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    The Latest on response to deadly tower-block fire in London (all times local): 8:55 p.m. Britain's government now says cladding samples from 34 high-rise apartment towers across the country have failed fire safety tests. Earlier Saturday, officials had put the figure of affected tower blocks at 27, saying they are located in cities from London to Manchester and Portsmouth. Urgent testing is being conducted on external siding panels on apartment blocks following the deadly June 14 blaze that engulfed Grenfell Tower, killing at least 79 people. Flammable cladding was blamed for helping that fire spread so rapidly throughout the 24-story building. Officials in north London's Camden area have been evacuating hundreds of residents from four public housing blocks on Friday and Saturday after fire inspectors found issues with the buildings' cladding, gas pipe insulation and fire doors. ___ 2:55 p.m. British Prime Minister Theresa May says the government is supporting local authorities in London to make sure residents evacuated from four public housing blocks due to fire safety concerns will have somewhere to stay. Over 600 apartments were evacuated overnight after fire inspectors concluded that the buildings, in north London's Camden area, were unsafe because of problematic fire doors, gas pipe insulation, and external cladding similar to that blamed for the rapid spread of a fire that engulfed Grenfell Tower on June 14. Residents say they were given little notice and were forced to seek emergency shelter. May added that the government is working with local authorities across the country to address fire safety fears about apartment towers. ___ 11:30 a.m. Britain's Press Association reports that dozens of people have refused to leave their homes on a London housing estate, defying efforts by officials to evacuate some apartment blocks due to fire safety concerns. Camden Council in north London decided that hundreds of residents at the Chalcots Estate had to leave Friday night amid safety fears linked to the deadly inferno that engulfed Grenfell Tower on June 14. Four tower blocks were evacuated following worries about the blocks' external cladding and gas pipe insulation. Many people gathered at a nearby leisure center used as a temporary shelter complained about the chaotic situation. Carl McDowell, 31, said he took one look at the packed inflatable beds offered in the center's gym and went back to his own apartment. He said officials knocked on residents' doors Friday night, two hours after he had heard about the evacuation on the news. Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said if residents had not left their homes after being visited again by officials on Saturday, 'it will become a matter for the fire service.' ___ 11:10 a.m. Britain's government now says that 27 high-rise apartment blocks in 15 areas have failed fire cladding safety tests. Officials had said earlier that samples of cladding panels from 14 buildings in London, Manchester and Plymouth had been found to be combustible. The testing is being done as officials around Britain scramble to assess the safety of apartment buildings following the June 14 inferno that engulfed Grenfell Tower in west London, killing an estimated 79 people. Combustible cladding used to insulate that tower and improve its appearance has been blamed for the rapid spread of the blaze. ___ 10:10 a.m. A local council in London says it evacuated some 650 homes overnight after inspectors found fire safety issues in four public housing towers, following the inferno in awest London apartment block that killed 79. The revised number was lower than the 800 estimated Friday night. Camden Borough Council says in a statement Saturday that it housed many of the residents at two temporary shelters while many others were provided hotel rooms. The council is working with police, firefighters and the British Red Cross to help the evacuees. Sky News quoted council leader Georgia Gould as saying the council secured 270 hotel rooms, 100 places in local public housing projects and asked neighboring boroughs for support. ___ 8:15 a.m. The residents of roughly 800 apartments in London have been evacuated due to fire-safety concerns. Many are being housed Saturday in temporary shelters. The unusual evacuation follows the fire that claimed at least 79 lives in a London high-rise last week. That fire was found to have been spread by a type of exterior cladding also found on the buildings that were evacuated. Camden Council in north London started the evacuation Friday night so urgent safety upgrades could begin. Officials say they acted because fire officials said they could not guarantee the safety of residents. Similar inspections are ongoing elsewhere in Britain on hundreds of buildings.
  • British officials were investigating a cyberattack Saturday on the country's Parliament after discovering 'unauthorized attempts to access parliamentary user accounts.' A statement from the House of Commons said that as a precaution, remote email access for members has been disabled in order to protect the network from hackers. 'As a result, some Members of Parliament (lawmakers) and staff cannot access their email accounts outside of Westminster,' it said, adding that IT services at Parliament itself are working normally. It was not immediately clear how many people were affected or what the extent of the damage was. An email sent all those affected described a 'sustained and determined attack on all parliamentary user accounts in an attempt to identify weak passwords,' according to The Guardian newspaper. 'These attempts specifically were trying to gain access to our emails.' Liberal Democrat Chris Rennard said on Twitter that urgent messages should be sent by text message because parliamentary emails may not work remotely. The National Cyber Security Center and the National Crime Agency are looking into the incident. Liam Fox, Britain's International Trade Secretary, told ITV News that the attack was 'a warning to everyone: We need more security and better passwords. You wouldn't leave your door open at night.
  • President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump were among the guests as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin's) married a Scottish actress. Mnuchin exchanged vows Saturday night with Louise Linton at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington. Mrs. Trump wore a pink blush dress and the president was in a tux. Vice President Mike Pence also attended. The 54-year-old Mnuchin worked for the Goldman Sachs investment firm for nearly two decades before founding a hedge fund. He also ran a company that invested in Hollywood movies and was finance chairman of Trump's presidential campaign. The 36-year-old Linton has appeared in movies and TV shows. Mnuchin also produced movies before joining the government. It's Mnuchin's third marriage and the second for Linton.
  • Illinois is on track to become the first U.S. state to have its credit rating downgraded to 'junk' status, which would deepen its multibillion-dollar deficit and cost taxpayers more for years to come. S&P Global Ratings has warned the agency will likely lower Illinois' creditworthiness to below investment grade if feuding lawmakers fail to agree on a state budget for a third straight year, increasing the amount the state will have to pay to borrow money for things such as building roads or refinancing existing debt. The outlook for a deal wasn't good Saturday, as lawmakers meeting in Springfield for a special legislative session remained deadlocked with the July 1 start of the new fiscal year approaching. That should alarm everyone, not just those at the Capitol, said Brian Battle, director at Performance Trust Capital Partners, a Chicago-based investment firm. 'It isn't a political show,' he said. 'Everyone in Illinois has a stake in what's happening here. One day everybody will wake up and say 'What happened? Why are my taxes going up so much?'' Here's a look at what's happening and what a junk rating could mean: WHY NOW? Ratings agencies have been downgrading Illinois' credit rating for years, though they've accelerated the process as the stalemate has dragged on between Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democrats who control the General Assembly. The agencies are concerned about Illinois' massive pension debt, as well as a $15 billion backlog of unpaid bills and the drop in revenue that occurred when lawmakers in 2015 allowed a temporary income tax increase to expire. 'In our view, the unrelenting political brinkmanship now poses a threat to the timely payment of the state's core priority payments,' S&P stated when it dropped Illinois' rating to one level above junk, which was just after lawmakers adjourned their regular session on May 31 without a deal. Moody's did the same, stating: 'As the regular legislative session elapsed, political barriers to progress appeared to harden, indicating both the severity of the state's challenges and the political difficulty of advocating their solutions.' WHAT IS A 'JUNK' RATING? Think of it as a credit score, but for a state (or city or county) instead of a person. When Illinois wants to borrow money, it issues bonds. Investors base their decision on whether to buy Illinois bonds on what level of risk they're willing to take, informed greatly by the rating that agencies like Moody's assign. A junk rating means the state is at a higher risk of not repaying its debt. At that point, many mutual funds and individual investors — who make up more than half the buyers in the bond market — won't buy. Those willing to take a chance, such as distressed debt investors, will only do so if they are getting a higher interest rate. While no other state has been placed at junk, counties and cities such as Chicago, Atlantic City and Detroit have. Detroit saw its rating increased back to investment grade in 2015 as it emerged from bankruptcy — an option that by law, states don't have. WHAT WILL IT COST? Battle says the cost to taxpayers in additional interest the next time Illinois sells bonds, which it inevitably will need to do in the long-term, could be in the 'tens of millions' of dollars or more. The more money the state has to pay on interest, the less that's available for things such as schools, state parks, social services and fixing roads. 'For the taxpayer, it will cost more to get a lower level of service,' Battle said. Comptroller Susana Mendoza, who controls the state checkbook, agreed. 'It's going to cost people more every day,' she said. 'Our reputation really can't get much worse, but our state finances can.' OTHER IMPACTS? Because the state has historically been a significant funding source to other entities, such as local government and universities, many of them are feeling the impact of Illinois' worsening creditworthiness already. S&P already moved bonds held by the Metropolitan Pier & Exposition Authority and the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority — the entities that run Navy Pier, McCormick Place, and Guaranteed Rate Field — to junk. Five universities also have the rating: Eastern Illinois University, Governors State University, Northeastern Illinois University, Northern Illinois University and Southern Illinois University. ___ This story has corrected to reflect that the venue where the White Sox play is now called Guaranteed Rate Field, not U.S. Cellular Field. ___ Follow Sara Burnett on Twitter at https://twitter.com/sara_burnett
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin says the most important principle for journalists is to avoid upsetting those featured in their articles and television broadcasts. Journalists should ensure their work 'won't be offensive to those about whom they do their reports,' Putin said Saturday, according to the TASS news agency. The Russian leader made the comments while talking to a child interested in working in journalism at a summer camp in Crimea, the southern Ukrainian region that Russia annexed in 2014. The number of independent media outlets in Russia has fallen drastically under Putin and there have been several murders of high-profile journalists. The journalists' group Reporters Without Borders placed Russia 148th in its ranking of world press freedoms published this year.
  • Nearly 20% of Americans aren’t using their dishwasher, according to a recent survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, and they’re wasting a lot of money. Read more: Do these DIY dishwasher detergent tablets really work? If you aren’t using a dishwasher, you’re pouring money down the drain There’s a common misconception that dishwashers use more water than hand washing dishes in the sink. This isn’t accurate! If you wash your dishes by hand, you’re wasting water and your dishes aren’t really getting clean. In fact, you shouldn’t even pre-rinse your dishes — the dishwasher will do it for you much more efficiently. Read more: Why you shouldn’t wash your dishes by hand Dishwasher vs. hand washing dishes How much can you really save by using your dishwasher? If you have an energy-efficient appliance, you can expect to: Cut your utility bills by more than $40 per year Improve the cleanliness of your dishes (dishwashers heat water up to 140 degrees, way hotter than our hands can handle — and our sponges are dirtier than a toilet seat) Save nearly 5,000 gallons of water a year So put down the sponge, load the dishwasher and enjoy the savings. Your hands — and your wallet — will thank you. How to clean that gunk from the bottom of your dishwasher Other stories you might like from clark.com: Home Retail alert: Sears is closing another 20 stores 28 ways to bring in extra cash each month
  • Ivanka Trump must testify in a dispute with an Italian shoemaker over one of her company's shoe designs, a judge said Friday. U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest rejected a request by the senior White House aide's lawyers that she be blocked from submitting to a deposition in the trademark infringement lawsuit brought by Aquazzura Italia SRL against her and her company IT Collection LLC. The Florence, Italy-based company sued President Donald Trump's daughter last year, saying her Hettie shoe was a 'virtually identical' knockoff of its popular Wild Thing Shoe, including nearly the same color, shape and tassel on the heel. Its lawsuit seeks unspecified damages. The judge says Ivanka Trump must submit to questions posed during a deposition lasting no more than two hours, 'given Ms. Trump's competing professional obligations,' and occurring in Washington, if that's Trump's preference. The judge said the deposition should occur by the end of October on a mutually acceptable schedule. In ruling, the judge said 'Ms. Trump's public statements regarding active and comprehensive brand management lead to a reasonable inference that the shoe at issue would not have been released without her approval.' 'In such a situation,' she said, 'a deposition is appropriate.' In a declaration filed with the court last week, Trump described herself as the former president of the company, saying she is now an assistant to the Republican president of the United States and maintains an office in the White House. 'I had no involvement in the conception, design, production or sale of the 'Hettie Shoe,'' she said, adding that those responsibilities belonged to the company's licensee, Marc Fisher, which was also sued. 'My involvement was strictly limited to the final sign-off of each season's line after it was first reviewed and approved by the company's design team,' Trump said. In requesting Trump's testimony, Aquazzura's lawyers cited public statements by Trump, including one in which she was quoted saying: 'There's not a shoe I'm not intimately involved in designing.' 'The purpose of the deposition is not for harassment, but because Ms. Trump possesses individual knowledge not only of what did or did not occur with regard to the shoes at issue, but of how she handles the supervision of her licensees generally, and what steps she takes to avoid licensees' intentional copying,' the lawyers wrote. In ruling, the judge said: 'While that declaration does assert a lack of personal knowledge of the design at issue, plaintiff asserts otherwise. That is the stuff of which factual disputes in litigation are made.' Trump's lawyers haven't responded to messages seeking comment. Aquazzura, in its lawsuit, said its shoe designs have 'skyrocketed to fame in the fashion world' since the company was formed in 2011, with its shoes 'coveted by fashionistas and celebrities alike.' It said the Wild Thing is one of its best-selling shoes and is not the first to be copied by Trump's company. According to the lawsuit, Trump's company, which has been operating since 2010, stopped selling another shoe after Aquazzura complained that one of its shoes had been copied.
  • MoneyTipsWe all know the political stereotype – Republicans are supposedly the party of the wealthy, and Democrats are the party of the less economically advantaged (outside of Hollywood). How does this stereotype hold up with respect to credit scores and outstanding credit card balances? A recent study by LendingTree provides some answers. Using the definition of states as Republican 'red' or Democratic 'blue' based on their voting in the 2016 general election, blue states have higher credit scores along with higher average credit card debt. Blue state residents hold $6,702 in credit card debt on average, led by Connecticut's $8,857, spread across an average of 3.5 cards. The average credit score in blue states was 681 on the VantageScore 3.0 scoring system, with California, Hawaii, and the District of Columbia tying for the highest credit score at 694. DC represents an anomaly in that it has one of the lowest average debts (41st) while having the highest credit score – perhaps because it has the highest average number of credit cards (4) and likely a higher overall credit capacity, lowering the credit utilization of DC residents. Red state residents hold a lower average debt of $5,475, topped by Alaska's $6,618. The average credit score in red states was 665, led by Utah's score of 683. Red states also have fewer credit cards on average – among red-state dwellers, North Dakota residents have the highest average number of cards at 3.1. The lowest average number of cards within blue states is 2.8, a greater average than 19 red states. Across all states, the average credit card debt in the survey was $5,936 while the average credit score was 671. You can check your credit score and read your credit report for free within minutes using Credit Manager by MoneyTips. Does this survey contradict the stereotype, or is there more to the story? The results arguably reflect geography and the cost of living more than wealth assumptions. Red and blue states follow a general pattern with respect to credit score and a clear-cut pattern with respect to credit card debt. Looking at average credit card debt, the top 11 states and 13 of the top 14 are primarily in the Northeast, the West Coast, and Alaska/Hawaii – all areas with the highest cost-of-living, according to an analysis by GoBankingRates.com. Conversely, the lowest 9 average credit card debts – and 19 of the lowest 21 – come mostly from the South and the Midwest. This matches up reasonably well with low cost-of-living numbers. In short, areas with higher average credit card debt have higher average debts because residents utilize credit to maintain their budgets. Credit scores may make that task easier or more difficult depending on location, but people borrow based on needs. The LendingTree survey results may have less to do with the wealth that you have and more with the wealth that you need – or think you need – in order to live in your area. LendingTree lists several other factors that explain the survey results, including culture (presumably this means rural vs. urban areas and the contrast in living standards) and economic opportunity. Concerns with economic opportunity and job losses in swing states may explain the red state vs. blue state distribution and how well it overlaps the cost-of-living map, and, in turn, average credit card debt. Lendedu.com found in a separate study that states voting for Hillary Clinton had an average credit score almost 20 points higher than states that Donald Trump won – but the deciding factor may have been credit score drops in swing states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Florida, and Iowa. These states apparently had more discontented voters looking for change, and Trump benefitted from their discontent. Of course, it's up to you as an individual to keep your own debt at a controllable level, regardless of your state and the local political environment. Make a reasonable budget based on your income and stick to it. It will be interesting to see whether the red vs. blue numbers change in the next election cycle – and if they do, whether they reflect a change in credit habits or a change in voting habits. After an election season like 2016, we wouldn't even attempt to predict the result, or the reasoning behind it. If you owe on one or more credit cards with high interest rates, a balance transfer card could be a great way to consolidate your debt and save money. Check out MoneyTips' list of balance transfer cards. Photo ©iStockphoto.com/aluxum Originally Posted at: https://www.moneytips.com/how-democrats-and-republicans-compare-in-the-battle-for-credit/571Today's Headlines: Nearly Half Of Credit Card Accounts Carry A Balance Southern States Burdened With Higher Credit Card Debt30% Of Credit Cardholders Carry Balances
  • Ready for the return of the boomerang? If you’ve got an adult children who off to college, graduated from school and made a round-trip right back home because of their job situation you know exactly what we’re talking about. It’s become a lingering phenomenon ever since the Great Recession. So if you have a boomerang kid at home, here are seven rules you need to lay down. Read more: This new Google feature can help you find a job — Here’s how it works! Consider having these discussions with your boomerang kids 1. Communicate and set up clear expectations If you’re a parent, any move by a grown child back to your home has to be prefaced by a lot of open communication. Will he or she pay rent or utilities? Who will pay for groceries? How long is he or she welcome to stay? The important thing is to have conversations routinely, not when something becomes a problem. In fact, a continuing series of conversations may be necessary. 2. Consider charging rent Paying rent should be contingent on your grown child having gainful employment. Because if he or she doesn’t have a job, it’s not realistic to start expecting rent! Set a timeline and let your child known how long they’re welcome to stay. You might consider letting them live for free with you for 12 months. But let them know that anything longer than that and you’ll start charging the going market rate for rent. 3. Have your son or daughter map out a five-year plan Sure, they’re living with you today. But where do they want to be in five years? Financial adviser George Gagliardi told Reuters he had his adult child sit down and plan out the next three to five years of his life once he started living under Gagliardi’s roof again. The son, 26, is now ready to move back out after working full-time and saving money while at home. 4. Know the hot spots of cohabitation First up is food. Nobody likes a conflict over who ate what and when! One solution is to have your son or daughter get a small second refrigerator that they can stock with their own food. Laundry is another big point of contention. If your son or daughter were living on their own, you would not be doing their laundry, right? So don’t do it when they boomerang back on you. Show them how to use the washer and the dryer and let them do it themselves. Finally, there’s the question of whether your son or daughter can have a friend spend the night. Again, this is a highly individual choice; just know that the more you set up the rules up front, the fewer headaches you’ll have down the road. 5. Don’t co-sign a car loan for a grown child Getting into debt over a car is a classic mistake many people make in their early 20s. With that first job comes the temptation to have a fancy ride. Not a good idea! If your grown child needs to buy a car while living at home, you can either lend them the money yourself or help them find the best deal on a car note. Credit unions are generally the best places to get a car loan. Have your son or daughter visit ASmarterChoice.org to find credit unions near you and see which ones they qualify for. 6. Don’t be afraid to show some tough love Piggybacking off the last tip about cars, financial adviser Brett Anderson tells Reuters he actually wanted his son to move home after graduate school and save money. But that doesn’t mean Anderson was content with bankrolling his son, who has since moved out. While he did pay $50 for his son’s medical insurance, he had to draw the line somewhere. That meant offering his son a bike to get around — not a car. 7. Make sure your kid gets a first apartment the right way Shared apartments are often the first exit strategy for boomerang kids ready to leave the nest. But apartment leases can be tricky. When you sign a lease with a roommate, be sure you can foot the entire rent in case the other person skips out. To avoid this problem entirely, your son or daughter might consider a six-month lease instead of a 12-month lease even if it’s more expensive. Let’s say the living arrangement doesn’t work out and somebody leaves. Whoever is left behind is then solely responsible for two or three months of rent, not seven or eight, if you’ve signed a six-month lease. Of course, it could be your child who leaves to relocate for a job opportunity. That’s why it’s wise for them to negotiate a relocation clause. They should ask the landlord for full lease termination in exchange for forfeiting the security deposit should they get a job offer more than 100 miles away. Read more: Here are the top 10 best jobs of the future This teen saves big and invests wisely Other stories you might like from clark.com: Home Retail alert: Sears is closing another 20 stores 28 ways to bring in extra cash each month
  • Google is going to stop reading your Gmail in search of opportunities to sell ads. The change announced Friday will end a practice that Google has embraced since the company introduced Gmail in 2004. The practice has raised concerns among privacy watchdogs and creeped out some users. To help finance the free service, Google has been scanning through what Gmail users were discussing and then showing ads connected to some of the topics. Someone writing about running, for instance, might see ads for Nike or Asics shoes. Google still plans to show ads within Gmail. But instead of scanning through email content, the company's software will rely on other signals to determine which ads are most likely to appeal to each of its 1.2 billion Gmail users. The Mountain View, California, company said it would stop the ad-driven scanning of Gmail later this year. Google says it's changing course so its free Gmail service operates more like the subscription version that it has sold to more than 3 million companies. The paid Gmail doesn't include ads, so the company has never tried to scan the content of those users' emails for marketing purposes. Despite that, Google said some of its business customers incorrectly assumed the company was scanning those accounts as well. By ending all scanning, Google hopes to end the confusion and sell Gmail to even more businesses. Gmail now ranks as the world's largest email service, an indication that most people didn't care about Google's scanning methods. Both Microsoft and Apple have publicly skewered Google for having the audacity to mine users' emails for ad sales, but those attacks didn't undercut Gmail's popularity.

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Police in Georgia are hoping surveillance video that captured a violent attack will help them find the people responsible. Video shows a restaurant owner and her teenage daughter being beaten by two customers Thursday afternoon in Baxley, Georgia. >> Read more trending news The victims told police the suspects were unhappy with their order. The verbal argument turned violent when one of the suspects began punching the restaurant owner repeatedly. When the victim’s teenage daughter came out of the car to break up the fight, the male suspect punched her in the face. WJCL reported that Baxley police have issued warrants for the suspects, Nathaniel Smith and Latasha Smith. The pair could be charged with aggravated battery and cruelty to children. The suspects drove away from the restaurant in a cream or tan Cadillac Escalade with tag number REU8495. Officials said they headed north on Highway 144. Anyone with any information about the assault is asked to call the Baxley Police Department at 912-367-8305 or the 911 call center at 912-367-8111.
  • A dive team is searching a ditch along I-4 from which Orlando firefighters removed a car early Saturday, police said. A car flipped into the ditch near the Kirkman Road exit. Emergency services responded to the car around 8:15 a.m. App users click here to see the video. 
  • The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a small plane crash that occurred Saturday morning near Fort Meyers, the Lee County Sheriff’s Office said. Deputies said the plane crashed into an unoccupied day care building. >> Read more trending news One person died in the crash while another was taken to the hospital. The survivor’s condition has not been released.
  • A Transportation Security Administration agent has been arrested after he was accused of stealing money from a passenger at Orlando International Airport in Florida, Orlando police said. >> Read more trending news Alexander Shae Johnson, 22, was arrested Thursday night. Passenger Kathleen Duddleston entered the TSA checkpoint and was stopped for additional screening, police said. While she was patted down, Duddleston told TSA security officer Michelle Metz that she couldn’t see her luggage, so Metz moved her closer. Duddleston complained again that she couldn’t see her bag, and Johnson moved slightly. After the pat down, Duddleston reached for her bag and could not find her money, police said. She said she noticed a bulge in Johnson’s left front shirt pocket. Duddleston asked Johnson if that was her money, and he said he got the money from the bank, police said. The woman complained to Metz that she believed Johnson stole money from her. Metz contacted her supervisor. Duddleston has been charged with third-degree grand theft. TSA said in a statement to WFTV: TSA has a zero tolerance for misconduct in the workplace. The TSA immediately reported the allegation to OPD and we aggressively investigated the incident with our law enforcement partner. TSA officers represent a professional and honorable workforce that is trained to treat passengers and their personal belongings with care and respect. No exceptions will be tolerated. We immediately ended the federal career of this individual.
  • A scare happened at a Leominster, Massachusetts, supermarket after a 4-day-old newborn was left locked inside of a hot car while her mother was inside shopping. >> Read more trending news Mother Sharma Murphy said that on her way to Market Basket supermarket on Friday, she stopped by the fire house to make sure her baby’s car seat was properly installed. Less than an hour later, those firefighters helped rescue her 4-day-old baby, who was locked in her hot car. A shopper called Leominster police after spotting a newborn alone inside a car. It was Sharma Murphy's silver Chevy Malibu. >> A reminder of hot car dangers as temperatures climb Murphy said she was out for the first time with her newborn daughter, 4-day-old Katherine, and was nervous. “I went, I bought it. Came right out and this lady just starts screaming at me. Screaming at me,” said Murphy. Murphy said she brought her newborn inside with her to Market Basket and then returned to the car when Katherine fell asleep. She said that she ran back inside for two or three minutes to buy some baby formula. “I went (in and) I bought it,” Murphy said. “(I) came right out and this lady just starts screaming at me.” Related: Two toddlers dead after 15 hours in hot car, police say Police said the windows were rolled up. “I believe she locked her keys in the car because they had to use the jimmy to get the baby out,” witness John Casey told WFXT. According to WFXT meteorologists, the outside temperature was 84 degrees at the time. Murphy said she didn’t want to wake her newborn. “I thought, ‘OK, if I run in and run out...’ It was one of those things where she's gotta eat because I have nothing left for her and that's when everything happened and I'm like, oh my God,” Murphy said. Katherine was taken to the hospital to be checked out. Her mother said he is fine. The baby is currently in custody of DCF. No charges have been filed.