based company said it had profit of 61 cents. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring costs, came to 73 cents per share. The results exceeded Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 15 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 69 cents per share. The software maker posted revenue of $22.09 billion in the period. Its adjusted revenue was $23.56 billion, which also topped Street forecasts. Nine analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $23.55 billion. Microsoft shares have increased nearly 10 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed nearly 7 percent. In the final minutes of trading on Thursday, shares hit $68.27, an increase of 34 percent in the last 12 months. _____ This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on MSFT at https://www.zacks.com/ap/MSFT _____ Keywords: Microsoft, Earnings Report, Priority Earnings
  • Starbucks is pointing to the Unicorn Frappuccino as an example of its digital savvy, and ability to ride out of its sales slump. The coffee chain reported disappointing U.S. sales growth for the first three months of the year on Thursday as customer traffic stalled, and it tempered its profit forecast for the year. Its shares fell nearly 5 percent in after-hours trading. But the Seattle-based company cited several changes it's been making to ease the congestion in stores that it said was driving away some customers. Starbucks also said the success of its color-changing Frappuccino — introduced for a limited time last week after the lukewarm quarter ended — proves the proficiency of its social media strategy. Executive Chairman Howard Schultz called the drink 'the most stunning example of our understanding of digital and social media and Instagram.' Starbucks introduced the Unicorn Frappuccino in nod to the online trend of food and drinks channeling the mythical creature, and promised it would change colors and flavors with a swirl of a straw. Though the chatter the drink generated online wasn't entirely positive, Schultz said it drove traffic to stores. The company also said the drink spurred interest in its Frappuccinos, and promised it has another drink in the pipeline that is 'as good as Unicorn or better.' Though Schultz stepped down as CEO earlier this month, he made surprise remarks during a conference call with analysts as an 'unscripted closer' to give assurances about the company's future after its results. Starbucks reported a 3 percent sales increase at established U.S. stores, marking the fourth straight quarter the figure has come in below 5 percent. The bump was driven entirely by higher average spending, which masked a decline in customer transactions. When factoring in a change in its loyalty program, the company said transactions were flat. Like other restaurants and retailers, the coffee chain says it is contending with a changing landscape in which shoppers are increasingly migrating online. Starbucks has said its digital efforts, including its mobile app, position it to grow despite the consumer shift that may hurt others. Still, there have been hiccups. Starbucks said the popularity of its mobile order-ahead option has created crowds near pickup counters in some stores, causing some people who walk in to then leave without buying anything. The company says it has implemented changes to address the congestion and that sales improved throughout the quarter, and that April has been even stronger. For the three months ended April 2, Starbucks Corp. earned $652.8 million, or 45 cents per share, in line with Wall Street expectations. Total revenue was $5.29 billion, short of the $5.42 billion analysts expected, according to FactSet. The company said it expects total revenue for the year to come in on the low end of its previous forecast, which was for growth of 8 percent to 10 percent. Profit is now expected to be $2.08 to $2.12 per share, down from the previous forecast of $2.12 to $2.14 per share. The company said it launched a 'review process' for Teavana mall-based stores, many of which have seen declining sales. _____ Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi
  • MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Alphabet Inc. (GOOG) on Thursday reported first-quarter net income of $5.43 billion. The Mountain View, California-based company said it had profit of $7.73 per share. The internet search leader posted revenue of $24.75 billion in the period. Its adjusted revenue was $20.12 billion. Alphabet shares have increased 13 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed nearly 7 percent. In the final minutes of trading on Thursday, shares hit $874.25, an increase of 24 percent in the last 12 months. _____ This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on GOOG at https://www.zacks.com/ap/GOOG _____ Keywords: Alphabet, Earnings Report, Priority Earnings
  • Is the online giant of retail also looking to conquer physical stores? Amazon has been dabbling in physical retail since 2015, during which time it's opened a half-dozen bookstores that double as gadget emporia, a score of campus bookstores that don't sell books and a convenience store without cashiers. For now, its efforts seem largely experimental, though that may not be true for long. Although the company already dominates e-commerce, 90 percent of worldwide retail spending is still in brick-and-mortar stores, according to eMarketer. Amazon has the chance to change retail with automation and data-mining technologies borrowed from e-commerce. 'It seems counterintuitive they are investing in any physical stores when they are blamed for the demise of so many of them, but no cow is sacred,' says Sucharita Mulpuru, a retail analyst in Charlotte, North Carolina. Amazon's offline ambitions could even boost Amazon's online operations further, even though they seem to be doing just fine for now. In the first three months of the year, the Seattle company earned $724 million, or $1.48 per share, a 41 percent increase from a year earlier. Amazon soundly beat Wall Street's expectations of $1.08 per share, according to FactSet. Revenue increased 23 percent to $35.7 billion, above expectations of $35.3 billion. Amazon doesn't break out numbers for its retail-store operations. Amazon Chief Financial Officer Brian T. Olsavsky told investors Thursday that the stores represent 'another way to reach the customer and test what resonates with them.' He said the company has been pleased with the results, but he didn't elaborate. Exactly what it's learning, and what it plans to do with that knowledge, is the next big question. Here are five ways physical stores could help Amazon. ___ A SHOWCASE FOR GADGETS At Amazon's six physical bookstores — six more are on the way — books are arranged on shelves face out, even though that takes more space. Amazon isn't trying to cram its entire inventory into these stores; Amazon figures you can just order everything else from your phone. Amazon also devotes a lot of space to its Kindle e-readers, streaming TV devices and other gadgets, so you can try them out before buying. Tutorials are also offered on weekends. Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter says physical bookstores are good places to win Kindle converts, as 'the only people who don't have Kindles who should have Kindles are luddites who also read.' ___ SERENDIPITY Amazon opened its third bookstore in October, near Portland, Oregon. Miriam Sontz, CEO of Powell's Books in Portland, calls Amazon's entry 'an acknowledgement of the inability of the internet to provide a certain retail experience that book buyers enjoy.' That includes spontaneous conversations with fellow shoppers on what they're reading, and having a book cover or blurb grab you as you walk down the aisle. Robert Hetu, a retail analyst at Gartner, says online customers tend to go to a website knowing what they want to buy. By contrast, customers visiting a physical store often make impulse purchases, even if they go in with something specific in mind. Amazon could learn more about that serendipity from its stores, and perhaps find better ways to increase impulse buying online, Hetu says. ___ MAKE CUSTOMERS DO THE WORK Amazon is scheduled to open its 20th book-less campus bookstore next week in Cleveland. Students order textbooks and dorm furnishings online and come to these stores to pick them up. The centralized pickup location reduces shipping expenses. The company is also testing a grocery pickup service at two locations in Seattle. Once it launches, Prime members will be able to order groceries online and visit one of these stores for pickup, skipping the aisles. Crews will even bring orders to the car. It's cheaper than door-to-door deliveries. ___ RETAIL TECHNOLOGY Amazon already makes heavy use of robots at warehouses to fulfill online orders. Now Amazon is trying to bring automation to retail. The Amazon Go convenience store in Seattle uses sensors to track items as shoppers put them into baskets or return them to the shelf. The shopper's Amazon account gets automatically charged. The store is expected to open to the public soon, after a test with Amazon employees. Amazon not only saves money on cashiers but also could use the data to manage inventory better and even assess when to discount items, says Mulpuru, the retail analyst. Hetu suggests that Amazon might even license its technology to other retailers, the way it rents out its data centers to businesses and groups to power their websites and other digital needs. That business, known as cloud computing, made up 10 percent of Amazon's revenue in the first quarter, as sales grew 43 percent to nearly $3.7 billion. ___ BUILDING LOYALTY Amazon can use its campus locations to promote its Prime loyalty program (students get 50 percent off the normal $99 annual fee). The strategy is simple: Get students hooked, and they'll be customers for life. As for the regular bookstores, Prime members get the same prices available online. For everyone else, only Amazon gadgets match the online prices; books and other items are sold at an often-higher list price. Of course, you can sign up for Prime on the spot. Hetu said Amazon could use these experiences to deepen loyalty — though they can also damage Amazon's reputation if it can't deliver an experience Prime members are already used to. ___ This story has been corrected with the proper spelling of Robert Hetu's name.
  • Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) on Thursday reported first-quarter profit of $724 million. The Seattle-based company said it had profit of $1.48 per share. The results topped Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 12 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.03 per share. The online retailer posted revenue of $35.71 billion in the period, also beating Street forecasts. Eleven analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $35.39 billion. For the current quarter ending in July, Amazon said it expects revenue in the range of $35.25 billion to $37.75 billion. Analysts surveyed by Zacks had expected revenue of $36.93 billion. Amazon shares have increased 22 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has increased nearly 7 percent. In the final minutes of trading on Thursday, shares hit $916.99, an increase of 51 percent in the last 12 months. _____ This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on AMZN at https://www.zacks.com/ap/AMZN _____ Keywords: Amazon, Earnings Report, Priority Earnings
  • The passenger who was dragged off a flight after refusing to give up his seat settled with United for an undisclosed sum Thursday in an apparent attempt by the airline to put the fiasco behind it as quickly as possible. David Dao's legal team said the agreement includes a provision that the amount will remain confidential. One his lawyers praised United CEO Oscar Munoz. Munoz 'said he was going to do the right thing, and he has,' attorney Thomas Demetrio said in a brief statement . 'In addition, United has taken full responsibility for what happened ... without attempting to blame others, including the city of Chicago.' The settlement came less than three weeks after the episode and before Dao had even sued. The deal means United will not face a lawsuit, which could have been costly, both in legal bills and in further damage to the airline's reputation. United issued a brief statement, saying it was pleased to report 'an amicable resolution of the unfortunate incident that occurred aboard Flight 3411.' The dragging was one of several recent embarrassments for United. The airline was criticized in March after a gate agent stopped two teenage girls from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings — an apparent violation of a dress code for passengers traveling in a program for employees and their dependents. Then a giant showcase rabbit died this week after it was shipped across the Atlantic on a United flight from London's Heathrow Airport to O'Hare. Cellphone video of the April 9 confrontation aboard a jetliner at Chicago's O'Hare Airport sparked widespread public outrage over the way Dao was treated. The footage showed airport police officers pulling the 69-year-old Kentucky physician from his seat and dragging him down the aisle. His lawyer said he lost teeth and suffered a broken nose and a concussion. In a phone interview with The Associated Press, Demetrio said the settlement also averts any lawsuit against Chicago officials. The airport police officers who pulled Dao off the jet work for the city. 'I praise Mr. Munoz and his people for not trying to throw the city under the bus or pass the buck,' Demetrio said. 'He stood in front of the world and has stated that, 'We, United, take full responsibility.'' Demetrio said it was 'unheard of' for a company to admit responsibility so quickly and completely. 'I hope corporate America notices when you goof up, people respect you a heck of a lot more when you admit it, instead of making people go through three years of depositions, motions, court hearings.' He said Dao was also impressed that 'United stepped up to the plate.' The incident arose from a common air travel issue — a fully booked flight. Wanting to seat four crew members, the airline offered passengers $400 and later $800 to voluntarily relinquish their seats. When no one did, United selected four passengers at random. Three people got off the flight, but Dao refused, saying he needed to get home to treat patients the next day. The airline then summoned the officers, who forcibly removed Dao. The dragging was a major public-relations crisis for United. The company's response in the immediate aftermath was widely criticized. Munoz first defended the airline and described Dao as 'belligerent' before publicly apologizing days later and vowing to do better. The three airport police officers who took Dao off the plane were placed on leave from the Chicago Department of Aviation. The agency released a report Monday in which the officer who pulled Dao from his seat, James Long, gave his version of events. Long said Dao was verbally and physically abusive and was flailing his arms before he lost his balance and struck his mouth on an armrest. The department's roughly 300 officers guard the city's two main airports but are not part of the regular Chicago police force. They receive less training and cannot carry guns inside the terminals. Also Thursday, the airline released a report detailing mistakes that led to the incident. United said it would raise to $10,000 the limit on the payments it offers to customers who give up seats on oversold flights and increase training for airline employees. The airline has vowed to reduce, but not eliminate, overbooking. United representatives have not said whether ticket sales have dropped since Dao was removed from the jet. ___ Follow Michael Tarm on Twitter at http://twitter.com/mtarm .
  • YouTube's inability to keep big-brand ads off unsavory videos is threatening to transform a rising star in Google's digital family into a problem child. It's not yet clear whether a recent ad boycott of YouTube will be short-lived or the start of a long-term shift away from the video service — one that could undercut Google's growth and that of its corporate parent, Alphabet Inc. Alphabet's first-quarter results, released Thursday, provided few clues. Major advertisers didn't start pulling their money from YouTube until the three-month period was nearly over. The company's earnings rose 29 percent to $5.4 billion while revenue climbed 22 percent to $24.8 billion. Shares surged nearly 5 percent, to $933, in Thursday's extended trading. CLOUD OVER YOUTUBE But the fallout from the YouTube boycott is likely to be felt through the rest of this year. Skittish advertisers have curtailed their spending until they are convinced Google can prevent their brands from appearing next to extremist clips promoting hate and violence. 'There is no entity in the world that is more risk averse than a senior marketing person,' says Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York. 'They don't want to go with a media choice that presents problems for a brand, and they don't have to because they have many other choices.' Google CEO Sundar Pichai told analysts during a Thursday review of the first quarter that the company has had 'thousands and thousands' of conversations with advertisers as YouTube takes steps to protect their brands. 'We are evolving overall to a better place,' Pichai said. At another point, he assured analysts that YouTube is still experiencing 'extraordinary' growth without providing specifics. Even if YouTube continues to lose advertisers, it won't leave a huge dent in Alphabet's earnings. That's because marketers are expected to keep feeding the company's golden goose — Google's dominant search engine. Ads appearing alongside the billions of search results Google churns out each day still generate most of Alphabet's revenue even as it expands into other fields. But ad spending has been accelerating at a rapid pace on YouTube over the past two years as brands sought to connect with its audience of more than 1 billion people. Now it looks like things might taper off. TAKING THE GLOSS OFF Before the boycott began, YouTube's ad revenue after subtracting commissions was expected to rise 26 percent this year to $7 billion, based on estimates from the research firm eMarketer. Alphabet doesn't disclose YouTube's finances. Advertisers began to flee YouTube last month, after The Times in London and other media outlets turned up evidence that their brands were appearing alongside clips promoting terrorism and racism. The findings alerted advertisers that YouTube didn't have adequate technology or staffing to shield brands from some of the appalling material that gets posted on a site that receives 400 hours of video per minute. 'This is an ostrich situation where the ostrich just pulled its head out of the sand,' says Harry Kargman, CEO of Kargo, which helps manage ad campaigns on mobile devices. FLIGHT OF THE BRANDS At one point, about 250 advertisers were boycotting YouTube. (Some also stepped back from a related system that Google operates to place commercials next to videos on outside websites.) The list included big-spending marketers such as PepsiCo, Wal-Mart Stores, Starbucks, AT&T, Verizon, Johnson & Johnson, and Volkswagen. It's unclear how many, if any, of those have returned to YouTube since Google promised to hire more human reviewers and upgrade its technology to keep ads away from repugnant videos. Both Verizon and AT&T, two companies that are trying to expand their own digital ad networks to compete with Google, told The Associated Press that they are still boycotting YouTube. FX Networks confirmed that it isn't advertising on YouTube either. Several other boycotting marketers contacted by AP didn't respond. TEMPORARY HIT OR PERMANENT SCAR? Even if advertisers return, Kargman predicted they are unlikely to spend as much as they once did. 'It's going to be a slow burn as brands quietly shift their spending away,' he said. 'There are now questions about the quality of video on YouTube in the long term.' Investors, however, apparently aren't too worried so far. YouTube's financial contributions remain a fairly small part of a company expected to generate $87 billion in revenue this year, after subtracting ad commissions. RBC Capital Markets analyst Mark Mahaney estimates the reduced spending on YouTube and Google's ad network for video on third-party sites could reduce Alphabet's net revenue by $300 million, to $1.5 billion, this year. Some of that spending could shift to Facebook, Mahaney said, although the social network is facing its own challenges trying to block live videos of violence that appall viewers and advertisers alike.
  • Starbucks Corp. (SBUX) on Thursday reported fiscal second-quarter profit of $652.8 million. The Seattle-based company said it had net income of 45 cents per share. The results matched Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 14 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was also for earnings of 45 cents per share. The coffee chain posted revenue of $5.29 billion in the period, missing Street forecasts. Nine analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $5.42 billion. Starbucks shares have increased 11 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed almost 7 percent. In the final minutes of trading on Thursday, shares hit $61.44, a climb of 8 percent in the last 12 months. _____ This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on SBUX at https://www.zacks.com/ap/SBUX _____ Keywords: Starbucks, Earnings Report, Priority Earnings

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • As if traffic on I-4 near the attractions isn't enough on it's own, a depression opened up in the median near World Drive Thursday, causing additional slow downs.   As emergency personnel arrived to investigated the incident, drivers slowed down to get a better look as well.   The depression, which is about 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep, was reported just before 5 p.m. rush.   The Florida Department of Transportation was evaluating the situation and had not released any information on what would be done to mitigate the depression.   No other details were immediately released.
  • Prosecutors are building a money trail of deposits, withdrawals, and lavish spending allegedly benefiting former Congresswoman Corrine Brown, through the testimony of an FBI Special Agent. But Brown’s defense says, at no time, did she have control of the account in question. Deputy Chief of the Department of Justice Public Integrity Section Criminal Division Eric Olshan’s questioning of FBI Special Agent Vanessa Stelly has spanned two days of Brown’s federal fraud trial. Stelly was assigned to this investigation as part of her work in the white collar crime division. She told the court she had worked through bank and business records for Brown, as well as the alleged sham charity One Door For Education, which Brown and a few others are accused of funneling money through. Stelly confirmed that at no time was One Door registered in either Virginia- where it was incorporated as a business- or Florida to solicit charitable donations as a 501(c)(3) organization. One Door’s President, Carla Wiley, opened a bank account for the organization in 2011, but it closed about a year later because of a negative balance. Wiley opened another account with a $250 initial deposit, and there was no activity until August 2012, when Stelly says there was a $25,000 check deposited by a Political Action Committee based in Virginia. That PAC is backed by a lobbying firm where Brown’s daughter, Shantrel Brown, works. Corrine and Shantrel Brown share a home in Virginia. One of the points that prosecutors are trying to hammer in is that there was a habit of using One Door donations for the personal expenses of Brown and a few others. To do that, Olshan first walked Stelly through repeated instances where bank records show hundreds of dollars at a time being taken from the One Door account at an ATM near the home of Brown’s Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons, with a like sum soon after deposited in one of Brown’s accounts- also in Laurel, Maryland, where Simmons lived. Prosecutors further showed surveillance of Simmons making at least one withdrawal and deposit. Prosecutors alleged Simmons would sometimes withdraw the cash and give it directly to Brown, and there was a surveillance photo of Brown herself making one deposit. Another focus is a trip by Brown and her daughter to the Bahamas, and later Los Angeles. A July 2013 check for $3,000 from the One Door account made out to a specific Bank of America bank account said in the memo line that it was for children’s summer camps. Stelly says bank records show $3,000 being deposited around the same time in to Shantrel Brown’s bank account, and $1,000 being transferred from Shantrel Brown’s account to that of her mother. At the same time, Stelly says bank records show several cash withdrawals from One Door’s account in Simmons’ city of residence amounting to $3,000, the same sum which was then deposited in to Brown’s account as well. This all happened as Brown and her daughter first spent time at a resort in the Bahamas and then traveled to the Los Angeles-area, where they did a significant amount of shopping, according to Stelly’s analysis. When Stelly’s testimony resumed Thursday, the focus turned to more than $330,000 in One Door funds that the US Attorney’s Office says funded events hosted by Brown or in Brown’s honor which didn’t actually result in any kind of scholarship fundraising. There were several events Stelly says were represented as being paid for by another group, like Friends of Corrine Brown, but actually had at least some One Door dollars. Still other events were almost entirely funded by One Door, but raised no scholarship dollars. Brown’s attorney, James Smith III, led questioning where Stelly admitted that at no time did One Door apparently solicit donations claiming it would only be for scholarships. He added that some of those events, including an annual reception held in DC, could provide for good networking opportunities with lawmakers and other important parties. Additionally, Stelly confirmed that Brown herself did not have control over the One Door accounts and was not ever formally affiliated with the organization. This is a developing story that will be updated as testimony continued in to the afternoon. WOKV is inside of the federal courtroom and will bring you new information as it comes in.
  • A pair of protective hawks has residents in one central Florida neighborhood ducking and running for cover this week. The birds are attacking people who get too near their nests in Oviedo in suburban Orlando, local news outlets reported. >> Read more trending news It hits me on the side of the head, not just hit, but grabbed, knocked me to the ground. I had to kind of shake my head loose,' resident Beverly Bonadonna told WPLG-TV.  'At that point, I started screaming for my husband ... then it flew away, it finally let go. >> Related: Man allegedly stuffed puppies into pillow cases, left them in drain Bonadonna had to go to the hospital for treatment of puncture wounds and a tetanus shot, but she said more than anything she was terrified during the attack. 'I have never been attacked by one; never even considered that I could be. I have never, I mean, they swoop real low over our head but never considered it was really a possibility,' she told WPLG. Bonadonna isn’t the only victim. Another resident in the same neighborhood, Don Cochran, has a hawk nest in tree next to his house and has been attacked twice. 'He scratched me right in the back of the head, but if you weren't thinking about him, he could have knocked you down because he weighs about 5, 6 pounds,' Cochran said.' >> Related: Florida Fish and Wildlife searches for monkey on the loose Cochran says he now uses an umbrella to go to the mailbox and hasn’t been attacked since. Hawks and their nests are protected under Florida law and can’t be moved or harmed.  Sarah Elsesser contributed to this story.
  • A wildfire has grown to 250 acres this afternoon in Volusia County, crossing State Road 44 after the wind shifted. Called the Damascus Fire, it forced the Florida Highway Patrol to close a section of the road between DeLand and Samsula, so fire plows could safely work in the area. Julie Allen with the Florida Forest Service said 14 tractor plows are trying to keep the flames from spreading further, with assistance from local fire departments. Federal personnel are also on the scene. “We had a sudden wind shift in the midst of the battle, and it caused a little bit of an issue with spotting over,” she explained. Cause of the fire is not known, but gusty winds help it to spread in the mostly rural area.
  • Its not clear why he went up there, but a naked man spent hours on a 140-foot utility tower in New Orleans East. Firefighters were able to raise a ladder and rescue him about 3 p.m. He was seen being placed in ambulance. Power was cut off to prevent him being electrocuted during the rescue.  The tower is near a Luzianne plant, but on Entergy property.